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Full text of "Royal purple"




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STUDENT PERSONNEL SERVICES 
COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 
HOLTON HALL, ROOM 111 
KANSAS STATE UNIVERSITY 
MANHATTAN, KANSAS 66502 



STUDENT PERSONNEL SERVICES 
COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 
HOLTON HALL, ROOM 111 
KANSAS STATE UNIVERSITY 
MANHATTAN, KANSAS 66502 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation 



http://archive.org/details/royalpurple1975unse 








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/olume 66 

Kansas State University 

(Tlanhattan, Kansas 66506 



Jean Trevarton - Editor-in-Chief 
Pam Kissing - Business manager 
Linda Reed - managing Editor 



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Contents 



Features 



E 



Administration 140 
Organizations 160 

240 
Housing 310 







STUDENT PERSONNEL SERVICES 
COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 
HOLTON HALL, ROOM 111 
KANSAS STATE UNIVERSITY 
MANHATTAN, KANSAS 66502 



It's not just buying rather than stealing your 
books trom the Union, and keeping your 
eyes off the test belonging to the kid next to 
you. 

There is more. 

To be really truthful, you must face reality 
and be honest with yourself. 




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Things Americans are taught to accept 
without question as being wonderful 
include Mom, apple pie, and the President. 

Then you find out Mom is not perfect, the 
apple pie was made by Sara Lee from non- 
union apples, and our President might not 
be the epitome of honesty that high office 
dictates. 

So, who to turn to? How about yourself? 
You know, if you can't be honest with your- 
self, then with whom? Many children grow 
up fooling themselves, and it carries over to 
the college scene too. Like who do we fool/ 
hurt by boozing it up the night before a mid- 
term, living in the illusion of "I'll pass the 
test — I always do." 




/hy do you stand in registration lines in 
Uiearn for eight semesters to spend money 
borrowed from a bank, gift from Mom and 
)ad, paychecks from summer jobs)? Ulti- 
nately it is solely for your, each student's, 
>enefit. 

3ut often students don't allow themselves 
o realize this until it's too late. It's hard to 
nprove a 1.8 grade point average very 
nuch when you're a first semester senior. 




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It is preached self-honesty and growing up 
are linked. This would mean as we become 
more knowledgeable and aware of the 
world, we correspondingly should become 
equally, and honestly, more aware of our- 
selves. 




However there is Watergate. A familiar 
word to most Americans — but why? Some 
say a quest for power, money, and prestige 
altered a few persons' senses of duty and 
honesty. Although their group dishonesty 
provided a temporary mask, person by per- 
son the scandal emerged, and lives were 
ruined. 



Two weeks before school began this year, 
Richard Nixon resigned his presidential 
post to Gerald Ford. The country as a 
whole survived, but individuals who had 
carried personal mental burdens succum- 
bed. Childhood adages come to mind: 
"Crime doesn't pay" and "Honesty is the 
best policy". 








All a. 






Sometimes the discovery is made that what 
is right for Mom and Dad, Sis, or the kid 
next door might not be right for you. Even 
that dynamite personality you've been dat- 
ing might do things which are acceptable to 
him, but you can't justify. 

Face it. Every person has the potential for 
developing a unique personal code, and 
yours might not match your friend's in 
every aspect. Your code should be ques- 
tioned often, and adapted after thought. 



Maybe you are a liberated person. Our 
society has dictated male children should 
fool around with Dad and automobiles and 
take out the trash, and the female children 
should be in the kitchen getting it on with 
chocolate chip cookies, or helping Mom 
clean the bathroom. 




So, if this iifestyle isn't for you, and if you 
are honest with yourself, you can break 
away from society's rules and be your own 
person. As a liberated male, you can 
become a nurse, go to culinary school in 
the East, or maybe someday supplement 
your daughter's knowledge with facts your 
father taught you about internal combus- 
tion. And females can then be proud to 
receive an electric drill for Christmas, feel 
more self-sufficient by paying their own 
way on dates, and really use their brains for 
more than washing diapers. 

But, if more traditional roles are for you — 
live your life the way you want to and in a 
manner which satisfies you. Just because 
your former roommate and her husband 
have decided not to have children, and 
your sister subscribes to Ms. Magazine 
does not mean you should follow because 
it is in vogue. Be your own person and eval- 
uate your lifestyle honestly. It doesn't mat- 
ter to which side of center on the lifestyle 
spectrum you place yourself — just so long 
as it fits your ideals and philosophies, and 
you honestly believe in it. 




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mistakes can be made, and knowledge 
gained from these mistakes. By experi- 
menting and developing honesty and inde- 
pendence here, you can gain confidence in 
yourself first, and then go help the world. 




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Upon unloading one's child into the hands ot higher educa- 
tors at that great limestone institution in Manhattan, some 
parents think the child and world's problems will be solved 
in tour short years. However, not all professors convey 
worldly answers, and not all students possess worldly aspi- 
rations. 



Susceptible contract 'it depends' 
but the prepared have immunity 




By David Chartrand 

I know I must sound ungrateful, but 
college is not tor everyone. 

Four years ago I would never have 
dreamed that my parting note would 
be anything but niceties. 

But that was then. Now, I have to 
speak the truth and make it stick. 

Ot course, college was good to me. 
Mostly, it was certain people who were 
good to me: Jetf, Merek, Joe, Alan, 
Brenda, Jean, Bill, Leanna, Len, 
Cathy, Gail . . . and more. 

But I'd rather shoot myself than let 
that be my last word. I mean, soon I'll 
be tossing my dirty clothes into the old 
Barracuda for the last time and I'll be 
damned if all I'm going to say is, "Oh 
gee, it was so beautiful. I have so 
many memories." 

You bet I have memories. I have one 
big memory too: the University organ- 
ism has a very bad cancer. 

In fact, four years of the college 
experience exposed such a serious 
and spreading cancer that my conclu- 
sion is this: college is not for everyone. 

What cancer? 

It is the corroding spread of an atti- 
tude called "It depends." 

So many college freshmen enter the 
University walls like they had arrived at 
the end of the rainbow. Everything to 
be desired, learned, or felt is going to 
be found somewhere in these hal- 
lowed halls. 

The ultimate experience is college. 
All that is truth and reason is at col- 
lege. All the answers are at college. 

And then the big shocker. 

One is immediately told by everyone 
with a degree by his name that there 
are no answers. There are no truths. 
There are no absolutes. 

Everything simply "depends." 

There is no way to tell with words 
the significance and impact this dis- 
covery has on the four-year experi- 
ence. 

Up through high school, the only 
serious conflicts were dealing with 
Mom and Dad's do's and don'ts or 
handling that first love affair. 

But this. This new discovery makes 
it a whole new ball game. 






20 — It depends 



At least before walking into general 
psych or intro to sociology there were 
a few yardsticks. A lot of things might 
have been shaky, but there were still a 
few blacks and whites, a few rights 
and wrongs. And I needed them. 

Enter college: it's all shades of gray. 
What used to be a definite yes or no is 
now "Well, it depends . . ." 

Sure, for those who had no blacks 
and whites to begin with, "It depends" 
was great. It saved one from making 
a lot of decisions. 

But if one was ready to build one's 
life — including one's education — on 
the assumption that some things are 
! not subject to whim and fancy, "It 
idepends" was a disappointment and a 
jbore. 

If one wanted to open one's mind to 
inew avenues and ideas, one first had 
ito open one's soul. 

j In fact, the place was overrun with 
iteachers and leaders who were sp 
"open-minded" that their brains fell 
put. 

What a paradox. 

In such a whirlpool of research, 
nvestigation, analysis, and profession- 
alism, one expects to find answers, 
nstead, there were mostly people who 
said there were no answers at all. 

Or if there were answers, most were 
afraid to admit it. It was too nifty to say 
Ihings like "It depends . . . it's all rela- 
'ive ... I don't want to impose my 
norals . . . do what you feel . . ." 

Most of this, of course, refers to 
[natters of ethics and social response. 
| At a time in life when a young per- 
son most desperately needs some 
solid guidance in these areas, it is 
towheretobefound. 
' And the reason such guidance is 
jibsent from college is the same rea- 
on it is absent everywhere else: intelli- 
jent, trained, and highly professional 
people no longer wish to discuss 
morals or absolutes or how they form 
everything we do. 
Why? Because to discuss that would 
lean to admit some absolutes — 
Dme blacks and whites. 
And it's just too "in" these days to 
III students all decisions about ethics 
nd social response are up to individ- 



ual feeling and fancy. It's too cute to 
get up in front of students and dispa- 
rate the totally accurate assertion that 
our entire legal and social system 
would dissolve if not for a handful of 
absolutes. 

Of course the "It depends" philoso- 
phy has done much good. 

Thank God, we came to realize that 
some "absolutes" were never meant 
to be absolutes at all. 

A woman's place is not always in the 
home. The President is not always 
right. What's good for ITT or the CIA is 
not always good for America. Progress 
is not progress if it annihilates the 
countryside. 

But, if ever we have gone too far, we 
have done it with the "It depends" 
mentality that has infested colleges. 
Those great minds who should know 
better have been unable to draw a line 
between absolutism and intellectual 
agnosticism. 

What is taught at K-State and all 
over the country is not that some, but 
ALL questions have the same answer: 
"It depends." 

Rather than coming up with some- 
thing original and commensurate with 
their intelligence, the big thinkers on 
campus manage to spew out nothing 
more than trite, popular responses — 
as though everything they think and 
feel came from Time magazine or The 
Tonight Show. 

Oh, for just a few men and women 
who would have said something differ- 
ent. 

I cannot apologize if this sounds like 
biting the hands that fed me. 

Indeed, I appreciate those who 
taxed my mind and sharpened my abil- 
ity to analyze and think rationally. 

I appreciate those who prepared me 
for my chosen profession. 

And I appreciate those few whom I 
did see manifest the courage to carry 
their own cross when everyone else 
followed the crowd. 

But I feel sorry for those who came 
so starry-eyed and open-brained that 
they were lured to worship the pan- 
theon of PhDs and professors who 
were more screwed up than their stu- 
dents. 



I wretch with disgust for those who 
were so foolish to believe there is no 
compromise between absolutism and 
relativism. 

College must not be for everyone. 

It must only be for those who have 
spent at least some of their lives build- 
ing a foundation on which to make 
basic ethical and moral decisions. 

To wait until coming to college to 
build that foundation is to play a rou- 
lette of the worst kind. 

For there is no ethical foundation to 
be found amidst the "It depends" rab- 
ble. There is only a babbling melting 
pot of fools. 

Parents must stop sending sons and 
daughters to college just because it 
looks good to the neighbors. 

Worse yet, parents must stop send- 
ing sons and daughters to college to 
"straighten them out." 

If they aren't "straight" when they 
go in, they may be human pretzels 
when they come out. 

College is for those who have built a 
personal foundation and discipline. It 
is for those who have at least begun to 
plant their feet on the ground. 

Those who come otherwise pre- 
pared are going to be suckled by a 
reckless nursemaid — a system that is 
trying to turn out men and women with 
minds of marshmallow instead of 
moral commitment. 

I don't know what will alter this situa- 
tion, I hope it alters itself. 

Meantime, I pray that my generation 
finds the right balance between abso- 
lutism and relativism. 

We might. And we might not. I guess 
it just, uh . . . depends. 



It depends — 21 



Although it's not listed in the General Catalog, many colle- 
giates decide their major will be that of professional stu- 
dent. With the help of an adviser, these kids adopt pseudo- 
majors such as medicine, architecture, law, and post-grad- 
uate degree. And, after 20-odd years behind the textbook, 
finally emerge as "The Professionals". 

Pre-lofty laurel sojourn rough 



By John Lonergan 

If you have a friend who's there, 
then you've likely already heard the 
stories — some true, some truly exag- 
gerated, but all of them grim. You've 
heard of the breakdowns, breakouts, 
flunkings, withdrawals, cheatings, 
beatings, and always, always, the 
pressures. Yet each year the number 
of people wishing to subject them- 
selves to such torture grows and 
grows. To the average student these 
images spell grad school, vet school, 
med school, and law school; but to 
those applying and those applied, they 
mean only one thing: "excelsior". 

Call them what you may, post-grad- 
uate positions are some of the most 
fiercely contested jewels in the aca- 
demic world. Fortunes are gambled 
and friends are made and lost in the 
quest for the holier-than-thou Grail. 
And regardless of the trials and tribula- 
tions one may face in the various pro- 
fessional schools, the biggest trick of 
all remains "getting in". 

To aid in this regard, pre-profes- 
sional clubs at K-State, their ranks 



swelling yearly, attempt to help the 
young hopefuls maximize their advan- 
tages for admittance. No fact or factor 
is unworthy of exploitation. In these 
highly competitive fields, this is simply 
a way of life. 

Still in the long run it is the student 
who must be able to sell himself. It is 
his responsibility to see that he has the 
appropriate GPA, test scores, extra- 
curricular, or what ever deemed nec- 
essary for acceptance. And should he 
not find the "pot of gold" at the end of 
his purple brick road, the unpleasant 
task of finding a more suitable pigeon 
hole for but another luckless student is 
left up to the adviser. 

The pursuit of higher education to 
many is a passion, to most an impossi- 
ble dream. But despite the horror 
stories about life one step beyond, 
every indication is that if the post grad- 
uate had it to do over again, he'd do it 
over again. For the successful appli- 
cants, the worries are certainly not 
over, but the important one, accept- 
ance, has been permanently con- 
quered. 



22 — Professional schools 




Professional schools — 23 




24 — Construction 






HHMBHH 




Campus kneels to slow face lift 



By Jeff Funk 

Detour signs flashed, jackhammers 
rattled, buzz saws whined, and three 
new buildings grew on campus. 

A three-story limestone addition to 
the KSU Auditorium was finished in 
February. It was built to house the 
music department, radio stations 
KSAC and KSDB-FM, and television 
studios — all destroyed in the Nichols 
Gym fire eight years earlier. Blending 
nicely with the hulking auditorium, the 
addition features modern facilities sur- 
rounding a courtyard with a fountain 
— a contribution by the architect. 

One of many planned stages was 
finished in the large veterinary medi- 
cine complex north of campus, allow- 
ing more offices and classes to move 
out of decaying Leasure Hall. The 
four-part complex will be one of the 
better in the nation when completed. 

Only days after the first spade of dirt 
was turned, the heavy machinery 
moved in to tear up the old football 
practice field north of Ahearn Field 
House. Durland Hall, a new chemical 



and industrial engineering building, 
was under way. 

As students registered for classes in 
August, only a big hole and a huge 
mound of dirt were visible. At mid-term 
time, pillars arose from the ground. 
Santa Claus would have seen a com- 
pleted steel structure with concrete 
flooring if he had looked down on his 
rounds over Manhattan. And as the 
last snow of the season cleared, a 
mammoth building commanded the 
attention of dozens of noisy construc- 
tion workers. 

One of the bigger obstacles for stu- 
dents was the reworking of sidewalks 
for better drainage around Farrell 
Library. Starting in early summer, 
Physical Plant workers — who would 
lose a race with a snail, according to a 
Collegian editorial — struggled with 
the project through fall. 

Remolding plans for the Union park- 
ing lot and the perennial problem of 
what to do with the gutted shell of 
Nichols Gym also filled drawing 
boards. 



Construction — 25 




26 — Free flicks 



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Flash, Tracy zap Wednesdays free of charge 



By Linda Reed 

Lights dim and cheers sputter in the 
close-aired theatre. People wiggle 
deeper into their seats, maybe prop- 
ping a foot to find comfort. The projec- 
tor gains speed and flickers. Music up 
. . . scant images ... the words roll 
by. . . 

FOREWORD 
CHAPTER FIVE 

FLASH and Roha capture a Ming 
ship and force the crew to fly 

them to Ming's palace and . . . 

To the delight of "middle-of-the- 
week woefuls", and the K-State stu- 
dent body in general, Flash Gordon 
leaped into action — not once, but 
three times — every Wednesday! 

As before, the ever-competent 
Union Program Council managed to 
add a little "zip and zowie" to the aver- 
age student's life by offering the Free 
Films series. Each week's show con- 
sisted of one feature serial adventure 
with several old, and usually moldy, 
short subjects. 

Flash Gordon and Dick Tracy, stars 
of those Saturday morning "nickel 
flicks" Mom and Dad raved about, 
each headlined a semester's cast. 
Playing once again to packed houses, 
these daring, unspoiled heroes out- 
fought, out-foxed, and at times, out- 
lammed even their foulest of foes. 

The sight of such wholesome good- 
ness and evil evilness drew spontane- 



ous commental outbursts from ticket- 
holders: hisses and boos for the rotten 
guys — cheering encouragement for 
the more civic-minded characters. 

Flash Gordon and his crew of earthl- 
ings tooled through the Universe in 
wobbly, bullet-like space ships, keep- 
ing track of the cruel Emperor Ming. 
Through ten installments, these mortal 
enemies chased each other in efforts 
to save and destroy, respectively, the 
kingdom ruled by Princess Aura and 
Prince Barren. Prince Barren? Oh well, 
Flash felt the guy was worth saving so 
he continued to foolhardedly risk his 
neck. 

And how could he possibly lose with 
the help of pretty Dale Arden, who, as 
her female foes discovered, could 
handle herself quite well under pres- 
sure. But then what superhero, and 
ex-Olympic swimmer, like Buster 
Crabbe, couldn't punch out a whole 
regiment of Mingites who resembled 
over-stuffed Munchkins with a bit of 
Robin Hood's merrymen mixed in? 

Second semester Free Film buffs 
were treated to the antics of Dick 
Tracy and company. Acting as calm, 
cool, and collected as Katie Winters, 
Dick battled modern day baddies with 
success and sap equal to Flash. 

Tracy's number-one fiend was "The 
Spider", a cripple armed with a myste- 
rious pocket flashlight that marked his 
victims quite appropriately with an illu- 
minated spider. This no-good wrong- 






doer was aided by the terribly mis- 
guided physician and hunchback Mol- 
och. Definitely not as classy as an 
Igore, Moloch's big thrill was rearrang- 
ing brains with his own special method 
of cerebral surgery. His operations 
usually left few scars but had the 
uncanny knack of skunk-striping the 
patient's hair. 

Cohorts of Tracy included Gwen 
and Junior, that drab devoted duo 
always ready to remind their idol and 
boss just exactly how much the free 
world needed him. 

Where Flash relied on elaborate 
weaponry, Tracy employed a simpler 
tactic. He "smiled" his enemies into 
submission! Those ivories could even 
do a number on audiences! 

Supplementing these two serial 
adventures were an aged assortment 
of short subjects. From the Keystone 
Cops to what seemed to be at least 
one sample each of the Our Gang-Lit- 
tle Rascals remakes, the shorts served 
as warm-ups for the "really good 
stuff". 

While UPC provided the nostalgic 
medium, student viewers added their 
own collegiate flavoring with audible 
sighs of "Oh, Flash!" or a heartfelt 
"Way to go, Dick!". And when the 
action or dialogue became too much 
to swallow, a good, long belch helped 
put things back into proper perspec- 
tive! 



Free flicks — 27 



Lower thermostat chills 
campus' Sunday martyr 




By Scott Kraft 

"My God, it's cold in here." 
"I'm sorry, sir, but we don't have 
any control over the supply, talk to 

"It's a socioeconomic problem." 

"Hey, I don't care about your 
socioeconomic problems — I just 
want light and heat. Is that too much. to 
ask?" 

In a day and age when it is possible 
to purchase nearly any service or 
commodity, Americans are finding it 
increasingly frustrating to adjust to 
colder building temperatures, power 
failures, and the demand-depressing 
effect of high gasoline prices. 

At the K-State front, the energy 
problems ranged from intense to mini- 
mal. 

Energy task forces and the like have 
appeared at K-State since it was 
learned in early October that the Uni- 
versity's energy supply would be cut 
down. K-State's energy supplier's sup- 
plier was cutting down. 

The energy task force was estab- 
lished on campus, and a concerted 
effort was made to conserve energy. 
But, as so often happens during a time 
when energy is being conserved, stu- 
dents and faculty became more sensi- 
tive of the temperatures around them. 
Verbal attacks on "the people who set 
the heat" were often heard. 

"I'm burning up in here and we're 
supposed to be having an energy cri- 



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28 — Energy 1975 



While others were saying, "It's so 
cold in here I can't grasp my damn 
pen." 

And the discrepancies between 
rooms and buildings were often called 
into question. Posters with notepads 
attached were displayed in every cam- 
pus building with the inscription: "Are 
you uncomfortable? Too Hot or Too 
Cold". If a person was uncomfortable, 
ie was asked to fill in the time, loca- 
:ion, date, and room. The task force 
A/as seeking the misuses of energy in 
ouildings. 

Budding architects still trekked to 

Beaton Hall on Sunday afternoons to 

sketch and work on drawing projects, 

).udding chemists still trudged through 

mow-blown sidewalks to laboratories, 

ind budding journalists still braved the 

:old January winds to make it over to 

.edzie Hall — but something was dif- 

9rent. The heat had been turned low 

Dr the weekend, not to be turned on 

gain, until Monday morning. More 

nan one student wore a beanie cap 

n Sunday afternoons. 

Campus lights were turned out early 

nd building hours were cut down — 

II just to cut back on energy usage. 

Five to ten years ago, when oil com- 

anies and other energy suppliers 

ere warning of the impending energy 

'isis, few would listen with a serious 

ar. Now, some of the major oil com- 

anies are being castigated for their 

gh profits, resulting from the high 

ice of gasoline. A need to develop 

icentives for deeper and more pene- 



trating research in seeking energy 
stockpiles has surfaced. 

Some conservative economists 
were calling for an end to the fuss over 
windfall profits. What the country 
needs to do, said these people, is to 
increase oil company profits. They 
reason that it is the oil companies that 
will need to search for alternative 
sources of energy. 

And so the answer to our fluctuating 
energy crisis seems simple — alterna- 
tive sources of energy. However, there 
are several problems with this simple 
solution. 

First, any new energy form is bound 
to be more expensive than the 50 to 
60 cents per gallon people were 
screaming about in 1974. Social costs 
involved in switching to another form 
of energy would be high. In a country 
that can't even switch its system of 
measurement, the probability of mak- 
ing an energy switchover without too 
much chaos seems slim. 

Inasmuch as strict governmental 
controls are not a favorable alterna- 
tive, the second problem with an alter- 
nate source of energy is that someone 
must do the necessary research — 
someone with an incentive. And it is 
looking like that incentive will have to 
be fabricated by the government. 

For an incentive system to work, the 
price of gasoline would have to start 
reflecting its demand. While skyrocket- 
ing prices at the pump would be reces- 
sive in its burden, it would provide an 
indication of the true value of the 



energy we are using. 

These solutions still untried, the 
country entered 1975 in a state of 
stalemate — no gas rationing, but lots 
of threats. People were beginning to 
wonder what happened to the signs of 
the sixties: "Live Better Electrically" or 
"Use Gas — It's Cheaper". Both gas 
and electricity are products of the 
energy producers, and the price of 
both was kept artificially low for years. 
Only now are the true prices of natural 
resources being borne by the con- 
sumer. 

But the issue is both social and eco- 
nomic. Socially, we cannot allow rising 
energy costs to price persons on fixed 
or low incomes out of the energy mar- 
ket — because it is a market of sur- 
vival. Everyone needs heat, light, and 
gasoline. A rise in the price of energy 
products will have an inflationary 
effect on the rest of the energy-con- 
suming public, and especially on the 
energy-consuming businesses. 

If America wants some form of 
energy in the next 50 years, it must 
bear the monetary burden now. Ameri- 
cans are finally realizing that 
resources are scarce, and assessing 
the real costs of these resources to the 
consumer is something that should 
have been done long ago. 

K-Staters seemed doomed in 1974 
to a life in dark rooms and packed car- 
pools, with the ever-present invigorat- 
ing mid-January chill sifting their hair 
and bringing goose-bumps to the sur- 
face of their skin. 



Vegetation: apartment living's link to environment 



The magazine article said that every really with-it apart- 
ment tor 1975 should be filled with greenery, and the apart- 
ment in the pictures was a student's dream. Even though the 
physical aspects ot my shabby second-story Manhattan, 
Kansas, penthouse didn't resemble the sleek, well-furnished 
look of the magazine's Manhattan, New York, apartment, I 
figured the liaison could at least be vegetation. 

When the KSU Horticulture Club advertised its plant sale 
early in the fall, I decided this would be a great opportunity to 
buy a couple plants and begin my apartment's gradual trans- 
formation into a local botanical garden. Partially because I'm 
a sucker, and partially because I can't resist a good buy, I 
found myself leaving the Hort Club's sale with a few more 
than the two plants I had planned to buy — nine more to be 
exact. The apartment was instantly transformed into a sec- 
ond-story greenhouse. 

Really, though, the apartment did look pretty good with all 
the plants lacing the window sills. I was proud of myself for 
taking the environmental, ecological, natural, and vogue step 
into the world of plants — I knew Better Homes and Gardens 
would be proud of me. 

Although many of the articles I had read on the care of 
plants preached the therapeutic benefits of talking to the 
plants, I did feel a little silly asking my Spanish Ivy how it was 
doing every morning. To avoid giving it an identity crisis, I 
began calling it Pedro, and I really think it enjoyed this per- 
sonified touch. 

Maybe because I never could figure out what kind of plant 
the one on the kitchen window sill was, and therefore 
couldn't assign it an ethnic name, its health began to sink 
around Thanksgiving, and during Final Week bit the dust — 
so to speak. I really felt like a failure, as if Hort Club would 



never let me into another sale because I had let one of its off- 
spring pass on. 

My guilt and problems were compounded with the onset of 
Christmas break, and home being 1000 miles away. The fea- 
sibility of making it through TWA's security check with my ten 
plants and my family greeting my brood with joy at the other 
end was slim. So, I recruited a plant sitter for the break. And, 
she must have really had a way with words as the plants all 
looked much bigger and healthier when I returned for sec- 
ond semester. I felt somewhat like a grandmother on her 
annual visit to see the grandkids, remarking, "My how you've 
grown. Your hair/vine is so long!" 

My greenhouse attendant role for second semester went 
along fairly well. I even ventured into the hierarchy of plant 
care and repotted some of my oxygen makers, and pinched 
back another. Although it was touch-and-go for awhile with 
the Coleus I pinched back, all were in good health by Spring 
Break time. In fact, I was mildly insulted when my plants 
looked so good after I left them in the hands of the plant sitter 
again over Spring Break. The least they might have done was 
wilt a little. 

The big obstacle course the plants and I have yet to face is 
the challenge of the drive to that home of mine 1000 miles 
from the penthouse. My only consolation when thinking of 
the impending sojourn is that I didn't purchase the rubber 
tree that beckoned me on my Hort Club shopping spree. A 
five foot passenger without knee joints might have provided 
quite a survival test — for both of us. 

Providing the vegetation and I make it home, I am in a 
quandary as to what to do with them when I transform from 
student into summer camp counselor. I just don't know if 
Pedro could make it in my knapsack. 



30 — Plants 






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32 : — Graduation 



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The student's individual effort to earn a col- 
lege degree is draped by anonymity at 
commencement ceremonies. But apprecia- 
tive parents and sweethearts still manage to 
spot their graduate from the stadium's top 
bleacher. 

Commencement: sweating it out for the last time 

ty John Lonergan 



You had sworn all year you wouldn't be among the word- 
reary throng at graduation. But due to pomp and circum- 
[ances beyond your control, you showed up. Sitting in 
fvhearn Field House and sweating like Touchdown VIII, you 
pel the relief from the realization that at least this will be 
pur last of a long series of graduation ceremonies — a dis- 
Inction shared this year with Governor Docking and your 
(even dollar cap and gown. 

I And as you observe your peers in the standing-room- 
hly crowd, you pause uncontrollably and conspicuously to 
iDnsider the suddenly short four years just past. You, your 
lass. Seemingly you've been through it all — orientations, 
lustrations, Nixon ramblings, K-blocktramplings, morning 
pssions, grade depressions, the thrills of victory, and the 
! gony of defeats — a whole wide world of sorts. You came 

as a mass of humanity — three thousand strong — and 
Du're leaving the same. 

Or so it seems. But dare you feel some emotion — save 
le cynical desire to thank your parents for making this day 



necessary? 

If you must think of something, think of this: you and your 
classmates came in as a group, but you will go out — 
ready, willing, able, or not — as individuals. The person 
who believes the main function of college is to mass pro- 
duce paper doll members of society has simply missed the 
point. 

College was never intended to lump everyone together, 
but to sift the particles out through their own personal and 
peculiar holes. The volatile package labeled "Kansas State 
University Class of 1 974" is soon torn open. The wrappings 
fall to the ground and are trampled in the wake. 

And so Graduate, sit and listen. But don't get lost in the 
lyrics. Surely you came, you saw, and for the time, you 
have conquered. 

Tonight it is your world, but tomorrow it will become 
again your city, your street, your home, and your person. 

And when you wake up and rub the four-year crust from 
your eyes, what will you see: the well-trod path to oblivion, 
or the road less traveled by? 



Graduation — 33 






34 —Spring Ring/FaM FoHlee 






Fling, Follies rejuvenate dorms 



For one week each spring and fall, 
the K-State residence hall world 
erupts. Spring Fling has traditionally 
served as an outlet to those students 
cramped by a long, hard winter, while 
Fall Follies acts as a farewell party to 
fair weather. 

During the Spring Fling week of April 
21-27, dorms set out to prove that 
"The Hall World's Crazy". Most peo- 
ple were convinced the slogan was 
true as they observed such events as 
the teeter-totter marathon and the 
Jello-snarfing contest. 

Games, movies, parties, and dances 
were crammed into the week, along 
with scholarship and leadership ban- 



quets. Keeping with current fads, six 
streakers added their special touch to 
the blanket movie. 

Fall Follies, the fall semester count- 
erpart to Spring Fling, was advertised 
as the "Great All Hall Fall Ball". 
Autumnal flavor was emphasized by 
scarecrow contests and hayrack rides. 

Tradition was served when, as 
usual, rain forced the scheduled picnic 
into Derby Food Center. A street 
dance in front of Anderson Hall and 
pool follies at the natatorium were 
some of the new innovations tested. 

Spring Fling and Fall Follies were 
sponsored by the Kansas State Uni- 
versity Association of Residence Halls. 



Spring Fling/Fall Follies — 35 



Coeds hash out female dilemma 



With the help of an amateur male 
projectionist, "The Story ot Eric" 
rolled and Women's Awareness Day 
began. On April 24, K-State students 
were given the chance to become 
aware of women, that is if watching 
films, listening to speakers, and partici- 
pating in discussion groups can make 
someone aware of women. 

All scheduled events were aimed to 
statistically and theoretically prove the 
female and male equal in capability 
and intelligence. Discussion groups 
and speakers, almost totally female, 
put the blame for inequality between 
the sexes on society. 

Just how society managed to place 



women in specific roles was explained 
by Joseph Hawes, associate professor 
of history. Hawes followed the histori- 
cal fate of women from the time of col- 
onial America, when a woman was 
"legally dead and her husband's chat- 
tel", to Freudian times when women 
came out of their closets and said, 
"This isn't right!" 

Non-traditional careers for women 
were covered through the use of stud- 
ies and personal experiences. 

Films covering the Lamaze method 
of educated childbirth, the socializa- 
tion process of women from childhood 
to adulthood, and birth control 
rounded out the day's program. 



UPC aids consumer protection 



The Union Program Council's Pot- 
pourri Committee sponsored a two- 
day Student Consumer Program, 
March 25 and 26, concerning five top- 
ics of interest to the student. 

Problems between owners and ten- 
ants were discussed in a session-con- 
cerning tenant's rights, local ordi- 
nances, and state legislation. The 
escrow ordinance was considered to 
be an effective solution in tenant-land- 
lord disputes. Under this ordinance, a 
tenant's rent money is placed in an 
escrow account and may be returned 
to him after three months of unan- 
swered and legitimate complaint. 

Questions about American appli- 
ances were answered by Jean Carl- 
son, household and equipment spe- 
cialist from Extension Services, and 
Cindy Simmons, representing Kansas 
Power and Light Company. 

Women's rights, in the areas of 
female consumers and banking poli- 
cies, were examined the second day 
of the consumer program. Mildred 
Buzenburg, assistant dean of business 
administration, spoke about women in 



the world of work and urged job-seek- 
ing women to assess their qualities, 
realize their abilities, and set their 
goals accordingly. 

Kathryn Graver, graduate student in 
family economics, enlightened the 
audience to the discrimination existing 
in the women's credit world, pointing 
out that single women generally have 
more difficulty attaining credit than 
single men. Sarah Carlson, assistant 
vice-president of the Kansas State 
Bank, explained some reasons behind 
bank policies which sometimes appear 
discriminatory or unfair to females. 

Food buying was another topic 
included in the program. Gwendolyn 
Tinklin, food and nutrition professor, 
and Stan Hayes, manager of Dutch 
Maid, discussed economy in the food 
purchasing. 

And the final discussion of the day 
concerned "Your Rights". Richard 
Morse, Cordley Brown, Cathy Butts, 
and Lance Burr — all involved in con- 
sumer activities — talked about new 
state legislation involving buyer pro- 
tection. 







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Trainer, beast 



reverse 

In county fr : - 



roles 



the top quality animal. But in a reversa 
of roles at K-State, trainers are put into 
competition to find the top quality 
showperson. 

The Little American Royal, co-spon>i 
sored by the Block and Bridle anej 
Dairy Science clubs, sifted over 15C 1 
students to determine the outstanding 
showperson in 21 classes on Marcf 
30. University-owned beef and dain 
cattle, hogs, sheep, and horses werc| 
prepared and paraded by the partici 
pants. 



36 — Short features 




Means pow-wows with AISB 



A young hackberry tree stands on 
the front lawn of Holtz Hall. Planted 
last April by members of the American 
Indian Student Body, the tree is a last- 
ing symbol of the growth of the Indian 
students toward the Indian community 
and the University. The tree-planting 
marked the start of the "Planting of the 
Seeds Festival", another name for 
AISB Awareness Week, April 1 -5. 

The highlight of the Festival was the 
appearance of Russell Means, head of 
the American Indian Movement. 
Means spoke to an audience of 400 
persons concerning his trial for the 
February, 1973 takeover of Wounded 
Knee, SD. He accused the FBI of using 
illegal tactics during that siege. The 
Indian leader told of the fear and 
uncertainty which had distressed Indi- 
ans inside the small village. Means 
cited Christianity, education, and the 
US as the three biggest enemies of the 
American Indian. 

"We don't want to overthrow this 
country," he said. "We'd just like a 
'leave us alone' policy." 



Other activities taking place during 
the week included an American Indian 
Art Show displaying the artwork of 
Indians from the northeast part of the 
state at the Union Art Gallery. An Isetto 
Pueblo Indian from Topeka, Ted Char- 
vez gave a presentation on the art of 
the silversmith. 

"Flap", a movie dealing with the 
problematic life of the Indian today, 
was shown in Forum Hall. Near the 
end of the week a panel discussion, 
"The Changing Needs of Indians in 
Kansas", was attended by about thirty 
persons. Educational, socio-cultural, 
and economic needs of Indians in the 
state were discussed. 

The final wrap-up of Festival activi- 
ties was a pow-wow, a social dance to 
advocate the Indian heritage. The pur- 
pose of the week of activities was to 
make people more aware of the cul- 
ture, the heritage, and other problems 
of the American Indian. The seeds 
have been planted, the growth has 
begun. 






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Ropers, riders 
stage a rodeo 

It was a weekend of ten-gallon Stet-, 
sons and clanking spurs, top-notch 
collegiate cowboys and a bronc riding 
mayor, and human intelligence versus 
animal brute' strength. It was the week- 
end of the 18th annual K-State Inter- 
collegiate Rodeo. 

The rodeo was March 22, 23, and 
24 in Weber Hall Arena. 

Male riders competed in bareback 
bronc riding, calf roping, steer wres- 
tling, and bull riding, while females 
entered in barrel racing, goat tying and 
breakaway roping. 



Short features 




tudents chalk-out frustrations 



Budding artists and frustrated writ- 
rs were given the chance to display 
leir creations to the world when the 
Inion Program Council sponsored the 
rst annual Chalk-a-lot, May 1 . 
Roads and sidewalks between the 
tudent Union and Seaton Hall were 
locked off and chalk provided for per- 
ons wanting to express themselves, 
^/arm weather encouraged a large 
rowd. 

Views expressed by the chalk- 
appy artists ranged from political, 
uch as "Impeach Nixon!", to whimsi- 
cal as "Get high, smoke a Cheeto", 
One warning read: "Earth, I have 
found a client interested in this prop- 
erty. Please vacate within 48 hours. 
The Lord". 



In addition to art displaying side- 
walks, other contests utilizing chalk 
were sponsored by UPC. In the origi- 
nal uses for chalk category, the winner 
urged grinding chalk into a powder, 
mixing it with Coors, and drinking the 
mixture five times daily during final 
week as a laxative. Screeching chalk 
on blackboards and drawing lines on 
campus sidewalks completed the con- 
test list. 

Chalk-a-lot may not have been part 
of the ancient May Day celebration, as 
Union ads claimed, but book-weary 
students apparently didn't care. The 
festival provided a welcome diversion 
from final-week panic, as well as an 
opportunity to finally see Bugs Bunny 
and Richard Nixon side by side. 




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halk-a-lot — 39 



When the groceries run low and the laundry pile is high, it's 
time to enter the Saturday morning derby. To win, one must 
successfully synchronize wash cycles and check-out lines. 
To lose means thawed TV dinners and deceased Dura- 
press sheets. 

Toss in soap, grab a cart, go 



"Hey Phil, where's the peanut but- 
ter? We just bought that jar Saturday." 

And so it's time for off-campus resi- 
dents to once again trek to the grocery 
store, a jaunt ofttimes combined with a 
visit to the laundromat. 

Many students do not consider 
these necessary trips as being high- 
lights of their college careers. But, 
unfortunately, shopping and laundry 
trips do not disappear upon gradua- 
tion as do tests and Union coffee. 

Varied culinary tastes and talents 
within a household can be a source of 
turmoil when roommates make gro- 
cery lists. "Sure Alice, I love your veal 
with mushrooms. But we really don't 
have enough money left this month. 
How about tuna casserole again?" 

So, shopping lists are made (some- 
times), avoiding meat and dairy prod- 
ucts, in preparation for the Super Mar- 
ket Race. When in conjunction with a 
laundromat trip, accurate timing is 
essential in avoiding shrunken knits, 
permanently wrinkled permanent 
pressed sheets, and thawed ice 
cream. 

Experts at this event advise room- 
mates to synchronize watches and 
head for the laundromat first. At the 
moment the washing machines swal- 
low the dimes and quarters, the partic- 
ipants have 30 quick minutes to com- 
plete their rounds — lest some impa- 
tient person remove their washed 



clothes and heap them on the table. 

Next, while running toward the gro- 
cery store, the list (which should have 
east store and west store items sepa- 
rated) should be torn in half, allowing 
each roommate about 20 minutes and 
a free rein with the shopping basket. 

Unavoidable problems may arise at 
the meeting of the baskets at the 
check-out counter if one roommate 
favors jumbo economy sizes while the 
other goes for regular. But, there 
seems to be no cure for the born bar- 
gain hunter, so just be silent if your 
roommate insists on the jumbo sized 
powdered milk box, and grab a small 
can of peas for spite. 

Experts also suggest you tell the 
carry-out kid your car is close, grab 
the basket, and head back to the laun- 
dromat. With precision timing, you 
should be able to put the grocery bags 
in the car and arrive at your washing 
machine's side just in time to see the 
spin cycle light click off. 

Drying is a tricky part. If you're into 
flash frying your clothes, you may be 
able to squeek through in 20 minutes. 
But, more conservative persons may 
take 30 minutes. 

And, then it's home again, another 
fun Saturday morning completed. 

"Hey Chris, toss the Excedrin here 
when you're done with them — and 
hurry." 




40 — Laundry/shopping 










Laundry /shopping — 4 1 






'^U^-S:! 



Next to Aggieville, purple used to be Man- 
hattan's hottest item. However, it seems 
purple no longer sits in the popularity 
throne which was once exclusively its. 



Where has all the purple gone — has pride died? 



By Judy Puckett 

K-State has a $600,000 stadium, complete with astro-turf. 

K-State has a $750,000 dorm, complete with athletes. 

Now, where's the purple? 

Remember the good old days when the Manhattan mer- 
chants desperately tried to sell the purple? Purple pairs of 
pants for your kid brother, purple suit coats for your dad, 
purple hose for your mother. Where is all the pride we had? 

The merchants seem to have lost their purple pizzazz, but 
they aren't the only ones. The student's role as purple spec- 
tator and buyer is dwindling as well. Why? Maybe it's prior 
commitments to other organizations, maybe it's Aggieville, or 
maybe it's lack of interest. 

"Things are different now. When I was in school that's all 
there was to do on a Saturday afternoon — go to a football 
game. But now the students have other interests," Cecil 
Keith, chairperson of the Manhattan Chamber of Commerce 
Sports Committee, said. 

Keith, a 1 957 K-State graduate and former football player, 
said, "Maybe it's true the kids are studying more, I don't 
know. But they have other. interests now. We didn't have 
anything like Aggieville and the bars when I went to school." 

Since many students no longer go to games dressed in 
purple garb, few Manhattan merchants now stock purple 
items. 

A long-time backer of Purple Pride products, one Manhat- 
tan department store now only stocks necessary purple 
items. As the assistant manager explained, "It just won't 
sell." 

"We do keep the basics on hand: sport coats for the men 
and pant suits for the women. But other than those, people 
just don't buy purple. We can't afford to sit with that much 
inventory on hand," he said. 

"More than anything else, we need to have a couple of 
game wins — then the purple starts selling," he added. 

Is winning the clue? When Vince Gibson first arrived at K- 
State, pride ran high. Seemingly everyone — students, mer- 
chants, and citizens — were "hittin' and hustlin' ". Gibson's 
"we gonna win" exclamation was well taken by fans. The 
team was winning, ticket sales were rising, the dorm looked 
dignified, and the stadium sparkled. 

But after a year in the loss column, he was hard put to con- 



tinue his Purple Pride public relations program. 

"Purple Pride has not died," Gibson insisted during his:, 
second and third years as K-State mentor. And after yet*' 
another losing season he still said, "The Cats are back." 

Gibson's rhetoric highlights his career at K-State. He made;' 
his players proud to wear the purple. i 

It was under the purple that: 

— Lynn Dickey and his fellow Cats defeated the Big Red 
Sooners of Oklahoma, 59-21 . 

— the nationally, renowned marching band began its famous 
scatter formation and played renditions of the K-State popu- 
lar "Wabash Cannonball." i 

— thousands of K-State alumni graduated in the K-State 
spirit. 

But where is the Purple Pride now? 

"The. pride element is not gone from Manhattan," Luc 
Fiser, manager of the Manhattan Chamber of Commerce 
said. . 

"I really don't think it's gone. It's just like a fire. We had a 
roaring fire and now it's burning out. We just need to put. 
another log on," he said. 

The necessary log seems to be victory. ° 

"There's nothing like winning to promote spirit," Fiser: 
said, "and it might also help if every business window would! 
support a Purple Pride sign." 

"Ticket prices keep going up — and let's face it — - the 
money situation isn't good right now for a lot of people," 
Keith added. 

Anyway you view it, the support just doesn't seem to be 
there. Dwindling enthusiasm, according to Fiser, might be 
because the newness has worn off of Vince Gibson and his 
Purple Pride program. 

So it has become a purple circle. Many students don't gc 
to the games because of prior commitments or a lack ol 
interest, so they don't buy the purple or the tickets. And if a 
store can't sell purple, it won't stock purple. Ticket sales are 1 
down because of decreases in the number of K-State wins) 
And if the team doesn't win, few buy purple or tickets. 

Maybe K-State's answer is a combination of a winning 
team, merchant support, cheaper tickets, and Interested stu-i 
dents. 

Or maybe we need a different color. 



42 — Where's the purple 




44 — Derby Day 




Derby Day spectators delight in female follies 



Thanks to Derby Day, it becomes 
acceptable one day annually for per- 
sons to zip themselves into sleeping 
bags mid Manhattan City Park, and 
before a crowd of onlookers, quickly 
change their clothes. 

The relay, called Zip and Strip, was 
one of several games scheduled for 
the 18th annual Derby Day, sponsored 
by Sigma Chi fraternity. Only females 
are contestants, with most being 
sorority members, though dorm resi- 
dents are also urged to join in. 

The nearly 400 females were 
divided into teams according to their 
respective living groups. 

Rival teams vied for the Derby Day 
traveling trophy that goes to the living 
group which piles up the most points 
during competition. 

Derby Steal, the game which earned 
the day its name, started the compe- 
tition on Friday, April 26. Females 
combed the park in search of the 
famed derbies, hidden earlier by 
Sigma Chis. Coupons for treats, such 



as free pitchers and steins of beer, 
were stuffed in some of the derbies. 
Taking the greater part of the after- 
noon, the steal was the only event 
scheduled for that day. 

Saturday spectators saw some rug- 
ged competition. Besides zipping and 
stripping, the competitors found them- 
selves tossing eggs in a game called 
Butterfingers. And they did generously 
butter their fingers before the game. 

Broom Sweep was a relay in which 
the contestants were to quickly sweep 
a grapefruit over a certain distance. 
Although it sounds simple enough, the 
broom had to be behind the contest- 
ant's back — which literally swept 
some of the females off their feet. 
Donut Dash participants ran a relay 
while wearing a stack of inner tubes. 

In the Dec-a-Sig competition, each 
living group borrowed a Sigma Chi 
member who they decorated to their 
liking. Results resembled huge ice 
cream sundaes and funny-looking 
oversized birds. Songs appropriately 



composed to match each creation 
were also presented. Judges from out- 
side the host fraternity chose the win- 
ning entry. 

Derby Day's final event was Slip and 
Slide. The girls ran and dove, front 
first, onto a huge sheet of polyethylene 
which was covered with soapy water. 
The winner was the person who slid 
the farthest. 

Gamma Phi Beta was awarded the 
over-all trophy, with Delta Delta Delta 
placing second, and Kappa Delta 
third. 

Derby Day participants wound down 
at Canterbury Court where beer, tick- 
ets, and T-shirt sales earned more 
than $500. The money went to Wal- 
lace Village, a treatment center in Col- 
orado for children with minimal brain 
dysfunction Sigma Chi chapters all 
over the country annually support 
Derby Day as a money-raising project 
for the center. 



Derby Day — 45 









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46 — Out-of- state/townee 







Going to college in the old hometown or clear across the 
nation both have their pluses and minuses. Just ask any 
townee or out-of-stater. 




K-State's drawing card: K-State 

By Mark Eaton 



s~* ^\ 







Out-of-staters and townees are 
hounded by the same obnoxious 
question: "But why did you choose K- 
State?" 

Students who are residents from 
states other than Kansas have cited 
various problems and advantages of 
living so far from home. 

Most out-of-staters attend K-State 
because of their majors or in an 
attempt to escape pressures of living 
close to home, or hometown sweet- 
hearts. But it's an expensive move due 
to steeper tuitions and travel expen- 
ses. 

Student stand-by air fare is obsolete 
now, almost doubling the cost to fly 
home. 

"I have to drive my car to Kansas 
City, take a plane to Chicago, catch a 
bus downtown to catch a train, the 
train takes me to Crown Point, Indiana, 
and then somebody has to pick me up 
at the train station to take me home," a 
student from Indiana explained, out of 
breath as if she had run up five flights 
of stairs. "That all adds up, you 
know." 

Another hassle is absentee voting. 
An Illinois resident said, "I feel totally 
uninformed on issues and candidates 
because I don't receive any informa- 
tion." 

An extreme case involves a sopho- 
more from Hawaii. 

"I came to K-State because my best 
friend I made while living and going to 
high school in Salina was going here," 
she said. "My father is in the military 
so we have moved around a lot. Join- 
ing a sorority has helped me as far as 
social life goes." 

Only seeing her family at Christmas, 
she avoids contracting homesickness 
by watching Hawaii Five-O. Two week 
tardiness of the mail and the one-dol- 



lar-per-minute long distance phone 
call charge are other problems she 
faces. 

An apartment dweller from Minne- 
sota has the advantage of not having 
to worry about unexpected parental 
visits if entertaining a female compan- 
ion for a weekend. 

On the opposite end of the home- 
base spectrum are the students whose 
parents and roots are in Manhattan. 

"One big problem of living in Man- 
hattan is that every time you walk 
down a street, the local bridge clubs 
know all about it," a disgruntled tow- 
nee said. "If you slip up in this town 
after living here a long time, all Man- 
hattan seems to know about it." 

"I am just too close to home to get a 
feeling of independence," a Manhat- 
tan female said. "However, one good 
aspect is if I need something from 
home it is only a few blocks away, and 
I always take my laundry home so I 
don't have to pay to have it done." 

A positive consensus among most 
townees is that besides getting a good, 
free meal at home on Sunday, they 
seem to be more college oriented and 
adjust easily to university life. Also, 
most are tired of Aggieville by age 18 
because they have been socializing 
there since high school. 

"I joined a fraternity to get away 
from home and meet new people 
rather than hang around the same old 
group from high school," another 
Manhattanite explained. 

Most townees go to K-State for the 
obvious reasons. It is cheaper, more 
convenient, and some parents insist 
their offspring attend the local univer- 
sity. 

"One advantage is that we already 
know where to go and what to do. But 
come to think of it, there isn't much to 
do in Manhattan anyway," one townee 
reflected. 



Out-of-state /townee — 47 




Union hideaway offers activities — in many forms 



Like the proverbial bread basket, the 
Union Catskeller harbors a diverse 
group ot individuals and events. 

In the morning hours, sleepy stu- 
dents escaping the chaos of the cafe- 
teria stumble there in search ot a lone 
chair. The juke box selections are 
Seals and Crotts, Carole King, and 
James Taylor — easy listening. The 
smell ot cottee and donuts tills the air, 
newspapers and books are open — 
but the pages are fuzzy. The University 
is just waking up. 

By 1 1 :30, the lunch crowd begins to 
take shape. 

"Do you see Jim? He said he'd save 
us a table." 

With a little luck, Jim was one of the 
early ones. Usually by noon an empty 
table is nowhere in sight, but that's no 
reason to leave. Many students recline 
on the carpeted floor, or resort to sit- 
ting on the stage. By noon, chairs are 



no longer situated in an orderly fash- 
ion around the tables. Instead, groups 
of eight and nine encircle a single 
table, the conversation rapidly 
becomes louder, and the music 
agrees. Grand Funk, Yes, Kansas, and 
Carley Simon ring out. 

For many, lunch is the only break in 
a daily schedule of assorted classes, 
and the Catskeller is their hideaway. 
The atmosphere is relaxed, but not 
serene; private, but not secluded. 

By mid-afternoon, the numbers 
have dwindled, but not the activities. 
Two minds battle over a chess game in 
the corner. A couple huddles closer 
together, engaging in deep conversa- 
tion. Somewhere a kid is snoring. 

The glass doors swing open, and 
two students cautiously enter in. 

"This is where we're having our 
seminar? What is this place?" 

"Our group leader called it the Cat's 



Killer or something, I don't know for 
sure." 

A waving arm guides them to their 
proper group — another class has 
found the atmosphere of the Catskel- 
ler inspiring. 

Evenings are quiet, sometimes. The 
stage in the Catskeller lends itself to 
entertainment. Accenting its coffee- 
house atmosphere, shows usually 
consist of folk singers with mood 
music and lots of conversation, but 
larger groups and speakers also fre- 
quent the stage. 

The juke box looks old-fashioned, 
and in a sense it is — it's free. This 
adds to the Catskeller's appeal, easy 
listening, at no charge. 

Card playing, chess matches, class 
discussions, lunching, talking, sleep- 
ing, studying, enjoying, watching: the 
Union Catskeller. 



48 — Catskeller 










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From the time we got our first pair of Buster 
Browns till we moved up the hierarchy of 
sneakers to Adidas, most college students 
have worn out a lot of tongues, eyes, and 
soles. Persuasive advertisements, Mother's 
prompts, and signs on restaurant doors 
have made second soles an almost manda- 
tory closet accessory. 



Soles of all sorts enhance abused collegiate feet 



By Sara Severence 

The 1 974-75 school term was a banner year for anyone on 
campus with a foot fetish. 

Shoe fads arrived and disappeared as fast as everyone 
could buy the latest leathers in footwear. Most were returns 
to other eras, but some were totally new. 

Crepe soles and wedgies were back from the time when 
your parents were in school, along with open toes and sling- 
backs. Saddle shoes still lingered from a few years before. 

But on the innovative scene, platform shoes reached new 
heights. Coeds staggered along on six-inch stilts, risking bro- 
ken ankles and torn ligaments in their search of fashion. 

Although the platforms were a definite asset in trying to 
reach high shelves, most who wore them learned to slump 
from the shoulders in order not to stand more than a few 
inches above the crowd. 

These super-lifts were especially popular in sandal styles, 
making it virtually impossible to find a flat-heeled version. 
Despite warnings from health experts that falling off of the 
platforms could cause serious damage, the style continued. 

As unique as the platforms were, they didn't hold a candle 



to the newest "scientific" discovery in footwear — earth 
shoes. Based on the principle that humans were noij 
intended to walk with their toes lower than their heels, the 
earth shoes slanted the inside soles upward from heel to toe. ! 

It was always easy to spot persons wearing new earth 
shoes — they were the ones tilting backwards at a 45- 
degree angle. The angle of the soles turned walking up ar 
ordinary slope into the equivalent of scaling a steep hill. 

Nevertheless, students who re-learned their walking habits 
were usually enthusiastic about the effects of the ugly clo-j 
dhoppers. Manufacturers' claims that the shoes would cure, 
backaches, sore feet, corns, and calluses must have beer 
fairly successful. Sales skyrocketed despite higher-than-i 
average cost and lower-than-average attractiveness levels. 1 
The platform shoes could at least lay claim to being good- 
looking while earth shoes weren't called pretty by their big- 
gest fans. 

But despite the footwear fads, old favorites remained pop- 
ular. Worn tenny-runners in mild weather and waffle-stom- 
pers during winter still stuck out from under K-Staters' blue- 
jeans. And somehow, in an age of changes, it was encourag- 
ing to see tnat some things never will change. 




52 — KSDB 



Nocturnal students no longer have to battle 
the AM waves to tune in KOMA or WLS, 
because K-State's own radio station, 
KSDB-FM, complete with night-owl DJs, 
keeps the campus company. From the 
penthouse of Farrell Library boom the stu- 
dent voices of future Wolfman Jacks. 



Campus disk jockeys spin 

By Mark Eaton 

If you tune your FM radio dial to frequency 88.1 , between 
3 pm and 9 am, you will hear a repertoire of music totally dif- 
ferent than most other radio stations. 

"We refuse to put any bubble gum music on KSDB," 
Roger Heaton, music director, said. "We won't compromise 
Dur music to cater to bubblegummers." 

Because of this, KSDB DJs receive strange calls from even 
stranger people for certain requests. 

If you call KSDB, your requested song will usually be 
Dlayed. But consider the poor DJ who must answer the call 
or a bubblegum request. 

"KSDB, may I help you?" 
"Yeth, will you pleathe play 'The Night Chicago Died'?'," 
[he not quite matured voice of pre-junior highette will ask. 

"I'm sorry, we don't play that on this station." 

"Pleathe." 

"Sorry, we just don't have it to play," the jock says sympa- 
:hetically. 

"If you don't play it, my big brother who weighs 200 
rounds and wears jack boots with spikes in them will run 
Dveryou on his motorcycle!" 

But threats don't bother DJs because nobody knows what 
hey look like. 

"Listen little girl, why don't you call KMKF or something. 
3ye." Click. 

Another type of call a DJ might get is something like this. 

"Hey, (hie) play shomething shweet for me (hie) and my 
shweet(hic) heart." 

"Okay, what do you wanna hear?" 

" 'I Honestly Wuv You' by 'Livia John (hie)." 

"Uh, you mean Olivia Newton-John." 

"What the hellja' jhust hear (hie) me shay?" 

"Okay, bye." 

KSDB plays solid progressive music from two to six am for 
ate night oil-burners, but the rest of the airing time is used 
or progressive top 40 and other programs to serve the inter- 
sts of the student. 

"I feel Sundays are special on KSDB," Alan Pickett, station 



unusual brand of tunes 

manager, said. "Starting in the afternoons with Casey 
Kasem, we then have a bluegrass program, a 1 950s and 60s 
nostalgia show, and Wolfman Jack." 

KSDB also programs live sporting events for the interested 
student and to train future sports announcers in play-by- 
play. 

'DB has regularly scheduled news and sports broadcasts 
throughout the broadcast day. And, that's a mouthful 
explains news director Lee Buller. 

"We call various radio news departments to get further 
details on state issues. Also, several students cover the state 
legislature during the week on an intern basis, so we keep up 
with the state news better this year than before." 

Bob Fidler, faculty adviser, gets new gray hairs each day 
making sure one of the 65 persons who work at the station 
doesn't pull a faux pas and get everyone in trouble. 

Since KSDB is a noncommercial station, the laws differ on 
the managing aspects and what announcers can and cannot 
do. For instance, editorializing and commercial advertising 
are taboos. So, if Case pulls a fast one, KSDB can't comment 
on it while the print media has a heyday with it. 

Example: "Well that jerk Bonehead is at it again. Yea, he 
took the doors off the Johns so we can't write on them any- 
more. Why can't he do sumpthin' constructive for a change 9 
He even has a superlight. I'll tell ya, he's superlight . . . 
headed that is . . . yuk, yuk. The next thing ya know he'll be 
blocking fire exits." 

Sometimes it's difficult not to editorialize just a bit, Pickett 
explains. 

"Other than trying to serve the college student's best inter- 
ests, we are busy getting ready for our move to the new wing 
of the auditorium," Pickett said. "We hope to increase our 
wattage from 10 to 1 ,000 watts of stereo power in the near 
future." 

Moving to the new wing doesn't mean they will be flying 
away, but this is KSDB's 25th anniversary and DBers are all 
fairly high on that note. 

Remember that request line is always open, so if you've 
got a request, give 'em a call and they'll play what you say. 



KSDB — 53 






54 — Unusual ag. classes 




Ag students desert lecture hall boredom, eyestrain 



By Patti Loving 

K-State's College of Agriculture 
offers some unique but practical 
classes. And, proves that a classroom 
is not necessarily the only place to 
learn what you need to know. 

In an age where doing it yourself is 
usually cheaper, the meat processing 
class lets students see and work with 
'the processes involved in packaging 
meat. Beef animals, pigs, and sheep 
are slaughtered, dressed, and cut up 
in this class by groups of five or six. 
The how's and why's of killing market 
beef and sheep by the captive bolt pis- 
tol and market pigs by electric shock 
are reviewed. 

Beef animals are eviscerated and 



skinned, and carcasses hung in a 
cooler for a week before the class sec- 
tions and cuts the meat into individual 
packages. The meat is sold to the pub- 
lic to recover some of the expenses 
incurred. 

The gestation of farm animals class 
prepares students to determine the 
presence and stage of pregnancy in 
farm animals. But students can't really 
learn how to pregnancy test cows until 
they actually see and feel what to do. 
So, instructors Miles McKee and Guy 
Kiracofe take small groups of students 
on field trips to gain experience. Usu- 
ally, area cattlemen are quite willing to 
have classes practice pregnancy test- 
ing on their cattle. Students test 
several hundred cows before they can 



be efficient, for it is difficult to deter- 
mine whether a cow is pregnant 
before 30 days. 

Poultry science class students raise 
chickens to illustrate the various 
stages an egg goes through before it's 
hatched. Eggs are bought and set at 
the first of each semester. Graduate 
assistants and professors are respon- 
sible for the turning and care of the 
eggs so they will be properly warmed. 

After the eggs hatch, the chicks are 
wing banded and debeaked, and then 
moved to the poultry farm where the 
class turns to housing and care. 

Each spring, the class kills and 
dresses the chickens raised. Plucking 
problems are minimized by a machine 
that automatically removes chicken 
feathers. 



Unusual ag classes — 55 



Diverse work ethics characterize governing body 



There's quite a paradox holed up on the ground floor of 
the Union; it's an organization with more than 15,000 mem- 
bers, almost unheard of club benefits and free services, and 
yet many members elect to hibernate rather than participate. 

This record-breaking-roster-claiming organization is the 
Student Governing Association. Upon signing the final matri- 
culation form, every student becomes a member of SGA and 
is eligible to reap member benefits — deciding what status 
his membership will assume. 

There are three basic categories of club members: 
GROUP 1 — those active in SGA and who think they know 
what is going on; GROUP 2 — those not directly active in 
SGA but think they know what is going on; and GROUP 3 — 
those who don't care. 

Students who have their membership cards engraved with 
GROUP 1 are the ones who have made an effort to become 
involved with student government. Some of 1 's participants 
are elected senators, others volunteered, and the rest are 
appointed. Among them are the kids who hung a few posters 
on campus trees, ran for senator of their college, and 
warmed a seat in the Big 8 room for a term. Often their char- 
isma and/or attractive signs are mistaken for intelligence. 
These students' parents and siblings think big sis has done 
K-State the biggest favor ever by answering "present" when 
her name is called every Thursday night at senate. But, in 
fact, these types of senators usually fail to exert themselves 
and become productive members of SGA. 

There are also persons within GROUP 1 who have made 
honest efforts to improve SGA and involve other students. 
These are the ones who realize that senate is only one facet 
of SGA, the legislative branch. The other two branches, as in 



the federal government, are the executive, or office of the 
student body president, and the judicial. These workers 
within SGA are the ones who publicize facts about SGA: free 
legal services and a notary public are available, along with 
financial counciling and a consumer relations board. Also, 
SGA is a member of the Associated Students of Kansas, a 
lobbying group of Kansas college students who spent hours 
fighting for landlord/tenant legislation and student wage reg- 
ulation. 

Many students who have GROUP 2 written all over them 
are the ones found in Aggieville and the Union cafeteria crit- 
icizing "those damn fools who gave CLUB X money again", 
yet they never managed to contact their senator and sensi- 
tize this representative to their views. Other #2 GROUPIES 
occasionally go to the weekly senate meetings, and also put 
themselves out enough to attend at least one presidential 
debate before casting their SGB ballot. They also visit the 
SGA office more than just their annual sojourn in November 
to get their absentee ballot notarized — they occasionally 
walk through to see what's new, or pick up on some of the 
information described in the periodic SGA News advertise- 
ments in the Collegian. 

Just because SGA is the campus' largest organization 
does not mean it escapes the driftwood-type members who 
wash in with the freshman tide and float back out in the sen- 
ior waves. These kids in GROUP 3 have been too busy their 
entire four years to vote in an election, discuss funding of 
minor sports, or walk through — rather than around — the 
ground floor office with two-foot tall letters advertising its' 
name: SGA. 



56 — SGA 




SGA — 57 




*"•»**><*«*■« **>em. 






58 — Special dorm dinners 





Dorms jazz up routine menus 
with candles, music, good food 

By Sara Severence 



Food service is often regarded by 
dormitory residents as something ot a 
necessary evil: if you live in the dorm, 
you have to eat in the large and imper- 
sonal atmosphere of the cafeteria. 

But for three meals during the year, 
the employees of Kramer and Derby 
food centers and the food services in 
the smaller halls break this stereotype 
by going all out to fix "special 
dinners". Then the dormies eat by 
candlelight, with tablecloths and soft 
music, and enjoy such exotic fare as 
wiener schnitzel, veal piccata, fish and 
chips, chocolate mousse, and prime 
ribs. 

These are the special dinners fea- 
tured at Thanksgiving, Christmas, and 
once in the spring. In addition, the 
food services have smaller-scale spe- 
cial dinners about every six weeks, for 
occasions ranging from football 
games to Valentine's Day. 

"We really enjoy doing the 
dinners," Noaleen Ingalsbee, dietician 
at Kramer food center, said. "They're 
a lot of extra work and planning, but 
they're enjoyable." 

It's not easy to feed homestyle spe- 
cial dinners to 4285 dorm residents, 
but years of experience make the task 
easier for the food service staffs. 

The extra work begins about two 
weeks before the meal is scheduled, 
when the preparation of freezable 
foods begins. The work is incorpo- 
rated into the cooks' schedules so that 
despite having twice as many menu 
items, the only extra help hired is stu- 
dents to assist with the actual serving. 

Planned for the whole campus by 



John Pence and Barbara Wohlers in 
the Department of Food Service, the 
dinners always follow a central theme. 

Themes for the Christmas and 
Thanksgiving meals are fairly stand- 
ard, but those for the spring dinner 
have varied from Southern cooking to 
a United Nations dinner. Students are 
encouraged to submit theme ideas 
and menus for the dinners. 

Food centers are decorated to carry 
out these themes, with special effects 
created by employees of the cafete- 
rias. 

"We have an Oriental lady who 
makes centerpieces out of vegetables 
for the salad tables that are really 
works of art," Ingalsbee said. 

Ice carvings and murals have also 
been used in the past few years. 

Despite the variety of food which is 
offered, students rarely refuse to eat 
an item at the dinners, and some items 
have gone on to become popular reg- 
ular menu items. 

"The only time we get into trouble is 
when we have something really differ- 
ent," Ingalsbee said. "It goes over bet- 
ter if you have something they're sort 
of familiar with." 

Instead of the usual two or three 
offerings of dessert and salad, whole 
tables of pies, cakes, pastries, and var- 
ious salads are available. Students can 
return for seconds — one of the few 
times this option is available. 

Although the special dinners are 
only offered three times per year, they 
have become one of the more popular 
events in the food centers. 

"We have done better every year," 
Ingalsbee explained. "It's nice to hear 
students say 'Wow, look at that!' 



Special dorm dinners — 59 






60 — Phones 




Kid dials losing number with Ma Establishment 



By Judy Puckett 

Don't get me wrong. I'm not a complainer. Every col- 
lege kid sutters the daily hassles ot the school routine. 
Tests and term papers. Projects and professors. Sleep 
and starvation. But I have a whole new list to add — I'm 
an off-campus kid. I pay $125 a month for a germ- 
infested kitchenette, leaky faucets, and a lumpy mat- 
tress. But, I'm not complaining. 

I could handle the hassles, if they didn't all come at 
once — every August. Unfortunately, they aren't 
always pleasant experiences. Take for instance, my 
undertaking of Ma Bell. It seems Ma had lost her record 
of payment for my $25 deposit, and proceeded to dis- 
connect my phone. Now, I was complaining. 

"Jingle Bell, may I help you?" 

"I hope so. May I speak to someone in the business 
office?" 

"When you hear the tone, leave your name and num- 
ber, and one of our service representatives will return 
your call. Thank you." 

"No, wait a minute, lady, you don't understand. Your 
people disconnected my phone. They don't think I paid 
that deposit. I'm calling from a phone booth. I don't 
even have a working number anymore." 

"Bleep." 

Was that it? Was that the noise I was waiting for? 

"Okay, my name is Joe College, but I can't give you 
my number, see, I don't have one. Well, I mean I don't 
have one that works. Look, I'll give you the number 
here. It's 539-8— " 

"Thank you for calling. Let us know when we can be 
of help again." 

That was it. I hopped in my car, headed downtown, 
and found a guy in the front office. 

"May I help you?" he said. 

"Yeah, you sure can. Get my name off your crummy 
list. My mom thinks I'm not paying the bills and Dad 
says I'm ruining the family name for credit. All my 
friends hate me, they think I've got an unlisted 
number." 

"Fine, fine, I'm not the person you need to talk to. 
But if you will have a seat over in that green chair, the 
one by the green pushbutton phone, I'll connect you 
with one of our service representatives." 

"Aw, come on, couldn't I talk with somebody face to 
face? No, huh. Okay, I'll use your phone. But what 
should I do?" 

"Just pick it up, and your connection will be com- 
plete." 

Following the jerk's instructions, a voice on the other 
end asked, "What number did you dial?" 

"What the hell," I said. "I don't even have a number, 
lady." 

Some movement in the corner distracted me. That 
guy at the desk was frantically waving his arms and 
sending up flares. I had a feeling he wanted my atten- 
tion and the tone of his voice confirmed my convic- 
tions. 



"Sir, sir," he screamed at me. "Please put that 
receiver down. Yes, cradle it. Thank you, I seemed to 
have pushed the wrong button. Okay, pick it up again. 
But if she asks you what number you dialed, hang it up 
quickly. I could never live it down if they thought I'd 
pushed the wrong button twice — you have no idea 
what it's like to be the only male operator." 

I couldn't believe it. Of all the employees, I get stuck 
with some incompetent schmuck. All I want is for my 
phone to work again. 

I slowly lifted the receiver, as he pushed an unlit but- 
ton. 

"Hello? Is this the business office?" 

The jerk at the desk is fidgeting. I gave him a reassur- 
ing smile and listened to the voice on the other side of 
the room divider. 

"No, this is Violet, your service representative. Busi- 
ness offices can't talk, silly." 

Choruses of laughter followed in the background. 
Violet had scored with a customer. My patience was 
dissolving. 

"Look lady, your establishment has been giving me 
the runaround too long. I'm a student at the University, 
and. . ." 

"Just a moment, I'll have to get my student files. I'll 
put you on hold for a moment." 

"No, wait a minute, don't put me on hold. I know how 
that works, you never come back. Hold is just another 
word for 'forget it, kid'!" 

Hmmmmmmmmmm. 

She did it. I knew I'd never hear from her again. I was 
sunk. They didn't care about me. All they wanted was 
my money. But, I was determined to fight them every 
inch of the way. Boiling, I glanced at that creep in the 
corner. He was punching buttons again. I stood up, and 
he looked my way. 

"Buddy, I'm through with you." It sounded impres- 
sive, I could tell. "I've given you guys some of the best 
years of my life and all you do is screw me around." 

Feeling the lump in my throat, I wasn't sure if I was 
going to throw up or cry. 

The guy in the corner started to say something. "Sir, 
we may be the only phone company in town, but we try 
not to. . ." 

That did it. I ran for the door. Arriving home, I found a 
piece of paper tied to my doorknob. It looked official — 
I thought I'd been drafted. 
To: J. College 

Sorry we missed you. We found the record of your 
cancelled check, and will be happy to re-install 
your phone at your convenience. Please let us know 
when we can serve you. 

Jingle Bell 

Scribbled at the bottom was a message I could barely 
decipher. 

"Hi, guy. Your door was unlocked, so I hooked you 
up. Fred Repairman." 

Finally, it was over — for another year. My family 
would take me back and I could settle down to study — 
free of the Credit Bureau's bad rating. 



Phones — 61 



Ex-comedian 'fasts' for starving 



When the skinny black man took the 
podium, the audience wasn't sure 
what to expect. First, he kept them in 
laughter with his jokes about niggers, 
white tolk, and Nixon. 

Then the crowd in KSU Auditorium 
saw what was really inside the man. 
He talked about moral decency, gov- 
ernmental corruption, and change. 

Dick Gregory was a man who had 
given up a high-paying job as a funny 
comedian to lecture. And he was 
skinny because he was fasting in pro- 
test of starving people in the world. 

Gregory warned the audience to not 
let anyone pull the wool over their eyes 
about crime. "I could halt crime right 
now — just let me. I can do it because 
I know to stop crime we have to start at 
the top — not the bottom. We must get 
the syndicates, not the mugger or the 
dope dealer. We may take a few 



judges, officials, and policemen down 
with us," Gregory said. 

He repeatedly asked the audience if 
they believed what the government 
had told them about Kennedy's assas- 
sination or the kidnapping of Patty 
Hearst. Citing instances in which his 
men had unearthed evidence of high 
level government conspiracies, Greg- 
ory urged people not to be fooled by 
government organizations. 

Talking about the Central Intelli- 
gence Agency, Gregory said, "Any- 
one who is insane enough to believe 
an organization which goes to foreign 
countries to fix elections and over- 
throw governments won't eventually 
come back here and do the same 
thing is out of their mind. " 

Gregory's October 10 talk was his 
third appearance before a K-State 
Convocation. 




Anti-Nixon cry 
by Abernathy 



. "I'm not going to give up on Amer- 
ica," Ralph Abernathy, close friend 
and associate of late civil rights leader 
Martin Luther King, Jr., told. students 
April 2 in KSU Auditorium. He was 
speaking as part of the observance of 
King's assassination six years ago. 

Abernathy urged his audience to do 
something for America. "We can no 
longer afford the luxury of indiffer- 
ence," he said, because racism is eat- 
ing away at the heart and soul of 
America. 

Calling the Nixon Administration 
insensitive to poor and black people, 
Abernathy urged the audience to push 
for Nixon to resign. If he refuses to 
resign, the people must build a fire 
under Congress and urge impeach- 
ment, he said. 



- Speakers 













Oil consumption 
root of all evil 



*~^-j ! 






American political system okay; 
individuals create a Watergate 



One of the principle characters in 
the Watergate trials defended the 
American political system to an all-Uni- 
versity convocation audience on Janu- 
ary 31. 

Fred Thompson, minority counsel 
during the Senate special committee 
investigation, emphasized it was not 
"the system" which spawned the 
scandal, but individuals within the sys- 
tem. 

The Tennessee Republican recalled 
the days of the trials, especially stress- 
ing the need to put Watergate behind 
us. 

"The solution to the corruption is 
not easy. We must understand we are 
dealing with humans who are capable 
of evil," Thompson said. 

He complimented the mass media 



on uncovering the Watergate scan- 
dals, but said it went too far once the 
trials began. 

"The press was properly heralded in 
its role," Thompson said. "But I'm 
afraid we saw grand jury testimony, 
which is supposed to be private, pub- 
lished verbatim. Newspersons also 
stepped beyond their duties when they 
exposed embarrassing facts about the 
private lives of those concerned." 

Appearing with Thompson was 
Howard Liebengood, a K-State gradu- 
ate involved in the investigation of the 
CIA's role with regard to Watergate. 

Liebengood told a seminar audience 
that the CIA is a necessary organiza- 
tion to the nation, but checks need to 
be put upon the group. 



Eight years ago when J. William Ful- 
bright spoke at K-State he was the 
chairman of the Senate foreign rela- 
tions committee at the height of the 
United States' most controversial for- 
eign involvement — the Vietnam War. 

Fulbright, retired from public office, 
returned February 13 to speak at KSU 
Auditorium on the nation's interests, 
and illusions of its current foreign 
entanglement — the Middle East. 

The former Arkansas senator said 
that the United States' difficulty in rec- 
onciling the Middle East conflict was 
the result of our illusions about "the 
priority of our interests in relation to 
each other." 

He singled out the major interest of 
the United States in the Middle East: 
"the access to oil, the security of 
Israel, and the avoidance of confronta- 
tion with the Soviet Union." 

Fulbright indicated the most press- 
ing issue facing the United States and 
the other oil-importing countries was 
to reduce current import inbalances 
with oil-producing countries, which 
could result in "the collapse of the 
world monetary system." 

To save the international monetary 
system, Fulbright said money flowing 
into the oil-producing countries must 
be recycled. This would mean the 
United States should encourage "a 
large-scale oil-country investment in 
the United States and other oil-import- 
ing countries." But first, he pointed 
out, that the United States would need 
to rid itself of its fear of Arabian invest- 
ment and its deep-rooted prejudice of 
the Arabs as people. 

On a national level, Fulbright 
strongly urged Americans to under- 
take a "stringent program of energy 
conservation" and to proceed with a 
national program to develop new 
energy sources. 



Speakers — 63 



TKEs foosball 
for MD dollars 

Grey skies and a vacant campus 
enveloped four K-State students as 
they foosballed their way to a world 
record. The 100-hour foosball mara- 
thon drew $2,800 in donations from K- 
Staters and Kansas businesses for 
Jerry Lewis muscular dystrophy tele- 
thon. 

Labor Day weekend-marathoners 
were Scott Griffith, Dayne Barren, 
Steve Thompson, and Greg Bauer, all 
members of Tau Kappa Epsilon frater- 
nity. 

The four students staged their 
endurance test in front of the K-State 
Union, moving closer to the building as 
the weather threatened. When the 
one-hundredth hour rolled by, 989 
games of foosball had been com- 
pleted. 






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Paddlers boost winning streak 



Stretching its winning streak to three 
years, Haymaker 4 was the first place 
team in the canoe race between K- 
State and Kansas. 

Lots of determination and muscle 
moved the participants down the Kan- 
sas River despite an unorganized start 
and finish. 

Males and females had to be repre- 
sented in each canoe. Residents from 
Haymaker and Ford Halls, comprising 
the Haymaker 4 team, made the trip in 
1 7 hours and 20 minutes. Because the 
river was lower, the journey took 
longer than other years, but offered 
more of a challenge to the racers. 

"Our advantage was the experience 
of the team," Kevin Donnelly, the 
team's coach, said. "Many of us have 
paddled the last three times." 



The race expanded over two days 
with the participants staying all night in 
St. Marys, before continuing to Law- 
rence where their final time was 
recorded. 

Some of the less experienced crews 
found canoeing involved both hard 
work and skill. Sandbars, sunken 
debris, and disorganization caused 
some unexpected difficulties. 

Although KU participation was low, 
two KU teams placed second and thr?d 
in the competition. 

"We are an experienced team," 
Susan Hervers, member of the winning 
team, said. "And we know the river's 
dangerous spots. We like to work 
together which adds a lot of pleasure 
to the trip." 



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Short features 



Dancing pirouettes into Aggie 




Beer, talk, popcorn, singing, smiling 
faces, and laughter. Familiar sights 
and sounds that have been a part of 
Aggieville since the days of the Kansas 
State College Aggies. But now flashing 
lights, strong music, moving feet, and 
a sensual drumbeat have been added. 
Curiously enough, these new sights 
and sounds flow from two of the oldest 
bars in the area — Mr. K's and Moth- 
er's Worry, formerly the Main Gate. 

Dancing has come to Aggieville, 
bringing with it — a change in atmos- 
phere. 

"People are in a different mood 
when they come here," Fred Lechner, 
co-owner of Mother's Worry, said. 
"They come here more dressed up, 
more formal and sophisticated." 

Mother's Worry has changed since 
its days as the Main Gate, due to the 
money and time of Lechner and Char- 
lie Busch, co-owner. During the sum- 
mer they added 1 000 square feet of 
room to the building and completely 
remodeled inside. Inside the addition, 
a floor and wall made of clear plastic 
panels with colored lights behind, 
were installed. The lights can be 
adjusted to flash in time with the 
music, in sequence, or randomly. A 
balcony overlooks the dance floor. 

Music is provided by a 500-watt 
stereo system playing through four 
three-foot-high speakers. A disc 
jockey chooses the music from a large 
selection of albums. 

"We have the best stereo equipment 
and light show in the Midwest," Lech- 
ner said. He claimed the closest com- 
parable light shows would be in Den- 
ver, Dallas, or Des Moines. 

Mr. K's also changed over summer 
break. Terry Ray, owner, bought the 
Mar Cafe, which had adjoined his bar, 



knocked out the wall between them, 
and remodeled both interiors. 

Gone is the old-fashioned atmos- 
phere, booths with jukebox selectors, 
and tile floors. Replacing them are a 
spacious dance floor edged by round 
tables, a rustic decor, and music from 
a stereo system steered by a disc 
jockey. 

"We like the new look of K's," Ray 
said. "It gives the students something 
different to come to Aggieville for. " 
Ray claims the high initial cost was 
worth it as he expects the addition to 
pay for itself soon. 

Both K's and Mother's Worry carry a 
cover charge to help pay for the sum- 
mer renovations and possible future 
ones. 

"We're planning to do more to this 
place," Lechner said, referring to 
Mother's Worry. "Eventually we'd like 
to create a night club atmosphere 
here." 

Lechner mentioned the possibility of 
bringing in bands for live entertain- 
ment in the future. But he added that 
many of his customers prefer to dance 
to recorded music because of the 
larger selection and better reproduc- 
tion of the original sound. 

Recorded music has captured other 
audiences in Aggie this year'. Besides 
the two dance bars, Dark Horse has 
installed a disc jockey playing records. 
No more of the old juke-box blaring 
away. 

Aggie goers not receptive to its 
changes could still enjoy the old favor- 
ites, like Kites, Brother's, and the rest. 

As Lechner explained, "Now, if you 
want to come down to Aggie for a beer 
with some friends, you can; and if you 
want to meet some new friends and 
dance a little, you can do that too." 



Short features — 65 



' 



Tyson laments 
film exploitation fc 

Cir.elv Tvson whisnered. shouted. ^X? \ ' 



Cicely Tyson whispered, shouted, 
and sang to her audience during "An 
Evening with Cicely Tyson", April 4, in 
the KSU Auditorium. 

Dramatic readings of "Ego- 
tripping", by Nikki Biovanni, and 
selections from "Give Me a Cool Drink 
of Water Before I Die", by Maya 
Angelou, conveyed Tyson's love of 
life. 

An ex-secretary turned model- 
actress, Tyson has become fed up 
with the stereotype roles of whores, 
junkies, and sex kittens given to black 
women in movies. 

Denouncing the image produced by 
black exploitation films, such as 
"Shaft", and praising the academy 
award nominee "Sounder", Tyson 
said: 

" 'Sounder' really is significant for 
the black woman. She has always 
been the strength of our race and she 
has always carried the ball." 



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66 — Performing arts 



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Severinsen shines for parents 



Sparkle, sparkle, supe'rstar. 

Sweeping the stage with an air of 
profound professionalism, Doc Sever- 
insen spotlighted Parent's Day enter- 
tainment. Accompanied by the Now 
Generation Brass and Today's Chil- 
dren, Severinsen captivated the audi- 
ence with his performance. 

Country and western, jazz, popular 
hits, and classical music headlined the 
program, displaying the diversity of 
Severinsen's trumpet talent. 

Along with his musical abilities, the 
Tonight Show trumpeter is renowned 
for his flashy outfits. Jackets and 
jeans, tailor-made and trimmed in 
sparkling sequins were abundant. In 
less than three hours, Severinsen don- 
ned five separate outfits, each more 
extravagant than the one before. Each 
time he returned to the stage, the 
applause grew louder in anticipation of 



the entertainer's return. 

Entertainer. Severinsen was just 
that. Whether making his horn whisper 
the introduction or scream the closing 
of a number, he never seemed to lose 
contact with his audience. 

Severinsen complimented both Phil 
Hewitt, K-State marching band direc- 
tor, and members of the band on an 
outstanding performance during half- 
time of Saturday's game. Severinsen 
and Ed Shaughnessy, Tonight Show 
drummer, were featured in that pres- 
entation. 

At the close of the show, Severinsen 
received a standing ovation. An appro- 
priate ending for the evening was his 
rendition of "I Believe in Music". The 
feeling was there — the bright clothes 
and light dialogue complemented the 
performance. But Doc Severinsen's 
talent could easily shine alone. 



Beatles regroup in multi-media 



It is said rock and roll will never die. 
And perhaps there's something to 
that. Three thousand people attended 
three showings of "The Beatles: Away 
With Words", presented in the KSU 
Auditorium September 1 2. 

The production, owned by Commu- 
nication Design, Inc., had three parts: 
the birth of rock and roll, Beatlemania, 
and reflections. An 8000-watt sound 
system supplied music which sur- 
rounded the viewers with memorable 
sounds of the rock and roll era. Cou- 
pled with these tunes of the fifties and 
sixties were thousands of slides and 
motion pictures projected onto three 
different screens. 

"It's the only rock and roll multi- 
media show traveling today," Howard 



Ragland, president of Communication 
Design, Inc., said. The 96-minute pres- 
entation was entitled "Away With 
Words" because the tale was told 
musically and visually rather than ver- 
bally. 

The story opened with a history of 
rock and roll, featuring music of stars 
such as Elvis Presley and Chubby 
Checkers, accompanied by black and 
white slides. The production then 
jumped to the appearance and subse- 
quent heyday of the stars of the show, 
the Beatles. The final section of the 
presentation was a nostalgic look into 
the past, a re-creation of the mood of 
the rock and roll years. 

As one viewer said, "It made me 
aware of the passing of time." 



'Chicken train' 
finally arrives 

Third time's the charm, or so it was 
in the case of the Ozark Mountain Dar- 
edevil's appearance at K-State, Octo- 
ber 19, 1974. 

In the past two years, the Daredevils 
had twice cancelled scheduled 
engagements at K-State. So, students 
were naturally apprehensive when the 
advertising began again in the fall of 
74. 

However, plans were fabricated and 
Weber Arena was readied for 90 min- 
utes of country music. • 

Squinting through clouds of smoke, 
an audience of 3,445 watched a per- 
formance that resembled a battle of 
swelling sounds, the only cadence 
being the collective heartbeat of the 
multitude. 

After an hour's presentation of 
music which featured much of their 
second album, including "If You Want 
to Get to Heaven" and "Chicken 
Train", the Daredevils departed and 
the crowd began drifting out the exits. 
Then the unexpected happened. 

The musicians reappeared and 
poured out two more songs to the 
remainder of a receptive audience, 
apparently for no special reason. It 
can't be planned, and it takes no prac- 
tice. 

The third time? For the Ozark Moun- 
tain Daredevils, it was a charmer. 





Performing arts — 67 



Tevye, K-State — perfect match 



"Fiddler on the Roof", already hav- 
ing proved its worth by becoming the 
longest-running Broadway musical in 
history, came to K-State, again finding 
critic and public acclaim. Capacity 
homecoming crowds packed the audi- 
torium November 7-9 to see the K- 
State Players and departments of 
speech and music's production. 

Taken from the stories of Sholom 
Aleichem, Tevye (Gary Tolle) is a poor 
milkman trying to make a living and at 
the same time worries about getting 
his five marriageable daughters wed. 
His wife, Golde (Charlotte McFarland), 
is determined to make the most profit- 



able match for the daughters, regard- 
less of the man it involves. In the end, 
none of the three oldest daughters are 
"matched", but instead fall in love. 

The musical was directed by Lew 
Shelton with Lynn Mahler Shelton 
directing choreography and Paul Roby 
conducting the pit orchestra. 

Colorful and fast moving dance 
scenes highlighted the presentation, 
with the crowd being especially 
impressed by the "Bottle Dance". 
Tolle's interpretation of Tevye domi- 
nated the stage, while effective lighting 
and costuming added to the profes- 
sional effect. 



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Borge chuckles 
through pieces 

If a smile is the shortest distance 
between two people, as Victor Borge 
claimed, then KSU Auditorium patrons 
must have been a close group on 
October 27. 

The world-famous pianist and comic 
kept a sell-out crowd of 1 800 laughing 
through two hours of musical comedy. 

Borge was assisted by Marilyn Mul- 
vey, a young coloratura soprano who 
often seemed as delighted as the audi- 
ence with Borge's humor. 

The Danish-born musician's antics 
included saluting Beethoven's bicen- 
tennial birthday by playing Debussy's 
compositions, and teaming with Mul- 
vey to sing all the parts of a Russian 
opera. 

An injury which caused the concert 
to be postponed and hospitalized 
Borge for three weeks, caused numb- 
ness in his left hand and occasional 
missed notes. 

"In no profession or art is there so 
much fun as music," Borge claimed 
and his humor proved it. 







68 — Performing arts 




Masque's 1 01 st rates extra high 



"Miss Reardon Drinks a Little", the 
spring presentation of the K-State 
Players and department of speech, 
played to Purple Masque theatre audi- 
ences from February 26 to March 1 , 
and had a special hold over perform- 
ance March 3. 

The production was the story of 
family relationships and conflicts 
between three adult sisters. 

Written by Paul Zindel, the work 
relived an evening in the lives of the 
women — one who had been accused 
of having illicit sexual relationships, 
one who had achieved a position of 



prominence in the community, and 
one who drank a little. They had to 
decide what actions to take about the 
accusations, and about their futures in 
general. 

Although no definite answers are 
given in the play, the sisters' observa- 
tions give insights into the modern 
family set-up. 

"Miss Reardon" was the 101st play 
performed in the Masque's seven-year 
history. Of its 100 predecessors, 32 
were full-length and 68 were one-act, 
69 of those being K-State originals. 






Kid Dyn-o-mite detonates thrice 
as final charge in BAW cache 



His 6-foot 1-inch, 130-pound frame 
was decked in faded patchwork blue 
jeans, blue T-shirt, and a puffy blue 
hat. Jimmie Walker looked just like the 
1 8-year-old J.J. who millions of Amer- 
icans watch each Friday night on 
"Good Times". 

But that's where the similarity 
between Jimmie, the person, and J. J., 
the character, ended. 

"People expect you to be like the 
character all the time," the 26-year- 
old Walker said. "I can't relate to peo- 
ple that way. To me, acting like J. J. is 
very mundane and boring. My public 
image is holding me back from what I 
really want to do — night club work." 

Walker performed for three sell-out 
crowds in the Catskeller on February 
28. His appearance was sponsored by 
K-State's Black Student Union as the 



final act of Black Awareness Week. 

Those attending the shows saw 
Walker as a stand-up comic doing the 
type of routines he has been involved 
in for more than seven years. 

Walker, who was born in Harlem, NY 
and came from a broken home, 
claimed his home life wasn't anything 
like the "Good Times" setting. 

"There was a lot of ass kickin' 
around our home. Instead of a love 
atmosphere like in the show, there was 
more violence going on." 

Walker said his early career was 
centered around ghetto-oriented 
material but "learned to get it together 
and go anywhere. My act has gained 
some universality. In this business, 
everyone must be able to understand 
you." 








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70 — Concerts 



It's like an old mystery "who-done-it" mov- 
ie. Who really murdered K-State's chances 
of having name performers in for 
concerts? Was it UPC, A-Council, or per- 
haps the ad hoc concerts committee? The 
only known fact in the case is who is get- 
ting screwed. Who's that? It's elementary, 
my dear — the student body. 



Council swaps baseball bat for magic music wand 

R\/ P,r&n Dn\/lp cert wasn't a benefit concert as such. In steDned McCain who immerii- 



By Greg Doyle 



Sitting tour rows from the stage, I 
was inundated with sound: the syn- 
thesizer, the organ, the perfect tempo 
kept by the drums. And the two guitars 
wailed, alternating licks with the elec- 
tric violin. The acoustically perfect 
KSU Auditorium was filled with the 
best rock a group from Kansas could 
produce. Two packed houses the 
night of January 24, and in each seat 
was someone who was bound to 
become a fan of Kansas. The local 
group that had returned for a kind of 
homecoming engagement after mak- 
ing it. Big Time. Big enough to have 
produced their first two albums within 
a year. Charitable enough to be doing 
the concert as a benefit for the finan- 
cially troubled K-State Soccer Team. 

The group showed its musical gen- 
ius fervently. Each instrument blended 
perfectly with the others; each song 
was played with musical expertise. 
The group came off like a fine-tuned 
watch. Although the decibel count was 
higher, I could have sworn I was listen- 
ing to the group on a stereo in the liv- 
ing room. 

After playing most of the songs off 
their first album, and a few teasers 
from their second album, which hadn't 
been released at that time, the stand- 
ing crowd cheered for more. 

Kansas obliged, with "Bringing it 
Back (from Mexico)". 

The group had helped the soccer 
team with an unofficial amount of 
$2500. The benefit concert seemed 
such a good idea that another sports- 
minded group, men's athletics, picked 
up on the idea. 

The February 7th Helen Reddy con- 



cert wasn't a benefit concert as such, 
but it was a money-making project for 
the athletic department. 

Although the Reddy concert came 
during a week when about five other 
events were competing for audiences, 
the singer whose first single hit was "I 
Am Woman" dazzled a large crowd in 
Ahearn Field House with her solo per- 
formance. Reddy's renditions of 
"Delta Dawn", "Ruby Red Dress", 
and "Angie Baby" showed the audi- 
ence why she has reached the peak of 
Top 40 charts. 

On the exterior, Reddy's perform-; 
ance came off like any other concert. 
But in the background, there were 
problems. 

Men's athletics had never before 
sponsored a concert. Because the 
athletic department had such a short 
time to confirm a date with Reddy, the 
department was allowed to bypass the 
normal channels of getting a concert 
date in the fieldhouse — an action 
usually requiring approval by the facili- 
ties use committee. 

The date was approved by President 
James A. McCain, which hit a sore 
spot with some members of the Union 
Program Council who were not 
allowed the special treatment given 
the athletic department. 

Another conflict caused by the 
Reddy concert was the competition it 
created over audience potential of 
other events set up for that week well 
in advance of the Reddy scheduling. 
Some kind of University policy was 
needed to encompass facilities sched- 
uling to prevent overlaps. Its guide- 
lines would apply to every campus 
organization wanting the fieldhouse 
for an event coming from off campus. 



In stepped McCain, who immedi- 
ately set up a temporary interim com- 
mittee to draft a policy. 

Controversy arose over what that 
policy should be. Should there be a 
"clearinghouse" committee to screen 
concerts and schedule facilities? Or 
were the present screening agents 
adequate? 

As if the headaches over the Reddy 
concert handling weren't enough, 
men's athletics grabbed Olivia New- 
ton-John from nowhere and tried to 
bring her to Manhattan. This was to be 
the ad hoc committee's first assign- 
ment, and they failed miserably. No 
one would want to see the Newton- 
John concert, or so claimed the com- 
mittee, so the use of faciltities was not 
cleared. Students protested the move, 
calling it a childish slap of the athletic 
council's hand. McCain's committee 
reconsidered and finally granted per- 
mission for the entertainment. But by 
then it didn't matter if anyone actually 
wanted to see such a concert or not. 
The performer had already accepted 
another booking. 

A month after the Reddy concert, no 
permanent policy had yet been 
adopted. The controversy was still 
apparent, and University policymakers 
seemed reluctant to implement a pro- 
gram that might make the situation 
worse. 

But one thing was obvious: UPC 
and the KSU Auditorium, who had so 
long been the only sponsors of con- 
certs, no longer had a corner on the 
market. Concert-bargaining began to 
appeal to other campus organizations, 
making an easy solution to the enter- 
tainment problem even more impossi- 
ble. 



Concerts — 71 




All rumps and carcasses are not created equal 



By Sam Knipp 

Angus bulls, sandy soil samples, 
broiler chickens, and cherry-red beef 
carcasses. All are common agricul- 
tural commodities probed and poked 
at by K-State judging teams as they 
compete in their respective categories. 

The K-State judging teams enjoyed 
a successful year with the senior live- 
stock team leading the way. They took 
top honors at the American Royal in 
Kansas City and won the International 
Livestock Exposition in Chicago. 

The eight-person team, coached by 
Bill Able, started working out in early 
summer, traveling to ranches and 
farms around the state, sharpening 
their judging skills. 

Angus, Charolais, Hereford, and 
Shorthorn cattle breeds all fell under 
the probing eyes of the livestock judg- 
ers. They looked for strong leg bones, 
straight backs, and well muscled quar- 
ters. 

Members of the senior livestock 
team were Jim Buchanan, Ron Roth, 
Tom Stoutenborough, Cliff Wilms, Dan 
Olsen, Ralph Wilson, Dwayne Mess- 
ner, and Rick Maxson. 

Sandy-clay-loam, silty-clay, and 
silty-loam soils may boggle the mind of 
an ordinary person, but members of 



the soils juding team can distinguish 
soil's differences in their sleep. 

Last October, soils judging team 
members were told they had placed 
third in the regional soils judging con- 
test at Fargo, ND. But months later 
after recalculating team totals, contest 
officials announced K-State had a first 
place tie with the University of Minne- 
sota. 

"Just another case of that good pur- 
ple luck," remarked a cheerful K-State 
winner. 

Soils team members included Rich- 
ard Weston, Gary Pennington, David 
Terry, and Dean Graber, with Orville 
Bidwell as team coach. 

Determining the quality of prod- 
uction hens, pullets, broiler chickens, 
turkeys, and eggs are main concerns 
of a good poultry judging team, 
according to Amos Kahrs, poultry 
judging team coach. 

Members of the poultry judging 
team take close looks at the poultry 
industry when they put their skills into 
practice, as they closely examine meat 
quality and body conformation of 
broiler chickens — similar to those 
used by Colonel Sanders. 

Poultry judging team members com- 
peting in two national contests, were 
Walter Marteney, Ken Taylor, John 



Skuban, and Mark Henely. 

Agriculture is the source of varied 
products, which eventually end up on 
consumers' shelves. One of the more 
popular consumer proudcts is meat 
cuts. Few consumers rarely see this 
product in its raw form, the meat car- 
cass. The carcasses must undergo 
strict inspection by United States 
Department of Agriculture officials 
before being cut up for human con- 
sumption. Such strict regulations are 
followed when the K-State meats judg- 
ing team goes into action. 

With coach Dell Allen at the helm, 
the meats judging team ranked sec- 
ond in the national contest at the 
American Royal. Members study meat 
carcasses, looking for good marbling, 
proper meat color, and low amounts of 
backfat. 

Team members included Merlin 
Chestnut, Robert Roth, Kent Weltmer, 
Craig Good, Rod Nulik, and Terry 
Henry. 

Although only four judging teams 
are featured, the College of Agricul- 
ture has much more to offer in the way 
of judging competition. Dairy cattle, 
wool, crops, flowers, and dairy prod- 
ucts round out the agricultural com- 
modities list. 



72 — Ag judging teams 






Ag judging teams — 73 



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It's hard to be a good Samaritan these 
days, you're damned if you do, damned it 
you don't. Jerks are lurking where travelers 
once feared to tread, and only the most 
uppity of Samaritans can handle present- 
day chance encounters. 



Ego maniac wilts in heat of potential date safari 



By John Lonergan 

It is said that college is tull ot chance 
encounters. Countless new acquain- 
tances are formed and reformed each 
day. Many lasting relationships have 
had their beginnings in such innocent 
events as sharing a chemistry lab or a 
lecture seat, making idle chatter while 
waiting for a tennis court, or eating 
mystery meat at the same table in the 
food center. 

The ruthless, and dateless, oppor- 
tunist knows better than to let such 
once in a lifetime shots go by. Thus, 
we find college students carrying cop- 
ies of Where the Girls Are, Body Talk, 
or 1001 Insults; sitting and scoping in 
residence hall lobbies; and perfecting 
the age old techniques of "breaking 
the ice". 

Such antics may be viewed as an 
example of trying to push a good thing 
too far, or as simply a way of meeting 
new and interesting people, a way of 
sharing common experiences. 

But regardless of what one thinks of 
such behaviorisms, it pays to keep 
handy some small talk for all occa- 
sions — because you never know 
when some stranger may walk up to 
you and say . . . 

"Hi" 

"Well, hello. Who are you?" 

"My name is Sandra, but I . . ." 

"And I'm Gary. Do I know you from 
somewhere?" 

"No I don't suppose. What . . ." 

"Well, where do you live?" 

"Ah.wha. . .?" 

"Where did you go to high school?" 

"Tractor, Kansas." 

"Well, I went to Shawnee Mission 
Central, in Kansas City." 



"That's swell." 

"You bet it is. Our ping-pong team 
won state my senior year." 

"You played ping-pong in high 
school?" 

"No, actually I was the team man- 
ager. But you've probably heard of the 
guys on the team — Paddles Harris, 
HaktuYu." 

"No, sorry." 

"Well, their pictures are in my year- 
book, perhaps you'd like to see it?" 

"Not really." 

"It's a great yearbook." 

"I'm sure it is. Really all . . ." 

"Well, where have you been all my 
life?" 

"Huh" 

"Urn, like, what's your major?" 

"Physical education." 

"Physed, huh?" 

"Nope, physical education." 

"Oh, I get it. That's pretty cute. But I 
can see why I haven't seen you in any 
of my classes. I'm in pre-med." 

"Swell." 

"Yep, gonna save the world, heh, 
heh.heh." 

"Aha." 

"What classes are you taking this 
semester, anyway?" 

"Well, I've got kinesiology, physiol- 
ogy, human anatomy — and a few 
others." 

"Really? I'm in music listening lab, 
general biology, jogging, and inde- 
pendent studies. Gotta get the ol' gpa 
up you know." 

"Uhuh.theol'gpa." 

"Yeah, well I'd been watching you 
across the room for the past 1 5 min- 
utes just hoping you'd come over and 
talk." 

"Oh, really?" 



"Yeah, and then you did. It wasn't 
just fate was it?" 

"No, in fact. . ." 

"Right. I bet we have something in 
common." 

"Don't think so." 

"You sure I don't know you? You're 
from Western Kansas aren't you?" 

"Yes." 

"Well, do you know Dusty Fellar?" 

"No." 

"Wendy Daze? Phillip de Troff?" 

"Nope, nope." 

"They're all from Western Kansas." 

"It's a big place." 

"Well, maybe I've seen you in the 
bars in Aggieville?" 

"Not me. I don't drink." 

"Huh? Then, I must have run into 
you at the games." 

"I don't go to the games." 

"Don't go to the games! What do 
you do for fun?" 

"Well, I like to ride my bike, play 
racketball, play piano, dance . . ." 

"Hey I like dancing, too. How'd you 
like to go to a function with me this 
weekend?" 

"Sorry." 

"Busy, huh?" 

"Nope." 

"Well, now, aren't you some weird 
chick?" 

"How's that?" 

"Well, if you didn't know me from 
somewhere, and you didn't want to 
meet me, why'd you come over here to 
talk to me?" 

"You know, I almost forgot why 
myself." 

"Then, for cripes sakes, what was 
it?" 

"I just came over to tell you thai 
your fly's down." 



74 — Chance encounters 




Chance encounters — 75 





Solitude essential to acquire self-consciousness 



People don't live solely for other 
people. They need time tor thinking 
only tor themselves. Time to evaluate 
themselves and their surroundings. 
They need time to gloat or tear apart. 
People need to be alone — solitude is 
a necessity. 

Searching for solitude among the 
1 7,000 other occupants of a 31 5-acre 
plot may seem futile. But it isn't. If the 
need is great enough, the searcher will 
succeed. And when no vacant corner 
exists, the searcher can turn to a 
crowd for solitude. 

Solitude is where you make it. 

In the lecture hall, one drugged by a 
voice's droan easily turns within. As 
nearby note-takers fade out, the self is 
focused. Think about things that could 
have been, those that should have 
been, and still others that might yet be. 
Remember a good thing and exploit it 
or blow a trouble out of proportion. 



Dwell on what is being left undone or 
take a vacation from it. Whatever 
needs to be realized or fantasized, fill 
the solitude with it. 

But solitude doesn't exist only in 
noncommittal classrooms. 

One can manufacture a pseudo iso- 
lation in even the most vibrant of 
atmospheres. What more of an alone 
place is a fieldhouse brimmed with 
12,000 screaming fans if one has 
nothing to scream about? With no 
causes to connect outside lines, the 
non-ecstatic can hang it up and sit 
alone next to the person beside him. 
Blurry motion from the court can hyp- 
notize the non-involved, allowing the 
mind to concentrate on itself. 

Again, solitude is where you make it. 
It is also what you make of it. 

Aloneness can be constructive — 
having a meaningful end. Total evalua- 
tion of oneself and one's world guides 



the future as it is formed from educa- 
tion and planning. And successful 
planning can be aided by hashing out 
what can't be grilled before an audi- 
ence. Solitude provides an outlet for 
private thoughts that never must 
become public, lest one should sacri- 
fice plunging in another's esteem. 
Success may depend on public fronts 
and so does society. 

Agreed, current trends in human rel- 
ations preach openness — the frank 
truth. But to be frank with others, one 
must be correctly established within 
oneself. Solitude helps this orientation. 
Something gone unexamined escapes 
whole comprehension — a personal 
fleeting glance is not enough. Seek 
solitude and acquaint yourself with 
yourself. 

But don't wait for an empty corner to 
open up on campus. Solitude is a state 
of mind. 



Solitude — 77 



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78 — Parking lot personalities 



Screeching brakes, wild swerves, and shat- 
tered nerves. They're all a part ot K-State's 
parking problem. The best advice to those 
driving on campus is: don't! But it that isn't 
feasible, at least be able to recognize your 
competition for the slanted lines. 



Auto maniacs 

By Judy Puckett 

What a way to start the day — hunt- 
ing for that nonexistent slot in an over- 
crowded parking lot. 

If a student had to face this dilemna 
infrequently, no doubt he could handle 
it. Unfortunately, that isn't the situa- 
tion. The trauma that comes with the 
search is a daily occurrence for most 
students. Surely the hassle could be 
greatly lessened if one didn't have to 
confront so many crazed drivers. 

The hunt begins. Pulling into the 
southern most row of the Union park- 
ing lot, the Plymouth crept along at the 
minimal rate, with the driver peering 
right and left. Reluctant to increase her 
speed for fear of missing an empty 
space, the Plymouth's driver slowed 
down — CRUNCH — a little too soon. 
She hadn't seen him coming. 

Zooming like it had been shot out of 
a cannon, the souped-up, red Camaro 
screeched to a halt, unable to avoid 
the Plymouth. 

The driver of the Camaro got out. 
You've seen the type — his hair is 
clone in the dry look, his pullover 
sweater matches his plaid cuffed 
slacks. Sauntering toward the Plym- 
outh, he leaves his pride and joy 
Dehind — his machine! 

No doubt he should slow down 
/vhen riding through the parking lot but 
hen the females wouldn't notice how 
:ool he is. So he continues to be a 



push cars, fellow drivers to limit 



hazard as the parking lot cruiser . . . 
bruiser. 

In the lower level of the parking lot 
lurks the mad Mustang — easily iden- 
tified by the five-foot-high letters on 
the right rear fender that spell, what 
else, but MUSTANG. Right off, you 
know the kid driving has got to be 
some kind of a jerk. 

He's never quite been able to leave 
high school behind. An oversized set 
of fuzzy dice hang from his rearview 
mirror. His back window displays 
numerous STP oil stickers that encircle 
the American flag. The grass skirt is 
swinging madly on the hula doll 
mounted on the back dash and the 
bumper sticker reads, "Dirty old men 
need love, too". 

We refer to this kid as the vulture- 
type. His hunting process correlates 
with the "hunt and peck" procedure of 
typing. He drives around at two-miles- 
an-hour just to be sure he doesn't miss 
a vacant spot. Then, when he sees a 
car back out a few feet ahead of him, 
he likens to Indy 500 drivers. Naturally, 
he has to slam on his brakes, but that's 
the good part — laying a little rubber. 

"Heh, wait'll the guys see that!" he 
thinks. 

Like the cruiser, the vulture is to be 
avoided. Both drive around with so 
many personality problems, they'd 
make Joyce Brothers' head spin. Rest 
assured, there are a few sane drivers 
left. Unfortunately, they're usually the 



ones who are really taking their educa- 
tion seriously. You know — always 
booking it! Because of this, they fail to 
keep their vehicles in good condition. 

Add another hazardous driver to the 
list: the "I'll get it down to the shop 
next week" driver. 

Warning: Do not remain behind one 
of these drivers if you value your front 
bumper. Without fail, this student is 
sailing through the parking lot in a two- 
toned 52 Chevy — magenta and flam- 
ingo pink. The first clue to his faulty 
car-care habits is his rear bumper — 
there isn't one. It's been rammed into 
so many times, it finally fell off. 

Even the best of defensive drivers 
have a hard time coming to an immedi- 
ate halt when the Chevy's ignition fails 
once again. All is fine with the 52, 
almost. It has this silly tendency to stop 
in the middle of the traffic flow, caus- 
ing a three-to-four-car pile up, 
depending on how many sleepy driv- 
ers were caught behind it. As said 
before, the Chevy's owner is no 
dummy, it's just that he can never find 
the time for repairs. 

But, when students live two miles 
from campus and choose to sleep late 
rather than walk and avoid the cam- 
pus' drag strips, they must contend 
with dangerous drivers playing pot- 
pourri in the parking lot. 

So, hold your breath, start your 
engine, and drive on in — at your own 
risk! 



Parking lot personalities — 79 



Shark pockets 
all challenges 

K-State students were offered 
chances to challenge champion billi- 
ards player Jack White in the Union 

this fall. 

All the takers lost. 

In the October 30 afternoon White 
played four students, as the onlooking 
crowd overflowed the courtyard and 
dangled from second and third floor 
railings to get a better look at his pool 
shark. 

At another exhibition that evening 
White defeated W. D. Curtis, the Union 
Billards Tournament champion, by a 
narrow margin. 

. Between matches White demon- 
strated some of the trick shots and 
cue-stick wizardry he has mastered 
during his 37 years as a billiards 
player. 



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Scruggs stars 
• K-Staters 

On Saturday, January 20, 1973 the 
K-State student body pulled a massive 
all-nighter. Ahearn was loaded with lis- 
teners for the kaleidoscopic concert, 
The Earl Scruggs Review. 

But that was two years ago. Like a 
ghost from concerts past, the Review 
was reincarnated in a world premiere 
of the documentary "The Concert for 
Earl Scruggs", shown at K-State on 
November 1 1 , 1974. But it just wasn't 
the same. 

Less than 1,000 persons watched 
the premiere. Not exactly a record- 
breaking attendance, considering 
Ahearn was filled to the brim in '73. 

The natural, informal atmosphere of 
the concert was replaced by a rigid 
format of songs followed by taped 
interviews with the musicians. 



- - 



80 — Short features 



Sextet of singing specialists swoon audiences 



Ziggy and the Zeu, a zesty, zany six- 
member concert act, zapped a K-State 
audience with a zillion and one zippy 
tunes from the 50s and 60s. 

The January 1 7 performance, spon- 
sored by the K-State Union Concerts 
Committee, was in the Union Ballroom 
before a crowd of about 250. The Zeu 
is unique for their authentically nostal- 
gic 50s costumes, choreography, and 
style. 

The group, five men and one 
woman, turned back the clock with a 
series of golden oldies from the 50s. 
Their renditions of "Book of Love", 
"Blue Moon", "Duke of Earl", "Little 
Darlin", and "Rock Around the Clock" 
did justice to the original versions. 

The Zeu's transition to 60s music 
included several early Beatles tunes. 
Ena Anka, the female vocalist, mim- 
icked Diana Ross' "You Keep Me 
Hanging On" and Bette Midler's 



"Uptown-Da-Doo-Ron-Ron ' ' . 

Ziggy momentarily stole the second 
half of the show, turning heads with 
his eye-catching gold "Elvis" style 
outfit. His entrance was sparked by a 
bright display of fireworks from his 
sparkler-burning boots. Simulating the 
infamous Teen Angel, Ziggy showered 
the audience with song, humor, and 
beer. 

The group's spontaneity, authentic- 
ity, and enthusiasm moved the audi- 
ence to demand two encores. 

Veterans of television and radio, 
members of the Zeu are individually as 
impressive as they are collectively. 

Anka, who began her career with 
Lawrence Welk, is from Belfast, North- 
ern Ireland, and is considered the fin- 
est European-born female vocalist of 
the last decade. Dover, of Dick Clark 
fame, is bass guitarist and recipient of 
the Peabody Award for Vocal Interpre- 



tation. 

The Mexican lead guitarist, Chico 
Vallarta, was a first-round draft choice 
in the Mexican-American Cultural 
Exchange Program, and Ricky Valli, 
drummer for the Zeu, is said to have 
the highest voice ever found in a sex- 
ually normal man. 

The Canadian pianist, Sir Douglas 
White III, can play several keyboards at 
once, using hands, feet, and face. Sir 
Douglas, who chose the Zeu over the 
throne in the Dukedom of Earl, often 
becomes carried away by his music 
and does just that with his piano. 

Ziggy himself, Eddie Dillivan, is the 
clown of the group. Singing off-key, 
making faces, and like a true Milwau- 
keean — drowning himself and the 
audience in beer, are his greatest tal- 
ents. 



Meadowlark's company dribbles 
into Ahearn for one quick game 



They were sandwiched into two 
weeks of concentrated entertainment 
presented during the first of February, 
but the Harlem Globetrotters still man- 
aged to almost fill Ahearn Field House 
on February 1 1 . 

Surprising no one, the team won its 
game against the Washington Gener- 
als, but the crowd was nonetheless 
entertained. 

Trick shots, the traditional water- 
bucket full of confetti to throw in the 
crowd, spinning basketballs, and argu- 
ments with the referees highlighted a 



performance which has become a rit- 
ual with Globetrotter fans. 

Meadowlark Lemon and Curly Neal 
were the crowd's favorites, and lived 
up to their international reputations 
with ageless grace and skill. 

Nearly as popular as the basketball 
game, though, were the various attrac- 
tions which preceded the contest. 

The world-champion Frisbee team 
and a juggler were among the enter- 
tainers who Occupied the crowd as 
they waited for the Globetrotters to 
appear. 



Short features — 81 




82 — Zoo animals 









Zoo enjoyed by all but animals 



Zoos are nice places for people — 
and sometimes even for animals. Man- 
hattan's Sunset Zoo is nice. It has big 
plots of grass that invite strollers. And 
the animals . . . Well, the deer and 
donkeys have a few tufts of green to 
chew on. 

Sunset doesn't have much concrete 
to harden things up. At least, those 
cement-crazy, big-city zoo designers 
missed out in Manhattan. The only 
concrete poured in this zoo forms 
floors for the big cats' cages . . . 
Maybe they do it for health reasons. 

But then, there really are few hand 
rails and barriers to keep kids away 
from the animals. At Sunset, you can 
see the creatures close up through the 
bars . . . There isn't much danger 
because most of the fiercer beasts are 
too old to give a damn about a free 
meal or mauling. Of course, there are 
some young animals, like the coyotes. 
And they pace a lot, so they must still 
remember freedom . . . 



Speaking of free, it doesn't cost any- 
thing to get into Sunset Zoo. And 
there's a snack bar and picnic tables. 
The animals get fed too — regularly, 
by the old caretaker. With the contin- 
ual hunt for food and natural instinct 
for survival taken care of by humans, 
all the animals have to do is lay around 
day after day. Or they can pace . . . 

If things get too boring, they can 
take a good, long look at the two-leg- 
ged creatures looking at them. There's 
usually at least one fool creeping up 
on a peacock's backside, or some 
wide-eyed three-year-old jumping 
back when he finally spots the tiger 
snoozing way back in his stone house. 
And the donkeys probably get a kick 
out of the jackasses on the other side 
of the fence, holding marshmallows in 
coaxing hands. 

Yea, zoos are nice places for people 
to visit and leave. Too bad the animals 
can't do the same. 



Zoo animals — 83 



84 — Psyc of exams 




Exams: rabbit feet vs studying 



By Judy Puckett 



We all have to face them. Whether 
it's a quiz, semester exam, or a final, 
every student has to face the all-time 
college downer — the test. 

Do professors realize the trauma a 
student undergoes in preparing for 
one of their monstrous 
questionnaires? Are they aware of the 
agony the enrollee suffers in trying to 
outguess them? It's all there in reality, 
there's no need to blow it out of pro- 
portion, the truth is rough enough. 

When faced with that sordid task of 
out-smarting the instructor, students 
find divergent ways to prepare them- 
selves for the game. 

Maybe, just maybe, there is a way 
— or ways — to lessen the blow, 
lighten the load, ease the mind. Many 
students feel they have found such 
solutions, and they practice them reli- 
giously. 

"Sure there's a trick to it," she said. 
"I begin preparing for the test a couple 
days before. Not that I really study all 
that much, it's my eating habits. I slow 
down on everything. Lighter lunches 
and suppers, and hardly any break- 
fast." 

She said her body succumbed to 
thought better if it wasn't quite as full. 

"I'm sure it's psychological, but I 
don't care. If it helps me get better 
grades, I'm going to keep it up," she 
added. 

Then there's the masochistic test- 
taker. 

"Well, this will probably sound ridic- 
ulous, but I wore my retainers to an 
exam, because I thought it would 
help," he said. "I hadn't worn them for 
a long time, and when I put them on, 
they hurt. I thought I might be able to 
concentrate better if I was in a little 
pain." 

The degree of success was nil. 

"Well," he admitted, "I'll have to tell 
you that it didn't help, it just hurt. But 
when it comes to taking a test, I'll try 
anything to get the grade." 

The sentimental student is usually a 
firm believer in luck. 



"I was born on a farm, and my 
brother and I raised rabbits when we 
were younger. When our favorite rab- 
bit finally died, we decided we'd each 
have one of its hind feet fixed for good 
luck," he said. "Sure I take it with me 
to my tests, but then I take it with me 
whenever I want something to go my 
way. I still have to study, it won't do 
that for me, but I feel like it helps. 
Maybe that's it," he explained, "think- 
ing positively, going in knowing you're 
going to ace it." 

The bed-time test-taker brings 
health into the picture. 

"I've never understood how a kid 
can pull an all-nighter and expect to 
have a mind left to think with," she 
said. "No way could I ever do that. If I 
haven't finished studying by 1 am 
that's tough. I go to bed anyway." 

Sleep is a sort of therapy for her. If 
her body is drained, so is her mind, 
and then she's "no good at all." 

Plotting and planning different 
devices to make the grade. The rules 
of the game say there's got to be an 
easy way out, a hidden trick. Some- 
thing to sharpen the senses, increase 
the knowledge, and improve the out- 
look. Are we looking for a gimmick that 
isn't there? 

"I think so," he said. "There's only 
one way to do well, and that's to study. 
I don't mean if you have time, or just 
the night before. I'm talking about con- 
stant mind-exercising studying." 

He is a freshman — the others were 
upperclass. They had once shared his 
feeiings, but lost them in the paranoia 
of semester after semester of test-tak- 
ing. Shortcuts. They were all sure that 
was the answer. 

"No, I tell you," he continued, "it's 
the guy who gets up at the crack of 
dawn and studies all day, then makes 
it to the rack at a decent hour — that's 
the guy that's going to make it." 

He grinned, and turned to enter the 
library. His friends call him "Books", 
and tease him about his intense study- 
ing. He just smiles ... he knows he'll 
make it, rabbit's foot or no. 



Psyc of exams — 85 



Jungle under glass showcases plant menagerie 



By Paula Meyers 

Picture yourself, machete in hand, chopping your way 
through the dense undergrowth of the tropics. Around you, 
the air is heavy with moisture and the earthy fragrance of 
lush foliage. Banana trees, pineapple plants, and 20-foot 
rubber trees are among the exotic vegetation which grows in 
this tangled, steaming jungle . . . 

You're trudging through the desert — thirsty, sweaty, the 
sun at your back and sand between your toes. With each 
painstaking step, perspiration trickles down your back. You 
shade your eyes to look at three large black birds circling 
overhead, stumble over a barrel cactus and fall face down in 
the scorching sand . . . 

Or you could walk through the Conservatory between 
classes — maybe even take your lunch and a friend. 

South of Dickens Hall, the Conservatory greenhouse shel- 
ters rare plants which require special care. Built in 1920, the 
structure is unique because of its curved glass and lack of 
internal support. 

In the Conservatory, plants grow huge because of the 
ample room and sunlight, and controlled temperature and 
humidity. Temperatures inside the Conservatory range 
between 70 and 75 degrees at night and 80 degrees by day. 
Summertime temperatures climb even higher. 

Here, humidity levels hit 60 or 70 percent. Because the 
average household humidity level is kept at 1 to 1 5 percent, 
this accounts for lack of response from many houseplants. 

"The colder temperature in a house may not be so bad, 
but the lack of humidity is," said Tom Slagle, greenhouse 
manager. 

There are three sections of plants in the Conservatory, the 
southern section being set aside for cacti. 

As if sculptured, some succulents look spidery, bulbous, 
or gnarled, while others resemble snakes, spears, tongues, 
or columns. One looks like an arrangement of swollen, color- 
less roses. 

Common names of these cacti are clues to their descrip- 
tions. "Old man cactus" looks surprisingly like a shrivelled, 
bearded oldster, and Astrophytum, or "bishop's cap", has 
the four-cornered headgear of the clergy. A 40-year-old 
"barrel cactus" also lives up to its name. 

Another ancient green, the Mexican Agave Americana, or 
"century plant", is a source of fiber, soap, and tequila. The 
plant, with long sword-shaped leaves, blooms only once after 
ten to 1 00 years on a 40-foot spike. 

The center section of the Conservatory is a tropical jungle. 
A 20-foot rubber tree pushes against the roof of the structure 



and delicate ferns hang from overhead. Here, the plush-look- 
ing "sago palm" measures seven feet in diameter, and the 
jade plants grow two feet tall. 

There are date palms, pineapple plants, stephanotis, and 
several members of the begonia family. A banana tree — cut 
down each year because of space — annually produces a 
cluster of fruit. 

A collection of orchids, native to Central America, fills one 
corner of the room. Grown without soil, these plants are set 
in a peat mixture. Because orchids require high humidity, 
there are plans for a small pool to be installed near the col- 
lection. 

Totally different plants fill the northern section of the Con- 
servatory — Boston ferns, Holly ferns, and "snake plants" 
— sometimes called "mother-in-law's tongue". There are 
also touch-sensitive plants which coil away at slightest con- 
tact. 

A grapefruit tree and an avocado tree both have grown 
from seeds from the fruits. 

Like cacti, clues to many of the plants' characteristics can 
be found in their names. A delicate, spicy scent rises from 
the "Shell ginger", and "Joseph's coat" is a multi-colored, 
small-leafed plant. 

Miniature umbrellas form the leaves of the Australian 
"Umbrella tree". The sap of "dumbcane" — containing cal- 
cium oxylate crystals which can cause temporary speech 
loss — was once used to keep order among rebellious 
slaves. 

The Conservatory has not been funded for several years 
because the money is channelled toward research and oper- 
ating expenses for the horticulture department. Students 
hired to work in the greenhouses spend four to five hours 
each week watering and caring for the Conservatory plants. 

"We try to maintain watering and heating for the plants on 
a regular daily basis," said Slagle. The students are also try- 
ing to improve identification and labeling of the plants and 
work toward attractive landscaping. 

Ripping off of plants is posing a problem. By-passers seem 
to find no harm in uprooting plants or taking cuttings from 
others. 

"As the commercial value goes up, the problem gets 
worse," said Slagle. "The stuff is here for everybody to see, 
but some are taking advantage." 

Plant materials are available to the University through 
trade with other schools and cities, donations from growers, 
cuttings from stock plants, and graduate students who trans- 
fer to K-State. 



86 — Conservatory 






Conservatory — 87 




88 — Liberation 



Human Rights: slowly easing into daily routine 



Die-hard ideas can change, although it takes time. 
When the Wright brothers approached Kitty Hawk with 
their flying machine, many people shouted that the Wrights' 
move was radical, unnecessary, and that "if people were 
meant to fly, they would have been born with wings". Today 
few people think of flying as a threat or as being extraordi- 
nary, and it is beginning to be this way with the women's 
movement. 

Claims boomeranged around the male dominated society 
of the 1 960s that Betty Friedan and Gloria Steinem were radi- 
cal, their thoughts unnecessary, and that "a woman's place 
is in the home". Maybe someday Friedan and Steinem's 
ideas will generate a response somewhat like the Wrights' 
now do. 

When students are lifted from their middle-class American 
homes for four years and subjected to the ideas of peer mid- 
dle-class Americans, some of their downhome thoughts are 
softened, and new philosophies displace those instilled by 
Mom and Dad. 

One idea which often undergoes mental surgery, minor to 
major, is the stand about the Human, Women's, and/or 
Feminist Movement. Although this movement masquerades 
under many pseudonyms, the basic concept is the same: 
equality for the sexes. 

The movement's public includes the very strong advo- 
cates, the allies, the slightly to the right and slightly to the left 
! middle-of-the-roaders, and the unconditional enemies. God 
i knows it takes all these kinds, or there wouldn't be an issue. 
Few wars have been fought or won when all the soldiers car- 
ried the same flag. 

Feminist soldiers are not confined to New York and San 
:Francisco, nor are they necessarily the bra burners and the 
[lesbians which so often seem to be linked to the movement 
: by the media. The female who sat next to you in Man's P 
World, lived down the hall from you in the dorm, or had the 
iK-Block seat next to you during football season might well be 
lone of K-State's own liberated females. 

In addition to being an average college student, she has 
personal goals which might differ radically from what her 
parents planned for her. She probably cringes when the joke 
'about coming to college to obtain her MRS is told, when rela- 
tives assume because she doesn't want to get married the 
day after graduation she never will, and when people snicker 




when she discloses her desire to be a lawyer and retain her 
own surname — married or not. 

But, she can take comfort in the fact that even if her room- 
mate doesn't agree with her thoughts, at least the United 
Nations does. The UN declared 1975 as Internationa! Wom- 
en's Year, and set the three-fold theme as equality, develop- 
ment, and peace. 

Questions have been raised, and not resolved, as to the 
equality of the sexes within this sponsor. However, the 
United Nations pledged faith in "the equal rights of men and 
women" in its Preamble to the Charter, and in Article 8 of the 
Charter it is stated: "The United Nations shall place no 
restrictions on the eligibility of men and women to participate 
in any capacity and under conditions of equality in its princi- 
pal and subsidiary organs". Even though this organization 
could probably not be deemed a feminist forum, it is at least 
serving as a catalyst for IWY. 

World-wide plans include conferences, festivals, and pub- 
lications in accordance with the theme. Nation-wide, this 
pre-bicentennial celebration was commemorated by an 
Amelia Earhart Day January 1 1 , which was to serve as the 
US kick-off for IWY. March 8 was the date set for tribute to 
International Women's Day, and female artists performing 
the works of women writers and composers were to be fea- 
tured. Festivities in the United States were scheduled to end 
with a Human Rights Day, December 12, which was to be 
observed by a special Women's Council at the United 
Nations General Assembly. 

K-State doesn't intend to be left out of this potentially his- 
toric year, as campus organizations plan regional speakers, 
a foreign women's forum, and a women's awareness confer- 
ence. Campus women and men, from many nations, plan to 
discuss and perhaps resolve some sexual inequalities plagu- 
ing the world. 

Before leaving K-State, most students will have managed 
to learn some concepts beyond the classrooms and 
textbooks which occupied four years of their lives, among 
them their ideas about liberation. The challenge upon gradu- 
ation from this mecca of idealism then becomes whether or 
not one will stick strongly to college inbred ideas, adapt and 
be a part of social changes, or slip back into the world of 
mediocrity beyond K-State's grasp. 



Liberation — 89 









90 — Music majors 




Egos bind musicians to majors 




By Sara Severance 

Egotists in an egotistical world? Or 
simply masochists? 

Who are these strange people 
known as music majors? 

Ask one and he'll probably describe 
himself as the first, an egotist. But ask 
anyone who knows what goes into 
getting a music degree at K-State, and 
you'll agree they must have a large 
slice of masochist in them. 

A single-minded devotion to music 
which laps over into their private lives 
is required of music majors. Just look- 
ing at class schedules in the music 
department makes this devotion obvi- 
ous. It's a rarity for the student to have 
more than one elective per semester 
outside the music department. 

Although they may not be taking 
more than a regular class load, many 
of the classes are for less than average 
credit. For example, marching band 
meets four times per week, two hours 
per class, but the student receives 
only one hour of credit. And two 
semesters of marching band are 
required for many music majors. 

In the same manner, orchestra, con- 
cert choir, and small ensembles all 
meet several times per week for one 
hour credit. These totals don't include 
performances, which usually mean 
weekend practices — time taken out 
from studying. 

Heaped on top of this pile are the 
mandatory recital attendances — 15 
each semester for zero hours credit. 

But even more time-consuming and 
important than the actual classes are 
the vital hours of private practice. 
Each credit hour in an instrument a 
music major takes means at least one 
hour daily practice. 

For upperclass music majors, the 
pressure is even greater. They are 
expected to participate in a joint recital 
as juniors and give a full recital as sen- 
iors. 

All of this work leads to a tremen- 



dous drop-out rate in the music pro- 
gram. Of the 140 freshmen enrolled as 
music education students, only 45 of 
them became student teachers during 
the past school year. 

So why do these surviving few do it? 
Are they basically masochistic? 

One explained her reasons for the 
choice in idealistic terms. "Music is 
something you can do for humanity." 

Another was more practical. "We're 
egotists in an egotistical field. This 
might be the last time I get to play with 
a symphony orchestra for the rest of 
my life, so I want to take advantage of 
it." 

Degrees are available in applied 
music, theory and composition, or a 
bachelor of arts in humanities with a 
music major. But by far the greatest 
part of music majors choose music 
education. 

Participants in the music education 
program show enthusiasm for their 
field. "Music is my outlet, but it's also 
my work." 

They also take pride in their talents 
and accomplishments. "This is a cur- 
riculum of skill. It's not something you 
can get out of a book, no one can do it 
for you." 

A tremendous esprit de corps exists 
among music majors — something 
not often found elsewhere on campus. 

This closeness carries over between 
students and professors within the 
department. Often students spend four 
years in weekly one-to-one interaction 
with the same private teacher. 

Finally, if music majors are indeed 
egotists in an egotistical world, there is 
no better place to show off their talents 
than in the field of music. Their entire 
efforts are devoted to creating a prod- 
uct which will please an audience — a 
musical performance. 

And when this performance is a suc- 
cess, it justifies the long hours spent in 
practice and the single-minded devo- 
tion to the art. 



Music majors — 91 



College life just ain't what it used to be, or is it? 



By Judy Puckett 

K-State — 20 years ago. Things were different then . . . 
or were they? 

Except for a considerable difference in the size of enroll- 
ment, the K-State students were involved in many of the 
same activities as we were in 1 974-75. A student body, 5343 
strong, hassled with parking and arch-rival KU, had SGA 
elections, worried about increasing tuition, and enjoyed big- 
time entertainers who visited campus. 

Only three parking areas were allotted to students. Any 
student ticketed for violating parking rules appeared before 
Tribunal, a board that tried the cases individually. Results 
were then published in the Kansas State Collegian. 

Obvious disgust with Tribunal was voiced when a group of 
students calling themselves "The Mob" ransacked the traffic 
files, January 12, 1955. More than 1 ,000 traffic tickets were 
stolen from the files of Tribunal. A note, left in the drawer, 
read: "We, the group of self-chosen students, have felt the 
need to correct the medieval parking restrictions on this 
campus. We realize that this does not solve the problem, but 
a strong action such as this will impress upon you our feel- 
ings. We are not alone in our convictions. We leave you this: 
THE MOB." 

Unfortunately, the revolution was not a success, as a 
duplicate file of the tickets was maintained in the physical 
plant. Tough luck for "THE MOB", as Tribunal continued 
interpreting "the Medieval parking restriction". 

Noisy construction during classtime has annoyed students 
over the years, but 1954-55 must have set the record for 
dedications. Farrell Library, Eisenhower Hall, Seaton Hall, 
Ahearn Field House, and Dykstra Veterinary Hospital all 
received their official names in the Spring of 55. 

The Union, under construction at this time, was a hot topic 
for student editorials. "Last April, when ground was broken 
for the Union, college officials said the completion date was 
set for October, 1955. 

"Last week, President McCain said the Union building is 
now four to five months ahead of schedule, and added that 
we might be able to use the building by January 1 956. 

"Let's hope the Union doesn't get any further ahead of 
schedule, or all of us may be alums before we get to take 
advantage of our activity fee payments. ' ' 

Fees and tuition were just as popular as student scape- 



goats in 1955 as now. Tuition was $80 a semester for resi- 
dent students, $150 for out-of-staters. Fee increases met 
with the same familiar glum looks, On May 10, 1955, fees 
increased $10 a semester, $4 to operate the new student 
union — if it was ever completed — and $6 for general 
administration. These tasks were carried out through the stu- 
dent council. 

Student council. One of its first orders of business was 
conducted September 21, 1954, when Becky Thacher, that 
really was her name, asked for new sweaters for the cheer- 
leaders. The council voted to ask the apportionment board 
for additional money for the sweaters. Big business. 

The Council's Social and Recreation Committee began the 
first in a series of free films on that same day. The films, 
shown in Seaton lecture hall, opened with a French film 
production, "Sextette". Not exactly our Betty Boop. 

October 28, 1954, brought the traditional painting by K- 
Staters of KU's Jimmy Green statue. The Lawrence police 
took names of several K-State students near KU's Potter 
Lake and stopped an attempt to dye the lake. Meanwhile, in 
Manhattan, Touchdown IV was in hiding after being cat-nap- 
ped by KU students. Manhattan police caught Touchdown's 
abductors when the getaway car failed to stop at a red light. 

But spirits were never so low that a party couldn't pick 
them up. All-school dances, Greek parties, and social activi- 
ties flourished. And for every event, there was a queen to go 
with it. The Royal Purple Queen, Miss Manhattan, Military 
Ball Queen, Homecoming Queen, the United Fund drive and 
its Queen of Hearts, Barnwarmer Queen, and others, reigned 
at numerous events. 

Then as now, entertainers and speakers graced K-State 
for the 1 954-55 school year. Some of the big names were 
Les Brown and his Band of Renowns, Margaret Mead, The 
Bob Dougherty Band, Celester White and Band, Norman 
Lee, Dave Brubeck, and Arthur Treacher. 

Campus government received little participation — if voter 
turnout is an indicator. Only 1842 students voted on April 21 
and 22 to elect a student body president, 1 8 council mem- 
bers, and three Board of Student Publications members. 

Interests, scholastically and socially, haven't changed 
much in twenty years. The same injustices are being 
claimed, the same people being blamed. The stories are true, 
no matter what year it is; only the names have changed as 
students lose their innocence and boldly question tradition. 



92 — 1955 






1955 — 93 






■ Snow storm 







Mom Nature befuddles campus 



Snow flakes are really beautiful, 
each with an individual styling. But pile 
a bunch of them together and it can 
really screw things up! 

By mid-February, no incredibly 
huge and hazardous blizzards or ice 
storms had hampered K-State stu- 
dents. It was almost too good to be 
true — a mild Kansas winter. 

But somebody must have been fool- 
ing around with Mother Nature 
because she really zapped the state in 
one short day! It began with some slip- 
pery sleet and ended in an avalanche 
of unanticipated precipitation! 

The Sunday snow caught parents 
and visiting friends with their chains 
off, forcing^ many to run for the 
Ramada. And the students who 
strayed homeward for the weekend 
followed the government's example by 



taking George's birthday off. 

But all being true, stout-hearted 
Kansans, the inconvenienced dug in 
wherever they were prematurely bur- 
ied. 

As usual, it didn't take students long 
to adjust. Snowballs were flying before 
sundown. Works of art — and icy 
snow — sprang from smooth lawns. 
All showed creativity — and some just 
plain showed a little too much for the 
feeble! 

And, like all good things, they are 
either fattening or short lived, so the 
white stuff turned to crap. First, it was 
sloshing through the slush . . . then 
hopping over ponds of slop . . . and 
then, oh God! It's beginning to snow, 
again! Wish spring break would get 
here — could really use a Padre Island 
right now! 



Snow storm — 95 



Group hierarchy: actors 

By Bruce Voigt 

THE NEXUS 

We were meeting to resolve one of the inevitable problems 
which comes out of group living. I can't remember now if it 
was an upcoming party, the food we were eating, or who 
wasn't doing their fair part of the work. But as group prob- 
lems go, it was a fairly serious one, important enough that 
eight of us had gathered to decide what to do. We sat in a 
circle, each uncomfortable with the problem we faced, and 
each uncomfortable because we were being called on to 
make a decision. 
THE LEADER 

"Well, I guess someone is going to have to talk first." 

I glanced at the speaker. The person was looking at all of 
us but not seeing any of us. A shoelace was fumbled with, 
and the speaker's eyes played back and forth between the 
collective us and the shoelace. 

"The group becomes a machine. It is quite unlike a machine 
made by men, which can have an existence of its own. The 
group is men themselves arranging themselves in patterns, 
strata, assuming and assigning different powers, functions, 
roles, rights, obligations . . ." 

I mused the traits of a leader. Eyes piercing just long 
enough to pull a comment out of a group member, and then 
mercifully dropped as to not embarrass. Eyebrows arching 
as if listening to a spoken comment, a quick smile as if to 
agree, and then a quick l-agree-with-you-but . . . 

"Don't you think it would be better if we went ahead and 
made a decision tonight?" 

And there is the implication of battle if the challenge is 
accepted. So softly over-bearing only the subconscious can 
hear the warning. 

Heed thyself, Tongue. The leader may know more about 
what to do than you do. And danger lurks in voicing an opin- 
ion. 

Intergroup banter picks up for a few moments, then I see 
the leader getting impatient. The chit-chat ignores the traced 
out plan. But the leader bides time, holding words back with 
self-control, painstakingly built from previous victories. 
"Each person is expected to be controlled, and to control the 
others, by the reciprocal effect that each has on the other. To 
be affected by the others' actions or feelings is natural. " 



playing specific roles 

"Look, the only way we're going to get it done is to reach a 
consensus about how we feel." 

Sentence is passed. 
"One of the most tentative forms of solidarity between us 
exists when we each want the same thing, but want nothing 
from each other . . . We might gladly cut each other's 
throats we may nevertheless feel a certain bond between us, 
a negative unity . . ." 

Who is going to relay our decision? 

"I will." The leader didn't hesitate this time. I saw the 
leader lean back and stretch, and then slap both hands on 
crossed knees. 

"Well that does it." 

It did. 
THE WORKER 

I glanced at the worker, who had said nothing the entire 
time. Eyes had made silent appraisals of each speaker, arms 
had remained motionless — except to change chin support. 
"What one is supposed to want, to live for, is 'gaining pleas- 
ure' from the esteem and affection of others. " 

"Whatever you all decide, I'll go along with it." 

Nice person, I thought, intent on listless fingers picking at 
rug fuzz and shoeless feet lazily scratching each other. 
Always the first one to get the back scenes work, always the 
first one to work the hardest, always the first one to get 
chewed out for missing a meeting called by the others. 
"The double action of destroying ourselves with one hand, 
and calling this love with the other, is a sleight of hand one 
can marvel at. Human beings seem to have an almost unlim- 
ited capacity to deceive themselves, and to deceive them- 
selves into taking their own lies for truth. " 

I never minded being around the worker. The worker 
wasn't a threat. The worker's presence always comple- 
mented my square corners, or someone else's points. The 
worker was a balloon I could puncture — but not pop. Never 
hated, but often despised, the worker had many acquain- 
tances, but no friends. 

"It is as though we all preferred to die to preserve our own 
shadows. " 

"If you really think it's necessary, I'll do it." 

We knew you would. 

The Politics of Experience, Laing, Ballantine Books NY, NY, 1971 



96 — The group 



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The group — 97 




98 — Streaking 



March came In like a lion, went out like a bare, and saw 
many new moons rise as streaking came to the K-State 
campus. 



Streakers flash through campus 



By John Lonergan 

Those apparently bored people orv 
this earth who have nothing better to 
do than wonder what the new year will 
bring did not have to wait long in 1 974, 
for the month of March came in like a 
lion, went out like a bare, and brought 
the "streakers". 

Beyond a doubt, streaking has been 
the fastest spreading fad on record — 
both coming and going. It spread so 
fast that K-State, remarkably enough, 
had its first streakers' delight a full two 
days before Walter Cronkite had any- 
thing to say about it. 

Who knows what precipitated this 
most diverting diversion? Perhaps it 
was boredom, the lunatic fringe, the 
Red scare, or perhaps indeed it was 
Billy Graham's K-State visit and extol- 
ment to "shed all inequities ye 
sinners". 

Regardless, streaking was at the 
forefront of the public eye for one full 
Watergateless week. It befuddled and 
bemused scholar and layperson alike. 
It was everywhere — on the radio, in 
the newspaper, at the corner grocery, 
and in the hearts of every red-blooded 
and red-cheeked college student. 
Even at the KU-K-State basketball 
game it was rumored a youthful enthu- 
siast would exhibit his unshakable 
support in the rah, rah, rah. 

And why this bombshell of accept- 
ance on the college scene? It was 
more than just good timing. Streaking 
became the ultimate form of protest — 



the put-off to end all put-ons. And in 
the shadow of the current governmen- 
tal debacle it was a refreshing change 
to see someone with nothing to hide 
and no way to hide it. 

But fast on the newly bared heels of 
the streakers was spring break. 

Students quickly had more things on 
their minds than nothing on their 
backs. At the same time it became 
apparent that the fad had no redeem- 
ing social value except shock. Red- 
faced giggles all too suddenly turned 
to yawns, launching the streakers out 
of the realm of curiosities and into the 
jurisdiction of misdemeanor. 

We are left to ponder the possibili- 
ties . . . will the streakers be back at 
full force next year? Surely as long as 
there are college students with time on 
their hands, stars in their eyes, and 
beer in their bellies — there will be 
odd creatures about. The red-bellied 
streaker may well replace the campus 
Jesus freak as the Herald of Spring. 
And who's to say that in our own 
promising futures the streak won't 
gradually deaccelerate into the "jog", 
the "shuffle", the "statue"? 

Regardless of what the next year 
may bring, for 1 974, the streaker lived 
and died in one week of glory. And as 
the last streaker fades quickly into the 
sunset, as the headlines recede into 
the back pages of time, we give an 
uninhibited salute to the grand-daddy 
of them all, Archimedes — a man cer- 
tainly a streak ahead of his day. 
Eureka! 



Streaking — 99 




100 — Sidewalks 





Pits and pedalers flirt with the lives of those beings so bold 
as to tread on campus sidewalks. These unyielding pedes- 
trians shirk the daily threat of tire-track brands or mysteri- 
ous disappearances into bottomless holes to arrive at their 
appointed destinations. 



Sidewalk perils 

By Sara Severance 

One all-time favorite cartoon situa- 
tion features an absent-minded profes- 
sor calmly strolling down the street 
when he suddenly disappears into a 
manhole. His hat floats in the air for a 
few seconds, then follows him into the 
pit. 

This scenario has become less fic- 
tion than reality on campus. Now at K- 
State, inattentive and careless stu- 
dents and faculty are in constant dan- 
ger of instant burial in one of countless 
caverns which physical plant workers 
have dug under selected portions of 
campus sidewalks. 

Contrary to popular opinion, the 
excavation sites were not chosen at 
random, nor did the physical plant cre- 
ate the chaos out of pure spite. Rather, 
repairs to telephone lines and electric 
cables made the construction work 
necessary. (Rumors that physical 
plant employees have an office pool to 
guess how many students will fall in 
the pits per day also proved to be 
unfounded.) 

But the construction workers are not 
totally heartless. Sometimes snow 
fences are erected around the holes to 
keep unalert pedestrians out. Lacking 
this, great mounds of dirt are piled up 
to perform the same function. 
Although the dirt is cheaper than the 
snow fences, it has the unfortunate 



await victims 

side effect of disintegrating into a sea 
of mud during a gentle rain, resulting 
in countless pairs of ruined shoes. 

If a student should happen to find an 
unobstructed walkway, he is still not 
guaranteed a trouble-free stroll to 
class. Odds are he will be molested by 
some machine, either a physical plant 
sidewalk-demolition vehicle or a stu- 
dent-powered bicycle. 

Of the two, the bicycle is more dan- 
gerous. Although the larger apparatus 
can cause permanent injury, it gives a 
louder warning of its imminent arrival: 
the noise of a tractor at ten feet away 
is somewhat unnerving. But this alert 
does provide sufficient time for pedes- 
trians to clear their bodies from the 
tractor's sidewalk and back onto the 
mud where they belong. 

Bicyclers, conversely, are virtually 
unnoticeable until they're within an 
eyelash of making tire tracks up the 
poor pedestrian's back. The only noise 
is an almost inaudible whir just before 
the collision, and on anything but a 
completely still day, even this is too 
much to hope for. 

Despite these obstacles, walking 
remains the primary mode of transpor- 
tation on campus. Those who must 
attend classes or frequent other build- 
ings on campus are forced to shake a 
fist at reckless bicyclers, curse the 
mud and detours, and walk on. 



Sidewalks — 101 






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102 — Graffiti 






To the amusement of many, and the dis- 
may of the Physical Plant, graffiti freaks 
leave their words of wisdom for posterity — 
on University owned slates. 



Etchers leave mark on society, desks, walls 



By Judy Puckett 



There is a place where a frustrated 
young writer can find an understand- 
ing publisher. A sexually-aggravated 
college student relieve his aggres- 
sions. And an insecure thinker stand 
on the soap box without fear of criti- 
que. 

With pen, pencil, or pocket knife in 
hand, they sweep across desktops like 
ghosts of printer's past. By etching 
their feelings in wood, graffiti is born. 

Since there have been empty walls, 
telephone booths, and bathroom 
doors, anonymous authors have 
carved their ideas into the lives of oth- 
ers. When a young person reaches 
college age the kicks he once got from 
writing obscene words seem to have 
diminished. Philosophies of life, politi- 
cal humor, sexual statements, and 
ove notes have replaced affluent juve- 
nile tendencies. 

It's easy to categorize graffiti freaks. 
Those commenting on political matters 
are civic sputterers. Whether current 
cr out-of-date, sputterers enjoy politi- 
al satire. 

— "Did you know Congress has 
decided not to impeach President 
Nixon? In fact, they are throwing a big 
carty in his honor . . . and they're let- 

ng Ted Kennedy take him home! 
We'll cross that bridge when we come 
:o it!" To this was added, "But that's 
/vater under the bridge." 

Length is not common among civic 
sputterers, most making their mes- 

ages short and sweet: 

— "Goldwater — now more than 
3ver." 

— "Agnew was easy — now comes 
he Tricky part." 

— "I hate hippies." 

Unlike the persons he writes about, 
he sputterer is usually shortwinded. 
Though love and sex perhaps 



should not be classified together, most 
graffiti written about either is usually 
intertwined. There are few common 
traits among these passion preachers: 

— "Horny people sit here — where is 
the love?" 

— "V.D. is good birth control." 

— "Chastity is its own punishment." 

— "If it feels good, feel it again." 
These statements are self-explana- 
tory, not requiring further comment. 
But many passion preachers voice 
their aggressions toward a specific 
individual and hope to find an answer: 

— "I, your wife, think sex is a pain in 
the ass." "You're doing it wrong." 

— "Virtue is its own reward." "How 
do you know?" 

— "Connie does it." "Does what?" 
"Can't you guess? Does it." "Some- 
where along the way, I have lost 
myself in this conversation." "I found 
someone on stack five who was lost, 
was it you?" 

— "I'm horny." "Join the crowd." 
One of the more philosophical pas- 
sion preachers wrote at great lengths 
about a female he never named: 

— "You have the joy of love — me, I 
have no 'her'. I am half a man — for 
no woman is mine. To love a woman is 
a great thing, to have no woman is a 
tragic thing. Please take care of her — 
so that no horny bastard like me will 
steal her away from you." 

— "I love her. I love her. I love her, but 
there is no joy. Is that love or lust? 
Were I impotent tomorrow, would I still 
want her? Yes! It is love. But love dam- 
pered by an inaudible crescendoing 
sadness. I wait to hear from her, but 
she won't call because she knows I'm 
waiting . . . Love is patient and long 
suffering." 

At the end of his troubled thoughts, 
someone had penciled in "God's love 
never fails," and under that, "You 
need more than one lover to be 



happy." It's as if the person who sat in 
the desk after him was consoling. Aah, 
the kinship of graffiti writers. 

The last category is somewhat of a 
catch-all, the statements can't be 
grouped. They are thoughts which 
must have come during a monotonous 
lecture or a lull in studying. Thus, we 
have the restless rhetorician. A good- 
natured rhetorician might come up 
with any one of the following state- 
ments: 

— "I hate you." "Hate is poison which 
destroys the receptacle which holds 
it." 

— "How come there's no graffiti on 
this desk?" 

— "What's wrong with the world is 
that you can't grab beautiful things. 
The ivy on the wall, what can you do 
but look at it?" "Don't feel too bad, the 
semester is almost over." 

— "Money and Banking is about as 
interesting as watching death eat a 
cracker." "So is Intermediate 
Accounting II." "So is Algebra." "So 
is Law." "So is Biology." 

— "We must silence those who 
oppose freedom of speech." 

— "What good is life if your god dam- 
ned head hurts all the time?" 

— "Beware, your local police are 
armed and dangerous." 

— "This desk was sat in by a KSU 
degenerate." 

— "Keep a green bough in your heart 
and the singing bird will come and 
crap on it." 

— "Rock chalk chicken hawk." 

— "Vince is our purple god." 

One of the older restless rhetori- 
cians obviously a senior, said it well, 
"My last semester is here — I have 
learned a great deal, but very little has 
come from a book or a test. To bust 
one's ass studying is to elude life." 

— "One hundred years from now, 
what will it matter?" 



Graffiti — 103 





33 







Universality hangs within Justin 

By Paula Meyers 



With its corridors adorned by 
authentic tapestries, textiles, and 
prints trom foreign countries and the 
United States, Justin Hall is an interna- 
tional show place. 

Doretta Hoffman, professor of home 
economics and former dean of the 
College of Home Economics, initiated 
the idea to collect and display the wall- 
hangings. Some are gifts from gradu- 
ates living in foreign countries, others 
come from foreign students, and still 
others are mementos of Hoffman's 
travels. 

Hand-embroidered textiles from the 
Middle East hang adjacent to delicate 
Japanese patterns of pure silk and 
frames of tie-dyed fabric from Nigeria 
in Justin's small-scale example of uni- 
versality. 

From France are actual forest 
scenes photomechanically repro- 
duced on huge cotton screens and 
from India are simple patterns formed 
by alternating solid bands of color. 

One Colombian contribution is 
made from alternating woven and tied 
sections. The colorful weave is inter- 
rupted by rows' of heavy string drawn 
together and knotted at intervals. 
Wooden slats reinforce these sections. 

There are several examples of the 
Indonesian process of batik. The intri- 
cate process of batik involves waxing 
the entire length of fabric and carefully 
carving a design into the wax. When 
the fabric is dyed, only the carved-out 
portion takes the color. The process is 
repeated for each new color and 
results in a delicate, complex pattern. 

A rare double-woven coverlet from 
the United States is used as a Justin 
wall-hanging. The handwoven coverlet 
is made from linen and sheep wool 
dyed by a special process. Few of 



these thick coverlets are preserved. 
Hoffman theorizes that a family of 
sheep ranchers made the coverlet 
start to finish. 

Mola textiles are crafted by the 
Cuna Indians who live on the San Bias 
Islands near Panama. By this method, 
several layers of contrasting colored 
cloth are sewn together around the 
edges. Multi-colored patterns are cre- 
ated by slitting through the layers, then 
carefully stitching around the cut-out 
design. 

Finnish prints are eye-catchers 
because of their decorative, bold, and 
colorful designs. They are Hoffman's 
favorites, and several of these bright 
rhythmic patterns liven the halls of 
Justin. 

Nigerian tapestries are handwoven 
by a primitive process by weavers who 
place their looms beneath rock ledges 
for shade. Large stones placed on a 
boat-shaped board keep the warp 
threads taut during the weaving proc- 
ess. Slight imperfections in the design 
prove the authenticity of these textiles. 

Besides the contributions of other 
countries, home economics has made 
a few of its own. Enlarged framed pho- 
tographs of the nursery school chil- 
dren, students in the dietetics lab, and 
other representations of age groups 
are displayed among the cloth-cov- 
ered frames. Unusually artistic finger- 
painting by nursery school children 
are also on display. 

All photographs and paintings rep- 
resent some facet of the home eco- 
nomics program. They follow the prin- 
ciple of "art in situation". Each is a 
glimpse into daily events in the field. 

"I want the building to be teaching 
all the time, whether we're here or 
not," Hoffman said. 



Justin wallhangings — 1 05 



Amnesty: separating convictionists from cowards 



By Mark Eaton 

Regardless of President Gerald Ford's possible motives for 
granting conditional amnesty to draft dodgers, a majority of 
K-State students favored an amnesty plan. 

"One thing we must remember is the United States is 
made up of draft dodgers who came to this country to 
escape wars in their home countries," John Greeley, a stu- 
dent and veteran of the Navy, said. 

"The Viet. Nam war was immoral, unconstitutional, and 
probably illegal, so the draft dodgers shouldn't be penalized 
for seeing the writing on the wall," Roch Thornton, a Marine 
veteran of Viet Nam, said. 

"Sure the families of the dead men are probably bitter, but 
they were victimized by the government just like so many 
people in this society," he added. 

"The war was a 'with the government or against the gov- 
ernment' type of thing," Thornton said. "The Veterans of 
Foreign Wars and American Legion consist mainly of World 
War II veterans. They claim to represent Viet Nam veterans, 
but really don't. When they speak out against amnesty, it 
doesn't mean a damn thing to me." 

"If resisters believed the war was definitely wrong for our 
country, it would be tough on them to live somewhere 
besides America," Mike Kearny, a sophomore dodge sympa- 
thizer said. "There isn't much benefit in having them do 
social work, though. If resisters could just come back and 
have nobody know what they had done, it would shed better 
light on society. As it is, the dodgers may never be able to get 
jobs and become productive citizens," he said. 

Not all students were jn favor of amnesty in any form, 
though. 

Some said they feel the draft evaders are cowards and 



should be banned from the country, or serve time in prison if 
allowed back into the country. 

"If there was some way to separate the moral conviction- 
ists from the cowards, I would be in favor of the amnesty 
plan," one student said. "The main problem with amnesty is 
that if a situation like Viet Nam ever arose again, everybody 
would split, moral conviction or no moral conviction." 

A consensus among students and veterans seemed to be 
the war was senseless and immoral, with the government at | 
fault for continuing it. 

"Dodgers should be allowed back in the country because 
the men were between 1 8 and 26 years old and did some- 
thing they believed in," Greeley said. "Many people fought in 
the war without conviction, but those who fled the country | 
were following their convictions ; — so they are morally right. 
Too many people do things they don't believe in." 

"A person should reproduce in society, and he can't by 
dying in wars he doesn't even believe in," he added. "If a | 
person fought in the war with convictions, he should be . 
respected as much as the resister who did not fight because 
of convictions. 

"The government is trying to buy off families of the 
deceased with insurance policies to compensate monetarily | 
for the deaths. 

"Social work for the resisters is definitely not the answer as 
far as the conditional aspect goes," Greeley said. "For one 
thing, it costs taxpayers more money. If the persons who are 
granted amnesty come back and have a record, it will be like 
equal opportunity employment with jobs. Pretty soon they 
will be standing in the unemployment lines, and businesses 
will be forced to hire them against their will — causing even 
more problems than this country already has with equal 
opportunities." 



•Amnesty 



Amnesty — 1 07 






WmB&MHBBm 



Step right up, 
choose a club 

Mass confusion. 

Anyone in the Union on September 
8 may have described it as such. Piles 
and piles of kids with smiles — trying 
to buy you. That's the Activities Carni- 
val, where organizations expose them- 
selves to the harsh examination of stu- 
dents. 

All too often these clubs are specifi- 
cally group oriented, no longer cater- 
ing to the average student. For exam- 
ple, only second semester sopho- 
mores in practical politics may join the 
Scrutinizing Statespersons. Hard to 
believe, but that's what you're up 
against, as many clubs put stipulations 
on curriculum, classification, or sex of 
the potential member. 

Pershing Rifles, a men's honorary, 
is offered to men enrolled in ROTC. Or, 
if you are enrolled in pre-nursing, 
there is a club to help further that inter- 
est. 

But what about the pacifistic kid 
who faints at the sight of blood? 

The Northern Flint Hills Audubon 
Chapter accepts anyone as a member 
and you don't even have to be a mem- 
ber to participate. To the student 
plagued by term papers and tests, the 
prospect of belonging to a club with- 
out devoting hours to bake sales and 
car washes seems long overdue. 

But what if you aren't a nature 
freak? Don't despair, the Center for 
Student Development is still interested 
in you. 

The Counseling Center, in Holtz 
Hall, wants you to "become the per- 
son you want to become", with a little 
help from them. They have counseling 
services in various student-oriented 
areas, like the Study Skills Center. 
What the Center for Student Develop- 
ment has to offer is free — all they ask 
is that you use them. 






ns£ 



■v-, <vrji 



Wk V 



WiJK 



Home Ec mentor slows down 



The resignation of Doretta Hoffman, 
Dean of the College of Home Econom- 
ics, became effective October 1 , 1 974. 
However, the professor of home eco- 
nomics continues to teach and 
research at K-State. 

Hoffman chose to resign for health 
reasons. A long-time sufferer from 
chronic bronchitis, her lung weakness 
was further aggravated two years ago 
by virus pneumonia. 

She is on oxygen at least 1 8 hours a 
day. Oxygen treatment units in her 
office, home, and car allow daily 
mobility, safety, and comfort. Since 
the oxygen treatment is unnecessary 
for six hours of her day, she tries to 
plan her schedule accordingly. 

Though not on a regular teaching 



basis, the former dean assists in the 
instruction of home economics 
classes. She occasionally takes the 
mobile unit into class with her. "When 
I know I'll be talking for the whole ses- 
sion, I take it along," she said. 

Hoffman was graduated from the 
University of Nebraska in 1941 with a 
bachelor's degree. In 1943 she 
received her master's from Michigan 
State, and in 1949 her doctorate from 
Cornell University. 

Over the years, Hoffman has made 
distinguished contributions in home 
economics from K-State to the interna- 
tional levels. Still in charge of the 
research program, Hoffman acts as 
administrative advisor for two regional 
technical committees. 



108 — Short features 



Whitewashing illuminates K-Hill 



"Okay, let's move everybody over to 
the 'K' and finish it, then we'll work on 
the'S'." 

Armed with sledge hammers, rakes, 
axes, brooms, and 50-pound bags of 
lime, members of Tau Beta Pi, K-State 
engineering honorary, withstood high 
winds and low temperatures on a fall 
afternoon to brighten the lettering on 
K-Hill. 

Ropes were secured to trucks at the 
top of the hill and lowered over the let- 
ters. With the rope knotted around 
their waists mini-mountain climbers 
moved gradually over the letters, or at 
least that was the idea. 

Sometimes knots weren't tight 
enough, and like sled riders on snowy 
inclines, the students slid down the 
massive 'KS'. Bodies not spirits were 
bruised as the members continually 
joked about their failure. 

"Did you figure out the angle of 
momentum on that fall?" 

"Yeah, how about your angle of 
approach?" 

"Too damn high, you clowns." 

In 1929 the 'K' was built, and it 
stood alone on the hill until 1 934 when 
the 'S' was added. The engineers 
adopted the annual whitewashing pro- 
ject in the early 30s. 

Whitewashing wasn't the only job 
tackled this year. Students with rakes, 
hoes, and clippers cleared brush 



between the letters, while others 
swung sledge hammers to remove old 
layers of whitewash. In areas where 
the letters had been vandalized with 
red paint, the clean-up was anything 
but easy. At times hard work led to 
despair, but the jovial attitudes of co- 
workers helped to lighten the load. 
. "This is a hopeless cause." 

"Aw hell, you just don't swing hard 
enough." 

"You should have been here last 
year. There was a big TNE in black 
paint in this corner of the 'K'. Now, 
that was hard to clean! When we put 
down the whitewash, it turned a nice 
shade of gray." 

"My brother helped clean it the year 
the class of 1 969 painted both letters 
just enough to make them look like 
'6& instead of 'KS'." 

Obviously, the familiar landmark has 
quite a history of lending itself to 
pranksters. 

Members attempted to envision the 
day the 'KS' was constructed, and 
what the builders may have thought 
the first time it was painted. 

"Probably no one who built this is 
even around." 

"Yep, they're all dead and gone." 

"Well those jerks! And they leave us 
to clean it." 

"That's tradition. Okay, let's move 
everybody over to the 'S' . " 



Union lacks Lincoln's coppers 



Along with shortages of housing 
and gas, a penny shortage struck K- 
State in the fall. The Union found itself 
with only $50 worth of the coins left, 
and was forced to conduct a turn-in 
promotion to build up its supply. 

Students were asked to dump their 
piggy banks and empty their pockets 
of pennies during the first week of 



September to help fight the crunch. 

Bic pens, small soft drinks, and 
reduced rates on recreational facilities 
were offered as incentives, and the 
campaign paid off. 

When the week was over, the Union 
had enough pennies to meet its daily 
requirements, with some extra stored 
for future emergencies. 



Short features — 1 09 



loooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooool 



By Scott Kraft 







mm 



Politic's broken state 
bandaged and healing 

In the eyes of many citizens, the honesty 
level of the US executive branch, and 
government in general, was at a deplor- 
able low in 1974. During the turmoil and 
fact-finding processes created by this 
state, the great American eagle was 
injured. However, what we hope are the 
best political doctors available have 
bandaged the wounds and say they are 
optimistic of a complete recovery. 



Honesty is emerging from a cocoon of turmoil in politics 
today and the vital signs of the country keep fluctuating — 
getting better and worse like a business cycle in an old 
economics textbook. 

Somewhat like these business cycles, and vital signs, 
and honesty — individual citizens are changing because 
of the whimsical moods of congressional representatives. 
Congress' power is becoming far-reaching. 

With the nation's 200th anniversary fast approaching, 
many incumbent members of Congress were being merci- 
lessly slaughtered in primary and general elections. 
Apparently, they had outlived their usefulness. 

Traditional methods of campaigning, persuading, and 
investigating were brought under fire — most of them fell 
to the inertia of the people. 

A feeling began to permeate the country — one which 
caused the electorate to look for the person with integrity 
and honesty, qualities too long obscured from election 
criteria. 

"I don't agree with his opinions but I'll vote for him 
because I know he is honest," seemed to be a popular 
attitude. 

The age of unprosecuted graft had come to an end for 
the country — or at least it had started to subside by 
autumn, and milk money held some of the limelight during 
the year. A special committee was appointed by the Sen- 
ate to study the possibility of illegal monetary dealings by 
political parties in the 1972 elections — particularly presi- 
dential elections. 

After Watergate, other campaigns were studied by this 
ad hoc committee, and although they did not make center 
stage as did Watergate, they were indicative of the type of 
politicking America had supported. Names such as 
George McGovern, Hubert Humphrey, and others pro- 
truded when illegal contributions were investigated. 

And out of this hodge-podge of haphazard investigating 
came campaign financing legislation. While Senate inves- 
tigating committees were building an impressive case 
against individual campaigners, the Senate was trying to 
find ways to avoid an encore of graft. 

Campaign spending and financing legislation never 
squeaked out of Qongress. Apparently the average politi- 
cian was not honest in the eyes of the people. 

In the midst of all this muck came the greatest muck of 
all. This muck was so outstanding it held the front pages 
across the country for almost a full year. Watergate, or as 
some called it — Nixon's Watergate — came in like a 
barefoot Indian and went out like a 200-pound basketball 
player with size 22 shoes. It might have been Nixon's 
Watergate but it was the country's problem. 

After the dust surrounding Watergate had cleared, 
Nixon was still visible, for several reasons. 

Until the Senate committee investigating 1972 elections 
uncovered now infamous names, such as John Dean III, 
H. R. Haldeman, Egil Krogh, John Ehrlichman, and E. 



110 — Political analysis 



ooooooooo< 



Howard Hunt, Nixon was untouched. Then all of the Presi- 
dent's persons started talking. Plumbers, ex-CIA agents, 
Cubans, lawyers, and aides were among those ratting on 
Watergate. Only one, Erlichman, seemed to show any 
backbone or hostility toward the committee during the tel- 
evised hearings. Summer reruns had little chance during 
that summer. 

A year later another show, live from Washington, DC, 
was taking marathon television time. That was the House 
of Representatives' Judiciary Committee hearings on the 
articles of impeachment. Those articles were leveled 
against Nixon, whose stature in the United States and the 
world was shrinking. 

Not long before the committee returned its verdict on all 
articles of impeachment, the committee had made the 
crucial first article vote. The committee requested the 
House to vote for impeachment of the President — possi- 
bly the second time in our history a president would face 
impeachment procedures. 

Headlines during this fateful summer read "Nixon Vows 
to Stay in Office" and "Nixon Will Not Resign." In August, 
Nixon resigned, becoming the first president to do so. And 
in picking his vice president, Nixon was also the first Presi- 
dent to actually chose his successor. 

Nixon hand-picked Gerald Ford, House minority leader, 
as the vice presidential nominee after the February resig- 
nation of Spiro Agnew. Nixon's choice was confirmed, 
and Ford began an uncontroversial role as the President's 
clean right-hand person. 

Admittedly, before Ford's nomination it seemed the 
Nixon hierarchy had been all but destroyed by Watergate. 
Only a few of Nixon's better cabinet and staff members 
were untouched by the event, and Henry Kissinger 
remained the status quo hero. 

After the abrupt changing of the guards in the White 
House, Ford glided in. He appeared not too bright, not too 
dumb, not too controversial, and not too apathetic. His 
rapport with former colleagues in Congress was perhaps 
Ford's best credential for the job. 

This rapport was in contrast to the running feud Nixon 
shared with the Congress. It seemed Ford could draft sim- 
ilar proposals to Nixon's yet have relative certainty they 
would be adhered to or agreed upon. Some said it was not 
so much because the proposals were good, but because 
of a "Jerry is one of us" attitude. 

However, Ford soon terminated his August honeymoon 
with the American people and began a nightmare of con- 
troversy. Oddly enough, Ford's first source of controversy 
related to Nixon. Ford granted Nixon a complete executive 
pardon in early September for any crimes committed dur- 
ing Nixon's presidency. Nixon's health was in question, 
and Ford said he wanted to take the Watergate matter out 
of the public limelight forever. 

Nelson Rockefeller, a liberal Republican millionaire, was 
chosen as Ford's vice presidential nominee. Ford said he 
chose Rocky so that both conservative and liberal Repub- 
licans would be represented in the Executive branch. 

The probability of his confirmation, however, went from 



1 00 per cent at the time of Ford's announcement to less 
than 50 per cent when newspapers reported that Rocke- 
feller owed almost $1 million in back taxes. 

After payment of his obligation, Rockefeller was con- 
firmed as vice president of the United States. 

In retrospect, it can be said these seemed like hard 
times of decision for the American people. 

Some columnists who said they believed Nixon's not 
guilty plea shed honest tears when Nixon's resignation 
and tapes indicated his involvement in the coverup. 

President Nixon did not, it should be noted, ever admit 
personal guilt for covering up any of the Watergate scan- 
dal; however, he did admit bad judgment on his part. Pre- 
sumably, this bad judgment occurred when Nixon chose 
staff members who were, as he called them, overzealous. 

Americans seemed both shocked and amazed, not so 
much at the content of the tapes, but by the language 
used by the President of the United States. On the tapes, 
Nixon called some of his longtime friends names which 
repulsed many Americans and "expletive deleted" was 
used by many humorists in the country. 

Nixon's honesty, which often came under close scru- 
tiny by many groups — including ministers, evangelists, 
politicians, columnists, and investigative reporters — 
caused a panic in the country. Stock market averages fell 
while other, not so obvious indicators of the country's 
mood, also dropped. 

Anything big or massive was dishonest and lacked 
integrity, or so thought some Americans at this time. Oil 
companies bore the brunt of much of this abuse. For 
many years oil prices were kept artificially low, and when 
the ceiling was raised, so was the roof. 

Many big billy clubs started coming down on heads of 
oil companies because some said the oil companies were 
making too much money. Perhaps the biggest sticks 
came flying from Ralph Nadarized federal government 
agencies. For example, Mobil Oil Corporation was not 
allowed to advertise on a national television network 
because of station disapproval, not public. 

Big businesses were castigated by the people for over- 
spending, alleged mishandling of funds, and overall dis- 
honesty. Labor unions, to a lesser degree, also had their 
hands slapped. Governmental overspending was never 
seriously considered as a causal factor of inflation by 
many people until Ford took office. 

The year was for the people. Although citizens were 
sometimes being led by their emotions, it never appeared 
to be unwillingly. Achievers were castigated while non- 
achievers were tolerated. And those fortunate souls who 
attacked the achievers were lauded and became the lead- 
ers. 

What holds true today will not necessarily hold true 
tomorrow but a trend can be noted. The age of the lauded 
industrialist and achiever is passing by and conniving 
back-stabbers have taken the throne. 

And what is worse — money, a definitive value of a per- 
son's worth, has become a bad word. And that — it 
appears — is not an optimistic outlook. 



Political analysis — 




112 — Homecoming 




Crepe-paper Willies soak up Homecoming week 



By Jeff Funk 

Bobby socks, zoot suits, apple hats, 
and saddle shoes. 

Nostalgia flowed through Home- 
coming 1 974. An interesting combina- 
tion of tradition and today, the celebra- 
tion honored K-State's retiring admin- 
istrator, James A. McCain. Two cou- 
ples — not one queen — wearing 
[clothes of the 1920s, were honored 
along with McCain on the pre-game 
football field Saturday, November 9. 

•The biggest part of the week-long 
celebration was not on Saturday after- 
noon but almost a week before when 
he Homecoming Couples were 
selected. Five couples, dressed in 

lothes of the 1 920s and 1 950s, sang 
yesteryear's songs and entertained a 
Hacked Forum Hall. The McCains saw 



their history unfold before them as 
finalists performed such acts as 
"McCain Melodies from the Tuneful 
Twenties" and "Play it Again, Jim". 

Bow ties and beads gave way to 
blue jeans as students in fraternities, 
sororities, and residence halls finished 
house decorations. Wood, nails, crepe 
paper, and tempera paint depicted 
purple and white wildcats mutilating 
black and orange cowboys. Pokes 
were corralled and cooked, run 
through and run over, kicked and 
crushed, and flushed down the river. 

Friday night, block-long lines of cars 
snaked through the campus as stu- 
dents and townspeople toured the ani- 
mated decorations — a tradition 
renewed. 

Saturday, game day, was not the 
highlight of the week. In fact, it was a 



drippy disaster, as the cold rain 
poured throughout the day. The usu- 
ally enthusiastic marching band 
walked onto the field in heavy, yellow 
raincoats and marched through their 
routine — though many members did 
not carry instruments. The alumni 
marching band, a Homecoming peren- 
nial, joined the wet misery at half-time. 

In completing the afternoon fiasco, 
the football team lost to Oklahoma 
State.. But, few people were at the 
game anyway. Because of the 
weather, attendance hit a seasonal 
low. 

The K-State Players helped salvage 
the weekend, however, with its superb 
production of "Fiddler on the Roof". 
Fiddler received excellent reviews and 
was a fitting close to a week of tradi- 
tion. 



Homecoming — 113 



mm 



While students of the 60s demonstrated against Viet Nam; 
and for peace, love, and long hair, their 70s counterparts in' 
Kansas schools took on student wages and landlord-tenant! 
legislation. Although Walter Cronkite didn't pick up onl 
these rallies for use on his evening news, ASK did make; 
waves on Kansas plains. 

ASK, ye shall receive . . . maybe 



Student of the public colleges and 
universities in Kansas began making 
their political clout felt during the 74- 
75 school year through a group known 
as the Associated Students of Kansas. 

Concerned students from all 
schools under control of the Board of 
Regents, except the University of Kan- 
sas, concentrated their efforts toward 
promoting bills in the state legislature 
that would benefit students. 

Financed through a 25 cent per stu- 
dent line item, ASK rallied behind a bill 
defining landlord-tenant rights, one 
creating a student advisory board to 
the Board of Regents, and a bill requir- 
ing minimum wage for students. In 
addition, the group supported a guar- 
anteed loan program for students. 

Although only in its second year, 
ASK received a favorable reception 
from the legislature, and particularly 
from Gov. Robert Bennett. 

Recognizing the importance of the 
student vote in his narrow victory, 
Bennett expressed his gratitude by 
endorsing both the student advisory 
board and the landlord-tenant bills. 

About 1 5 students from K-State took 
a more active role during early March 
by spending a day in Topeka lobbying 
for the bills. They talked personally 
with legislators from their home dis- 
tricts, attended workshops, and talked 
with officials including Rep. Martha 
Keys and Sen. James Pearson. 

But despite an encouraging recep- 
tion from lawmakers, ASK representa- 
tives were given a lesson in the fine art 
of compromise. 

Even Bennett's endorsement of the 
landlord-tenant bill didn't insure its 



passage. He encouraged lobbyists to 
be receptive to change. 

"I'd hate to see it thrown out 
because of inflexibility," he said. 

Then the students learned that the 
bill might never get past the House 
Judiciary committee, simply because iti 
was sponsored only by Democrats., 
Portions of the bill were predicted to j 
show up later in Republican-spon- 
sored measures. 

Opposition also developed on 
another front. An amendment was pro- 1 
posed to the Regent student advisory 
board bill which would replace the stu- 
dents with a board made up of the fac- 
ulty senate presidents of the six state 
schools. 

Bennett admitted that opponents of; 
the bill had a viable argument, saying 
that if students were granted such an 
advisory board to the Regents other 
groups (faculty, minorities) would 
soon be requesting similar input. 

"They're saying 'if we start here 
where do we stop'?" Bennett 
explained. 

Legislators generally maintained a 
noncommittal attitude, citing a needj 
for more information before they could 
make decisions. 

Overall though, ASKers termed their 
lobbying efforts successful. 

One state senator summed up the 
attitude of the group when he com- 
mended ASK on its accomplishments 
of the past year. 

"When students start realizing that 
they are 50,000 strong, they can start 
getting things done," he said. 

ASK is getting things done. 




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ASK— 115 



Mundane lifestyles offered alter-options by UFM 



Alternatives Week, March 3 through 
6, was more than tour days of discus- 
sions, lectures, presentations, panels, 
and films. It was an attempt to make 
participants aware of the need for 
change, and to present them with pos- 
sible alternatives to the status quo. 

Topics were channeled into four 
main categories: people to people, 
political/social, education, and 
energy. Sponsored by University for 
Man, each day's category was com- 
prised of several activities. 

The people to people category dealt 
with several concepts, including the 
family, death, sexuality, and philoso- 
phy. Some of the topics were the 
Lamaze method of childbirth, the 
black man and dying, suicidology, 
human sexuality, transactional analy- 
sis, death and dying, "Future Shock", 
and women's health care. 

On the political/social level, partici- 
pants discussed the threat of urban 
decay. Alternatives were presented to 
counter the problems of revenue shar- 
ing, urban renewal, inner-city decay, 
model cities, and the effects of the 
poor on community decisions. 

The power and responsibility of the 



consumer to "blow the whistle" on the 
consumer-abusing companies was 
covered by members of the Consumer 
Relations Board and Social Accounta- 
bility of Industry following a film featur- 
ing Ralph Nader. 

An optimistic alternative, Utopian 
politics, was presented and discussed 
in terms of political science, philoso- 
phy, literature, and economics. 

Through the subject of death and 
dying, participants attempted to dis- 
cover alternatives to present condi- 
tions which rob people of the right to 
death. They discussed euthanasia, 
brain death, legal ambiguities, motive, 
and lifeboat ethics. 

The final topic dealt with the Kent 
State tragedy during the summer of 
1 970. A documentary film of the actual 
incident reconstructed the event and 
provided a basis for discussion of the 
use of military force in police actions, 
dissent, and the United States justice 
system. 

The education category dealt mainly 
with trends toward change in our edu- 
cational system. The concepts of the 
open classroom, ungraded schools, 
and competency-based education 



were presented. Also considered were 
contributory factors to sex-role stereo- 
typing in the classroom, and the 
recent history and evolution of drug 
abuse education. There were discus- 
sions of the ideas of non-traditional 
study, such as universities without 
walls, open learning systems, credit for 
experience, and college at home. 

The final category of energy 
included a little food for thought: a 25- 
cent meal which exemplified the possi- 
bility of tasty, nutritious low-cost 
meals. Discussion of the food crisis 
throughout the world focused on dis- 
tribution, production, processing, and 
nutritional aspects of food. 

The energy crisis was met with dis- 
cussion of natural resources, energy 
production, governmental action, anc 
alternative energy sources. Partici- 
pants also considered the problems o 
population explosion and the alterna 
tive foods and energy supplementec 
discussions. 

A March 4 arts and crafts fair set uj 
in the Union let artists and craftsper 
sons exhibit and sell their merchan 
dise, demonstrating the trend fron: 
defined job roles to alternative careers 




116 — Alternatives Week 







Alternatives Week — 117 



Majors — another rubber stamp in ink pad of life 



By Judy Puckett 

Ever since we were children, most of us have been victims 
of assumptions. We are continuously cast into categories 
and classes in which we don't belong. Like disheveled coats 
on the rack, labels are hung on us as individuals because we 
are associated with a certain group. 

Remember how it was in sixth grade when you got an A on 
the geography test, and everyone else flunked? Immediately, 
you were "the brain" or "teacher's pet". No one would 
believe you were just a good guesser. 

Society has molded us to believe certain characteristics 
coincide with specific roles in life. Truck drivers are red 
necks. Librarians are frigid. Athletes are something less than 
intelligent. Insurance salespersons are crooked. Politicians 
are liars. Interior decorators are homosexual. The list is end- 
less. Almost every occupation has its set of idiosyncrasies 
which have been tacked on after surface observation by a 
blind society. 

Since it is something of a small society in itself — a people 
set apart — a university becomes fertile breeding ground for 
further stereotyping. 

The institution itself begins categorizing immediately. 
Through university records, students are dumped into vari- 
ous categories their first semester. Living group, religion, 
ethnic background, age, and financial status. If a student 
was a member of Zeta Zeta Zeta, Catholic, Chicano, 27 
years, and on a scholarship, Admissions and Records would 
have a heyday. They'd have created a taco-eating, Greek, 
anti-abortionist spinster who was on welfare. Why else would 
she apply for a scholarship? 

Unfortunately, the establishment is not alone in its need- 
less classifying. One of the greatest cases of mistaken identi- 
ties which students undergo is one they inflict upon them- 
selves — classification by major. 

Home economics and agricultural majors suffer the most 
from these alleged characteristics they supposedly all share. 

If she's a home ec major, she's really at school to get a 
MRS. degree. Not that the education will hurt, by any means 
. . . it's good training for becoming a wife and mother. Cer- 
tainly, the gpas in this curriculum are high. How hard is it to 
learn how to bake a cake or make an apron? Don't let her 
fool you if she says she'd like to work as a nutritionist when 
she graduates. We know she's just learning how to cook so 
she can trap a man. 



You can always tell an ag major when he walks through 
the Union — there's a certain air about him. Of course we all 
know "he growed up on a farm", and this is his first visit to 
the city, so we'll excuse that funny smelling mud on his 
boots. 

While everybody else is at Aggieville Saturday nights, the 
ag majors gather 'round their fish bowls at Mels, and talk 
about tractors. Some day they all hope to meet a nice home 
ec major, and settle down back at the ranch. (Better start 
looking elsewhere, fellas, everybody knows home ec majors 
are prudish, you'll never find them in a bar.) 

Of course you'll never find a pre-med student down there 
either, but for different reasons. He's studying. Or pricking 
somebody's finger for a sample of AB positive. Or injecting a 
serum into a helpless white rat. This is the 4.0 kid who rents a 
room on third floor Farrell. He had scholarship offers his sen- 
ior year in high school the way most kids had acne. He 
spends four years booking like a workhorse to get accepted 
to medical school. Because of this, we never see him, but we 
know he's there — somebody's been checking books out of 
the library. 

Somebody besides the pre-law major, that is. You know, 
the kid who's served four years on student senate saying, "I 
second it". The only thing she can talk about is how terrific 
she did on her law exams, and how it's "simply horrible" to 
wait for replies from the 1 98 schools she applied to. No mat- 
ter what the topic of conversation may be, she'll throw in 
some fancy jargon like "breach of privilege", "the Supreme 
Court denying certiorari", and obtaining a writ of habeas cor- 
pus". She's out to impress, and no doubt will be a fine 
lawyer one day since she can convince her audience she 
knows what she's talking about. And that's one of the main 
prerequisites for lawyers, right? 

So, K-State has its share of bookworms, the classifiers 
have made sure of that. And to keep things balanced, 
they've seen to it that there are plenty of students majoring in 
general. General what? No one knows for sure, but we do 
know that these are the kids who are crowding the class- 
rooms and causing boosts in tuition costs. We also know 
they did not come to school to learn, they came to play. It's 
much more fun than finding a job or studying, and besides, 
Daddy's paying for it. These kids have no real aim for the 
next four years, except getting out of 43 hours of incom- 
pletes. But, that should keep them busy. 



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118 — Curriculum images 







Curriculum images — 119 




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1 20 — Nichols Gymnasium 





First spark ignites raging blaze 
that burns long after ashes cool 



It was a spectacular blaze when 
Nichols Gymnasium burned in 1967, 
but in the eight years since, the heat 
generated by arguments about what to 
do with its ashes has almost equaled 
the temperature ot the original fire. 

Everyone had an opinion about 
what should be done with the gloomy 
remains on the northern edge of cam- 
pus, and very few of them coincided. 
Should the stone shell be torn down to 
make room for campus expansion, or 
should it be restored? 

Specialists wrangled about the fea- 
sibility of putting more weight on the 
weakened structure, and administra- 
tion officials bemoaned the expense 
involved. Students and alumni pro- 
tested the loss of the landmark. 

But despite the varying opinions, 
one fact was clear — something had 
to be done. 

The perennial problem seemed to 
be coming to a close this year, though. 



A solution appeared at hand when 
Gordon Parks, renowned artist, 
author, and composer, donated a col- 
lection of his works to K-State. Unfor- 
tunately, there was no place to put the 
photographs and manuscripts. 

By converting Nichols into a combi- 
nation art gallery and art department, 
both problems would be solved. Archi- 
tects drew up plans for the renovation, 
and the long wait was almost at an 
end. Even President James A. McCain 
gave his approval to the project. 

But bureaucratic red tape delayed 
the project. The required feasibility 
studies were delayed because no one 
signed a request for them. 

In a final touch of irony, specialists 
estimated that the ruins could be reno- 
vated in as little as nine months. 

So, although the future of Nichols 
Gymnasium is still not completely cer- 
tain, a solution seems well on its way. 



Nichols Gymnasium — 121 



Unfunny pranksters never will surpass puberty 



By Ura Sucker 

Everyone has to have known one of 
these clowns. You remember, corny 
old Ima Cutie and how about Chuckles 
A. Plenty? He was that creep in eighth 
grade who always pulled your chair 
from under you just as the teacher 
walked in. His obnoxious laugh still 
echos in your ears each time your 
back goes out on you. 

But you can find comfort for your 
aches because all of those slap-stick- 
ers and their crummy jokes have been 
phased out of your life. Or have they? 
Hate to break it to you like this, but I 
had dinner with Ima at the dorm yes- 
terday. Couldn't believe it myself, but 
between the roast beef and cauliflower 
— sure enough, it was corn all the 
way! 

"Hi, guy! How's tricks? Remember 
your old pal?" 

"Can't say as I do. I'm sorry . . ." 

"Well, I'm Ima! Yuk, yuk, snort! Glad 
to meet you, Sorry!" she said, cleverly. 

"Ima? Ima Cutie from home? Well, 
I'll be.damned," I stuttered, foolishly. 

"Probably will be, you old Sardine!" 

God, I hadn't seen this drip for over 
five years and in five minutes she had 
successfully set me up for two of the 
most basic of all puns. My snappy 
comebacks and dodges wereobvi- 
ously rusty. But then I hadn't needed 
them since the last meeting with Ima. 
By the time we reached a table, the 
corn queen was ready to roll. 



"Want to hear a dirty story?" 

"Sure," I replied, innocently think- 
ing that her humor might have 
matured after all. 

"A white horse fell into a mud pud- 
dle!" 

"Yea, go ahead. I'm listening." 

"That's it! A white horse falls into a 
mud puddle. Get it?" More yuks and 
snorts. 

She'd done it again and we hadn't 
even pulled out our chairs yet. Just for 
safe keeping, I turned around before 
sitting down to make sure Chuckles 
wasn't behind me waiting to jerk the 
chair from under me. 

Quickly evaluating the situation, I 
realized the score was three to zip. I 
had to shake my old defenses out of 
the moth balls and block a few puns. 

Ima's eyes glazed over — I knew 
another rush was coming my way. 

"You'll never guess what i got for 
Christmas this year!" 

Christmas? Maybe I had my signals 
mixed up. Glazed eyes — sick joke. It 
just had to be . . . but Christmas? 

"I got a 'damattababie'," she 
blurted. 

"What's a damattababie?" Once it 
was out of my mouth, I wanted to 
erase it. 

"Not a much. What's a da matta wid 
you?" 

A real knee slapper, but at least I 
had seen it coming. For sure, the next 
one was going to be mine. No more of 
this grin and bear it stuff. She started 



in again. 

"Hey, did you hear about the witch 
who was walking the street and . . ." 

"And turned into a drug store? Yea, 
I heard about that," I retorted. 

Bless your heart, Henny Youngman! 
That zonker really stripped Ima's 
gears. And now that she was momen- 
tarily in neutral, I started to return her 
fire. 

"Did you know they're going to 
make a movie by combining 'Earth- 
quake!' and Towering Inferno'?" 

"Show? Towering what . . .?" she 
asked, still stunned by my earlier blow. 

"Yea, they're going to call it 'Shake 
'nBake'!" 

"Shook 'ner. . .huh?" 

Touched She was shook all right. 
These crummy jokers can't take new 
material. It screws up their Vaudeville 
digestive tracts or something. Anyway 
judging by Ima's numb expression, 
one more cunningly calculated teaser 
would just about plant the queen of 
corn. 

"Know why Polocks bury their dead 
ass end out? They use them for bicycle 
racks." 

"Ass end out?" 

Forget it sweetheart. You've been 
had! Now I could leave with my head 
up. 

"See you later, alligator!" 

"Yea . . . er, in awhile, crocka . . . 
bicycle racks?" 

Anyone seen Chuckles around 
lately? 



-- 



122 — Yuk, yuk, yuk 






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Yuk, yuk, yuk— 123 



BAW celebrates black culture 



Black Awareness Week 1 975 was a 
"dny-o-mite" affair. The schedule of 
events, from February 23 through 
March 2, included a movie, play, 
dance, art display, talent-fashion 
show, and several speakers — includ- 
ing Jimmie Walker of CBS's "Good 
Times". 

The week got off to a musical start 
with a Religious Day Service in Dan- 
forth Chapel, conducted by Sherwin 
Williams of Omaha. Featured was a 
gospel musicgroup, the McClellan 
Singers, of Kansas City, MO, and 
Donny Gordon of Omaha's Salem 
Baptist Church. 

The movie, "Five on the Black Hand 
Side", was shown at the Union as a 
feature film later that day. 

A Gordon Parks display, art of the 
noted author and film director, was 
displayed in the Union Showcase dur- 
ing the entire week. 

George Riddick, member of the 



national staff of Operation People 
United to Save Humanity, discussed 
the future of black economics and 
Operation PUSH. PUSH was founded 
by Jesse Jackson, civil rights leader. 

Evening Fashion Fair, a talent and 
fashion show filled Forum Hall on 
Wednesday, and K-State graduate and 
art instructor, Leon Hicks, was the fea- 
tured lecturer Thursday. 

Jimmie "J. J." Walker of television 
fame showed three sell-out audiences 
some good times on Friday night. The 
comedian performed along with 
"Jaws", a jazz group. A dance 
reserved Saturday night at the Cat- 
skeller. 

The final activity of the week was the 
award-winning play, "The River 
Niger", presented in the Auditorium by 
the Negro Ensemble Company. The 
play, about a black family in New 
York's Harlem district, won the "best 
play of 1974" award. 



Dirt Band always leaves 'em stompin' for more 



Students were accustomed to 
standing in endless, slow-motion lines 
that seemingly went nowhere. A week 
before it was the afternoon wait in front 
of Ahearn to see the Wildcats play the 
Jayhawks. Then there was the line to 
buy tickets to the Harlem Globetrot- 
ters' game or to see those other guys 
that had done concerts at K-State 
before. And it was in seeing those 
same returning performers that gave 
students yet another opportunity to 
form a line and wait and wait and wait. 

This wait was different. It was 
because the 7 pm concert was still 
going on when the 10 p.m. show 
should have started. But that was all 
right because it meant the first concert 
must have been a good one. 

While other name attractions, such 
as Helen Reddy and Kansas, played to 
"plenty-of-good-tickets-are-still-avail- 
able", first-time audiences, the Nitty 



Gritty Dirt Band continued to pack 'em 
in. On February 13, their fourth con- 
cert at K-State in the last three years 
sold out for two KSU Auditorium 
shows. 

And as before, the crowds loved 
them with both concerts lingering past 
scheduled stopping times. 

Dirt Banders Jeff Hanna, Jim Ibbot- 
son, John McEuen, and Jimmy Fad- 
den, renewed their welcome at "their 
second home" by merely stepping 
onto the stage. Ice-breaker John Hart- 
ford warmed up the crowd with an 
exceptional multi-instrument demon- 
stration but the audience was steam- 
ing for Nitty. When Hartford finished 
an hour later, the sight of the Dirt Band 
was more than welcomed. 

"Cosmic Cowboy" calmed all pre- 
Nitty Gritty nerves but two songs later, 
all hell broke loose on "Battle of New 
Orleans". Ever tried stompin' in an 



auditorium aisle before? 

After that outburst, Hanna 
remarked: "Well, I guess we're back in 
Kansas!" Cries for "Bo Jangles" and 
other favorites were answered with: 
"We'll get to that one later". And they 
did. 

Though switching instruments less 
than in previous K-State showings, the 
Dirt Band proved their versatility with 
country, bluegrass, and 50s samples. 
McEuen even fiddled and leaped his 
way through a Doug Kershaw song. 

Grumbles from non-Nitty Gritty fol- 
lowers over the Band's repeated 
appearances to K-State found space 
in the campus newspaper's letters-to- 
the-editor section. B,ut these ion- 
believers' woes didn't shake m? y. To 
those who had seen the boys p form, 
the reason for their success was obvi- 



1 24 — Short features 



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Candidate tardy for filing date, 
but 'write-in' time with students 



The 1975 SGA presidential election 
was unique in several ways. None of 
the official candidates won. But the 
victor still won by the largest margin in 
the history of the SGA general elec- 
tions. A senior in political science and 
English, Bernard Franklin received a 
record 55 percent of the votes cast in 
the presidential race. 

Not only did Franklin win by a land- 
slide, but he did it as a write-in candi- 
date. Because he did not announce 
his candidacy until the day after the fil- 
ing deadline, Franklin undertook a 
write-in campaign. 

Franklin, who spent two-and-a-half 
years as a student senator and one 
year as a student representative to the 
faculty senate, became the first black 
president of the student body in K- 
State's history. 

Beside the need for creative SGA 
programs, Franklin voiced the urgency 
of lowering educational costs in order 
to encourage °student attendance at 



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four-year institutions. He also 
expressed concern for sports and the 
development of strong academic pro- 
grams. 

Candidate Mike Relihan polled 17 
percent of the vote. An arts and sci- 
ence senator for two years, Relihan's 
primary goal was to maintain the level 
of student fees. He also introduced the 
ideas of a book co-op and a wholesale 
grocery store. 

Amy Button closely trailed Relihan 
with 1 6 percent of the vote. The only 
female candidate, Button previously 
spent two-and-a-half years as an arts 
and science senator and acted as 
chairperson of the senate operations 
committee. 

Button proposed an alternative to 
the present advising system and 
focused largely on sports issues that 
included physical education require- 
ments, credit for varsity sports, and 
non-revenue sports funding. She also 
advocated the lowest presidential sal- 
ary. 

Bill Nichols, a senior in political sci- 
ence, polled 10 percent of the vote. 
Relatively inexperienced in senate, 
Nichols thought of himself as an 
"alternative to senators with struc- 
tured" beliefs. 

He cited the election issues as being 
the advising system, the proposed fee 
waiver for certain students, non-reve- 
nue sports, faculty merit increases, 
faculty tenure, reappointment review, 
and social work accreditation. 



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Perpetual procrastinators produce little but pains 



Few things irritate conscientious 
students more than staying up all night 
finishing a project only to hear the kid 
next to them in class the next day 
sweetly explain to the teacher how he 
just didn't have enough time to tinish 
the project, but will try to pull it out 
over the weekend. 

Most college students recognize this 
kid, some on a more personal level 
than others. This patriot ot not- 
enough-time seems to strike in at least 
one class every semester. 

Few of these persons who have 
fought a losing battle with Father Time 
restrict their laments to the lecture hall 
however. As their enough-time coun- 
terparts breeze through the Union for 
a Coke on their way to the library 
(which will be followed by a meeting to 
help plan Architecture Open House), 
they often note the timeless lamenter 
slumped in a cafeteria chair, on the 
juke-box side of the State Room, play- 
ing a fast game of poker among Coke- 
less, ash-filled cups. Where is aca- 
demic justice? 

A few years back, when standing in 



the high school guidance counselor's 
office deciding one's fate, high school 
kids gave their solemn oath to the prin- 
cipal, Mom and Dad, and themselves: 
"Yes I will do well at the University. I 
will buy my books, read them, go to 
class, make you proud." 

However, a few weeks into that fate- 
ful first freshman semester, the 4.0 
gpa diversions arise. To some they 
begin and end in Aggieville; to others, 
with the first momentous "yes, I'll do 
it" at a committee meeting; and to oth- 
ers, with the persecuted attitude of 
"I'm the only kid who has ever had it 
this rough, I can't get everything 
done". 

But there are those students who 
defy the odds. They are involved in 
extracurricular activities, active in their 
living groups, and maintain a respecta- 
ble gpa. Discounting the possibility 
that these wrist watch wizards are 
granted 28-hour days from some spirit 
above, their productivity ability may 
stem partially from childhood training, 
then mature management. 



As a ten-year-old, the conscientious 
student was probably one of those 
kids on the block who had to practice 
the piano 30 minutes every day, think- 
ing between simplistic melodies that 
everybody, just everybody else in the 
world was out playing in the street. 
Although few of these early keyboard 
students are today rivaling Elton John, 
their childhood practice sessions may 
have served to help them organize 
their later-life time: if it was possible at 
age ten to practice the piano, play in 
the neighborhood clubhouse, eat, and 
attend school, it is now possible at age 
20 to be on arts and science council, 
play in Aggieville occasionally, rely on 
McDonalds for nourishment, and 
attend most classes. 

This timeless question has no 
answer, the problem doesn't disap- 
pear after leaving the classroom. Ten 
years hence, the conscientious person 
will still be tormented, as he rushes to 
an executive-level meeting, by the 
lamenters hanging around the water 
cooler. 



126 — Time 





Time — 127 



Vendo: the most misunderstood machine in town 



By Dennis Christesen 



A young man enters the room with his girlfriend adhered to 
his side. 

People are scattered around the room — most of them sit- 
ting, some standing. Several look up to see the young cou- 
ple, but only for a few seconds; most have already tried their 
luck with the machines. 

This is a familiar place to the young man. He comes here 
often. Sometimes he's lucky, sometimes he's not. 

But he feels lucky today. 

Approaching one of the many machines, he digs deep into 
his pocket, bringing out a few coins. He doesn't have much 
money. 

Sorting out two coins, the young man reaches toward the 
machine and inserts the coins in the deposit coins slot. 

"Wait, Dave!" someone shouts. 

It was Stu, one of Dave's friends, who rushes to Dave. 

"That machine's a money eater, Dave," Stu says. "I lost 
40 in it awhile ago." 

"Really?" In a way, Dave seems relieved he was stopped, 
but he is also disappointed. He bites his lip. "I'm going ahead 
and take a chance." 

"But — " Stu is speechless. Dave's girlfriend continues to 
remain silent. 

"You must have confidence in these machines," Dave 
says. 

His hand slowly reaches for the insert slot again, pausing 
slightly before dropping the coins into the machine. 

The machine makes a noise as Dave pulls one of its han- 
dles. His girlfriend tightens her grip on his arm, anxious to 
see what, if anything, will come out of the machine. 

Another noise from the machine is heard, and soon some- 
thing drops out into the delivery tray. 

Dave's girlfriend finally speaks. 

"Oh, my M&M Plains. Thank you, Dave." 

The setting of this scenario was not in a gambling casino, 
or even a penny arcade. 

Instead, Dave was taking his gamble with a Union vending 
machine, not a slot machine. And Stu was referring to a loss 
of 40 cents, not 40 grand. 

Dave represents the students who at sometime during 
their years at K-State gamble with a vending machine. He 
then, probably represents the entire student population. 

No matter where you go on campus, vending machines 
are there. The K-State Union concessions department owns 
and operates approximately 120 of them, not including pop 
machines the Union oversees. Automated venders are found 



in so many locations it would be simpler to list the places not 
having them rather than those which do. 

Vending machines are available where students attend 
classes, prepare for classes, get away from studies, or where 
some live. Because of the students who depend on vending 
machines, it's important to keep these machines well-sup- 
plied and in good running order. 

People like Stu may get disgusted with vending machines. 
But, no person is perfect, so why should people-assembled 
machines be perfect? These people call the machines money 
eaters and other names not found in a Webster's New World 
Dictionary. This blasphemy doesn't produce the product or 
money desired. 

Instead, persons gypped by vending machines should call 
the Concessions Department or fill out a refund slip at the 
location of the machines. 

"Over $700 in refunds were made to K-Staters during the 
last fiscal year," Vaughn Hart, Union concessions manager, 
said. 

"We respond quicker than most vending machine opera- 
tors," he said. "We've done a pretty good job in getting 
refunds back, but there are a few areas where we could do 
better yet." 

Hart says he considers the purpose of his department as 
providing the K-State campus with a quality vending service. 

Vending machines never say, "May I help you" or "Thank 
you", but they do provide quick service. 

A wide variety of goods await the drop of the goin and 
push of the button in these machines: soft drinks, candy, cig- 
arettes, frozen novelties, coffee, milk, cold food, potato chips 
and similar snacks, stamps, washing soap, ball point pens, 
and change. 

The prices of vending-machine products, like most every- 
thing else, are being affected by inflation. Gum and Lifesav- 
ers are two of the lower-priced cavity formers peddled by 
vending machines, going for the low, low price of 1 cents. 
But how much longer will it be until a pack of Dentyne goes 
for 1 5 cents? At that price it would almost be cheaper to go 
home and brush your teeth after meals. 

Nickel and dime candy bars are a thing of the past. With 
sugar prices at enormous heights, 1 5-cent candy bars are 
expected to jump to 20 cents. 

Many popular-name candy bars have been absent from K- 
State vending machines for some time. Hart attributes this to 
those candy companies no longer making 1 5-cent candy 
bars for which the machines are equipped. So get ready to 
say hello to the 20-cent candy bar. For that price, it ought to 
say "hello" back to you. 



1 28 — Vending machines 









Vending machines — 1 29 



Nostalgiaishoobe-dooin'is back 

By Linda Reed 



Connoisseurs of the cinema know it. 
Retailers have adopted it. Music mak- 
ers are transposing their composing 
because of it. 

It's called nostalgia. A longing for 
the past, a homesickness for what 
was. Simplicity. 

Students are looking to the past, not 
to the future. On campus there are 
fewer causes and faded blue jeans, 
and more relaxing and baggie trou- 
sers. P-arties lean toward the 50s, 
away from the sensuous 70s. Dooms- 
day-predicting science fiction has 
stepped aside for post-Depression 
flicks in the movie houses. 

When the pilgrimage to the past 
started, why it has stayed, where it is 
headed doesn't matter. It just is. 

The forerunner of the nostalgia 
movement has to be the 50s. Duck 
tails, grease, bobby sox, ponytails, 
Fabian, grease, Chevy coupes, 
chains, and more grease. Living 
groups constantly throw 50s parties, 
hopping and bopping to old 45s or K- 
State's own Bobbie Gem and the Blue 
Diamonds. 

Flash Cadillac and the Beach Boys 
have recaptured America's youth with 
their light-hearted shoobe-doos, doo- 
wahs, and surfin' sounds. Local radio 
stations carry a syndicated Wolfman 
Jack, howling his way through the Top 
40. KSDB has devoted Sunday night to 
Elvis and his cohorts. 

"American Graffiti" immortalized 
the fading 50s of the early 60s. Marlon 
Brando's T-shirt was resurrected for 
the night when several Manhattan 
viewers dressed for the occasion, clad 
in shades, black leather jackets, and 
studded denims. 

While the 50s reigned as queen of 
the prom, post-Depression and World 
War II times dictated movieland. The 
fine art of conning was reintroduced 
by "Paper Moon" and "The Sting", in 



which bad guys had dimples and wer- 
en't so bad after all. "The Sting" went 
one step further in lightening the 
Depression by featuring the ragtime 
music of Scott Joplin. Even television's 
own favorite son, "The Waltons", 
made the Wallstreet crash appear 
inviting and secure. 

Hermie and Benjy entertained audi- 
ences by stumbling their way through 
World War II in "Summer of '42" and 
its spinoff, "The Class of '44". The 
more sentimental movie-buffs remem- 
bered the "big one" with a tear over 
"The Way We Were" . 

Spurred by exposure in major 
motion pictures, 70s' clothing styles 
similarly took a detour through the 30s 
and 40s. Although billed as the dec- 
ade's motion picture blockbuster, 
"The Great Gatsby" proved more suc- 
cessful in men's clothing businesses. 
The "Gatsby look" impressed one 
local merchant enough to warrant 
turning Manhattan's premiere of the 
movie into a private showing for his 
clientele. White flannel suits, with 
matching vests and pleated trousers, 
silk shirts, and oxfords filled the thea- 
tre lobby that night and later retailers' 
display windows. 

Women's apparel moved thirty 
years back to the days of World War II, 
victory gardens, and wedgies. Knee- 
length jersey flocks sporting flirty 
skirts, boxed sleeves, and inch-wide 
buttons ran minis and midis off the 
dress racks. Wedgies and spectator 
shoes again danced the "red apple" 
to Bette Midler's rendition of "In the 
Mood". 

Those not "in the mood" to revert to 
the past may laugh — but their laugh- 
ing teeth could be brighter if they 
brushed with a new toothpaste con- 
taining what else but baking soda. 

There it is. Nostalgia, a glance at 
what was. The 30s, 40s, and 50s . . . 
70s' style. 




130 — Nostalgia 










Nostalgia — 131 



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With eager anticipation, prospective travelers sign them- 
selves up tor Union-planned destinations. Exotic and not- 
so-exotic adventures draw students trom Manhattan with 
thoughts ot finding themselves, somebody else, or just fun. 
And, a week or so later, these same weary voyagers are 
back in the Union parking lot (tanned, frostbit, or tired), 
stumbling off the Greyhound. 

Trips and tours a la Union 



By Mark Eaton 

Fear not to venture oft the beaten 
path of life and allow the Outdoor Rec- 
reation Committee to take you to new, 
exciting places you've never been to 
before. 

Coordinator of the Outdoor Recrea- 
tion Committee, Mark Johnson, may 
pry you from your everyday humdrum 
routine and shuttle you off to the fresh 
air of the wilderness, releasing the 
Daniel Boonism imbedded in your 
soul. 

Outdoor Rec, sponsored by the 
Union Program Council, is headed by 
a ten-member committee. Each mem- 
ber has a chance to develop an outing 
designed for rugged individualists who 
enjoy escaping campus life for a week 
or weekend. 

If you have the blood of the woods 
in your veins, you might try a weekend 
of canoeing and camping. But, if your 
bag is crawling on hands and knees in 
a dark maze of tunnels, exploring 
caves is what you've been waiting for. 

Committee members crank out 
ideas for adventures, corresponding 
with the Department of the Interior and 
with national parks for information on 
terrain and timeliness of the event. 

"We differ from other activities' 
committees because we are 
sporadic," Johnson said. "While plan- 
ning a trip we work about 25 to 30 
hours a week, but when we don't have 
one in the making, we work very little." 

When boys and girls get together on 



an outdoor adventure, there some- 
times can be what are termed morality 
problems, depending on your frame of 
mind and age. 

Aha! You thought those worries dis- 
solved in high school along with the 
lectures about going blind if you went 
all the way. 

"The sponsors we choose to 
accompany us on these trips are fun 
people," Johnson said. "Finances for 
sponsors are allowed for in our 
budget, so they go free." Thus, the 
standard Bible-toting old lady, who 
swears by Ann Landers, doesn't get to 
go and spread her wrath upon 
immoral, sinful, and all around fun-lov- 
ing young adults on Outdoor Rec ven- 
tures. 

If a premarital couple (or triple, 
depending on what you happen to be 
into at the time) decide to camp out 
together, they can do it with others 
and make it a group effort. 

Plans for the fall semester include a 
back-packing trip in Arizona during 
Christmas, a caving expedition in Mis- 
souri, a camp out at Tuttle Creek with 
a survival clinic, and a bike race. 

"Outdoor Rec tries to put more 
emphasis on individualism because of 
the small number of people who usu- 
ally go. What we do in the field 
depends upon each other, so there 
must be a cohesiveness among the 
participants," Johnson explained. 

A cross-country ski trip in the Tee- 
tons and a canoeing trip on the Buffalo 



River in Arkansas were on tap for the! 
spring semester. 

Costs for trips are tailored to fit stu 
dents' budgets. 

"We provide everyone with necesj 






ind 



sary equipment for the trips," Johnsor 
said. "Rental fees are included in the! 
price. For instance, the caving trip tcj 
Missouri the weekend of October 28 
cost $26, camping equipmen 
included. 

"After school broke for the summe 
in 1974, Outdoor Rec went to th( 
Grand Canyon for seven days 
$72," he added. 

Financially, one thing has hinderec 
Outdoor Rec excursions: skyrocketing 
fuel prices. 

"Some students take their own cars 
getting a discount on the trip to com ! 
pensate for use of their car," Johnsor! 
said. 

"No one to my knowledge has beer 
injured on any trips," Johnson said' 
But so the Union won't take the hea 
for your injuries, waivers must b< 
signed to eliminate the Union'; 
responsibility should your preciou: 
body be bruised or battered. 

Not only does Outdoor Rec providt 
adventure, but they also give preview: j 
of the trips through films, slides, arV 
bull sessions. 

So if you're up to discovering whc' 
Euell Gibbons is all about, sign up fc| 
an Outdoor Rec adventure into thl 
wilderness. Perhaps you could eve 1 
try consuming a pine tree — it migl ! 
open up a whole new life for you. 

If you are the type of individual wh: 
likes to travel but with some luxury, th 
Union Travel Committee excursior 
are for you. 

"People who go on these trips usi 
ally go for the event, not like the Ou 
door Rec people who go for intimal 
relations," Mike Waters, coordinator < 
the committee, said. 

"To make the trip worthwhile w 
usually need about 100 persons! 
participate. Most people get togetht 
with a clique of friends and han 
around with them during the whol 



132 — Union travel 



trip," he added. 

To many people, this is the chance 
for a first taste of real traveling, so they 
prefer to go with a larger group, avoid- 
ng the insecurities which sometime 
accompany an amateur traveler. 

After testing the temperature of the 
travel-water on Union trips, partici- 
pants usually diffuse and venture into 
the world on their own. This cuts re- 
turn numbers on these trips, Waters 
explained. 

Two weeks before fall semester 
begins, the committee starts working 
Dn travel arrangements. The big pro- 
ects have included ski trips to Key- 
stone, Breckenridge, and Copper 
Vlountain. 

"We try to rent condominiums 
nstead of hotels because they are 
cheaper and more convenient," 
A/aters said. "This way people can 
book their own food, making it more 
economical for them. Also, more peo- 
Dle can stay in the same room." 

The Travel Committee is a nocturnal 
raveler, allowing more daytime action 
or the participants. 

The agenda for the Travel Commit- 
ee this fall included skiing trips and a 
[rip to Kansas City to see a Chiefs' 
game. 

Annual treks south to sunny Padre 
sland are always smash successes. 

'All trips are about the same as far 
as social aspects of them go," Waters 
>aid. "It is always fun to go some- 
where new to socialize." 

Despite extracurricular possibilities, 
le said the event is still why people go. 

"To attract people for these events, 
lyers are sent to living groups, adver- 
ising tables are set up in the Union, 
ind individual informational talks 
given," Waters said. 

Between set up times and departure 
or the trip, films are available in the 
orm of travelogues. 

Outdoor Rec and Travel are cen- 
ered around the K-State student and 
lot the whole community of Manhat- 
an so everyone has at least one thing 
n common. 




Union travel — 1 33 



Stadium captures spirit of past 



Notes of a baritone come mellow 
arid soft from inside the old stadium, 
contributing to its sense of stillness 

Rusted gates which in one age held 
out anxious fans rooting for good old 
Kansas State College, still bear the 
imprint of that university — KSC 

Ivy has grown tall on the stone walls 
of the stadium as it stands as one of 
the decreasing number of links with 
the past on campus 

Withered events cap-turfed beneath 
its bleachers reflect the adaptations its 
University has had to make to match 
changing times 

Memorial Stadium, known better by 
students today as East and West Sta- 
dium, was constructed as a monument 
to students and graduates of K-State 
who died in World War I. Initial plans 
for the stadium were laid down in 1919 
with the final touches added in 1938. 
The field within the stadium served as 
the football field and track field until 
the KSU Stadium was completed thirty 
years later. 

Besides housing the athletic depart- 
ment, the inside of East Stadium was 
first used as a rifle range. During World 
War II, the east wing was converted to 
an indoor gym and then into living 
quarters. The dormitories were con- 
structed to accommodate the increase 
in enrollment caused by veteran stu- 
dents. East Stadium continued serving 
as a dorm and athletic department caf- 
eteria until 1960. 

After Nichols Gym was gutted by fire 
in the late 1960s, the music depart- 
ment moved to East Stadium, now 
sharing it with the speech department. 
The Purple Masque Theatre also per- 
formed on this side. 

West Stadium was used as a dorm 
for upper class women until twelve 
years ago Part of the art department 
lives there now 

All academics aside, Memorial Sta- 
dium harbors tales of ghosts and curi- 



ous acts. East Stadium provides the 
setting for these haunts. The stories 
are believed to be rumors by some, but 
to those people familiar with the build- 
ing and Purple Masque, they are 
believed true. 

One story stems from the time when 
today's Purple Masque Theatre area 
was a cafeteria for the athletic depart- 
ment 

A football player named Nick was 
brought inside after being injured dur- 
ing practice He lay on a table awaiting 
an ambulance, but died before it 
arrived. Now, Nick supposedly haunts 
the Masque. Unexplained inoidents 
have convinced some people of his 
presence 

Once a teddy bear prop was lost 
during a Purple Masque rehearsal. 
The area was thoroughly searched, 
but the bear wasn't found until the final 
curtain was drawn. 

Another spook story involves a pio- 
neer homestead which burned while 
the man of the house was hunting. His 
wife and two daughters were killed in 
the fire. The homestead was situated 
on the land East Stadium now stands 
on. The pioneer man and his family 
supposedly roam East Stadium looking 
for each other. 

On the field today, students do 
some roaming themselves. Stripped of 
some of its seats, the old stadium 
serves members of crew as they run 
up and down the isles of steps, getting 
in shape for rowing. Regular season 
rugby and soccer games are sched- 
uled in the arena. The now almost 
obscure cinder track guides joggers 
preparing for the varsity sports it once 
featured. 

The old scoreboard is covered by 
overgrown bushes But on crisp game 
day afternoons, Memorial Stadium still 
echoes cheers for the purple as rug- 
gers and sdccer players do battle on 
its grass turf 



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1 36 — Quick-food joints 





Students may gripe about cold, greasy burgers, but they 
still go tor the gut-bombs. Cheap and tast, these quick 
foods complement student lifestyles. 

Finger lickin' good quick-food 
sticks to hungry students' ribs 

By Sara Severance 



Besides death and taxes, there are 
few inevitable tacts in lite. One other 
fact is that no matter where they eat, 
many persons complain about their 
food. 

And while dormitory food center del- 
icacies are the most commonly com- 
plained about, local quick-food joints 
also receive their share of gripes. 

This year, students had plenty to 
complain about. Fast-service estab- 
lishments sprouted throughout Man- 
hattan, selling hamburgers, tacos, 
fried chicken, and pizza. Each tried to 
get the student dollar with its own gim- 
mick. 

Two of the nation's major ham- 
burger chains set up franchises in 
Manhattan. Far from yesterday's two- 
window drive-ups, customers of these 
establishments now eat their Big Macs 
and Hardeeburgers in dining rooms 
complete with miniature fountains and 
plastic plants. 

Salespersons in identical uniforms 
pour pre-shook milkshakes while 
charco-broiled delights are kept warm 
under lights until someone develops a 
craving for them. 

Students with more ethnic tastes go 
to Mexican food shops scattered 
throughout the city. Decor in these 
has a definite Spanish flavor, with pic- 



tures of matadors and lacy iron grill- 
work climbing the walls. 

Or students may go to one of the 
delicatessens to order lox and bagels. 
One proprietor printed an advertise- 
ment in the school paper to explain 
Jewish foods to campus WASPs. 

A favorite iate-night student hang- 
out is a combination drive-in and din- 
ing room restaurant, where customers 
can order hamburgers, shrimp plates, 
or their taste buds' desire without leav- 
ing the privacy of their car. 

But for a more personal touch, their 
dining room is equipped with more 
plastic plants, and they will even whip 
up a milkshake from real ice milk. 

Despite attempts at individuality, 
quick-food establishments tend to 
blend together. Harried waitresses 
take orders and fling back change 
without looking at customers. Lines of 
customers reciprocate by ignoring the 
help. Stacks of trays and wadded nap- 
kins litter tables and cups overflow 
trash barrels. 

And the customers complain — 
about the service, the food, the long 
lines, the music, or the weather. 

They complain, but they keep com- 
ing back because each is in a hurry 
and quick-food restaurants supply just 
what each needs — a meal in a hurry, 
and change back from their dollar. 



CO - BROILED 



Quick-food joints — 1 37 






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Campus Christmas: mistletoe, gifts, finals, home 



It's easy for college students to lose 
Christmas in the commotion of semes- 
ter projects and finals. 

Seeing the downtown lights on a 
Vista run, an occasional "Jingle Bells" 
on'the radio, and letters from Mom and 
Dad with Santa queries helped jog stu- 
dents' memories to Christmases past 
— lots of people, food, and presents. 

But it was different this year. Blase 
joyfulness was present, but not ramp- 
ant. Even the Salvation Army bell ring- 
ers seemed more earnest. 

Economic situations and reflections 
of 1 974 sobered many people for the 
entire holiday. After Santa's 1 973 visit, 
President Nixon promised bigger and 
better things for Americans who were 
eager for good news. 

These promises turned into a mag- 
nificent show which awed the public. 
The show included Watergate, Nixon's 
image getting blacker, Ford becoming 
the saving then not so saving son, 
sugar prices soaring, and Detroit being 
engulfed by auto layoffs. 

But the year was not all bad news 
and sorrow. Because of a reduced 
speed limit, more people stayed home 



and became familiar with family and 
neighbors, and fewer of those ventur- 
ing outside the cities were killed in 
auto accidents. Americans also real- 
ized they really didn't need a light 
turned on in every room to be happy. 

These thoughts in mind, students 
were less extravagant, but not neces- 
sarily less generous in their Christmas 
giving this year. Hand-and-heart-made 
gifts flourished, almost reverting to the 
days when Grandma and Grandpa 
were young and spent evenings in the 
kitchen and workshop fulfilling their 
Christmas lists. 

Few campus offices and dorm corri- 
dors were without at least one Christ- 
mas fanatic who drug in mistletoe, 
holly, and boughs; first to the amuse- 
ment and then to the joy of cohorts. 
For the spirit of Christmas, at least the 
uncommercialized spirit, is catching. 

And, as unappealing as the com- 
mercial aspects of Christmas might be, 
they have become necessary. in our 
society. Americans are quickly 
prompted into Christmas spirit by plas- 
tic trees mixed with discount stores' 



Halloween masks. 

Even with the Five-and-Ten's early 
buying prompts, Americans still mailed 
late. "Beat the Christmas rush, mail 
early" slogans were heeded by some, 
but the Saturday morning lines at the 
Post Office grew longer as the magic 
day drew near. 

Those students without cars had to 
make arrangements to get home. For 
some it meant deciding how many 
hours it would take between the end of 
the last final and arriving at the thresh- 
old of the homeward bound TWA. To 
others it meant telling the kid driving 
home that eight plants would be 
among the baggage. 

By Saturday of final week most stu- 
dents had left town, for Manhattan's 
semesterly grasp had onpe again lost 
its holding power. And, like grandpar- 
ents when all the kids leave after 
Thanksgiving dinner, Manhattan 
seemed ready to relax with its native 
residents for the holidays. 

Likewise, most students were glad 
to go home and be that irreplaceable 
member of the family one more time. 



Christmas — 1 39 



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ministration 



Twenty-five years is a long time to retain 
any executive position. But James A. 
McCain has accomplished it, and with little 
criticism. 

Despite periods of national unrest in places 
and policies of education, McCain's win- 
ning campaigns with legislators and 
regents have spurred uninterrupted growth 
at K-State. 

But to give one-quarter-of-a-century of 
service is enough. Retirement has ended 
the McCain Era. 





1 42 — James A. McCain 







James A. McCain — 1 43 





One score and five 
McCain recalls his ere 






By James A. McCain 










As large oaks from the proverbial small acorns grow, s 
the greatness of universities is often the product of singl 
events that are deceptively inconsequential but symbolic c 
productive of major developments. 

As I review the past 25 years at K-State, there come t 
mind many such happenings which attracted only moderat; 
attention at the time. 

In 1953, for example, on April 30, a small group gathere 
on the vacant lot south of Seaton Hall where Gerald Shac- 
wick, SGA president (now a successful state businesj 
leader) turned the first spadeful of earth to begin constru<; 
tion on a union building that was to provide the setting for j 
new and more elegant life style. Proper tribute was paid 1 
alumni present who represented the unselfish and farsighte 
student leadership that, a decade earlier, had initiated tr 
student fee which made this achievement possible. 

In 1966, on January 26, the Board of Regents approve!' 
establishment of a Food and Feed Grain Institute to coorc,, 
nate K-State's incomparable resources for research arj 
instruction in wheat and feed grains from production in tfj 
field, to processing, distribution, and consumption, clear | 
the nation's most comprehensive collection of such facilitie 
Already the national center for the flour milling industry, ! 
State assumed a similar role for feed manufacturing in 19! 
and for the bakery industry ten years later. Thus, our Unive 
sity was established as a major world center in the gri 
global war against hunger. 

In 1956, K-State, on March 23, contracted with the Gc 
ernment of India and the International Cooperation Admin 

ration (now AID) to join four other land-grant universities ir 
major program of technical assistance in agriculture, vete 
nary medicine, and human nutrition in India; and thereby J 
in motion a series of events that transformed us into an int< 



ational institution. In rapid succession thereafter, the 
3SOurces of the University were similarly employed in Egypt, 
ligeria, and Latin America; students and faculty exchange 
Urograms developed with two German universities; opportu- 
nities for K-State students to study abroad were established 
p France and Mexico and the on-campus enrollment of for- 
eign students exceeded 500. 

I In 1954, in a cryptic letter to the president dated April 27, 
)r. L. Irene Putnam proposed endowing the Putnam Schol- 
irships which have now assisted well over a thousand wor- 
hy but needy Kansas youth to attend K-State and have 
ecome intellectual badges of distinction both on campus 
I nd throughout the state. Dr. Putnam's gift was the nest egg 
iat stimulated additional gifts for scholarships, now having a 
)tal value of more than $700,000 annually, and was a signif- 
;ant milestone in the rapid progress of the K-State Endow- 
lent program. 

In 1974, a telegram dated August 1 1 officially announced 
iat K-State was awarded a chapter of Phi Beta Kappa, dis- 
iguished honor society, recognition that our University had 
come of age" in the humanities and the fine arts. This was 
ling culmination to a series of events including reestablish- 
tent of the Bachelor of Arts degree in 1957, completion of 
le new auditorium and the new undergraduate library in 
970, a considerable strengthening of graduate programs in 
le humanities and behavioral sciences, the increase in 
nnual library support to well over a million dollars, and a 
I larp increase in campus cultural activities symbolized by 
he Gordon Parks Festival in 1 973. 

In 1966, on December 13, Governor Alfred Landon, Kan- 
las' most distinguished native son, in an address, "New 
hallenges in International Relations" inaugurated K-State's 
landon Lecture Series, judged by many to be the most 
ipressive program of its type in the nation, which has 
rought to the campus 27 distinguished Americans including 
nators, governors, cabinet ministers, economists, histori- 
s, clergymen, and, on September 16, 1970, the President 
the United States whose address was carried live over all 
tional TV networks. 

In 1 964, by official minutes adopted on June 26, the Board 

Regents inaugurated a major program to strengthen and 

large the College of Veterinary Medicine. Subsequently, a 

jccession of Kansas legislatures increased by 42 profes- 



sional positions and 35 classified positions, the Veterinary 
staff and appropriated funds for an entirely new physical 
plant consisting of a five million dollar teaching center, a 
three million dollar research and diagnostic center, and a 
fourteen million dollar hospital and clinic. This new plant is 
located on an 84 acre tract just north of the central campus. 

In 1958, on July 1, the establishment of a Department of 
Nuclear Engineering initiated a series of events that thrust K- 
State into the forefront of universities engaged in teaching 
and research in nuclear energy. In April of 1 961 , ground was 
broken for a nuclear laboratory to house a Triga Mark II reac- 
tor. K-State's Nuclear Engineering curriculum was the first in 
the nation to be officially accredited, an action taken on 
October 5, 1964. Nuclear physics at K-State received a 
major thrust forward when on October 6, 1 969, the twelve 
million electron volt Van de Graaff particle accelerator, the 
most advanced scientific device of its kind in the central 
United States, supported by a major Atomic Energy Commis- 
sion grant, went into operation. AEC pledged a minimum 
grant of $250,000 annually for operation of the accelerator. 

In 1 965, the program of teacher education was elevated to 
the status of a College of Education. The rapid development 
of this program culminated in a doctoral program which was 
established in September of 1968. Subsequently, 409 stu- 
dents have been enrolled as doctoral candidates and 100 
degrees have been conferred. 

In 1973, on March 30, the College of Home Economics, 
now one of the five largest in the nation, celebrated K-State's 
pioneering role in offering the first college-level credits in this 
discipline 100 years ago. At the banquet, which was the cli- 
max of this Centennial, 1 2 distinguished alumnae of the Col- 
lege were honored. 

In 1973 the College of Business Administration was noti- 
fied on April 27 that it had received official accreditation from 
the American Association of Collegiate Schools of Business. 
Through this recognition, K-State joined an elite group of 
universities offering degrees in this field; it was a climax to a 
decade of progress initiated when business administration 
was officially designated a College in 1 963. 

On February 1 9, 1 959, Governor George Docking signed 
into law a bill passed by the legislature designating K-State a 
University, a fitting capstone to almost a century of uninter- 
rupted progress. 





James A. McCain — 1 45 



1 ) Daniel Beatty Vice-President for Business Affairs 



The major objectives of K-State are to provide for high 
quality of instruction and other services for its students, to 
discover new knowledge through research, and to dissemi- 
nate the results of its research to the people of Kansas 
through its extension division and public service activities. 
The primary goal of the staff of the vice president of business 
affairs is to support and serve the faculty who are engaged in 
these activities. 

To help insure that the University will have adequate state, 
federal, and private financial support, it is the responsibility of 
the staff of the business office to budget and disburse these 
funds in accordance with the university policies, state and 
federal laws, and with high standards of prudence to allow 



the University to operate on an efficient and economic basis. 

Offices responsible for university business administration 
are accounting and payroll, auditing, budgeting, cashier and 
student loans, employee relations, financial reporting, grants 
and contracts, personnel services, and purchasing. 

These offices, within the resources available, will continue 
to evaluate and improve their procedures by adopting new 
management techniques and increasing the use of elec- 
tronic technology. The management information and ser- 
vices provided will assist the University in accomplishing its 
goals in the face of rising costs, increased enrollments, and 
additional demands for research in the areas of environmen- 
tal improvements, energy, and food production. 



2) Glenn Beck Vice-President for Agriculture 



The Office of Vice President for Agriculture is the focal 
point for planning, coordinating, and implementation in 
teaching, research, extension, and international agricultural 
development. 

The major goal of this office has been to strengthen the 
worldwide reputation of K-State as a leading institution in the 
field of agriculture. 

It has been our goal to increase undergraduate enrollment 
in agriculture. Since 1 960, our enrollment has almost tripled, 
increasing from 673 to 1 ,91 8 in 1 974. 

It has been our goal to expand research, especially in the 



areas of grain and meat production, solid and moisture con- 
servation, and economies of marketing. This has been done 
by obtaining more tax funds as well as an increase in grant 
funds. Research funds, likewise, have tripled since 1 960. 

It has been our goal to strengthen programs in areas other 
than production where they were already strong, and there 
has been a 75 per cent increase in staff since 1 960. 

It has been our goal to help develop two universities, one 
in India and one in Africa, patterned after the land-grant uni- 
versity. 



3) John Chalmers Vice-President for Academic Affairs 



The main task of the vice president for academic affairs is 
to exert his influence persistently to improve and strengthen 
the academic programs of the University. This involves a 
variety of interrelated decisions: the distribution of new posi- 
tions among the colleges; the allocation of financial support 
for programs; the maintenance of a climate for free inquiry 
and discussion; the recognition and reward for outstanding 
teaching and scholarship through support of recommenda- 
tions for promotion, tenure, sabbatical leaves, and merit sal- 
ary increases; the involvement of faculty and students appro- 
priately in decisions concerning academic developments; 
the improvement of the support areas of the educational 
enterprise such as the Library and Computing Center; and 
participation with the college deans in developing viable 
plans for academic progress within their colleges. Although it 



is clear that our central mission is instruction, all faculty are 
engaged in scholarly work and research which help make 
them more exciting instructors and at the same time expand 
the store of knowledge to be transmitted and used. Addition- 
ally, the University has a service function to the broader com- 
munity in meeting its needs for knowledge to solve societal 
and individual problems and to assist in the enrichment of the 
lives of all citizens. 

This office, then, under the direction of the president, 
works with the deans, appropriate faculty, student commit- 
tees, and representatives of the broader general public to 
make it possible for all individuals in contact with the Univer- 
sity to have richer and fuller lives and to become more valua- 
ble as individuals and as contributing members of a demo- 
cratic society. 



-Administrators 



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1 ) Chester Peters Vice-President for Student Affairs 



Major goals of the Office of the Vice President for Student 
Affairs are to facilitate the student searching for the best 
learning experience and opportunities; discover and develop 
his capabilities; refine a sense of direction and capacity to 
control that direction; develop and clarify meaningful rela- 
tionships with a diversity of people; and redefine and further 
develop lifetime values, and to fulfill his role as a learner and 
a teacher. 

In accomplishing these tasks, my efforts are directed to 
staff development through selection and development of 
competent personnel. Staff morale must be maintained to 
facilitate transmitting effective learning relationships to stu- 
dents. 

Major efforts are given to developing effective communica- 



tion with students through an "open door" policy, encourag- 
ing the students to discuss concepts and ideas and obtain 
assistance in accomplishing mutual goals. 

Developing new programs to assist new students adapting 
to the University, assisting established students find mean- 
ingful roles in residence halls, Union programs, in classroom 
environments, and in their personal relationships, takes my 
time and energy. 

A major responsibility is to utilize limited resources innova- 
tively. Priorities are established which will return to the stu- 
dent the most effective programs. If those tasks outlined can 
be achieved effectively, a student's development will be 
enhanced to the highest level possible within the capacities 
that are available in Student Personnel Services. 



2) Paul Young Vice-President for University Development 



A campus environment in which learning and living can 
take place is the goal of the Office of Vice President for Uni- 
versity Development. Lawns, trees, buildings, residence 
halls, streets, walks, architecture, classrooms, libraries, labo- 
ratories, are only some of the elements which must be devel- 
oped and coordinated to create this campus environment. 

The Vice President for University Development has 
responsibility for the day-to-day campus maintenance, the 
repair and renovation of existing facilities, the supply of heat 
and light, new construction, and planning for the future cam- 
pus development. 

During the last year the office coordinated the participation 
of K-State with the other Regent institutions in the develop- 



ment of long-range plans to meet the physical facilities needs 
of the various instruction, research, and extension programs 
of the University. The report which was prepared as a result 
of this planning effort provides a basis for the discussion of 
the development of the campus over the next decade. Plan- 
ning is a dynamic process which must be monitored and 
maintained on a continuing basis if it is to be effective. Fur- 
thermore, it must receive inputs from all segments of the Uni- 
versity. In addition, to the formal organization of the Univer- 
sity into departments and colleges, this input is channeled 
through the Long-range Planning Committee which is 
broadly representative of students and faculty of the Univer- 
sity. 



3) Max Milboum Assistant to the President 



The goal of my office is to be an effective assistant to the 
president in the handling and in the anticipation of the myriad 
of administrative matters which are the president's responsi- 
bility. 

Advising and counseling in an objective, candid, and con- 



structive way with the president is a major function. This can 
be done by knowing almost as intimately as the president 
himself all facets of the University operation as well as its out- 
side relations at the local, state, and federal levels. 




•Administrators 






Administrators — 1 49 



1 ) Bemd Foerster Dean, College of Architecture 



Our success depends on the quality, commitment, and 
effectiveness of our faculty. The dean strives to enable the 
faculty to do its work with the least possible interference. 
Some administrative efforts remain invisible, because they 
relate to difficulties that were reduced or prevented. 

The most important task of academic administrators is to 
attract and retain an excellent faculty. In our College, stu- 
dents have a vital role in faculty recruiting, and their recogni- 
tion of special efforts and concern contribute mightily to our 



ability to keep our outstanding teachers. 

The dean assists departments in developing curricula and 
courses that recognize changing needs, emphasize educa- 
tion rather than training, and stress intellectual as well as 
vocational aspects of professional preparation. In addition to 
providing knowledge and skills, we want to encourage stu- 
dents to develop professional ethics, a social and environ- 
mental conscience and individual responsibility. 



2) Ellsworth GerritZ Dean, Admissions and Records 



Since the Office of Admissions and Records is a service 
office, our only reason to exist is to be of assistance to stu- 
dents, faculty, administrators, parents, and alumni. As head 
of the office, my aim is: to help students toward their educa- 
tional and career goals through admission, placement in 
courses, registration, and graduation; to help faculty by 
reducing details of room scheduling, student scheduling, 
and student accounting to enhance their time for advising 
and teaching; to help administrators with accurate and timely 
reports; to help parents to better understand the mission of 
the University and the academic progress of their sons and 



daughters; and to help alumni by providing an accurate 
account of their transcripts of record. 

In the twenty years I have been at K-State, we have moved 
to early advisement in faculty offices to scheduling by com- 
puter to a computer tape student information system, and we 
have managed to provide better services with an increase of 
10,000 students. 

We have also worked with the American College Testing 
Program to provide better information about students for bet- 
ter advisement. 



3) Carroll HeSS Dean, College of Agriculture 



The goals of the Dean's Office in the College of Agriculture 
are to provide administrative leadership, encouragement and 
support for the academic programs in the eight departments 
of the College. Providing educational information to prospec- 
tive students and gathering feedback data from graduates 
help support and give relevance to the on-campus instruc- 
tional program. Commendable as these goals might be for 
this office, they can be fully achieved only with the support 
and cooperation of the department heads and through fac- 
ulty understanding, support, initiative, and effort. 

The Dean's Office can organize and help implement 
change through the appointment of standing or ad hoc com- 
mittees of faculty, department heads and students. Through 
the combined efforts of faculty, students and administrators 
in agriculture, agricultural undergraduate enrollment 



increased from 720 undergraduates in 1963 to 1 ,913 in the 
Fall of 1974. This phenomenal enrollment increase suggests 
that the College is graduating very capable persons, able to 
perform well professionally, thus improving the reputation of 
the College among high school students and parents. 

The Dean's Office continues its intensive contacts with the 
state's community and private colleges in the interest of 
attracting more transfer students into agriculture. Faculty are 
rewarded for their excellence in teaching and advising of stu- 
dents. 

The work of the Dean's Office is essentially to assist faculty 
in efforts to achieve the above objectives on behalf of the 
student body in agriculture. Uppermost in our minds are the 
professional goals of students and welfare of faculty mem- 
bers. It's a team effort all the way! 



■Administrators 








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I ) ROD6rt Lynn Dean, College of Business Administration 



An administrative or managerial job has two main parts. 
One relates to the establishing and pursuing of basic goals, 
and the other involves responding to large and small details 
that constantly arise outside the basic goals. The trend 
appears to be for items in the second category to increase at 
a fast rate. Care must be exercised or they can take over all 
energy and attention, leaving little time for the basic goals. 

Regarding basic goals, they are of two types: Those you 
set yourself and those set by others. The others can be fac- 
ulty, students, top management, groups within the state, or 
national professional associations. A problem here is balanc- 
ing the way you try to achieve your own objectives while giv- 



ing proper consideration to the legitimate concerns of others 
in what our objectives should include. 

My most fundamental goal for the College has been this: 
while handling rising enrollments to raise the quality of the 
work we do in educating students, doing scholarly research 
and publication, and meeting the service needs of off-cam- 
pus constituents. I might add that I regard these three items 
as important in the order that they are listed. As I review 
seven years in this position I believe significant progress is 
being made. If I could not say that this was the case, I would 
feel very uneasy about admitting the seven years of trying. 



2) Donald Rathbone Dean, College of Engineering 



My goal as dean of Engineering is to have the best College 
of Engineering in the country. To me, this implies having an 
excellent undergraduate program, an active graduate and 
research effort which is nationally recognized, and a commit- 
ted service arm of the College that relates engineering at K- 
State to the needs of the state and of the nation. 

To achieve these goals, the College has first and foremost 
attempted to attract the best young people into engineering. 
We feel that we have been very successful here. Typically 
over 50 per cent of our incoming freshmen rank in the top 1 
per cent nationally on their ACT scores. Most of them were 
also very active in extracurricular activities in high school. 
Engineering is solving problems for people, and as such, it 
certainly needs the best minds available and the community- 



committed individual. 

A second objective I have as a dean is to develop the best 
faculty in the country. This is something that a dean cannot 
generally achieve quickly unless of course he inherits such a 
group. I personally feel fortunate here in that the College of 
Engineering at K-State has an excellent teaching faculty, a 
very service-oriented group of professors and many fine 
researchers. 

Finally, it is particularly important in engineering to have 
modern facilities for the students and the faculty. We have 
had considerable needs in this area in the past ten years, but 
now are making major additions and renovations with the 
building of Durland Hall and the improvements in Seaton 
Hall. 



3) William Stamey - — Dean, College of Arts and Sciences 



The faculty of the College of Arts and Sciences is responsi- 
ble for almost three-fourths of the instruction at K-State. 
More than one-third of all K-State students take all of their 
course work in the College, and virtually every student 
enrolls at some time in at least one course in Arts and Sci- 
ences. The goal of the College is to help this large group of 
people gain knowledge and understanding, acquire skills, 
develop habits of critical thinking, and generally to change in 
ways which make them educated people. 

The most effective agent influencing the student to 
become educated is the teacher, and the kind of teaching 
that results in quality education comes from the unfettered 



efforts of professional, dedicated faculty members. I see my 
responsibility as promoting the development of a learning 
environment where students have the opportunity to interact 
with the best faculty our resources can provide. I accomplish 
this by critical review of recommendations of appointments, 
reappointment, salary increments, promotions and tenure, 
by careful allocation of funds for supplies, equipment and 
service and by reasoned decisions concerning the assign- 
ment of space. Because of their direct effect on attitudes and 
capabilities of faculty, all of these are matters which will influ- 
ence the quality of education now and in the future. 



1 52 — Administrators 



I ) Ruth HotlJn Acting Dean, College of Home Economics 



With the promise ot a new home economics building, Dr. 
Doretta Hottman agreed to come to K-State as dean in 1 954. 
She said the taculty planned a tunctional and beautiful build- 
ing that was dedicated in 1960, and now in 1975 has kept 
pace with the times. For 1 7 years the two of us have worked 
together to make our college one of the best in the nation. I 
believe we have succeeded. 

Our research and teaching facilities are excellent. Through 
the years our enrollment has continued to grow faster than 
the University as a whole. All of our freshmen have computer 
experience as they plan individual programs for graduation. 
Good students, from freshman level on, are encouraged to 
plan toward graduate study. Channels of communication 
remain open among students, faculty, and the dean's office. 



We have a relevant and innovative undergraduate program, 
most students have intern or work experience. We continue 
to build an even stronger graduate program than before. K- 
State grants more home economics master's degrees in 
home economics annually than any other institution. 

Students, faculty, Dr. Hoffman, and I are proud of our Col- 
lege's one hundred year history of accomplishments. Our 
current study of 1968 and 1973 alumni reveals they are 
proud of their K-State degrees. I became acting dean when 
Dr. Hoffman chose teaching and research due to health rea- 
sons. In the future we will continue to work toward the same 
goals for the College. One final goal is to continue to gradu- 
ate excellent students to help meet the pressing demands 
around the world for K-State home economists as leaders. 



2) Samuel Keys Dean, College of Education 



One of the most significant characteristics of an educa- 
tional institution is the constant element of change. With the 
assumption that no one is locked into any system of educa- 
tion, an administrator must provide constant encouragement 
to the faculty in meeting these elements of change and in 
finding the best ways of educating the people. 

The educational administrator is generally assumed to be 
an educational leader. He must provide faculty with leader- 



ship in identifying resources for better program construction. 
They must be given a wide variety of alternatives having 
potential for program improvement; and psychological sup- 
port must be an integral part of the entire leadership scheme. 
In my endeavors to be considered an educational leader, I 
have assumed in the past, and hopefully will expand in the 
future, responsibility for this dimension of my position as 
dean of the College of Education. 



3) Robert Kruh Dean, Graduate School 



Although all academic units of the University have a pri- 
mary interest in instruction, the graduate school represents 
the additional activities characteristic of a university, namely 
the discovery and application of knowledge through 
research and scholarly work as a means of learning. It is the 
task of the graduate office to facilitate that process and to 
maintain programs of the highest possible quality. 

This is a time of pronounced transition for graduate 
schools across the nation, and K-State's graduate school is 
responding to changing needs while insuring a strong 
research capability. New populations must be served as they 
seek programs beyond traditional patterns. Minorities, 



women, intermittent learners, and adult problem-solvers 
need graduate study opportunities more than ever. At the 
same time, diminished funding for advanced study and 
research, particularly from federal sources, may threaten 
flexibility and curtail the rate of scholarly advances in some 
areas. 

The graduate office is providing for a new student mix and, 
at the same time, has succeeded in securing hundreds of 
thousands of dollars annually in new support for faculty and 
student research. With able students and an outstanding fac- 
ulty, K-State's graduate programs will continue their achieve- 
ments in current areas and extend them into new ones. 



■Administrators 



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Administrators 



1 ) Donald Trotter Dean, College of Veterinary Medicine 



The dean's office tries to be the focal point for the coordi- 
nation of all broad operational and developmental programs 
of the College. These activities include all of the ongoing 
teaching, research, and service functions of the various col- 
lege departments. 

The allocation of faculty, funds, and facilities, for use by 
the different disciplines in the College, is done with a goal of 
achieving the various missions of the College as excellently 
as possible, within the resources available. 

The various interactions of students, faculty, on and off 
campus groups related to veterinary medicine, the livestock 
industry and other animal interests, are important to the 
dean's office function. Other activities include student selec- 
tion, close observation and recording of student achieve- 
ment while they are in school and eventual placement of 



graduates into satisfactory positions. The maintenance of a 
strong veterinary medical alumni association, development 
of a post-doctoral continuing education program, and 
administration of the veterinary medicine part of the K-State 
sponsored veterinary college in Africa are other responsibili- 
ties. 

At certain times, in the history of the College, special 
developments require additional effort or concentration of 
College effort to achieve major goals. In recent years the 
rebuilding of the College's physical plant, enlargement of the 
student enrollment, increase of faculty numbers and quality, 
and modernization of the teaching-research-service pro- 
grams have been major goals. Some of the objectives have 
been attained — others are goals toward which the leader- 
ship of the College is still directing major College effort. 



2) Thomas Frith Director of Housing and Food Service 



The Department of Housing exists on this campus 
because there are students here, students who have a vari- 
ety of housing needs. The first objective of the housing 
department is to meet these physical needs by providing 
clean, comfortable rooms and apartments, and wholesome, 
nourishing meals. 

Just as important as the physical needs of the resident, but 
less easy to define or provide, are the many additional things 
a maturing, active, intelligent individual requires for growth, 
development, and peace of mind. Attempting to meet these 



less tangible needs is the second objective of the housing 
department. 

Opportunities exist in on-campus housing for the student 
to express individuality by converting assigned living space 
to meet personal life style, to develop responsibility by partic- 
ipating in student government, to assist others by tutoring or 
orienting new students, and to learn to live with others by 
getting to know different types of people. Assisting students 
in each of these areas is a primary aim of the staff of the 
housing department. 



3) Jay RaUSch Director, Libraries 



It is the main goal of the Library director's office to provide 
library service which will be responsive to the needs of 
undergraduates, graduate students, and faculty members in 
both class related activities and research activities. We try to 
provide not only the collection, but also the services which 
are best suited to meet these needs. In order to reach our 
goals, it is necessary to keep abreast of changes in the cur- 
riculum and to be closely associated with many groups on 
campus. 

To do his job, the director must maintain two-way commu- 
nication with persons all over the campus to interpret the 
Library to members of the campus community and to inter- 



pret the needs of that community to the members of the 
Library staff. In that way the Library staff is aware of the 
needs that must be met, and the campus community is 
aware of what facilities and services are available to meet 
their needs. 

In my year-and-a-half at K-State, we have expanded hours 
of services to better meet the needs of students and closer 
ties have been established with several units on the campus. 
Meanwhile, the collection has improved considerably and we 
have formed additional cooperative arrangements with other 
libraries to gain access to more material. 



Administrators — 1 57 



1 ) Earl Nolting Director, Center for Student Development 



The Center for Student Development was established in 
1970 when the Dean of Students Office and the Student 
Counseling Center were combined. Since then, the center 
has become home base for several other units which also 
provide services to students. The units which are part of my 
responsibility or which work quite closely with me are: Coor- 
dinator of Student Activities; Coordinator of Religious Activi- 
ties; Cultural and Minority Affairs; Foreign Student Office and 
International Center; Interfraternity Council/Panhellenic 
Council; New Student Programs; Program Development and 
Research; Student Counseling Center; University Learning 
Network; and Women's Resource Center. 

The common concern of these units is to provide aid, 
counsel, information, supportive services, or referral to per- 
sons on our campus. Most often these are students, but our 



staff will also be contacted by parents, high school students, 
high school teachers and guidance counselors, and pro- 
spective graduate students. Our staff also works quite closely 
with faculty and administrators with regard to a wide range of 
campus and student concerns. 

While we do not usually work in a formal classroom set- 
ting, we supplement the development of critical thinking and 
problem solving skills by providing opportunities to propose, 
discuss, try out, and evaluate new ideas. The staff of the 
Center for Student Development endeavors to make an 
important difference in the person's education at K-State; an 
education in which the person has experienced growth and 
development of knowledge and of the self, and who leaves 
K-State with preparation for a life's work. 



2) Robert Sinclair Director, Student Health Center 



When I became director of Lafene Student Health Center 
in August, 1970, I inherited from my predecessors a fiscally 
sound operation. The unit also had received "peer medical 
approval" in that it was accredited by the Joint Commission 
on Accreditation of Hospitals. These two hurdles accom- 
plished, I was free to concentrate on two major areas of 
health care delivery as directed by the Student Health Serv- 
ice Advisory Committee — namely, recruiting younger phy- 
sicians and working on new methods of health education. 

We have been extremely fortunate to attract dedicated, 



knowledgeable physicians from the private practice sector. 
We now have nine full-time physicians on the Lafene staff. In 
conjunction with our division of health education we are 
moving in new and innovative ways to bring lay medical edu- 
cation to the students. This shall be our area of greatest 
thrust in the coming school year. 

Competent, economical, available medical care along with 
informative, practical health information delivered in a palat- 
able format should be a strong additional contribution to the 
excellent academic programs here at K-State. 



3) Walt Smith Director, K-State 



nion 



The director, the staff, Union Governing Board, and Union 
Program Council form the team that determine the goals and 
standards of performance in carrying out the Union's educa- 
tional and service objectives. The cultural, social, and recre- 
ational needs of the University community must be met by 
providing various types of activities and different types of 
service facilities. They must stimulate not only the student 
interest, but also the faculty and staff interest so that the K- 
State Union is one of the major focal centers of campus life 
and activity outside the classroom. 



The K-State Union building is one of the finest physical 
facilities of college unions in the Midwest. We feel that all 
members of the Union staff have a complete understanding 
of the Union's place and purpose in the educational, as well 
as the business and administrative function of operating a 
college union. We feel that the key factor in the success of 
the K-State Union has been the interaction among the cam- 
pus population — that in coming to the K-State Union for 
one activity or another, students will be exposed to and per- 
haps inspired by other people or activities. 



■Administrators 



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Agricultural Education Club 




TOP ROW: Stan L. Newby, Judy K. Gress, Terry M. Gruber, John C. Schell, 
George A. Welborn, John T. Thull, Dennis B. Kraus. SECOND ROW: Steven 
K. Meier, Arthur W. Barnett, John D. Cubit, Keith E. Portenier, Jim H. 
McClung, Don H. DeWerff, Ralph Field. THIRD ROW: Danny 0. Lundberg, 



Kenny E. Depenbusch, Aryln D. Julian, Tommy K. Turner, Donald L. Rhine, 
Rodney L. Nulik, Wayne E. Dunn. BOTTOM ROW: Howard R. Bradley, Wil- 
liam O. Berg, Ron J. Wilson, Stephen L. Clark, John R. Brooks, Craig W. 
Cooper. 



Agricultural mechanization Club 




TOP ROW: Edward G. Reece, Jeffrey E. Noll, Rodney L. Hasman, Gerald 
Kail, Thomas G. Schnittker, Kenneth S. Taylor. SECOND ROW: Roger E. 
Davignon, Robert G. Neely, Elmer R. Brunker, Richard W. Heiniger, Keith D. 
Bruning, Earl E. Baugher. THIRD ROW: Charles D. Schettler, Keith B. Call, 



Thomas K. Hooper, Don A. Suderman, Glenn T. Biederman, Dale D. Allen 
Tim A. Berglund. BOTTOM ROW: Harry L. Field, Craig N. Wilson, Steven C 
Jenik, Jim O. Herbers, David R. Hickert, Jon E. Buckman. 



1 62 — Organizations 



Agriculture Student Council 




TOP ROW: Catherine I. Wright, Pamela I. Warmund, Evelyn S. Bergkamp, 
Lonnie J. Nichols, Tom D. Mertz, Tom A. Dill, Stephen H. Combs, Daniel A. 
Ball, Duane W. Frasier. SECOND ROW: Jay H. Holste, James C Buchanan, 
Neil W. Miles, David D. Terry, Jim H. McClung, Gary L. Pennington, William 
E. Small, Jay P. Weidner. THIRD ROW: Tom K. Turner, Rodney L. Nulik, 



Clifton L Willms, Verlyn R. Engler, Allen L. Hurley, Richard J. Suellentrop, 
Christopher J. Badger, Greg A. McCune, Stephen L. Clark. BOTTOM ROW: 
Jon E. Buckman, James P. Weyer, Roderick A. Kline, Stuart D. Becker, John 
A. Lauber, Brian J. Maydew, Carl H. Garten, Tom S. Strickler, David J. 
Mugler. 



Agronomy Club 




TOP ROW: Norman D. Johns, Steven K. Norsworthy, Gary C. Peterson, 
Loren L. Seaman, Aden E. Joy. SECOND ROW: Carl W. Matousek, Tom W. 
Cott, Duane W. Frasier, Keith R. Lanter, Jay H. Holste. THIRD ROW: Ernest 



L. Mader, David B. Tholstrup, Barry D. Rowland, William H. Slater, Gary L. 
Pennington, Ed J. Shipman. BOTTOM ROW: John P. Meisenheimer, Joe H. 
Bunck, Howard F. Parr, Stan G. Freyenberger, William J. Harmon. 



Organizations — 1 63 



"— »l 



HlphcX EpSilOfl RhO— radio and television honorary 




TOP ROW: Sylvia L. Stucky, Alan W. Pickett, Leroy G. Buller, Greg C. 
Switzer, Jack A. DeVeau. BOTTOM ROW: Verl J. Wurtz, J. Steven Smeth- 



ers, John C. Feldmann, Cynthia J. Railsback, Joseph J. Vavricek, Bob B. 
Fidler. 



Alpha KappQ Psi— business honorary 




TOP ROW: James M. Spilker, David W. Perky, James D. Corkran, Donald J. 
Voth, Robert W. Parker, Donald D. Deck, Donald R. Johnson. SECOND 
ROW: Royce C, Janssen, Dennis J. Hudson, Richard O. Graves, Ralph E. 
Lagergren, Rod L. Jones, Larry D. Fox, James W. Kennedy. THIRD ROW: 



Mark D. Tate, Rick Bloomer, Bruce A. Mullen, Larry L. Sears, Paul D. Harri- 
son, Patrick Bolin, Mike Grosdidier. BOTTOM ROW: Ted F. Settle, Larry D. 
Dubbs, Tim J Porter, Gary M. Gottschalk, Steven W Dodd, William J. 
Frusher, Dennis L. Lassen, Verlyn D. Richards. 



164 — Organizations 



AlpblQ LQfTlbdQ DeltQ— freshman women's honorary 




TOP ROW: Jan L. Hess, Debra K. McCandless, Dana J. Woellhof, Denise E. 
Hartter, Amy D. Bachman, Wanda J. Sedlacek, Patricia E. Russell, Debra S. 
VanTasell, Nancy A. Ford, Janelle S. Ramsdale. SECOND ROW: Marilyn J. 
Lenz, Deborah D. Ward, Karen K. Brinker, Susie C. Zimmerman, Carolyn J. 
Lenz, Ann C. Tollefson, Teresa D. Tucker, Denise A. Conaway, Ann R. 
Johnson, Linda J. Cook, Eileen F. Havel. THIRD ROW: Dianne L. Hart, 



Carol E. Oukrop, Susie J. Sageser, Mary B. Schwarzenberger, Patti J. 
Spratt, Denise I. Blomquist, Becky L. Durst, Nancy S. Anstaett, Marlene S. 
Stum, Susan B. Japp, Jeanette L. Neumann, Mary Fran Morris. BOTTOM 
ROW: Shelly Moore, Rebecca J. Buller, Jane E. Brunt, Marilyn A King, Deb 
Haifleigh, Maryellen R. Rogge, Debra Romberger, Lesley K. Whitehead, 
Charlotte D. Mothes, Barbara I. Roe, Nancy Benignus. 



RlphCX Pi [Mil- industrial engineering honorary 




TOP ROW: Sidney D. Hoobler, Gerald L. Esfeld, Jonathan P. Jantz, Karl L. 
Townsend, Wayne E. Santord, Warren E. Seytert, Lynn E. Bussey. SECOND 
ROW: David M. Handkins, Roger D. Baker, Michael D. Chatham, Gary A. 



Pepperdine, Larry D. Steier, Robert W. Schmidt, Girish D. Desai. BOTTOM 
ROW: Richard B. Grapengater, James E. Loyd, Roger A. Stalcup, Alan J. 
Siemer, Robert A. Bascom, Marc A. Cambell, Glenda S. Brunkow. 



Organizations — 1 65 



AlpblQ Phi OfTiegCX— national service organization 




TOP ROW: Barb L. Atkinson, Barbara J. Hitt, Mary J. Kent, Belinda A. 
Pteifer, Cindy M. Robinson, Sherry M. Nave, Kathy McDonough. SECOND 
ROW: Beverly A. Urbanski, Judith J. Mathewson, Donald D. Firestone, Bev- 
erly A. Brzuchalski, Marilyn A. Allen, Michael J. Sauber, Ronald A. Kite. 



THIRD ROW: Elaine M. Redenbaugh, Steve O. Adams, Patrick R. Schwab, 
Charles W. Brzuchalski, Gordon Brest, Ted Grimwood. BOTTOM ROW: 
Thomas N. Roane, Paul A. Pitman, Mark W. Dardis, John A. Smith, Jr., Dale 
D. Allen, Russ S. Claus, Gaspar M. Davila. 



fllphO TOU AlphQ— agriculture education honorary 




TOP ROW: Dennis B. Kraus, John C. Schell, Judy K. Gress, Terry M. Gru- 
ber, Don W. Miller, George A. Welborn, James J. Albracht. SECOND ROW: 
James H. McClung, John T. Thull, Steven K. Meier, Arthur W. Barnett, John 
D. Cubit, Randall L. Warner, Keith E. Portenier. THIRD ROW: Wayne E. 



Dunn, Dan O. Lundberg, Kenny E. Depenbusch, Edward W. Phillips, Keith L. 
Carr, Rodney L Nulik, Tommy K. Turner. BOTTOM ROW: Craig W. Cooper, 
Don L. Martin, Stephen L. Clark, William O. Berg, Daniel L. Peterson, Ronald 
L. Smith. 



1 66 — Organizations 



American Choral Director Association 




TOP ROW: Mindy S. Fogelman, Deborah L. White, Sharon L. Kroupa, Karen 
J. Steward. SECOND ROW: Susan J. Truax, Peggy L. Richardson, Janie S. 



Hardman, Martha A. Thomas, John A. Holmes. BOTTOM ROW: Keith L. 
Collett, Jo L. Schraeder, Barb A. Floyd, R. S. Thompson, Eddie Gwin. 



American Institute of Industrial Engineers 




TOP ROW: Mary K. Burkes, Glenda S. Brunkow, Ginsh D Desai, Eduardo J. 
Anzola, William J. Demint, Cindy K, Langmacher, Jerry L Esfeld, Robert W.- 
Schmidt, Prakash B. Deshpande, Sathorn Srisuthep, Steven C. Johnson 
SECOND ROW: Craig C. Mock, Alan J. Rabas, Marc A Campbell, Larry D. 
Walker, Terry E. Cooper, Bryce A. Tolin, Randall G. Wagner, James G. Loyd, 
Jettrey J. Parker, Gary A. Pepperdine, Mike B Sterling THIRD ROW: Her- 



bert E. Harrod. Rick C. Grapengater, Tim Wagenknecht. Alan J. Siemer. 
Warren E. Seyfert, Roger A Stalcup, Michael D. Chatham, William E. Odell. 
Rex C. Vernon, Armm R Mock. Richard E. Still BOTTOM ROW: Danial E. 
Chrisman, Sidney D. Hoobler, Robert D. Williams, James P. Stonehocker, 
Ronald W. Koskan, Dean B. Mock, Richard S. Henry. Wayne E. Sanford, 
Joseph J. Meysing, Thomas E Parker. Frank A. Tillman. 



Organizations — 1 67 




American Society of Agricultural Engineers 




TOP ROW: George R. Gardner, Kendall E. Scheer, Nancy J. Cooper, Kyle 
D. Swart, Bruce Feldhausen, Daniel J. Lingenfelser, James G. Leiszler. 
SECOND ROW: Steven L. Phillips, Rick K. Koelsch, Mark Olson, Paul B. 
Ingle, Joe A. Hattener, Harold R. Blume, Larry K. Boldt, Blake G. Martin. 



THIRD ROW: Nicholas F. Koch, Lester F. Young, David H. Weast, Phillip A, 
Harden, Samuel M. Babb, Craig J. Ramsey, Darryl D. Baldwin. BOTTOM 
ROW: James K. Koelliker, Ray A. Dilts, David L. Malm, William H. Neibling, 
William A. Cook, Edward L. Janke, Gregory A. Gartrell, Matthew L. Birzer. 



1 68 — Organizations 



American Society of mechanical Engineers 




TOP ROW: Mark E. Gerard, Richard A. Beier, Gary A. Schneck, Mark L. 
Cozine, Michael L. Goyen. SECOND ROW: Greg L Kern, Kenneth D. 
Moore, Thomas A. Klenke, Craig A Sydney, Wayne A. Abrams, Terry Zim- 



merman. THIRD ROW: Walter C. Williams, Gerard F. Meitl, Glen H. Steele, 
Rod J. Zeman, Cliff Hobson. BOTTOM ROW: Thomas F. Bailey, Nyle M. 
Miller, John C Lindholm, Michael H. Brender. 



American Veterinary medicine Association 




TOP ROW: James R. Kenyon, Wayne L. Ingmire, Dan T. Gates, Byron J. 
Dedrickson, Fred W. Hubbard, Dick J. Knilans, James C. Parks, Ronald L. 
Green. SECOND ROW: Richard L Bowman, Randall K. Whitcomb, Gregory 
J. Windier, Vern E. Otte, Jon Schroeder, Larry R. Bramlage, Philip S. Har- 
denburger, Louis W. Cronin. THIRD ROW: Mike L. Herndon, Dennis K. Lar- 



sen, Ricke J. Woodbridge, James R. Johnson, Phillip G. Hoyt, Donald E. 
Kanouse, Eddie F. Chavez, Terry Funke. BOTTOM ROW: Thomas L. 
Noordsy, Charles L. Stinchcomb, Martin C. Langhofer, Joe H. Scoby, Brent 
W. Herrig, Dwight Smith, F. M. Gaddie, Doug Funk. 



Organizations — 1 69 



flflQ©! FliQht— Air Force ROTC auxiliary 




TOP ROW: Nina M. Kelly, Mona J. Elder, Wini L. Laaser, Maria J. Zarda, 
Melissa K. Hathaway, Carol J. Doyen, Barbara J. Stover, Pamela D. 
McDaniel, Jana M. Jones, Cari S. Leman, Sarah S. Stewart. SECOND ROW: 
Barb E. Kessler, Jane E. Sedlacek, Mary C. Erdwien, Karin K. Cramer, Debo- 
rah J. Stadel, Susan J. Denzel, Deborah F. Hobbie, Teresa J. Case, Jenney 
L. Bayer, Karen A. Mehl. THIRD ROW: Carolyn F. Thompson, Barbara C. 



Wehrwein, Elizabeth A. Bearly, Evelyn A. Everett, Belinda R. Neuharth, 
Lynda K. Burgess, Shelly C. Conn, Diana L. Weyer, Jill E. Tobler, James A. 
Mercer. BOTTOM ROW: Connie Doebele, Elaine Lichtenhan, Barb Doe- 
bele, Janet S. Grothusen, Debbie Ward, Karen Ukena, Deb Peters, Alice Wil- 
liams, Fritz Baumgarten, Cindy Anderson. 



Architecture Design Council 





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TOP ROW: Ann Benson, Martha E. Rygaard, Lois A. Elliott, Michael E. 
Donahue, Jr. SECOND ROW: James P. McWilliams, David L. Roberts, 
Debra J. Erickson, Larry C. Reed. THIRD ROW: Ronald G. Phillips, Alan J. 



McClanahan, Jim C. Fisher, Gary A. Elliott, David C. Esis. BOTTOM ROW: 
Jane E. Kittner, Mary L. Meier, Dave H. Livingood, J. Alden Krider. 



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1 70 — Organizations 



Arnold flir Society - 



Air Force ROTC officers 





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TOP ROW: Janiece M. Sabatka, Jacqueline Herl, Colleen O'Gorman, She- 
rylyn Baay, Gary Mitchell, Steven A. MacLaird, Richard M. Seitz, Terrence 
Ray Kraft. SECOND ROW: Scott A. Simpson, Frank W. Meyer, David W. 
Alvis, Frank D. Meacham, Ronald P. Jones, Dan D. Cummings, John 
Blanken, Richard E. Felton. THIRD ROW: Danny D. Marrs, Jeffrey L. Gross, 



Steven J. Coloney, Allan B. Hundley, Robert L. Coen, Stanley R. Miller, Gor- 
don A. Brest, Gerald M. Feeney. BOTTOM ROW: Don M. Marks, Rob E. 
Jenkins, James C. Bundy, Steven J. Wagoner, Gregory A. Lucke, H. 
Thomas Jackson, Bruce E. Barrett, John E. Collier, Captain James A. Mer- 
cer. 



Arts and Science Council 




TOP ROW: Laureen L. Ott, Carol J. Doyen, Mark E. Stanley, David W. Sar- 
gent, James J. Hamilton, Dan Fowler, Leslie Stanwix, Ronald Gaches, Dave 



Cooper. BOTTOM ROW: Mark A. Furney, W. Russell Harris, Marjorie 
Adams, Ron Spangler, Albert F. Sutlick, Jane M. Peterson. 



Organizations — 171 



Association of General Contractors 




TOP ROW: Sidney C. Shriwise, Brad C. Gilliland, Michael S. McEuen, D. 
Craig Nelson, John W. Rohrer, Mark M. Maness. SECOND ROW: Theodore 
H. Grossardt, Robert E. Becker, David T. McAdow, L Bruce Johnston, Don- 
ald J. Marty, Gary A. Elliott. THIRD ROW: Ronald E. Phillips, Glen E. Dimick, 



Gregory B. Fyfe, Gary W. Grimes, Mark A. Keenan, David F Osborne. BOT- 
TOM ROW: Wendell E. Geiger, Kevin C. Gilkison, Dennis A. Haugh, Ken R. 
Orr, David W. Bower, Merrill Blackman. 



Biology Club 




TOP ROW: Anita E. Culp, Treva J. Roder, C. Chris Carter, Patricia A. Wiltz, 
Carol M. Holzrichter, Barbara McClanahan. SECOND ROW: Steven E. 
McCormic, Max W. Harris, Neil B. Schanker, Christopher C. Smith, Amy K. 
Anderson, Roger G. Britton. THIRD ROW: Gene H. Keltner, Mark W. Rob- 



erts, George F. Athey, Randy A. Smith, Neil L. Johnson. BOTTOM ROW: 
Gerald P. Tramposh, Scott M. Dennis, Sheila D. Bahruth, G. R. Marzolf, Ste- 
ven J. Lotz. 



1 72 — Organizations 



Block CXfld Bridle— agriculture interest group 




TOP ROW: Daye Olsen, Margie M. O'Neill, Virginia L. Henke, Teri R. Catrell, 
Kathy A. Renken, Pam S. Gray, Linda K. Scheuerman, Cinda L. Roberts, 
Deborah E. Clark. SECOND ROW: Melanie P. Forster, Patty J. Drom, Barb 
D. Marston, Claire H. Myers, Ann T. Leach, Kayleen C. Lewis, Karen L. 
Scott, Donita L. Whitney, Vicki L. Tyler. THIRD ROW: Cynthia C. Craig, 



Leah S. Price, Martha A. Vanier, Marianne A. Pember, Janet L. Peterson, 
Letty J. Hammerle, Peggy A. Pickford, Maria K. Finegan. BOTTOM ROW: 
Dave E. McClaskey, Gary R. Rider, Edward W. Phillips, Kent A. Ott, Bruce D. 
Rinkes, Chuck E. Oleen, Paul Casady. 




TOP ROW: Bill Powers, Amy L. Townsend, Connie L. Story, Carla J. Stee- 
ples, Laura J. Starks, Deborah L. White, Kimberly R. Skinner, Ruth A 
Schweitzer, Marsha L. Kerley, Patsy L. Houghton. SECOND ROW: Don W 
Miller, Charlotte A. Jones, Cindy M. Macy, Teresa A. Wmgert, Douglas G. 
Zillinger, Thann Boyum, Kim M. Fawcett, Debbie L. Carter, Jim C. Riley, 
Kent L. Searcy. THIRD ROW: George A. Ferguson, Jack E. Wilson, Bob E. 



Doile, Kenton L. Weltmer, J. Dave Wheat, Aline G. Nelson, Kirk L. Ward, 
Robert E. Roth, Richard D. Scott, Reg S. Phillips. BOTTOM ROW: Tom A. 
Marsteller, Ron D. Farmer, Raymond B. Hawn, Jon R. Dreith, Chris A. Mel- 
son, Duane A. Schierling, Ricky L. Jessup, John C. Bienhoft, Richard L. 
Dean. 



Organizations — 1 73 




TOP ROW: Jayne Y. Dutton, Martha L. Voigts, Sidney R. James, Sharon S. 
Scott, Debra D. Shive, Lynette K. Bond, Katie A. Blunk, Teena Scott. SEC- 
OND ROW: John C. Steeples, Scott Williams, Meredith L. Elliott, Russ V. 
Anthony, Tina Flynn, Susan D. Snyder, Glenn L. Wolfe, L. Jay Sheldon. 



THIRD ROW: B. Kent Bearnes, Mike A. Collinge, Leon D. Houghten, Jim I 
Miller, Tom Nelson, Joe H. Allen, Steve W. Tiffany BOTTOM ROW: Dan D. 

Murphy, C. Ted Hetzke, Bradd L. Cranston, Nick P. Steffen, Pete R. Fish, | 
Kurt W Beyea. 




TOP ROW: Brenda J. Hemberger, Janet K. Urish, Sherry J. Morgan, Deadra 
L. Cauble, Harold E. Anderson, Mary C. Eilert. SECOND ROW: Craig A. 
Good, Terry W. Henry, Robert A. Welborn, Donald H. Kropf, Kenneth D. Big- 
ham, John W. Hildebrand. THIRD ROW: Paul W. Merklein, Beverly F. 



Droge, Kathleen A. Klein, Richard H. Cott, Joyce A. Reid. BOTTOM ROW.P 

Bob G. Neely, Guy H. Kiracofe, Lynn E. Pelton, John T. Ney, Rick W. Olson, | 
Chris A, Strait. 




TOP ROW: Debra D. Encson, Dianna L. Walker, Paula J. O'Donnell, Beth L. 
Ungeheuer, Carol S. Kelsey, Kathryn A. Gatz, Lon J. Hagenbuch, Renee S. 
Urish, Debbie L. Bennett, Steve V. Douthit. SECOND ROW: William G. 
McClintock, Tom W. Cott, Lee Sankey, Wanda J. Burke, William R. Edwards, 
Ted J. Nighswonger, Duane W. Frasier, Brett A. Prochaska, Blaine L. Krafft, 
Gary D. Pulliam. THIRD ROW: David D. Nelson, Cindi J. Lohrey, Rich J. 



Walsten, Monte W. Whitmer, Steven K Riffel, Rodney L. Nulik, Leon E. Syl- 
vester, Raebern L. Nelson, Randel D. McCabe, James W. Oltjen. BOTTOM| 
ROW: B. Rex Buehman, James L. Jarred, W. Darrel George, Gary L. 
Michels, David Smith, Charles W. Fountaine, Greg A. McCune, Tim A. 
McNickle, Clayton J. Story. 



1 74 — Organizations 



Bill© K0IJ— senior men's honorary 




LEFT: William R. Powell, Michael C. Doering, Steven W. Lloyd, Randell G. 
Allen, Jon L. Jenkins, Jeff L. Funk, Larry R. Bramlage, Thomas L. Noordsy, 
Dr. David Mugler. RIGHT: David L. Swanstrom, David T. Raden, Kris G. Kim- 



ple, Chris J. Badger, Bernard E. Franklin, John C. Mein, Kent C. Cooper, 
Mark A. Adelman. 



BYlQJ BVith Hillel— Jewish interest group 









TOP ROW: Charlotte L. Edelman, llene Gutchin, Janis C. Galitzer, Steven J. 
Galitzer. SECOND ROW: Laura A. Cohen, Ira P. Gutchin, Janis L. Atzenhof- 



fer, Lee B. Fleischman. BOTTOM ROW: Mark D. Atzenhoffer, Stanley A. 
Wileman, Tim K. Rudolph, Robert L. Brandes. 



Organizations — 1 75 



Business Council 




TOP ROW: Mark T. Dolliver, Joe L. Beebe, Patrick L. Anderson, Roger L. 
Kroh, Craig A. Swann, Don A. Folkerts, Michael A. Dobratz, Rick J. Bloomer, 
John G. Lewis, Matthew W. Peters, William J. Frusher. BOTTOM ROW: 



David W. Perky, Joyce M. Leiker, David L. Swanstrom, Brad J. Roberts, 
Karen L. Kelly, Patrick J. Bolin. 



CcXDGfS— coec! a ^ ilia ^ es of Pershing Rifles 




TOP ROW: Rita M. Screen, Pamela Y. Green, Robin D. Amrine, Linda L. 
Bell, Roxanne Morgenstern. SECOND ROW: Kathy A. Mummert, Leigh Ann 



Kenagy, Diane Bever, Belinda A. Pteifer. BOTTOM ROW: Gloria A. Atkin^ 
son, Ann E. Bales, Jane M. Peterson, Beth Land, Cindy A. Barker. 



1 76 — Organizations 



Cheerleaders 




BACK ROW: Cheryl Hill, Robert Harper, Jane Fore, Gerald Janssen, Gail 
Breen, Steve White, Meredith Ramsey, Greg Baker, Karen Cott, Eugene 



DeDonder. FRONT ROW: Cam Smith, Malcolm Copeland, Sandy Castetter, 
Brad Case, Karen Johnson, Greg Cline, Robin Walker, Terry Walker. 



Chi EpSilOD — c ' v '' engineering honors committee 




TOP ROW: Farouk K Kiridly, Cynthia K, Sanders, Donald R. Weaver, Jerry 
J. Westhotf, F. Acan Wiley. SECOND ROW: Eldon F. Mockry, Karl F. Stick- 
ley, Richard L. Kussman, John J. Zey, Roger A. Farrell. THIRD ROW: Ken- 



neth K. Kellogg, Barton L Brandenburg, Kim A. Tanner, Steven D. Sand- 
berg. BOTTOM ROW: Rick F. Biery, Alan L. Sylvester, Gordon A. Brest, Rex 
E. Largent, W. Clay Adams 



Organizations — 1 77 



Chim©S — junior women's honorary 



1 




TOP ROW: Karen L. Cable, Marilyn J. Schulz, Linda E. Kern, Cindy A. Mur- 
rill, Leslie A. Koepke, Deanene S. Messmer. SECOND ROW: Julie A. 
Gamba, Cathy Sullivan, Susan K. Stuart, Cynthia D. Roney, Paula S. Ukele, 
Sallie K. Davis. THIRD ROW: Jennifer L. Main, Heather K. Johnson, Cynthia 



A. McClure, Cindy M. Macy, Suzanne H. Aalbregtse, Barb J. Doebele. BOT- 
TOM ROW: Debbie K. Marsh, Anne K. Hollis, Patricia A. McEwen, Margaret 
A. McGranaghan, Sara F. Dickerson, LouAnn Bruey. 






Circle K- 



community service organization 




TOP ROW: Shane W. Nonamaker, Steven E. Hirt, Scott R. Condroy, Michael 
L, Gastmann, Francis J. Griebel, Patrick B. Conrad. BOTTOM ROW: Mel- 



ody L. Compaan, Debbie Stoskopf, Kathy McDonough, Janet Edwards, 
Sharon McCrary, Karen Salyer. 



1 78 — Organizations 



, 



Clothing, Textiles and Interior Design 




TOP ROW: R. Lynn Robb, Marilyn R. Cole, Char A. Ediger, Mary Gardner, 
Kalhy A. Henricks, Victoria M. Swift, Carla F. Campbell, Debbie J. Schrock, 
Denise E. Hartter, Virginia A. Fornal, Jeanette M. Konicek. SECOND ROW: 
Nancy C. Roach, Sharon A. Boehm, Ruth M Sawin, Janet L. Siler, Debra L. 
Drake, Shannon M. Lewis, Kay A. Galle, Janice K. Wiens, Shirley P. Brown, 
Karen A. Whiston, Joyce A. Cathey. THIRD ROW: Karen M. Depe, Cindy L. 



Baetz, Dorothy W. Ketter, Cindy A. Richmond, Debra D. Dickson, Janet E. 
Newcomer, Sheri K. Tompkins, Nancy Cornwell, Pamla J- Haack, Suzanne 
K. Muller, Joan M. Jacobs, Carolyn K. Pratt. BOTTOM ROW: Lana J. Wool- 
ery, Angela K Sharpe, Kathy A. Graves, Valenda D. Wysong, Wendy L. Bab- 
ington, Pamela E. Hotfman, Darlene C. Vinduska, Andrea A. Palonsky, 
Diane E. Higgins, Debra J. Seley, Marilyn A. King. 



Collegiate 4-H 




TOP ROW: Ruth G. Dobbins, Jenni K. Edwards, Roxann J. Lovseth, Sandy 
C. Wendt, Mary K. Robitaille, Carol S. Carswell, Amy L. Townsend, Dee A. 
Lewis, Beccy J. Tanner, Pennie E. Parcel, Joleen D. Moden. SECOND 
ROW: Debbie L. Drake, Cinda A. Topliff, Cathy L. Carswell, Kathy K. Lin- 
dholm, Laurie A. Norman, Elaine C. Hetty, Janice E. Unruh, Terry S. God- 
frey, Joyce K. Haskett, Becky A. Topliff. THIRD ROW: Donna J Whitehair, 



Marsha A. Hagenmaier, James L. Cooper, Susan L. Gannger, Marlene S. 
Stum, Nancy S Carnahan, Maria K. Finegan, Rose M. Kaiser, Ann K Nel- 
son. BOTTOM ROW: Brad A Trexler, Steve K. Riffel, Don M. DeWerff, Don 
D. Olson, Adel L. Visser, Sally M. Reed, Sue J. Gibbs, Aline G. Nelson, Melo- 
deeA. Mai, Diane M. Robson. 






Organizations — 1 79 




TOP ROW: Susan C. Jones, Julie L. Govert, Emily G. Rest, Patty E. Russell, 
Juliana J. Hair, Mary L. Milberger, Ann R. Johnson, Kayleen C. Lewis, 
Margo A. Reiman, Debbie A. Zimmerman. SECOND ROW: George R. Gard- 
ner, Tom W. Cott, Suzanne K. Muller, Cindy M. Macy, Starla J. Krause, Mel- 
ody L. Compaan, John W. Hildebrand, Barbara I. Roe, Donna Meyer, Rita L. 
Guess. THIRD ROW: Colleen M. Crowley, Beverly F. Droge, Robert G. 



Neely, Gregory W. Roberts, Dean Stoskopf, Leon E. Sylester, Gary L. Baeh- 
ler, Curtis R. Willhite, Vernon L. Waldren, Mary L. Fisher. BOTTOM ROW: 
Steve A. Mein, Deryl E. Waldren, Casey D. Garten, Carl H. Garten, Marvin E. 
Sparks, Richard C. Blocksome, Kellee R. Parr, James F. Schesser Jr., 
Michael D. Bellar. 



Council for Exceptional Children 




TOP ROW: Elizabeth A. Haywood, Nancy A. Adams, Jerrie Lea King, Becky 
S. Nelson, Debbie L. Fisher. SECOND ROW: Ruth E. Howard, Libby G. 
Meyer, Alicia A. Rues, Linda L. Holeman, Jeannine Silcott, Christine E. Erni. 



BOTTOM ROW: Claudia M. Cunningham, Vicki D. Purinton, Wendy J. Rob- 
erts, Janet K. Loader, Carol J. Hansen. 



180 — Organizations 



. 



CfeSCentS— Lambda Chi Alpha 




TOP ROW: Kathy E. Gray, Shera V, Carpenter, Karen S, Letourneau, Jean 
M. Ramsdale, Mary J. Kent, Martha L. Baker, Pam G. Gillespie. SECOND 
ROW: Cheryl L. Collins, Debbie Schrock, Francie Vining, Debbie Jones, 
Maria Campuzano, Teresa Kautman, Thorn Remus. THIRD ROW: Debbie A. 



Albers, Joy J. Russell, Debbie K Williams, Karen S. Ukena, Sheri K. Tomp- 
kins, Anne Jackson, Jo E. Hoglund, Debbie L. Rhoades. BOTTOM ROW: 
Emily K. Barham, Debbie J. Stadel, Mary Jo Duethman, Linda L. Zatezalo, 
Martha A. Thomas, Carol Ann Carr, Carol L. Goeckel. 



Crop Protection 




TOP ROW: Fred W. Marmor, Linda L. Spradling, Greg C. Clark, John M. 
Yost. SECOND ROW: Dean E. Stites, Leland H. Gerhardt, Anthony C. 
Schmid, Larry Schilling. THIRD ROW: Dan A. Ball, Bob J. Day, Barbara J. 



Lee, James V Francis, Terry P. Holovach. BOTTOM ROW: Stanley W. 
Ehler, Loarn L Bucl, Jamie F. Schesser, Donnie L. Bockelman. 



Organizations — 181 




Daughters of Diana- Tau Kappa Epsiion 




TOP ROW: Donna L. Snyder, Brenda G. Baker, Jackie R. Beatson, Christine 
M. Egan, Ann F. Baker, Jere M. Murray. SECOND ROW: Ann C. Tollefson, 
Lisa K. Robinson, Vickie J. Gatewood, Barbara K Book, Anne S. Devers. 



BOTTOM ROW: Shelley A. McBee, Kym L. Cline, Janet C. Gorman, Mary L. 
Hirning. 



1 82 — Organizations 



Delta Darlings- Delta Tau 



Delta 




TOP ROW: Mary D Stockton, Mary Beth Ellis, Cindy M. Snow, Nanci K. 
Jones, Linda K. Knecht, Marilyn M. McVicker, Jan R. Townsend. SECOND 
ROW: Debbie L. Sommer, Cindy D. Thomas, Nancy L. Windsor, Cindy S. 
Bieker, Marcia J. Lancaster, Julie A. Gamba, Peggy A. Mclntyre. THIRD 



ROW: Carla A. Berger, Debbie J. Braun, Sandy S. Thies, Sally C. Reed, Den- 
ise I. Blomquist, Michelle D. Leister. BOTTOM ROW: Judy A. Streeter, 
Nancy S. Kelly, Melinda K. Snyder, Judy K. Crabtree, Cindi L. Oetinger, 
Karen J. Hancock, Kay D. Patrick. 



Delta Psi Kappa— women's athletic honorary 




TOP ROW: Kristin A. Stockstill, Judith M. Biegler, Michele Downing, Cynthia 
M. Medill, Kathie J. Orme, Kim Rule. SECOND ROW: Katheryn A. 
McKinney, Ginger K. Thull, Karen A. Wheatley, Elaine L. Webster, Debra J. 
Kennedy, Cynthia A. Corbin, Barb Moses. THIRD ROW: Miriam P. Poole, 



Debbie Andrew, Rebecca S. Anderson, Marge L. Wilke, Joann M. Dobbie, 
Barbara E. Gench. BOTTOM ROW: Joyce R. Urish, Donna G. Perry, Cheryl 
J. Hill, Jan L. Laughlin, Nancy L. Wilson, Janette E. Larson, Janice E. Mem- 
man. 



Organizations — 1 83 



Delta Sigma Theta- social sorority 




TOP ROW: Juanita C. Marshall, Rosalind M. White, Rhonda D. Rush, 
Rlonda R. Knight, Sharon D. Blackman, Diane C. Rogan, Lorraine E. Breck- 



enridge, Lori J. Givens. BOTTOM ROW: Rita Y. Walker, Deborah A. 
Fletcher, Kathy L. Revels, Terri L. Terrell, Winnona D. Dancy, Cheryl A. Hill. 



Diamondettes- Ka PP a Alpha psi 




TOP ROW: Violet Grant, Joleen K. Cooper, Carolyn S. Fletcher, Marcella L. 
Johnson, Terri A. Combs, Dedria L. Dane, Brenda C. Jackson, Sharon M. 



Williams. BOTTOM ROW: Gaynelle A. Jennings, Charlesetta Bey, Samone 
L. Jolly, Renee R. Kerr, CeLois Eatmon, Loretta O. Ford. 



1 84 — Organizations 



Education Council 




TOP ROW: Dennis Barba, Sue Sandmeyer, Claudia Cunningham, Carl Kirk- 
patrick, Connie Hoover, Terry Young, Karren Kinney. BOTTOM ROW: 



Syneva Curry, Donann Steenberg, Jan Dam 



EnQindeCXfS— engineering auxiliary 




TOP ROW: Karen D. Graham, Catharine A. Brown, Jane L. Dembski, Luci L. 
Ronning, Suzi Nadon, Cathy Sullivan, Nancy S. Line, Dara R. Pyke. SEC- 
OND ROW: Kayhryn J. Andrews, Rebecca A. Price, Mary A. Robben, 
Susanna Klenda, Brenda L. Moser, Ann M. Broadie, Susan E. Rohles, Mar- 
sha P. Ramsey. THIRD ROW: Kathy Flynn, Debbie L. Sommer, Karen M. 



Cott, Judith L. Graham, Mary E. Moser, Linda L. Eatherly, Lynda C. 
Schockey, Beth Land. BOTTOM ROW: Marilyn B. Shetter, Charlotte M. 
Sontag, Patricia A. Reeder, Carol B. Engel, Susan B. Henderson, Linda L. 
Carnahan, Joan A. King 



Organizations — 1 85 



EtQ KQppCX Nil— electrical engineering honorary 




TOP ROW: Kala Marietta, Sharon A. Feightner, Donald D. Firestone, Gary 
A. McNaughton, Russell K. Johnson, Larry D. Jones, Robert L. McClurg, 
Brad M. Biggs. SECOND ROW: John C. Mein, Mark E. Skidmore, Randal D. 
Haun, Scott A. Boster, Edward H. Perry, Jett S. Barth, Thomas R. Shaw. 
THIRD ROW: Philip N. King, Glen D. Fulkerson, Harold W. Roesler, James 



P. Moore, Michael W. Farrell, Don L. Rempel, David E. Kimble, Boyd Hi 
Culp. BOTTOM ROW: Thomas L. Hopkins, Keith E. Davis, Harold L. Hamil- 
ton, Steve R. McKinnis, Douglas D. Fowler, Carl C. Andreasen, Dennis A| 
Kruger, David W. Havener. 



Engineering Student Council 




TOP ROW: Steven H. Spencer, Gary A. McNaughton, Donna D. Reed, Mari- 
lyn B. Shetter. SECOND ROW: Byron C. Steward, Rick K. Koelson, Dennis 
A. Stephen, Joe A. Hatfener. THIRD ROW: Gary A. Schneck, John C. Mein, 



Alan L Sylvester, Robert G. Foncannon, Kent C. Cooper. BOTTOM ROW" 
William H Neibling, Edward L. Janke, Michael J. D'Antonio, Sidney D. Hoo 
bier. 



1 86 — Organizations 



Extension Club 




TOP ROW: Lynn Y. Schroeder, Tonya M. Bren- 
neman, Valeria L. Marrs. SECOND ROW: 
Brenda S. Hunt, Sheri A. Hunt, Maria K. Fine- 
gan. BOTTOM ROW: Debby A. Dennett, Ann R. 
Johnson, MarleneS. Stum. 



Family and Child Development 




TOP ROW: Jan L. Hess, Carol L. McCracken, Kathleen M. Jokerst, Peggy L. 
Hjetland, Carolyn C. Warren. SECOND ROW: Nancy M. Craig, Doris M. 
Fair, Marilyn R. Marcotte, Christina L. Blackaby, Jeanine E. Haynes. THIRD 



ROW: Hedwig E. Kroeger, Diane K. Heitschmidt, Cindy M. Peterson, 
Kathryn J. Bartak, Cheryl J. Keller. BOTTOM ROW: Marilyn Ljungdahl, 
Keven A. Guipre, T. Lynne Stout, Nancy A. Martin, Carolyn S. McNeely. 



Organizations — 1 87 



Forestry Club 




TOP ROW: Dean A. Graber, Tapley W. Kent, Bradley R. Myers, Kirk A. Mli- 
nek, Richard Suellentrop. SECOND ROW: Neil B. Schanker, Charles M. Zil- 



linger, Rick Salters. BOTTOM ROW: Keith E. Seifert, Mori A. Marsh, Wendy 
L. Benefiel, Stuart D. Becker. 



GibsOfl GiflS— athletic recruiters 



L 




TOP ROW: Debra K. McCandless, Anna L. McNeill, Carol L. Hahn, Jeannie 
M. Mills, Juanita Alexander, Marney Erickson, Paula L. Gatzoulis, Leigh A. 
Roderique. SECOND ROW: Cindy M. Feldcamp, Gia M. Stalcup, Dena Tja- 
den, Julie K. Tucker, Cheryl A. Charles, Stephanie J. Wells, Deb J. Stadel, 



Wendy Darling. THIRD ROW: Becky L. Wohler, Shelly L. Gates, Holly J. 
Thayer, Peggy Fitzgerald, Gerry A. Coffman, Linda S. Holloway, Nancy E. 
Cassing. BOTTOM ROW: Lisa P. McCrann, A. Teresa Collier, L. Paige Ous- 
duhl, Leann Schraeder, Jodi R. Knocke, Cindy S. Grisham. 



1 88 — Organizations 



Golden Hearts— Sigma ph Epsiion 




TOP ROW: Holly K. Hooker, Kathy A. Hogerty, Debbie L. Unruh, Nancy G. 
Woods, Tana S. Lee. SECOND ROW: Cindy S. Converse, Jennifer L. Main, 
Jules A. Bourk, Thelma G. Mueller. THIRD ROW: Dianne M. Krebs, Cinda A. 



Topliff, Debbie J. Barnes, Nancy J. Woodworth. BOTTOM ROW: Nancy L. 
Montgomery, Debie J. Lindgren, Jean V. Tidemann, Yvonne K. Schmidt. 



Home Economics Council 




TOP ROW: Cynthia D. Wyatt, Ruth G. Dobbins, Denise S. Russell, Karen S. 
Honig, Barbara J. Hitt, Ruth M. Sawin, Trudy L. Weaver, R. James Willis. 
SECOND ROW: Marsha R. Isaacson, Vickie S. Baehler, Maureen K. Hintz, 
Debby A. Dennett, Connie M. Hoerman, Cheryl Keller, Susan D. Persinger. 



THIRD ROW: Carolyn Hoener, Paula A. Felder, Carrie E. Stapleton, Sheri K. 
Tompkins, Mary E. Moser, Martha J. Cornwell, Carol J. Denholm, Barbara I. 
Roe. BOTTOM ROW: Jill E. Bartley, Patricia A. McEwen, Joanne F. Schley, 
Sarah L. Heter, Marilyn A. King, MaryAnn E. Channel, Marcia J. Almond. 



Organizations — 1 89 



Home Economics Educotion 

























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TOP ROW: Jacqueline S. Wilson, Denise S. Russell, Nancy J. Henke, Den- 
ise M. Bucher, Dee A. Lewis, Cathy L. Carswell. SECOND ROW: Vicky L. 
Rathert, Patricia K. Vogt, Debra S. Kidd, Debra A. Crosley, Carol S. Cars- 
well. THIRD ROW: Vickie S. Baehler, Beth Warner, Janice E. Unruh, 



Deanna J. Libby, Rebecca R. Canny, Jannette E. Luthi. BOTTOM ROW: 
Mary E. Moser, Barbara R. Holle, Becky I. Graham, Marian S. Patry, Marcia 
J. Almond. 



Horticulture Club 




TOP ROW: Joseph M. Jackson, Cari S. Leman, Carol L. Becker, Catherine 
I. Wright, Shelley A. Braden, Nancy A. Corbin, Mary Beth Scott, Janet L. 
Siler, Jeanene G. French, Heather K. Johnson. SECOND ROW: G. Jean 
Armour, Lyetta A. Duerksen, Crystal L. Wiley, D. Susie Johnson, Virginia 
Shirer, Evelyn S. Bergkamp, Debbie J. Bell, Mike L. Allen, Carol J. Maggard. 



THIRD ROW: Marsha K. Baugher, Emmy K. Barham, Mona J. Bottoms, 
Nancy J. McCann, Mary C. Budke, Teresa D. McCandless, Roger A. Bra- 
den, Debbie K. Hoetgen, Janet K. Anderson. BOTTOM ROW: Maria K. 
Lisher, Bill E. Small, Craig S. Dunning, Bob J. Dameron, Marlin D. Edwards, 
Tom J. Walter, Mike T. Chotena, Gary L. Fanning, Dick H. Mattson. 



190 — Organizations 



IEEE — Institution ot Electrical Electronics Engineers 




TOP ROW: P. Jayachandran, Donald D. Firestone, Gary A. McNaughton, 
Kenneth A. Ward, Daniel J. Burk, Russell K. Johnson, Robert L. McClurg, 
Brad Biggs, Boyd Culp. SECOND ROW: Philip N. King, John C. Mein, Greg- 
ory S. Hart, Allen D. DeForest, George F. Detar, Thomas R. Shaw, John S. 
Rector, Jeft S. Barth. THIRD ROW: John D. Blanken, Harold W. Roesler, 



Steve McKinnis, Ted Grimwood, David E. Kimble, Michael W. Farrell, James 
P. Moore, Harold L. Hamilton, Nathaniel G. Thomas. BOTTOM ROW: Mel- 
vin C. Cottom, Glen D. Fulkerson, Keith E. Davis, Michael J. D'Antonio, Wil- 
liam E. Gooley, Dennis A. Kruger, Stuart L. Claassen, Carl C. Andreasen 



India Association 




TOP ROW: Prochy P. Sethna, Madhuei K. Raut, Yogesh B. Parikh. Jayapa- 
lan Purushothaman, Sudhakar R. Paidy, Dakshesh D. Parikh, B. R. Vujjeni, 
Shirish R. Kotecha. SECOND ROW: Raviprasad Shetty, Mohammed M. 
Beyad, Dilip D. Chande, T. Natarajan, Baig M. Hamed, Ravi L. Arudi. THIRD 
ROW: Girish D. Desai, Gopal T., Khalid Osman, Subramani Krishna, Pra- 



kash V. Joshi, Prakash B. Deshpande, Purush Jayachandran BOTTOM 
ROW: Anand Chitlangia, Subramaniam Krishnan, Aslam G. Porbandarwala, 
Adisesh C. Ramaswamy, Shah F. Alam, Ramesh Vaghela, Tiruvoor G. Naga- 
raja, Nazeer A Saleem. 



Organizations — 191 



Islamic Association 




TOP ROW: Mohammad Ganjidoost, Mohamad S. Khan, Khalid Osman, M. 
A. Quadeer, Huseyin Demirkan, Nabil F. Abughazalah. SECOND ROW: 
Basil Al-Rawi, Hameed A. Bajoi, Abbasali-Hosseinmardi, Ali A. Oghabi, Mah- 
moud F. Moghaddam, Hossein Ganjidoost. THIRD ROW: S. Farhatulla Qua- 



dri, Abdur R. Khan, Saif U. Khan, Saeed A. Shad, Bakht R. Khan, Abdelmo- 
neim I. Mustafa. BOTTOM ROW: Lai M. Chawla, Mahmood-Jianpanh, Sal- 
ihu S. Abubakar, Yunusa Yusuf, Baba K. Kaigama. 



K — LCXJ f©S — square dance club 




TOP ROW: Jane E. Whitham, Patsy Y. Jones, Deborah E. Clark, D. Susan 
Sigle, Catherine A, Gillett, Denise A Conaway. SECOND ROW: Marilyn A 
Allen, MaryAnn Weibert, Michael D. Klahr, Helen D. Carpenter, T. Natarajan. 



THIRD ROW: Carol K. Whisman, Leslie J. Allen, Larry L. Sigle, Robert K. 
Young. BOTTOM ROW: Harry L. Field, Max A. Jones, Carrie L. Robinson, 
J. Michael Kinsey, Dale D. Allen. 



1 92 — Organizations 




TOP ROW: Treva J. Rader, Alice F. Ammel, Nancy J. Morrison, Kieth A. 
Long, Margaret M. Hein, Elaine C. Hefty, Judy K. Haskins. SECOND ROW: 
Rose Mary Martin, Sharon D. Johnson, Marsha K. Baugher, Jean A. Dunn, 
Jeanne M. Byrnes, Debora A. Zimmerman. THIRD ROW: John W. Hildeb- 



rand, Virgil D. Hearn, Kay S. Conkwright, Pamela K. Moseley, John C. Coen. 
BOTTOM ROW: Richard W. Heiniger, Michael F. Kerkuliet, Randall R. Gru- 
ber, C. Erik Humbert, Howard A. Zimmerman, Donald L. Rome. 



K-State Singers 




TOP ROW: Jerry Polich, Ray Witthuhn, Brad Drown, Sharon Wilson, Kevin 
Koch. SECOND ROW: Denise Craig, Mark Keller, Debbie Andrews, Denise 



Jackson, Kent Williams, Andrea Curry. BOTTOM ROW: Bob Langenkamp, 
Cathy Brown, Susie Altland, Mike Oliver. 



Organizations — 193 



KSU Engineers 



TOP ROW: Thomas F. Bailey, John W. Sadauskas, Bruce G. Bailey, Keith E. 
Pike, Jerry L. Baker, Tom A. Gerdis. BOTTOM ROW: Bruce A. Feldhausen, 



Robert G. Foncannon, George F. DeTar. 




KSU Judo Club 




TOP ROW: Russell F. Kaufman, Mark E. Cookson, Terri J. Frick, Mike Mont- 
gomery, Nick Seeley, Mitchell J. Herl, Chuck C. Dierks, Garth B. Strand, 
Michael Fulley, Rita J. Staub. BOTTOM ROW: Isaac Wakabayashi, Ruth E. 



Jansen, Debi J. Mack, Linda C. Gross, Mark Ward, Teresa A. Kaufman, 
Keith A. Consani, Greg S. Ronsse, Mark W. Harper. 



1 94 — Organizations 



KSU Orchestra 




VIOLIN I: Shelley Heffel, Vincent Baskin, Steve Easterday, Phil Wittmer, 
David Melgaard, Rochelle Forsberg, Lyndal Nyberg, Maralyn Cunningham, 
Louis Pigno. VIOLIN: Marsha Curtis, Cynthia Williams, Jeff Sutton, Gena 
Rochat, Sara Severance, Roxie Fundis, Scott Jacobsen, Leroy Johnson, 
Karla Hempstead, Kathy Burkhard, Doug Frost. VIOLA: Patt Allen, Linda 
Scales, Jeanette Slinkman. CELLO: Sally Blomquist, Dave McLeland, Blythe 
Karstadt, Mark Holt, Laura Cohen, Lelah Duskin. BASS: Michael Boss, Jan- 



ice Wenger, Tony Walker, Scott Reed, Randy Detrick. FLUTE: Jean Sever- 
ance, Renee Marcotte, Bret Tomasch. OBOE: Carol Campbell, Deadra Cau- 
ble, Mitzi Maddux. CLARINET: Debbie Marshall. BASSOON: Linda Roby, 
Suzan Hall. HORN: Jeff Frost, Cyndy Simonson, Debra Boyd. TROMBONE: 
Daryl Batchelor, Timothy Ney, Mike Esau. TRUMPET: R. Jan Zubeck, Don 
Dilling, Rod Manges. TUBA: Marion Roberts. TIMPANII: Craig Biegler, 
Steve Hitt. 



KSU Rifle Club 




TOP ROW: Robert Hundley, Joe E. Noble, Bill W. Ahrens, Margaret J. 
Schoap. BOTTOM ROW: Marlene K. Oswald, Rick S. Stubbs, Debbie Wil- 



liams, Evan Larsons, Greg Wagner, June E. Bryan, Mike D. Heywood, S. 
Jody Singer. 



Organizations — 1 95 



KSU Sailing Club 




TOP ROW: Lynne E. Bessier, Ramona L. Myers, JoEllen Arnold. SECOND 
ROW: Debra S. Ribordy, Jenney L. Bayer, Margaret M. Nash, Marsha R. Liv- 



ingston. BOTTOM ROW: Edward E. Ribordy, Kathryn J. Fischer, Ken D. Bit- 
ter. 



KSU Skuba Cats 



TOP ROW: Mike J. Wittlieff, Jay P. Merkley. SECOND ROW: Stan A. Wile- 
man, John H. Havens. THIRD ROW: Chris N. Davis, Ted Grimwood. BOT- 
TOM ROW: John E. Hellman, Mike J. Metz. 




1 96 — Organizations 



KSU Wildlife Society 




TOP ROW: Jody S. Johnston, Carol M, Holzrichter, Richard S. Gould, Kath- 
leen B. Blair, Terry Z. Riley, Steven E. McCormic, Randy D. Rodgers. SEC- 
OND ROW: Eric C. Larsen, Neil B. Schanker, D. Elton Nickel, Robert J. 
Robel, Frederick J. Stump, Roger D. Vancil. THIRD ROW: Steve P. Nolting, 



Glen R. Roths, Rick L. Mossman, Randy A. Smith, Sheila D. Bahruth, Mack 
E. Byard. BOTTOM ROW: Dennis E. Wilson, Albert F. Sutlick, Michael L. 
Peterman, Melvin L. Madorin, Robert K. Culbertson, Greg A Wingfield. 



KQppQ DeltCX Pi— education honorary 




TOP ROW: Lynne E. Bessier, Cynthia L. Baldwin, Anne L. McClure, Sharon 
L. Fisher, Dee A. Lewis, Nancy C. Ginthner. SECOND ROW: Susie C. Zim- 
merman, Teri L. Nutsch, Stacey J. Miller, Vicky L. Rathert, Carol A. Whitney, 
Beverly E. Holmon, Sharon K. Graves. THIRD ROW: Sharon D. Johnson, 



Karen J. Kinney, Susan D. Persinger, Yvonne K. Schmidt, Mary E. Channel, 
Beverly S. Wolf. BOTTOM ROW: Steve Albracht, Mike D. Helton, Robin V. 
Hax, Patrice Burns, Michael J. Byington, J. H. Loeb. 



Organizations — 1 97 




TOP ROW: Linda S. Warner, Suzie G. Weltsch, Sharon I. Zeiner, JoAnn 
Cronister, Lucille M. Bogner, Donneta McBoyle, Cindy D. Keenan. SEC- 
OND ROW: Terri A. Oesterreich, Carolyn A. Eubanks, D'Ann F. Schooley, 
Pamela J. King, Claudia M. Cunningham, Vickie S. Baehler, Linda L. Hole- 



man. THIRD ROW: Da'Nella J. McCullough, Anne N. Neely, Ann F. Baker, 
Deborah L. Tripp, Helen M. Neilsen, Debbie J. Lundstrom. BOTTOM ROW: 
Connie J. Hoover, Anna M. Kroeger, Lou Ann Bruey, Teresa L. Biery, Linda 
A. Robinson, Linda L. Carnahan, Cindy M. Macy. 



KODDQ Phi— women's Christian group 




TOP ROW: Carol S. Jacobson, Teresa D. McCandless, Gaila M. Freeland, 
Juliana J. Hair, Brenda J. Schneider. BOTTOM ROW: Sally R. Blair, Sheri A. 



Hunt, Cynthia L. Baldwin, Pamela S. Maben, Edythe Perry. 



1 98 — Organizations 



I 



KSDB — campus radio station 




TOP ROW: Roxanne Morgenstern, Kathryn A. Gatz, Maureen K. Hintz, 
Thomas D. Tadtman, Cynthia J. Railsback, Arlon L. Meek, Michael D. Alum- 
baugh. SECOND ROW: Verl J. Wurtz, John C. Feldmann, Sylvia L. Stucky, 
Joseph J. Vavricek, Mark D. Haden, Steve E. Cless. THIRD ROW: Steve A. 



Menaugh, Gorden V. Hibbard, Eric P. Deffenbaugh, Mark T. Eaton, Greg C. 
Switzer, Alan W. Pickett, Chris E. Beyer. BOTTOM ROW: Gary L. Hine, 
Roger A. Harvey, Leroy G. Buller, Roger A. Heaton, Jack A. DeVeau, Steven 
H. Physioc. 



KSURRH— associated residence hall governing board 




TOP ROW: Mary T. Chase, Cindy A. Murrill, Cindy D. Zimbelman, Margaret 
A. Vining, Debra K. Miller, Vickie A. Doud, Kathy M. Lungren, Jane C. 
Wheeler, Kathie J. Orme, Mabel B. Strong. SECOND ROW: Diane G. Heck- 
erson, Carol J. Maggard, Karen S. Reed, Janet M. Weston, Peggy M. Jen- 
sen, Jett Staftord, Janene Lewis, Charlotte E. Alexcites, Barbara J. Heimer 



THIRD ROW: Judy A. Ruebke, Cliff S. Lewis, Pamela E. Hoffman, Tony F. 
Alfino, Glenn E. Funk, Jim L. Pottberg, James C. Putnam, Gregory L 
Goforth, Peggy A. Krehbiel. BOTTOM ROW: Don B. Roof, John D. Warrior, 
Ed Barker, Tim J. Nass, Mark D. Elliott, Jim D. Stoltz, Deb Haifleigh, John G 
Anderson, Steve W. Lloyd. 



Organizations — 1 99 



Latter Day Saints— religious interest group 






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TOP ROW: Eric D. Knoeppel, Bruce D. Kubie, Karl Schaab, Dennis K. 
Matteson, Diane R. Matteson. SECOND ROW: Ruth M. Jacobs, Christine E. 
Erni, Toni M. Sanders, Sharon L. Jorgensen, Jean Denney, Dee A. Moore. 



BOTTOM ROW: Brent G. Larson, Janene Lewis, Jeanene Bodily, William M. 
Jefteries. 



Light Brigade- Army ROTO auxiliary 




TOP ROW: Jacqueline S. Wilson, Stefni L. Weeks, Cathy Sullivan, Diane M. 
Buck, Susan R. Schrock, Terry L. Appleby. SECOND ROW: Debbie J. 
Schrock, Sandra K. Elliott, Nancy Parks, Vickie J. Gatewood, Mary A. Rob- 
ben, Judy L. Puckett. THIRD ROW: Terrie L. Lafferty, Rose M. Kaiser, Adel 



L. Visser, Mary C. Stiles, Su M. Townsend, Denise L. Kettler. BOTTOM 
ROW: Alan K. Underwood, Vicki D. Wedel, Andrea A. Polansky, Joan 
Houghton, Sheri K. Tompkins. 



200 — Organizations 



Little Sisters of ITIinerva- Delta 



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TOP ROW: Terry L. Appleby, Barb A. Weisser, Sheree R. Lowe, Brenda J. 
Lala, Diane K. Foote. SECOND ROW: Janis L. Bergner, Schelly Yarsulik, 
Cathy Allen, Kathy Flynn. THIRD ROW: Sally Ann Turek, Charlotte M. Son- 



tag, Debi L. Bishop, Mary Kay Zawatzki, Patti O. Harman. BOTTOM ROW: 
Pam K. Rowland, Jane L. Cramer, Susan B. Henderson, Nanette E. Farmer. 



Chi DelphiQ- Sigma Alpha Epsilon 




TOP ROW: Nancy L. Giesch, Gayle L. Line, Susan E; Dring, Ann R. Sweet. 
SECOND ROW: Marty A. Bishop, Barclay Howard, Annabelle Beezley, Mar- 



sha McKinney, Shana K. Winston. BOTTOM ROW: Meg Glidden, Sharon A. 
Laudel, Sharyl A. Strack, Shelly L. Fohey. 



Organizations — 201 



Little Sisters of the Gold Rose - Beta sigma Psi 




TOP ROW: Cindy Biehl, Hattie L. Houts, Sherry J. Kline, Janet L Dalton, 
Jenny A. Jungmann, Carolyn K. Wittorff, Mary A. Lindstrom. SECOND 
ROW: Teresa C. Millsap, Diane M. Heeter, Marilyn R. Steponick, Cindy L. 



Edwards, Carol S. Crawford, Kala J. Marietta, Janey E. Oswalt. BOTTOM 
ROW: Gayle L. Gerken, Stefni L. Weeks, Kathy K. Lindholm, Susan K. Rin- 
gler 



Little Sisters of the Shield- PniKappaTau 




TOP ROW: Roberta R. Johnson, Nancy S. Chaffee, Janice L. Bolton, Cindy 
Anderson, Terri L. Wahle, Shelly A. Buxton. SECOND ROW: Cynthia L. Fjel- 
stul, Candace E. Vlcek, Patricia A. Meador, Deborah L. Jackson, Karen L. 



Reed THIRD ROW: Kathleen L. Murphy, Carol S. Klopfenstein, Christine E. 
Garrett, Peggy Fitzgerald, Suzette E. Stein. BOTTOM ROW: Debra A. Com- 
fort, Cynthia G Loucks, Laura J. Powers, Christine A. Curley, Mary T. Day. 



I 



202 — Organizations 






Little Sisters of the Shield and Diamond - pi Ka PP a Alpha 




TOP ROW: Sandra A. Harris, Jean A. Boyd, Lorrie A. Weir, Cathy M. Roush, 
Linda M. Cory, Susan C. Bachman. SECOND ROW: Rhonda G. Young, 
Susan L. Specht, Michelle R. McCaffree, K. Kay Hamilton, Nancy J. Murphy. 



THIRD ROW: Victoria A. Seitz, Debbie L. Staples, Kim A. Dean, Betsy A. 
Baltzer, Renee M. McMahon, Nancy Womack. BOTTOM ROW: Debbie S. 
McLeod, Heather M. Warren, Colleen P. Kill, Audrey L Rein. 



Little Sisters of Theta Xi 




TOP ROW: Anne E. Winger, Renet A. Olson, Kim M. Denton, Kristin A. 
Stockstill. SECOND ROW: Debora A. Zimmerman, Cathy R. Karst, Jan L. 



Nedwed, Phyllis J. Buchele, Bev J. Kongs. BOTTOM ROW: Susan K. Peter- 
son, Kim A. Burik, Cynthia A. Nay, Rebecca J. Smith. 



Organizations — 203 



■ 



IDedical Technology Club 




TOP ROW: Crystal A. VanHorn, Vicki D. Snell, Rebecca J. Cady, Randa M. 
Vincent, Teresa Kautman, Cheryl A. Ekberg, Jill E. Mueller, Gail Gilham. 
SECOND ROW: Betsy L. Burden, Kathyrn L. Bortz, Carol S. Jacobson, 
Paula R. Koch, Cynthia J. Frewen, Cheryl L. Robbins, Kathy L. Debrick, 
Laurie E. Matzeder. THIRD ROW: Susan R. Seely, Karen D. Thurlow, 



Melinda K. Snyder, Kirk L. Cates, Barbara J. Dudrey, Marcia J. Baldwin, 
Charlene K. Johnson, Liz L. Pope. BOTTOM ROW: Max W. Harris, Richard 
D. Smith, Jeffrey J. Sutton, Dennis K. Chapman, Mitch C. Moherg, JorJean 
A. Reynolds, Randall S. Gerard. 



Little Sisters of Triangle Fraternity 




TOP ROW: Margie Lohrentz, Bonnie R. Covert, Patti S. Hobson, Marjorie 
Neibling. SECOND ROW: Jan E. Hardman, Susan L. Brown, Mary K. Miller, 



Beth Land. BOTTOM ROW: Susan Cox, Deb Peters, Sue Hobson, Christo- 
pher L. Gartner. 



204 — Organizations 



ITIen's Glee Club 




TOP ROW: Tindel K. Jennison, Steve R. Lacy, Douglas J. Craig, Evan L. 
Leonard, Steve D. Karr, Sam Waldman, Bill Foley, Steve Thompson. SEC- 
OND ROW: David J. Kadavy, Roger Hannatord, Gregory N. Thompson, 
Terry L. York, James R. Ireland, Ronald P. Jones, Tim Rose, Gary L. Diener. 



THIRD ROW: Gerald Polich, Marc T. Dunn, James H. Filby, James L. 
Magan, Ross Z. Stryker, James V. Francis, Jeb E. Bolan, Relihan A. Bruce. 
BOTTOM ROW: Steve J. Miller, Mark L. Marshall, Christian Loschcke, Law- 
rence D. Moehlenbrink, Leo C. Stuart, Kim K. Komarek, Janet S. Deines 



(TlicfobiologL) Club 




TOP ROW: Beverly A. Urbanski, William M. Shafer, Billie M. Moats, Thomas 
J. Gianforte. SECOND ROW: JorJean A. Reynolds, Max W. Harris. BOT- 



TOM ROW: James E. Urban, Phillip J. Stroupe, Frank J. Peretti. 



Organizations — 205 



lOftCXf DOQfO — senior women's honorary 




TOP ROW: Carol J. Doyen, Barbara J. Beecher, Shelley Batt, Linda Pattin- 
son, Suzie Weltsch, Cathy Claydon. SECOND ROW: Jean E. Severance, 
Claudia M. Cunningham, Candy A. Hart, Cindy Strawn, Brenda L. Moser. 



THIRD ROW: Lucille M. Bogner, Pamela J. E. King, Sandra L. Castetter, 
Maureen K. Hintz, Susan D. Persinger. FOURTH ROW: Sandra L. Bell, 
Karen Kinney, Diane Swingle, Barbara LaPlante, Martha Cornwell. 



(Till Phi EpSilOfl— music interest group 




TOP ROW: D. LeAnn House, Karen K. Brady, Diane K. Swingle, Jo L. 
Schraeder, Jane A. Gatz. SECOND ROW: Leslie P. Gwin, Vaudene A. 
Howell, Carol J. Campbell, Janie S. Hardman. THIRD ROW: Janice K. Wen- 



ger, Jean E. Severance, Sharon L. Kroupa, Caroline S. Crawford, Stephanie 
D. Lusci. BOTTOM ROW: Shelley L. Batt, Paula J. Hoisington, Deborah L. 
White, Ella E. White, Linda L. Carpenter, Mario J. Ledy. 



206 — Organizations 



Natural Resource management Club 




TOP ROW: Linda L. Bell, Pamela J. Warmund, Garth W. Wilson, Kevin D. 
Smith, Darrell D. Parks, Amy L. Hammons. SECOND ROW: Stephen F. 
Guettermann, George C. Watts, Matt D. Murphy, Roger G. Britton, Edwin E. 



Nilson THIRD ROW: Carl D. Schroeder, David S. Frisbie, Terry D. Jones, 
Anthony W. Sharp, Laverle L. Busenitz. BOTTOM ROW: Ben D. Mahaftey, 
Dennis M. Martin, Michael E. Oppitz, Gary A. Schuler, Orville W. Bidwell. 



Omega Psi Phi -social fraternity 




TOP ROW: Jonnie L. Thomas, Timothy M. Hamilton, Michael Thigpen, 
James D. Jackson. BOTTOM ROW: Wendell O. Johnson, Peter C. Buck, 



Bruce D. Mitchell, Willone E. Eubanks, Samuel J. Cox, John W. Stapleton Jr. 



Organizations — 207 



OmiCfOn Nil— home economics honorary 




TOP ROW: Cynthia D. Wyatt, Jane Winkler, Pam S. Whitesell, Linda S. War- 
ner, Martha K. Hagen, Suzi Nadon, Karen C. Proffitt, Betsy Wright. SEC- 
OND ROW: Jo A. Rubenich, R James Willis, Patty J. Fernkopf, Barbara A. 
Rust, Kristine Sahlberg, Barbara J Meister, Linda Hoener, Elyse B. Levene, 
Linda S. Dixon. THIRD ROW: Pamela A. McCaleb, Jill L. Hamlin, Dena E. 



Keas, Cheryl J. Drummond, Carolyn M. Loyd, Cindy K. Mullenix, Connie M. 
Hoerman, Patricia M. Tiemeyer. BOTTOM ROW: Susan P. Bartel, Rae A. 
Smith, Susan D. Persinger, Jeanice A. McReynolds, Martha J. Cornwell, 
Carol A. Whitney, Yvonne K. Schmidt, Patricia A. McEwen. 



Pakistan Student Association 




TOP ROW: Rab N. Khan, Haroon U. Rashid, Haider Zaman, Mohammad S. 
Khan. SECOND ROW: Abdul H. Bajoi, Iftikhar A. Khan, Saif Ullah Khan, 



Saeed A. Shad, Bakht R. Khan. BOTTOM ROW: Mohammed N. Khan, R. F. 
Kruh, Lai M. Chawla, Ahmad Nawaz. 



208 — Organizations 



Panhellenic- 



sorority governing board 




TOP ROW: Amy L. Button, Joan K. Waeldin, Carol A. Hillebrandt, Christine 
\A. Egan, Kim M. Denton, Karen A. Testori, Lucille M. Bogner, Leigh Ann 
<enagy. SECOND ROW: Barbara L. Campbell, Jere L. Murray, Martha L. 
Hurley, Lana J. Bigelow, Debi R. Swenson, Jeanine M. Besch, Suzanne H. 
\albregtse, Cindy L. Parks. THIRD ROW: Barbara K. Robel, Debbie S. 



McLeod, Mary E. Moser, Paula F Marshall, Mary L. Hirning, Marsha K. 
Ames BOTTOM ROW: Leslie A. Koepke, Janet E. Newcomer, Elaine M. 
Lichtenhan, Leslie A. Schoenleber, Debbie E. Wian, Anne K. Hollis, Kathy L. 
Bartlett. 



PeCXflS— Omega Psi Phi 




TOP ROW: Terry D. Revels, Robin E. Walker. 
Fredreala Atkins, Barbara J. Piper, Alicia G. Gar- 
rett. SECOND ROW: Loranda Breckenridge, 
Linda K. Morris, Mitzi Stuart, Latessa R. Jack- 
son, Norma J Thomas BOTTOM ROW: Bea- 
trice A. Johnson, Brenda Taylor. 



Organizations — 209 



PeQrlS Qnd RubieS— Farm House Pearls and Rubies 




TOP ROW: Patsy L. Houghton, Martha J. Cornwell, Ginger K. Thull, Ann C. 
Lux, Pam S. Hornbaker. SECOND ROW: Kevin J. Kimerer, Lucille M. Bog- 
ner, Joyce K. Lang, Mary J. Berber, Sue L. Pelton. BOTTOM ROW: Deana 



C. Paulsen, Charlotte D. Mothes, Adel L. Visser, Nancy S. Carnahan, Bar- 
bara J. Dudrey. 



PefShing fifleS— military honorary 





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TOP ROW: Thomas N. Bell, Michael D. Heywood, Dennis V. Lacey, Ivan E. 
Harrison, John F. Barnes, N. Craig Dibben. SECOND ROW: Lee D. Ellis, 
Steven E. Pearson, Edmund G. Hill, Gordon A. Brest, Thomas L. Hopkins, 
Darrell E. Herrmann. THIRD ROW: Rick S. Stubbs, Roger D. Duwe, Charles 



E. Herrmann, Howard H. Depew, Kernit O. Taylor, Darrell R. Riekenberg. 
BOTTOM ROW: David H. Carpenter, Barb J. Doebele, Kim M. Denton, 

Alverna D. Streit, Margo L. Vanover, Don R. Olmstead. 



210 — Organizations 



Phi Chi rh©tQ— physical education interest group 




TOP ROW: Kathy S. Reukauf, Joyce M. Leiker, Ann M. Dusin, Gail D. Holt- 
man, Debra D. Shive. SECOND ROW: Ann L. Lockyer, Jaime S. Knaus, M. 
Joan Russell, Mary Sue Davis. THIRD ROW: Judy K. Haskins, Patti O. Har- 



man, Debra J. Mausolf, Alesia J. Ball, Diane E. Blackburn. BOTTOM ROW: 
Susan E. Peters, Linda M. DesMarteau, Beth Land, Mary L. Ginn. 



Phi EpSilOfl KappQ— business honorary 




TOP ROW: Ralph P. Ziegler, Donald C. Dreher, Stephen W. Rankin, Greg B. 
Miller, Cedric K. Hands, Randall E. Merritt. SECOND ROW: Lance E. Reid, 
Terry E. Duncan, Gene W. Warren, Randall K. Dirks, Paul V Klipowicz, Tim 
A. Strathman. THIRD ROW: Wm. B. Zuti, Veryle E. Snyder, W. J. Kline, Tom 



W. Jones, Paul L. Weixelman, Donald Atkinson. BOTTOM ROW: Donald A. 
Avery, Michael D. Kitch, William R. Kehmeier, Thomas C. Winchell, M. Larry 
Nobel, Michael L. Milam. 



Organizations — 211 



Phi UpSilOfl OmiCfOn— home economics honorary 




TOP ROW: Ruth G. Dobbins, Marilyn R. Cole, Colleen G. Feese, Nancy K. 
Grove, Janet M. Simpson, Karen C. Protfitt, Barbara A. Rust, Karen M. 
Gutsch, Kathryn A. Gatz, Janet L. Twaddell. SECOND ROW: Kristine M. 
Sahlberg, Patricia A Gaskin, Betty S. Alefs, Cherly A. Rothman, Brenda J. 
Laid, Cheryl J. Drummond, Connie S. Cornett, Angie M. Shinkle, Christina L. 



Blackaby. THIRD ROW: Patti L. Harrison, Julie A. Johansen, Cynthia S. 
Bieker, Judy M. Kidwell, Susan D. Persinger, Sharon D. Johnson, C. Susan 
Tellefson, Stacey J. Miller. BOTTOM ROW: Sandra J. Ward, JoAnn 
Schweitzer, Patricia A. McEwen, Martha J. Cornwell, Jeanice A. 
McReynolds, Carol J. Barnett, Bonnie R. Funk, Lori J. Givens. 




TOP ROW: Karen S. Honig, Leslie A. Schoenleber, Carole Sharp, Pamela J. 
Lehner, Tammy A. Netherton, Jo A. Rubenich, Sue L. Pelton, Cynthia D. 
Roney, Vickie A. Doud, Beverly E. Holman SECOND ROW: Dee A. Lewis, 
Marsee L. Bean, Brenda L. Moser, Vickie S. Baehler, Vickie L. Mumma, Judy 
A. McKee, Vicky L. Rathert, Carol A. Whitney, Yvonne K. Schmidt. THIRD 



ROW: Carolyn M. Loyd, Maureen K. Hintz, Constance C. Oppitz, Susan E. 
Bowe, Jennifer J. Cotten, Kathleen A. Cole, Marlene S. Stum, Alice M. Wil- 
liams, Debbie J. Payne. BOTTOM ROW: Barbara J. Kelly, Barbara R. Holle, 
MaryAnn E. Channel, Susan E. North, Jean A. Trevarton, Carol J. Denholm, 
H. Dean Howlett. 



212 — Organizations 



Phi Gammas— Phi Gamma Delta 




TOP ROW: Anna G. Piland, Ronda G. Shehi, 
Kathryn A. Gatz, Rhonda S. Noel, Alice F. 
Ammel. SECOND ROW: Sally A. Heller, Elaine 
Whitehair, Joyce L. Patton, Marcia L. Sutton, 
Valerie A. Vedros. BOTTOM ROW: Karen L. 
Vacek, Debbi K. Holcomb, Jamie J. Hoverder, 
Debbie K. Marsh, Cynthia D. Pistora. 



Pi KappQ LerOy— social organization 




BOTTOM ROW: Bill J. Nolan, Joel L Moulin, Stuart A. Hamilton, Kevin M. 
Mullen, Jeff L. Stafford, Greig L. Goforth, Valerie H. Peterson, Rick L. Jones, 



Tim J. Nass. TOP ROW: Jim C. Putnam, Steve Highberger. 



Organizations — 213 



Phi KaptiVeS -Phi Kappa Theta 




TOP ROW: Ann Weixelman, D. Jean Burns, Susan E. Peters, Kathy Young- 
blood, Debbie L. Gulknecht, Mary Ann Engel, Linda M. Atwell, Sherry Spit- 
snaugle, Crystal L. Wiley, Barb Mehan, Mary Schwarzenberger. SECOND 
ROW: Nancy J. Henke, Debbie Miller, Debbie L. Craig, Colleen M. Ouinn, 



Terry Muckenthaler, Susan Schmidt, Rose Jilka, Susan E. Morgan, Karen J. 
Plegge, Mary E. Soltis. BOTTOM ROW: Elois Winterscheidt, Marjorie J. 
Hedger, Pam K. Kissing, G. Jean Armour. 



Phi (TlU Alpha Sigma- choral directors 




TOP ROW: Patrick D. Heinz. SECOND ROW: Keiih L. Collett, Donald W. 
Dilling. THIRD ROW: Richard A. Stein, Robert S. Thompson. BOTTOM 
ROW: Timothy D. Ney, Stephen P. Easterday, John A. Holmes, Douglas M. 
Hoglund. 



21 4 — Organizations 



Pi TqU SiOITlQ— men's social service 




TOP ROW: Terry D. Hubbs, Richard A. Beier, Cliff Hobson, Terry J. Zimmer- 
man. SECOND ROW: Craig A. Sydney, Michael L. Goyen. BOTTOM ROW: 



Paul L. Miller, Thomas F. Bailey, Gary A. Schneck, Michael H. Bender. 



PiOmCX Sti — mechanical engineering honorary 




TOP ROW: Bruce A. Relihan, David R. Roesler. 
Eric Lauine. SECOND ROW: Broc B. Sears, 
Mike D. Relihan, Roger J. Bunten. THIRD ROW: 
Wayne A. Abrams, Nick A. Sotfler, Dave L. Biehl, 
Doug A. Davidson. BOTTOM ROW: Mike Rous- 
selot, Greg T. Barnes, Randy Thatcher, Wayne 
E. Buhrer, Phil S. Yerby, Dave E. Morland, Rich 
L. Penner. 



Organizations — 215 



Pre-Nursing Club 




TOP ROW: Deborah A. Combs, Norma D. Niles, Sharon K. Cazier, Teresa S. 
Haffener, Anne E. Winger. SECOND ROW: Jill M. Burris, Barbara A. Furga- 
son, Nancy E. Clark, Beverly L. Shirk. THIRD ROW: Susan G. Leach, Phyllis 



A. McCarthy, Charlotle A. McKee, Lois J. Cramer. BOTTOM ROW: Robin 
M. Buchanan, Carol L. Goeckel, Linda L. Gabel, Linda L. Neal. 



PfidetteS— women's drill team 







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TOP ROW: Dana J. Paulich, Melinda Melhus, Jo A. Schrock, Debe J. 
Gallagher, Marly A. Rieschick, Kym L. Cline, Charleszetta Bey, Cindy L. 
Fry, Linda J. Spicer, Joyce E. Smith, Cheryl L. Baker, Georgiana Beverly, 
Sue A. Stetfenhagen, Julie A. Juno, Susan E. Rohles, Sandie L. Miller, 
Michelle L. Sweeney, Deb. L. Bell, Rhonda L. Berry, Denise R. Arnold, 
Mary G. Hornung. BOTTOM ROW: Melissa A. Gutzman, Angie C. Bis- 



choff, Roxann J. Lovseth, Susie J. Foley, Kathy A. Mitts, Teresa E. Jar- 
rett, Debbie A. Andrew, Kimberle J. Rule, Becki S. Anderson, Su M. 
Townsend, Marty L. Parsons, Thena M. Bell, Debi D. Lauch, Loranda E. 
Breckenridge, Terri J. Bosch, Del G. Hoge, Susan M. Aska, Myra J. 
Rucker. SEATED: Gyll C. Bates, Marilyn S. Bramlage. 



216 — Organizations 



Professional Foods Club 




TOP ROW: Susan E. Bowe, Barbara A. Rust, Barbara J. Hitt, Betty A. Hen- 
ning. SECOND ROW: Olinda G. Pfost, Cheryl L. Hoeckle. BOTTOM ROW: 



Sherri D. Voss, Jennifer J. Cotten, Janet L. Backhus. 



Recreational Services- governing board 




TOP ROW: Raydon Robel, Nick Sottler, David O'Brien, Randy K. Rathbun, 
Chester Peters, Frank A. Tillman. BOTTOM ROW: Sue Tilden, Linda Hagler, 



John Burdick, Mark Edelman, Kathie Orme 



Organizations — 217 



RhlO iTlateS— Alpha Gamma Rho 




TOP ROW: Denise S. Russell, Sharon M. Houser, Debra L. Drake, Jennifer 
L. Carlson, Angie M. Shinkle, Cindy M. Peterson. SECOND ROW: Carla J. 
Steeples, Marsha P. Ramsey, Jane A. dander, Peggy Morgan, Cynthia D. 
Roney. THIRD ROW: Noralee N. Matousek, Jean C. Sharp, Judy A. Pal- 



enske, Marilyn B. Shetter, Jeannie L. Palenske, Ann L. Sharp. BOTTOM 
ROW: Wendy J. Young, Jeanne L. Reichenberger, Linda J. Kimble, Linda L. 
Carnahan, Toni M. Peterson. 



Scabboard and Blade- Army rotc officers 




TOP ROW: James E. Townes III, Fred L. Waterman, Dennis L. Barba, 
Michael D. Helton, Thomas D. Warren. SECOND ROW: Darrell E. Herrm- 
ann, Joel A. Buck, Stephen A. Hicks, George B Hansen. BOTTOM ROW: 



Gerald Lord, Robert J. Wiesner, Gary M. Gottschalk, Wayne E. Sanford, Dar- 
rell R. Riekenberg. 



218 — Organizations 



Senior Veterinary medicine Students 




TOP ROW: Katherine A. Ryer, Nick L. Weidle, Kirby E. Joy, Patrick J. Grow- 
ney, Linda L. Gratny, Gary E. Miller, Robert E. Totman, John H. Claus, Alan 
E. Beyer. SECOND ROW: Dale E. Hiesterman, Jack L. Beezley, Fred M. 
DeHoff, Joe D. Strahm, Ernest L. Kratina, Ronald L. Highland, Rick E. Purs- 
ley, Randall D. Bartlett. THIRD ROW: Ron W. Trotter, David K. Wallace, Dan 



K. Thompson, James G. Stuart, Marvin L. Raile, Sandra L. Philip, Robert E. 
Cope, Byron W. Williams, Ronald A. Oyster. BOTTOM ROW: Ronald D. 
Roy, Bruce T. Groff, Doug A. Nielson, Bruce A. Buller, Joseph O. Pavlik, Jeff 
J. Schuett, Jarvis E. Williams, Charles W. Scheib, Randy J. Schuett. 



She DUS— Delta Upsilon 




TOP ROW: Jean M. Plegge, Suzie Weltsch, Karen E. Long, Loranda Breck- 
enridge, Joan E. Roby, Kelsey Menehan. SECOND ROW: Susie Edgerley, 
Trish Kerr, Terri L. Wesley, Sandie Miller, Karen Kinney, Janice S. Seim, 
Kathy K. Kuebelbeck. THIRD ROW: Nancy M. Wingfield, Susan D. Tvohey, 



Linda S. Dixon, Lorraine E. Breckenridge, Barbara J. Kelly, Cindy K. Hull. 
BOTTOM ROW: Leslie A. Stanwix, Jonna L. Bolan, Debra L. Gehlbach, 
Charliss A. Miller, Chris Palmer, Dana Denyer, Lori J. Givens. 



Organizations — 219 



SigiTKX DeltQ Chi— journalism honorary 




TOP ROW: Janie L. Smith, Linda M. Locke, Linda A. Reed, Tim J. Janicke, 
Cynthia S. Bieker, Cynthia D. Dalton, David V. Chartrand. SECOND ROW: 
Scott C. Kraft, Judy L. Puckett, Marilyn I. Rudeen, Barb A. Schoot, Ann E. 
Bales, Gloria B. Freeland. THIRD ROW: Bill E. Brown, Chad L. Perry, Greg- 



ory S. Doyle, Jean A. Trevarton, Kyle S. Shively, Sara J. Severance, Dennis 
E. Christesen. BOTTOM ROW: Jeff L. Funk, Michael R. Scott, Sam F. 
Green, Joi L. Wilner, Ray A. Shank, W. Russell Harris. 



Sigma Lambda Chi— building construction honorary 




TOP ROW: David C. Wiard, Dale J. Goetz, Randy K. Hurlburt, Mike S. 
McEuen, Donald J. Marty. MIDDLE ROW: Donald D. Nelson, DocZ. Geiger, 
John D. Warrior, Wayne R. Sloan, Robert E. Becker, Keith E. Boehner. BOT- 



TOM ROW: Ronald E. Phillips, Steven E. 
Johnson, Mark A. Keenan. 



Peake, Dennis A. Haligh, Keith A. 



220 — Organizations 




Sisters of the fTlaltese Cross - Alpha Tau omega 




TOP ROW: Cindy M. Shields, Joan E. Marcotte, Eve L. Rundquisl, Jan A. 
Harders, Gail L. Breen. SECOND ROW: Kathryn J. Bartak, Tresa L. Flora, 
Karen J. Kloster, Sara E. Love, Renee S. Marcotte, Teri L. O'Neal. BOTTOM 



ROW: Cindy L. Stewart, Charyl D. Larson, Elizabeth A. Bearly, Susan F. 
McCarthy, Suzie May. 



Sisters of the Sphinx- Delta sigma 



Phi 




TOP ROW: Mary E. Jecha", Diane L. Wentworth, Nancy K. Grove, Nancy L. 
Adams, Janet M. Simpson. SECOND ROW: Colleen G. Feese, Susan M. 
Schabel, Lana J. Avery, Cheryl E. Cope, Mary K. Robitaille. THIRD ROW: 



Janet A. Goff, Sheryl A. Ingram, Sandra K. Clanton, Cindy B. Bingham. 
BOTTOM ROW: Eleonore M. Kenning, Terri A. Phillips, Kathleen A. 
O'Toole, Jan R. Tyaack, Kathy D. Burkhard. 



Organizations — 221 



Sisters of the White Rose- sigma n u 




TOP ROW: Cheri D. Cox, Lisa A. Gill, Amy K. Davis, Jane Braxmeyer, Debi 
D. Lauck, Barbara E. Liebl, Karen A. Testori, Nancy A. Nichols. SECOND 
ROW: Beverly J. Benda, Cindy S. Gill, Betsy Wright, Liz S. Smith, Frances E. 
Phillips, Suzanne C. Shaw, Heather K. Johnson. THIRD ROW: Carol A. 



Covert, Debbie K. Sherman, Karen R. Bitler, Cyndi D. Twietmeyer, Julie A. 
Juno, Susan L. Cox, Rita B. Debrick. BOTTOM ROW: Susan E. Prather, 
Laura J. Stetson, Jane A. Fore, Lois J. Cramer, Joan A. King, Patricia A. 
Mahoney, Debra J. Erickson. \ 



Society of Physics Students 




TOP ROW: John A. Davis, Dennis A. Kruger, Darrell E. Herrmann, James B. 
Heathman, Bill Smith, Steven J. Coloney, James W. Oltjen. BOTTOM ROW: 



Gary L. Porubsky, Jon J. Held, Merle E. Thowe, Roger L. Facklam. 



222 — Organizations 



SPURS- 



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TOP ROW: Roni M. True, Sharon S. Emig, Janelle S. Ramsdale, Patricia E. 
Russell, Deborah K. Dlabal, Ann C. Tollefson, Debi A. Fuller, Kathryn L. 
Askren. SECOND ROW: Debra A. Keck, Terry L. Feldkamp, Mary B. 
Schwarzenberger, Susan R. Varney, Nancy L. Musick, Suzanne C. Shaw, 
Jeanette |_. Neumann, Connie J. Hoover. THIRD ROW: Nancy S. Carnahan, 



Mary L. Herbin, Brenda C. Byers, Cathy L. Nelson, Becky L. Durst, Jean M. 
Peterson, Karen G. Evans. BOTTOM ROW: Debbie Gehlbach, Debra Bax- 
ter, Donna R. Meyer, Cindy Thomas, Elaine K. Geist, Barbara I. Roe, Kay 
Patrick. 



StQfduSterS— Kappa Sigma 




TOP ROW: Becky S. Bayer, Deb M. Foster, Patrice D. Shepard, Vicki L. 
Warner, Terry S. Dunaway, Janis A. Pack, Jan E. Kaup, Kathy L. Schoon- 
over. SECOND ROW: Susie K. Lukert, Tudy Head, Sue A. Malone, Michele 
Luckeroth, Julie B. Shiek, Sydney L. Hefner, Cindy Pixley. THIRD ROW: Jill 



E. Tobler, Cindy A. Joerg, Marty Lewis, D'Earl Danner, Jodi J Brown, Jayne 
Badgley, Terri Tucker, Karla Hulett. BOTTOM ROW: Susan J. McClure, 
Debby K. Crider, Linda J. Cook, Tricia A. Fish, Mary Ann Weibert, LuAnne 
Faubion, Carol L. Beaty, Sherry J. Ackerman. 



Organizations — 223 



StOel Ring— engineering honorary 




TOP ROW: Byron C. Steward, Gary A. Schneck, John C. Mein, William A. 
Cook, Earl F. Glynn II, Bruce A. Feldhausen, Rick K. Koelsch, Kent C. 



Cooper. BOTTOM ROW: Sidney D. Hoobler, Alan L. Sylvester, Donna D. 
Reed, Rick F. Biery, Dennis A. Stephen. 



Student Education Association 




TOP ROW: Colleen F. Karr, Linda K. Bennett, Jo A. Rubenich, Cynthia L. 
Baldwin, Reta R. Hemphill, Patricia L. Ingalsbe, Sharon L. Fisher, Carolyn A. 
Eubanks. SECOND ROW: D'Ann F. Schooley, Libby G. Meyer, Ann E. 
Mueller, Nancy K. Hedrick, Marilyn K. Newton, Lucille M. Bogner, Terri A. 



Dobbie. THIRD ROW: Dawn L. Coleman, Kim A. Hay, Martha L. Minturn, 
Kathy J. Jarvis, Phyllis A. Schmidt, Jani K. Seim. BOTTOM ROW: Carol J. 
Hansen, Wendy J. Roberts, Linda K. Vosicky, Margaret L. Fieser, Jo L. 
Schraeder, Michael L. Remus, John W. DeMand. 



224 — Organizations 



SGR Executive Council 




TOP ROW: Stephen G. Divine, Daryl M. Heasty, Billy G. McDaniel. BOT- 
TOM ROW: Mark A. Edelman, Dick C. Works, Karen J. Kinney, Dennis A. 



Devenney, Marcus L. Hoover, Jr. 



Student Governing Rssociotion 




TOP ROW: Bill Frusher, Roger Kroh, Dick Works, Pat McFadden, Larry 
Reed, Charliss Miller, Matt Smith, John Lauber, Doug McClure. ROW TWO: 
Al Ringleb, Joey Schley, Randy Rathbun, Amy Button, Carol Laakso, Kent 
Snyder, Mike Donahue, David Hein, Lonnie Nichols, Paulette Johnson, John 
Lewis, Carrie Stapleton. ROW THREE: Mike Remus, Steve Larkin, John Ire- 



land, Nancy Kraus, Ed Janke, Mike Relihan, David Terry, Bill Small, Pat 
Reeder, Mary Moser, Sarah Heter. ROW FOUR: Bryce Haverkamp, Jane 
Kittner, Julie Parks, Mark Johnson, Mark Dolliver, Craig Swann, Tom Mertz, 
Greg Herzog. BOTTOM ROW: Ed Barker, Byron Williams, Vickie Doud, 
Chris Badger, Richard Still, David Garvin. 



Organizations — 225 



Student Publications 

Board of Student Publications 




Susie Nuss, Jeff Funk, Jack Carpenter, Walter Bunge, Scott Kraft. 





bill bfOWn —Director of Student Publications 



226 — Organizations 



Royal Purple Business Staff 




TOP ROW: Debbie Van Tasell, Emme Smith, Angie Rosselot, Barbara Kelly, 
Marty Redden. BOTTOM ROW: Pam Johnson, Cathy Jilka, Marilyn Miller, 



Linda Brozanic, Lucy Chartrand, Sally Blair. 



Royal Purple Writers 











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Photographers 




Sam Green, Don Lee, Tom Bell, Ted Munger, Tim Janicke, Jeff 
Cott. 



Organizations — 227 



Royal Purple Staff 




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Beverly Wunder, Ann Benson, Jean Trevarton, Linda Reed, Scott Kraft, Judy Puckett, Pam Kissing. 




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Jean Trevarton 



Editor 





Linda Reed 



Managing Editor 





Organizations — 229 




Summer Collegian Staff 




TOP ROW: Gloria B. Freeland, Nancy C. Keebler, Susan C. Shaw, Sheila S. Russell. 
BOTTOM ROW: Rich A. Browne, Don D. Lee, Scott C. Kraft. 



Summer Collegian fid Staff 




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Kent Hendrichs, Vicki Davis, Steve Lee, Matt Smith 



230 — Organizations 



Fall Collegian Pd Staff 




Pat K. Richards, Sherry Spitsnaugle, Donna E. Standley, Colleen M. Smith, 
Hilger. 



Steve A. Lee, Kelsey D. Menehan, Brad J. Keshlear, Jan K. Nelson, Chuck J. 



Fall Collegian Staff 




TOP ROW: Brad H. Morris, Steve D. Buchholtz. MIDDLE ROW: Dennis E. 
Christesen, Debbie D. Leckron, David V. Chartrand, Linda M. Locke, Jeff L. 
Funk, Cathy I. Claydon, Joi L. Wilner, Barbara A. Schoof. BACK ROW: Chad L. 
Perry, Cindy D. Schwartz, Colleen M. Smith. 




Cathy Claydon 



Fall Editor 



Organizations — 231 



Spring Collegian Staff 



TOP ROW: Robert C. Miller, Mike R. Scott, Barbara A. Schoot, 
Kelsey D Menehan, W Russell Harris, Debbie D. Leckron, Jetf 
L. Funk, Robert S. Williams, Greg S. Doyle, Goria B. Freeland. 
BOTTOM ROW: Richard N. Row, Mark A Furney, Chad L, 
Perry, Jack W. Huttig, Jim H. Brock, Dennis E. Phillips, Ted W. 
Ludlum, David V. Chartrand. 




Spring Collegian fid Staff 




Donna E. Standley, Ginny O'Brien, Jan K. Nelson, Dennis E. Phillips, Don R Carter, 
Sherry J. Kline, Janet L Dalton, Chuck J. Hilger, Paula K. Hood, Colleen M. Smith. 











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232 — Organizations 



Symphonic Band 



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FLUTE: Lou Ann Bruey, Renee Marcotte, Audrey Percy, Ann George, 
Karen Bell, Patty Bruey. CLARINET: Lional Noel. CLARINET: Jackie Woep- 
pel, Ken Howe, Debbie Marshall, Pam Lamphear, Lila Ahlquist, Pat Lynam, 
Melissa Moore, Karen Honig. ALTO CLARINET: Cynthia Page. BASS 
CLARINET: Alan Leuke, Kim Miller. CONTRA-BASS CLARINET: Rhonda 
Redd. ALTO SAX: Alan Hallmark, Bryan Brown. TENOR SAX: Jon Chest- 
nut. BARITONE SAX: Sara Goldberger. OBOE: Carol Campbell, Mitzi Mad- 
dux. ENGLISH HORN: Deadra Cauble. BASSOON: Suzan Hall, Susan 



Ober HORN: Stephanie Lusco, Janice Ambler, Cindy Simonson, Debra 
Boyd. CORNET: Daryl Batchelor, Tim Nye, Pat Heinz, Richard Philbrook. 
TRUMPET: Kim Harrison, Becky Ballew, Dennis Jones. TROMBONE: Jan 
Zubeck, Jon Hutchison, Don Dilling, Tom Zercher. BARITONE: Alan 
Schreiber, Marjorie Neibling. TUBA: T. J. Taylor, Randy Kloetkorn. PER- 
CUSSION: Allen Carter, Jo Jo Hargrave, Richard Smalley, Lynn Robbins. 
HARP: Florence Schwab. STRING BASS: Mike Boss. 



fOU BetCX Pi— Engineering honorary 




TOP ROW: Robert A. Bascom, Larry D. Steier, Terry J. Zimmerman, Kent C. 
Cooper, Eldon F. Mockry, Bruce A. Feldhausen, Russell K. Johnson. SEC- 
OND ROW: Gary A. Schneck, Richard L. Kussman, Wayne J. Mikols, Sid- 
ney D. Hoobler, Larry J. Koudele, Randal D. Haun, Douglas J. Teel. THIRD 



ROW: Steven D. Sandberg, Alan J. Siemer, Michael D. Chatham, Michael R. 
Fitzsimmons, Dennis C. Wegener, Jeff S. Barth. BOTTOM ROW: David P. 
Palmer, Bruce A. Napier, Jeffrey D. Bone, Don L. Rempel, Rick F. Biery, 
Frank A. Tillman. 



234 — Organizations 




TOP ROW: Luci L. Ronning, Kala J. Marietta, Donna D. Reed, Sharon A. 
Feightner, Steve T. Brumbaugh, Dody L. Demuth, David O. Johnson, Robert 
L. McClurg. SECOND ROW: Gary A. McNaughton, Roger A. Farrell, Craig 
A. Brockmeier, John C. Mein, Larry D. Jones, Philip N. King, Edward H. 
Perry, Robert G. Foncannon. THIRD ROW: Karl E. Stickley, Richard M. Kel- 



sey, Alan L. Sylvester, Michael W. Farrell, James P. Moore, Rocke C. Verser, 
David E. Kimble, Jay L. Shorney. BOTTOM ROW: Steve R. McKinnis, John 
R. Schlup, Russell L. Bone, W. Clay Adams, Keith D. Tucker, Carl C. 
Andreasen, Wayne E. Sanford. 



Tau Sigma Delta - 



architecture honorary 




TOP ROW: Stanley D. Lewis, Kevin W. Halbach, David K. Lohrentz, Donald 
J. Marty. SECOND ROW: Greg J. Dowling, Kim A. Williams, Terry F. Bader. 
THIRD ROW: Roger J. Bunten, David E. Roesler, Rodney P. Venjohn, Jon L. 
Jenkins. FOURTH ROW: Daniel F. Musser, Gary A. Busse, William C. Ben- 



ish. FIFTH ROW: Dennis A. Haugh, Gregory L. Allen, Jim C. Fisher, Kevin 
C. Scott. BOTTOM ROW: Steven J. Stock, Ardis D. Cook. David E. Heyne, 
Joel M. Burrow, Kendall J. Helmer. 



Organizations — 235 



Union Governing Boord 




TOP ROW: Roger L. Kroh, Sam E. Mathis, Ronald K. Spangler, Douglas L. 
McClure, David A. Schoneweis, Randy Zohn, Karen Kinney. BOTTOM 



ROW: Janet S. Ayres, Randall S. Riepe, Tom McCoy, Frances L. Egan, 
Steve Hermes, Bruce E. Brinkman. 



Union Progrom Council 




TOP ROW: Lynne Thorn, Mark Johnson, Ron Spangler, Kathy Bartlett, 
Mike Waters. BOTTOM ROW: Nancy Kraus, Phyllis Buchele, Dan Love, 



Rory Turner. 



236 — Organizations 



University Faculty Senate 




TOP ROW: Thomas L. Brown, George R. Peters, Dorothy L. Thompson, 
Naomi B. Lynn, John R. Graham, Lawrence R. Jauch, Cecil H. Best, I, M. 
Essien, Mark A. Edelman, Bernard Franklin, Kendall F. Casey. SECOND 
ROW: E. Lowell Brandner, Thomas Dunbar, Drayttord Richardson, Eddy J. 
Van Meter, Fredric C Appl, Robert Poresky, William E. Moore, John D. 
Spangler, James C. Carey, Robert R. Snell, William H. Johnson. THIRD 
ROW: Warren Walker, G. Richard Marzolf, John M. Marr, Matthew W. Smith, 



Ray A. Keen, Fred M. Parris, Robert L. Johnson, Virginia M. Quiring, Sylvia 
J. Blanding, Connie J. Batson, Norma J. Redeker. FOURTH ROW: David J. 
Mugler, John P. Murry, Donald P. Hoyt, Roscoe Ellis, Robert E. Scott, Basil 
Curnutte, Leonard Fuller, Kenneth R. Burkhard. BOTTOM ROW: Carol L. 
Miller, Robert D. Linder, James Greig, Eugene McGraw, Leon H. Rappoport, 
James J. Albracht. 



University Learning Network 




TOP ROW: Doug L. Herman, Val Mans, Russ S. Claus, Sharon L. McCrary, 
Jenna S. Booth, Rick E. Dempster. SECOND ROW: Nancy Hamilton, Den- 
nis J. Schatfer, Doris Wright, Suzanne M. Jaeckel, Janis Southerland, Karen 



A. Whiston. BOTTOM ROW: Gary Bachman, Terry Baker, Donna L. Lund- 
berg, Eileen M. Timmins, Sue A. Roe. 



Organizations — 237 



Women in Communications 




TOP ROW: Jan S. Garton, Kristin Clark, Linda A. Reed, Linda M. Locke, 
Carol J. Doyen. SECOND ROW: Marty M. Snyder, Cindy S. Bieker, Susie 
Nuss, Cindy Schwartz, Debbie Leckron. THIRD ROW: Sheila S. Russell, 



Cynthia D. Dalton, Sally R. Blair, Sara J. Severance, Ailine H. Deters. BOT- 
TOM ROW: Uteva E. Powers, Diane M. Spencer, Jean A. Trevarton, Margo 
L. Vanover, Colleen J. Hand. 






Women's Glee 




TOP ROW: Regina L. Williams, Candace K. Cramer, Jill K. Luthi, Janet E. 
Blue, Karen S. Dammann, Deanna K. Bayer, Peggy Fitzgerald. SECOND 
ROW: Mary J. Johnson, Ruth E. Howard, Janet L. Myers, Mary L. Herbin, 
Terri A. Oesterreich, Jana J. Redeker, Julie K. Tucker. THIRD ROW: Susan 



B. McAuliffe, Deborah S. Eisenberg, Brenda C. Byers, Joyce L. Hugg, San- 
dra K. Persyn, Kathryn J. McDonough, Susan C Rolfs. BOTTOM ROW: 
Rita A. Oltjen, Charlotte D. Mothes, Anna M. Kroeger, Judy K. Crabtree, 
Dana L. Denyer, Janet A. Mahoney. 



238 — Organizations 




TOP ROW: Gerald Polich, Renet A. Olson, Lisa Good, Belinda K. Shelite, 
Gail L. Eyestone, Roberta J. McFarland, Laura I. Hoisington. SECOND 
ROW: Pamela J. Noller, Kathleen A. Youngblood, Tressa A. Mikesell, Jana 
L. Whitney, Barbara A. Furgason, Martha A. Thomas. THIRD ROW: Jean- 



ette Rush, Barbara J. Hixson, Carol E. Unrein, Deb Collins, Nancy K. Baker, 
Debra L. Giger. BOTTOM ROW: Marsha L. Dietrich, Debora A. Zimmerman, 
Vicki D. Wedel, Cindy A. Wesson, Sheila M. Burger, Colleen M. Crowley. 



Wrestling Cheerleaders 




TOP ROW: Sue A. Malone, Rhonda L. Whitmore, Pam D. Albers, Barbara G. 
Delimont. BOTTOM ROW: Linda J. Cook, Deanna C. Paulsen, Marsha L. 



McKinney, Vicki F. Luttrell. 



Organizations — 239 



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Athletics, of all styles and magnitudes, has power- 
ful drawing forces for society in general, K-State in 
specific. The reasons why are not always clear, for 
scores are not a definite cause. Sport just has a 
charisma all its own. 



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Sport: more than a cold 

By Scott Kraft 

Sport. 

A game of people. 

A game of honesty. 
. It is something more than a big drunk at a Saturday after- 
noon football game, a five-hour wait to see a Big 8 basketball 
game, or a hot dog at a modern baseball stadium-complex. 

The game of sport is dependent upon honesty. But not the 
kind of honesty which keeps you from cheating on your 
score card, buying off the referees, or paying someone to 
throw a game. 

Sport is a stage play in honesty where the athletes are the 
actors. 

Competition, as exemplified by the players and glorified, by 
the fans, is a pure form of honesty. A player or fan must be 
honest enough to realize his interest in the game is evoked 
not so much by the game itself, but more by the competition 
— : an emotional high which can only be explained by fans 
and players who have experienced it. 

It's a fervor which builds and builds within the competitors. 
They need to compete, to test their skills or minds against 
each other, and this is honest. 

The true sportsperson derives no pleasure from the 
trouncing of an inferior team; rather from the slim margin of 
victory which is the result of two closely matched teams or 
individuals. 

Words often associated with hurting someone — best, 
first, win — are all integral to sports. Someone has to lose, is 
the common response to someone spouting this honesty. 

But true competitors or sportspersons answer that com- 
ment with, but someone also has to win. And it is the winners, 
who contribute to society or to the game of sport. 

When a true sportsperson loses, he does not want sympa- 



Coors, popcorn, Cosell 

thy or to be given anything, just to earn another chance. He 
goes back to the practice field or to the laboratory or to thi 
factory or to the office or to the classroom — and works 01 
improving. Losing is an exercise in both humility and hon- 
esty. 

Winning is honesty, and wanting to win is everything. The 
only way to be honest to yourself when you step onto the 1 
clay tennis courts, or the wooden basketball courts, or the; 
stubborn wrestling mats, or the first tee, is to try for victory. 

If winning means defeating another person, as it most 
often does — then so be it. People should not be ashamed of 
wanting to match their skills against the skills of another. To! 
do so is natural and honest. 

To castigate those who participate in the game is to 
degrade competition and to degrade competition is to 
degrade human instinct. 

But there is more to the game than simply the participants. 
There are others involved in the broad perspective of sport, 
and as athletic programs grow in size in major colleges and 
universities, those other people become very important. 

The purple-clad fan, the officials, the coaches, the statisti- 
cians, the newspaper reporters, the radio announcers, and 
even the people who prepare the playing field are part of the 
game — the game of people. 

But what draws these, often overzealous people to drop all 
their activities for a short time to attend a show where the 
center stage is often not the most exciting thing to watch. 

The charisma of sport centers on the people involved. Not 
just the ones wearing university-issued togs but also those 
participants in the stands, on the court, or by the radio. Each, 
without the other, could not exist. And all, without the sport, 
would perish. <■> 

Honesty — it's the game. It's the winner. 



242 — Sports introduction 



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Sports introduction — 243 



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244 — Men's baseball 



Proud diamond nine capture best record ever 



The season's outcome came down 
to a three-game series with league- 
leading Oklahoma, but the K-State 
baseball team could not turn the trick. 
Oklahoma swept two of the three 
games which were crucial to K-State, 
leaving OU to take the Big 8 Title. 

But the Wildcats did not seem to be 
overly disappointed with their 31-16 
record, the best ever at K-State. This 
team's overall victory mark was 1 1 
higher than any other Wildcat baseball 
team had ever recorded. The squad 
finished 14-7 in Big 8 competition, a 
record good enough for second place. 

K-State's successful season did not 
begin furiously, as the team was 5-5 in 
late March. After taking two victories 
from Creighton and splitting a double- 
header with Missouri Western, the 
Wildcats entered their first league 
game with a record of 8-8. But three 
home games from Nebraska and two 
of three away games from Kansas 
boosted the Wildcat record. 

Picking up momentum, the squad 
had a seven game winning streak by 



late April. Among those games were 
three from Oklahoma State giving the 
Wildcats sole possession of second 
place for the first time that season. 

Phil Wilson, in his second season as 
head coach, cited sluggishness in the 
early innings as the reason for K- 
State's poor showing in their opening 
games. He attributed the team's sud- 
den turnabout as being "more of a 
self-instilled attitude by my players 
than anything I had specifically done. 
They simply decided they wanted to 
win," Wilson said. "And more impor- 
tantly, they're having fun playing the 
game." 

Wilson cited improved pitching as a 
major factor in his team's improve- 
ment. This pitching came from Stu Lin- 
dell, Andy Replogle, Ted Powers, and 
Les Sutton. Lindell finished with a 4-1 
season including a no-hitter during the 
Cat's final home stand. Sophomore 
Replogle from Indiana had a record of 
8-2 on the season after Oklahoma 
took two of three games in Manhattan 



to sack the league title. 

Steve Anson, Lon Kruger, Curt 
Shockey and Dave Specht led the 
Wildcat battles through the mid-sea- 
son surge. 

"Our mental attitude has improved 
1 50 per cent over last season," Wilson 
said. "We've got the feeling we can 
win. It's very easy to see the differ- 
ence. Now every time the players put 
on a purple and white uniform, they're 
proud to be a part of K-State," Wilson 
said of the change. 

Top left: A Cat slide into third base is unsuccess- 
ful as the umpire makes his decisive call. Bottom 
left: A late throw from a Friend's infielder is 
enough to allow a successful K-State steal dur- 
ing the fifth inning of a close game. Bottom right: 
Baseball Team — Top row: Dale Allerheiligen, 
Steve Anson, Don Hoffman, Mike Hampton, 
Andy Replogle, Ted Powers, Jay Parker, Bob 
Brasher. Second row: Ken Lehrmann, Tim Whit- 
son, Jim McCormick, Lon Kruger, Gary Fisher, 
Les Sutton, Dave Tuttle, Curt Shockey, Carl Bai- 
ley, Rick Dreiling, Phil Wilson. Bottom row: Jim 
Peterson, Michael Delehanty, Craig Cooper, 
Gary Holub, Stu Lindell, Paul Klipowicz, Mike 
Chapman, Dave Specht, Steve Shelley. 







Men's baseball — 245 



Sackers strike out with 'firsts' 



Two weeks of practice. That's a 
short time to teach a young squad the 
fundamentals for winning softball. 
However, the Wildkitten softbaliers 
almost pulled it off, but a series of 
"firsts" got in their way. 

Out-of-state travel appeared on the 
Kitten schedule for the first time this 
season. This meant meeting nation- 
ally-rated competition like John F. 
Kennedy College from Wahoo, NB, 
and Southwest Missouri State. The 
record: out-of-staters 6, K-State 2. 

Battling Southwest Missouri State 
became another first, since the Mis- 
souri team won the nation's number 
one ranking in the national tourna- 
ment. Still, the Kittens managed to split 
a doubleheader with them. Shortstop 
Michele Swartz and second-sacker 
Judy Anderson hit their only home 
runs of the season to drive K-State 



past SMSU for a 10 to 7 win. 

Conference play opened with the 
Kittens pairing off against cross-state 
rival, Kansas. The Jayhawkers shut 
out K-State, 6 to 0. But the Kittens 
blanked the rest of the seven-team 
league, earning them a trip to the 
nationals. 

With no chance of meeting KU 
again, the Kittens took revenge on 
conference opponents Haskell Junior 
College, Ft. Hays State, Washburn, 
and Emporia State, outscoring them 
collectively 33 to 1 1 . Wichita State 
interrupted the Wildkitten march with a 
9 to 5 victory, but the Kittens hung on 
to secure the league's second place 
crown with a 4-2 record. 

Rain and mud had forced massive 
rescheduling in past seasons. This 
year the weather also scored a first — 
it cooperated. 






246 — Softball 



w. 





Volleyballers spike statistics despite height woes 



"Wanted: six pairs of rubbersoled 
stilts. Report to Ann Heider, Wildkitten 
volleyball coach." 

An odd request? Not when the aver- 
age height of the volleyball squad is 
five feet five inches. 

Despite the height detriment, this 
year's Kittens put together the best 
season in history, finishing second in 
the state tournament. This earned 
them a trip to the Association of Inter- 
collegiate Athletics for Women 
regional tourney at Lincoln, NB, where 
the team ground out an eighth place 
finish from a field of 15. 

Or, as the coach put it: "For what 
we had, we had a lot of power." 

The season started with a jinx- 
smashing victory over the Kansas Uni- 
versity squad at a quadrangular meet 
in Hays, the first time the Kittens had 
ever beaten KU. 

The Kittens had little trouble with in- 



state competition, except for Kansas. 
After that initial victory the Kittens 
came close but never managed to get 
by the Jayhawks again. 

Out-of-state competition was 
another matter, but Heider pointed to a 
notable improvement. Last season 
was the first time the Kittens faced out- 
side competition and they lost every 
game. This year, they won 22 out of 
102. 

Though three seniors started for the 
Kittens, only Judy Anderson had 
played all four years. So, inexperience 
had its effects too. Still, sophomores 
Cindy Corbin and Lorsey Tuttle closed 
out the season in fine form. Tuttle 
moved to the A-squad at mid-year and 
wound up with a 97 percent setting 
success. Corbin practically spiked the 
other teams to death at the state tour- 
ney. 

Leading the squad to its 24-20 



record was senior Pam Pearson, who 
Heider said could "jump like a rabbit", 
yet only stands 5'5". 

Heider praised the team's consist- 
ency. The Kittens completed 86 per- 
cent of attempted spikes, 92 percent 
of attempted sets, and 84 percent of 
their serves — about a 20 percent 
increase in each category over last 
year's statistics. 

All of this adds up to only one thing, 
says Heider, "a tremendously suc- 
cessful season." 

Top center: Loisann Tuley sets up the volleyball 
for a spike by a teammate. Top right: Wildkitten 
Volleyball Team — Top row: Brenda Meyer, 
Rose Tuttle, Kay Kennedy, Terri Akin, Peggy 
Hadachek. Second row: Delores Tuttle, Loisann 
Tuley, Pam Pearson, Cindy Corbin, Ann Estes, 
Ann Heider. Bottom row: Vicki Edmonds, Judy 
Anderson, Ann Spence, Betsy Locke, Sharon 
Moore, Barb Moses. Bottom center: Pam Pear- 
son executes a return during a game in the field- 
house. 



Volleyball — 247 








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Netters get latent racket wins 



Lack of practice and a light sched- 
ule contributed to a disappointing sea- 
son for the K-State tennis team, as it 
posted a 4-6 overall record and ranked 
sixth in the Big 8. 

"We could have done better," Karl 
Finney, coach for the Wildcats, said. 
"We never realized our maximum 
potential until too late." K-State won 
the last two matches against Nebraska 
and Washburn. 

"We had a late start," Finney said, 
"And our schedule was pretty light. 

"In fact, I would say we played half 
as many matches as the rest of the Big 
8." 

The Cats won only one Big 8 match, 



beating Nebraska 7-2. They were 
more successful against non-confer- 
ence opponents, losing only to Wichita 
State and Air Force. 

"We simply didn't play enough ten- 
nis to be competitive," Finney said. 

Top left: Tennis Team — Top row: Kent Magill, 
Michael Lynch, Randy Davis, Dan Johnson, Karl 
Finney. Bottom row: Don Dreher, Ron Dreher, 
Jeff Birk. Top center: Ron Dreher awaits the ball, 
preparing for the return. Bottom center: Wom- 
ens Tennis Team — Top row: Megan Franzman, 
Pat Stenzel, Pat Macke, Pat Bice, Pat Given, 
Linda Crandall, Kathy Mollet, Mynn Barrett, Bev- 
erly Yenzer. Bottom row: Christy Hrabe, Marisol 
Velez, Judy Casaert, Susie Sageser, Becky Bul- 
ler. Bottom right: Marisol Velez judges the speed 
of the ball as she begins her backhand. 




248 — Tennis 





Kitten lobbers grab state title 



The Wildkitten tennis team finished 
the 1974 season with a perfect 7-0 
record and the unofficial Kansas State 
Championship. 

The opening match in late Septem- 
ber set the season's tone. Ft. Hays 
State was the 1973 state champion 
and had beaten K-State on three occa- 
sions. But this time a crop of Kitten 
performers demolished the Hays crew, 
8to1. 

Twice the Kittens faced Baker Uni- 
versity. Twice the Baker squad was 
crushed, 9 to 0. Washburn fared no 
better, twice 9 to victims of the K- 
State netters. 

From down, the Kaw the Kansas 
Jayhawks were anxious to threaten. 
That match was set for October 3. 
Game day dawned bright and clear. 



The Kittens traveled 90 miles to Law- 
rence. 

At the same time, the Kansas squad 
was on its way to Manhattan. It was a 
mix-up. 

Eventually, the two rivals clashed. K- 
State emerged victorious, 7 to 2. 

For the fall season the Kittens com- 
piled a 39-3 singles record and an 
undefeated doubles score, 21-0. 

Coach Beverly Yenzer praised her 
players, emphasizing the balance and 
depth of the squad. She said she 
couldn't single out one performer as 
the key to the Kittens' success. 

"If anything we were a little disap- 
pointed in the season in that we didn't 
have better competition from several 
of our opponents," Yenzer said. 




Tennis — 249 



Optimistic harriers win NCAA qualifying race 



DeLoss Dodds, head cross country 
coach for K-State, viewed his 1974 
team with optimism at the start of the 
season. However, it seemed that with 
less than half the season past, he 
would have lost most of his hope for 
success. 

The Wildcat harriers placed high in 
their first three meets, finishing third 
behind first place Wichita State. 

With Jeff Schemmel taking medalist 
honors in all three meets, it looked as 
though the Wildcats, and Schemmel, 
would be doing well in 1974. But then 
the roof started to fall in. 

Don Akin, a senior who had lettered 
two years, was injured and would miss 
the rest of the season. It was also 
doubtful if Chris Perez would be able 
to run due to a foot ailment. Dodds' 
outlook didn't falter, however, and the 



Cats began to move. 

K-State had been a pre-season pick 
along with Missouri and Oklahoma to 
capture the Big 8 title. But, with the 
loss of Akin and Settle the title 
appeared beyond reach. Dodds put 
together his three juniors, Schemmel, 
Palmer, and Perez; one senior, John 
Gillaspie; and freshman runner Jim 
Nicolay; and set out for the conference 
meet in Ames, IA. 

The five harriers ran well, but 
because of an unexpected perform- 
ance by Iowa State, tying Missouri for 
the title, K-State finished third in the 
conference. 

Next stop for the Cats was the 
National Collegiate Athletic Associa- 
tion qualifying race. Palmer's third 
place Big 8 finish had already qualified 
him for the nationals. 



Dodds took his conference runners 
to the qualifying race. And this time it 
paid off as the Wildcats took first 
place. Schemmel placed third, with 
Palmer behind him. Perez bolstered 
the pace by placing tenth, with Gillas- 
pie taking 13th and Nicolay finishing 
26th. 

All five runners were off to the 
nationals. They ran into a little more 
trouble this time, however. National 
powers were too tough for the Cats as 
they finished 25th in a field of 93 
teams. 

That is how the Wildcats' cross 
country season ended. But Schemmel, 
Palmer, Perez, Nicolay, and Akin will 
return next year, and Dodds again will 
be able to look at his team optimisti- 
cally. 







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250 — Golf, Cross Country 






Meet pressures choke golfers 



Why can't we win? That is a ques- 
tion golt coach Ron Fogler has otten 
tried to answer. But he still can't solve 
the problem. 

Cat goiters emerged trom the Big 8 
tournament with a tirm hold on last 
place. 

"We don't have any confidence," 
Fogler said. "Sometimes we have low 
qualitying scores here at home but 
can't keep them down under the pres- 
sure ot meets." 

Fogler's problem is similar to many 
other links coaches. He has good 
material, but that materiaf has no 
desire to play well. 

"Golt is the type of game where an 
individual must make the decision that 
he wants to play. When a good high 
school golfer comes to K-State there 
are so many things here to distract him 
from his game — and an individual's 
golf game must be kept in shape con- 
stantly," Fogler said. 

Ten golfers lettered during the 1974 
spring season, and K-State partici- 



pated in five tournaments. 

Next year Fogler said he plans to 
concentrate his attention on the low 
qualifiers for the first meets, and make 
excellent players out of them. 

"The Athletic Department can't 
afford to spend the kind of money nec- 
essary to build a great program, and I 
can accept that," Fogler said. 

"But we should be able, with the 
money we have, to be competing 
neck-and-neck with at least four of the 
Big 8 teams." 

Top right: Varsity Golf — Top row: Ron Schme- 
demann, Kim Swearingen, Terry Brennan, Bob 
Peel, Brent Olney, Mark Lindblom, Paul Ander- 
son, Ron Fogler. Second row: Mark Coco, Steve 
Kaup, John Hensley, Butch Thames. Bottom 
left: Cross Country Team — Top row: Craig 
McVey, Jim Nicolay, Doug Weber, Chris Perez, 
John Gillaspie, Mark Denning, Jim Hinchliffe, 
Ted Settle, DeLoss Dodds. Second row: Tony 
Sharp, Jim Fleming, Bob Prince, Blaine Camp- 
bell, Keith Palmer, Jett Schemmel, Roger Win- 
ter, Lennie Harrison. Bottom center: Golf team 
member Scott Bunker executes a chip shot. 



Golf, Cross Country — 251 




Thinclads capture indoor title — finish best ever 



Prior to K-State's 1974 track and 
field encounters, head coach DeLoss 
Dodds commented that the key to a 
winning season would come from 
"good Wildcat people beating every- 
one else's good people." 

Such was the case as Cats enjoyed 
their finest year in the school's history, 
capturing the Big 8 Indoor Meet 
besides several outstanding perform- 
ances on the Midwest Relays' outdoor 
circuit. 

The thinclads toured through an 
undefeated indoor campaign, capped 
by a tenth place finish in the National 
Collegiate Athletic Association cham- 
pionships at Detroit, Ml. The Cats were 
also tabbed as the nation's second- 
ranked indoor squad at the season's 
end. 

Tracksters Dean Williams (sprints), 
Mike Lee (sprints-hurdles), Jeff 
Schemmel (mile), Keith Palmer (mile), 
Don Akin (middle distances), Bob 
Obee (javelin), Lennie Harrison (mid- 
dle distances), Vance Roland 
(hurdles), and Ted Settle (distances) 
combined their individual efforts to 
lead K-State on its outdoor surge with 



the Texas, Kansas, and Drake relays 
serving as stomping grounds. 

The four-mile relay combo of Akin, 
Schemmel, Palmer, and Settle high- 
lighted the circuit invasion as the Cat 
distance-runners swept past competi- 
tion to emerge undefeated. 

"I don't think there's a team in the 
nation that can run with our four mil- 
ers," assistant coach Terry Holbrook 
commented. "There are lots of 
schools that have two good milers, but 
none with four good horses. And you 
can't have a weak leg — or you lose. ' ' 

Half-milers making up the two-mile 
relay were not to be slighted either, as 
John Feltner, Bob Prince, Jim Hin- 
chliffe, and Harrison took their event to 
Texas and Kansas for first place hon- 
ors. 

Several career best performances 
also highlighted a track campaign 
referred to by Dodds as "one which 
showed a great deal of competitive 
spirit on everyone's part." 

Big 8 champion Vance Roland 
clocked a career best of 13.5 seconds 
at the Drake Relays' low hurdles event 
while milers Palmer and Schemmel uti- 



lized lengthy strides to break the tape 
as sub-four minute milers. Their times 
of 3:59.2 and 3:59.4, respectively, 
took place at the U.S. Track and Field 
Federation meet in Wichita. 

Half-miler Jim Hinchliffe, third in the 
Big 8, boasted a career top of 1 :50.7 
at the LSU Quadrangular in Baton 
Rouge, LA, as did Lennie Harrison 
with a time of 1:49.7. 

Top left: Track Team — Top row: DeLoss 
Dodds, John Hardwick, Paul Baltzer, Allan 
Moore, Lonnie Harrison, John Gillaspie, Roger 
Winter, Dave Piatt, Jack Loomis, Darrel Bennet, 
Mike Lee, Jim Hardin, Lawrence Combs, Dean 
Williams, Roger Prodey. Middle row: Phil King, 
Brad Daurelton, David Tholstrop, Robert Obee, 
Rick Slifer, Bob Fingland, Bob Prince, Don Akin, 
Tim Porter, Don Marrs, Jim Williams, Keith 
Peterson, Vance Rollands. Bottom row: James 
Hinchlitfe, Fred Merrill, John Feltner, Keith 
Palmer, Chris Muehlbach, Bill Kehmeier, Ted 
Settle, Jeff Schemmel, Al Kolarik, Craig McVey, 
Dave Garcia. Top center: Gary Geist lets the 
shot fly during an indoor dual. Top right: Dean 
Williams gives a sign of power as he finishes the 
anchor leg of a winning 440 relay team. Bottom 
right: Jubilant tracksters raise the trophy for the 
Big 8 indoor championship above their heads. 
K-State had an undefeated indoor season. 



252 — Track 






Track — 253 





254 — Women's track/cross country 




Harriers, tracksters fare well 



Wildkitten track and cross country 
teams made strong showings in 1974 
competition. 

The cross country runners brought 
home a third place tinish in the 
national cross country championships 
at Ames, IA. Previously, no Wildkitten 
team in any sport had placed that 
high. This year was the first official 
season for the harriers. 

"I can't say enough good things 
about the team," Coach Barry Ander- 
son said. "They're the most enthusias- 
tic group I've ever worked with." 

Joyce Urish led the female contin- 
gent. She finished eighth out of 107 at 
nationals, captured first place at the 
Missouri Valley Amateur Athletic Union 
Championship, and set two school 
records — times of 1 5:04 for two and 
one-half miles and 1 1 :48.2 for a two- 
mile race. 

The efforts of her teammates Becky 
Koster, Jane Wittmeyer, Roselyn Fry, 
Barb Eakin, Karen Brinker, and Janet 
Rickey helped bring the season record 
to: three victories in three dual meets; 
a first-place finish at a six-team invita- 
tional in Springfield, MO; two second 
place berths in the Northwest Missouri 
Invitational and the Missouri Valley 
Amateur Athletic Union Champion- 
ship. 

"If they work as hard as they did last 
year, they're going to be super next 
year." 

Wildkitten tracksters also experi- 
enced an exceptional 1974 spring 
season. 

The Kittens finished no worse than 
second in every regular season meet 
they entered, capturing three outright. 

Taking their own invitational in Feb- 
ruary, the Kittens outperformed Colo- 
rado's Gold Track Club, 49 to 41 . 

The Kittens' primary spring competi- 
tion was Iowa State. In the three meets 
which both schools entered, K-State 
always finished second to ISU. At the 
seven-team Southwest Missouri State 



Interstate meet, ISU scored 165, the 
Kittens 1 1 9. Then, at the Women's Big 
8 championships in April, the score 
was ISU 200 to K-State's 129. And 
once again, on May 3, ISU claimed 
first with K-State second at the Iowa 
State Relays. 

But the Kittens did more than give 
chase to ISU. Against four other state 
squads at its own invitational, K-State 
tripled the score of second place Ft. 
Hays State. K-State had another big 
win one week later, when the Kittens 
topped an eight-team field at the Bear- 
cat Relays in Maryville, MO. 

This strong showing was topped 
when the Kittens earned ninth place in 
the nationals. 

At the AIWA National Champion- 
ships in Denton, TX, Susie Norton led 
the Kittens with a second place finish 
by heaving the javelin 156'6". Marsha 
Poppe took fourth in the same event. 

The mile relay team of Brinker, 
Eakin, Janet Reusser, and Peggy 
Johns sped to a third place finish. 
Their finishing time of 3:58.6 broke the 
championships' record. Reusser's fifth 
place medal in the 400-meter hurdles 
ended the Wildkitten effort. 

Norton and Poppe advanced to the 
AAU Nationals in Bakersfield, CA, 
where Norton set a school javelin 
record of 1 56'1 0" and placed seventh. 
Poppe came in eleventh. 

Fourteen of the 18 school records 
were broken by the Kittens during the 
1974 season. 

Top left: Wildkitten Track — Top row: Becky 
Goering, Lennis Yarrow. Second row: Janet 
Reusser, Pam Pearson, Karen Brinker, Diane 
Grout. Third row: Kathy Wasserman, Debra 
Dudley, Lanette Arnoldy, Peggy Johns. Fourth 
row: Becky Koster, Joyce Urish, Nancy Benin- 
gus, Marsha Poppe. Fifth row: Kay Kennedy, 
Susie Norton, Teresa Biery, Barb Eakin. Bottom 
row: Selma Goering, Barry Anderson. Bottom 
left: Debra Dudley shows the form needed to fol- 
low through on a discus heave. Bottom center: 
Mia Brewer finishes a heave in a dual meet at K- 
State's new Christian Field. 



Women's track / cross country — 255 



Gridders lack 

By Scott Kraft 

By all indications, the Wildcats 
should have been consistently clim- 
bing the ranks of the football "Top 
Twenty" for the last three years. They 
have astro-turf, new playing and living 
facilities, and a flock of professors who 
coach football. But they have iacked 
an integral ingredient to football pow- 
ers — a winning tradition. 

Students have yet to realize that 
football was the philanthropist for 
other K-State sports. 

Witnessing some colleges abandon- 
ing their football teams has not helped 
the morale of cellar-dwelling college 
teams. 

Up in arms over last year's 5-6 fin- 
ish, some alumni threatened Coach 
Vince Gibson with his job. His optimis- 
tic outlooks were often turning into los- 
ing seasons. 

Then, Gibson gave his ultimatum — 
a winning team or a new coach. He 



winning tradition 

said he would resign if he did not win, 
because he would know he could do 
no more for K-State football. 

More of Gibson's optimistic rhetoric 
emerged during spring practice. But 
columnists and sports writers were 
predicting the autumn downfall of a 
very young K-State team. Purple pride 
may have been dying, but the coaches 
were enthusiastic. 

The early grandstand mood was 
typical of the situation — fans were 
not ready to view losing football 
endeavors. Gibson's job was on the 
line, and the fans — from die-hard to 
results-readers knew it had to be the 
year of the Cats — or Gibson wouldn't 
be back. 



Top center: Grogan is brought down by WSU 
defenders after a first down gain Top right: 
Defensive tackle Bill Crosby solemnly views the 
Mississippi State game from the sidelines. Bot- 
tom left: Grogan begins his roll-out pass with a 
defender in pursuit Bottom center: Vince Gib- 
son ponders his Team's performance. 






256 — Varsity football 



\ 



€ 





Pre-season wins create atypical fan responses 



Fans drained slowly out of the 
stands, cars inched away from the sta- 
dium parking lot, and the players trot- 
ted for the locker room. There was no 
big hurry it seemed — no anticipation 
or excitement about next week's 
game. 

This was the uneasy mood which 
followed each of the pre-Big 8 home 
games. People were not leaving the 
sparsely populated stands dejectedly, 
but rather with fear. Most of them were 
afraid of the next game and the possi- 
bility of landing in the Big 8 mortuary. 

Tulsa, one of the better teams in the 
Missouri Valley, showed little strength 
in the Cat's season premiere and the 
Cyclones fell 31 to 14. But the Cats 
didn't leave the game without a scare. 

The Cyclones recognized an over- 
confident and lax attitude in the Cat 



ball club, and brought the score to 1 7 
to 14. Tulsa's try for an upset was 
thwarted, however, when Les Chaves, 
cornerback, picked up a blocked Tulsa 
punt and scored. 

Wichita State fans and players made 
the three-hour drive to Manhattan 
expecting to see the emergence of a 
new rivalry. If they came to see good 
football they were disappointed. 

Neither team looked good, but the 
Cats came out on top with the final 
score, 1 7 to 0. 

First-string quarterback Steve Gro- 
gan was injured in the first half of the 
WSU game. Coach Vince Gibson said 
Grogan's neck injury gave the 
momentum of the game to WSU. 

At the next weekend's game, Pacific 
sank at the hands of the Wildcat 
eleven, 38-7. For the first time in the 



season, the Cats showed sparks of a 
promising football team. This win 
marked the first time since 1939 K- 
State had won their first three games. 

The last pre-Big 8 game was against 
Mississippi State, the strongest team 
the Cats had faced thus far. MSU dealt 
K-State its first loss of the season, 21 - 
16, in Mississippi. 

Although plagued with fumble wor- 
ries through the first three games, the 
Cats had yet to be victimized by their 
mistakes. MSU, however, turned Wild- 
cat mistakes into Bulldog points. 

In the four games, K-State had pen- 
etrated the 24-yard line 23 times, turn- 
ing the ball over 1 of those times. 

"We can't make those mistakes next 
week against Kansas and win," Gib- 
son said. 



Varsity football — 257 



ck, time, points run short for Wildcats again 



Once again K-State was invaded by 
its neighbors down the Kaw. 

Once again Kansas was favored. 

Once again it was a close ballgame. 

And once again K-State bowed. 

The Wildcats were two yards and 
seconds short of a victory on the 
windy, cool Saturday which spelled 
their doom. With the score 20 to 13, 
Cat quarterback Steve Grogan was 
stopped by five blue and red defend- 
ers on the two-yard line, with no time 
left. A 77-yard drive had ended in no 
score, and<no win. 

The game, however, was not always 
close. There was a time, at the end of 
the first half, when some Cat fans 
would have been happy to take their 
purple hats off to the final strains of the 
Alma Mater immediately — so as not 
to suffer the embarrassment of a 
trouncing. 

Leading 12 to at the half, Kansas 
was showing only some of the form 



which helped them defeat fifth-ranked 
Texas A & M a week earlier. If the Jay- 
hawks snapped out of their stupor, 
some fans thought, the Cats would be 
in trouble. 

A different K-State team emerged 
from the locker room for the second 
half. The Cats stopped KU's momen- 
tum, showing some of their offensive 
prowess by scoring twice in the third 
quarter. 

A 39-yard pass completion netted 
the Cats their first lead, 1 3 to 1 2. A 51 - 
yard Jayhawk run from scrimmage 
boosted KU ahead, 20 to 13. The Cats 
could not come back. 

As Gibson said later, the K-Staters 
were not allowed a break. With sec- 
onds remaining in the third quarter, an 
electrical failure in the scoreboard o 
clock caused the timing indicator to 
stop. 

So K-State battled the clock and the 
Jayhawks — each proving too much 



of an obstacle for the upset-minded 
Cats. 

The final score was 20 to 13, not an 
impressive victory for the Jayhawks, 
but a victory all the same. 

If near-wins had been recorded, the 
Cats would have been sitting well at 
this juncture in the season. But such is 
football — the team with the least 
points loses. 

In their two losses thus far, the Cats 
had come on with enough strength, 
but always too late, and belated 
awards or extra minutes are not given 
to settle close games. 

Top right: A Jayhawk gridder bites the astro turf 
as Lou Wegerer, Rickey Gray, and Roy Shine 
close in on the play. Bottom left: Vince Gibson 
ponders the situation as he and offensive line 
coach Ted Heath view KU's first touchdown. 
Bottom center: Cat center Robert Baker and 
offensive tackle Carmen Trevitt show exuber- 
ance as K-State makes a critical first down. Bot- 
tom right: John Tuttle gets shutdown by Kansas 
defenders after a handoff from quarterback 
Steve Grogan. 








Varsity football — 259 




260 — Varsity football 




Gridder repairs can't fix OU 




Many K-State fans left the Missouri 
game early. And it seemed there were 
others who would have liked to leave 
— but they were playing on the field. 

Missouri, K-State's eighth season 
opponent and fourth league opponent, 
took advantage of a sluggish fourth 
quarter to steal any spark of hope for a 
Cat upset. 

At the end of the third quarter the 
Cats were still in the game, behind 24 
to 15. 

"We just stopped hitting people in 
the fourth quarter," Gibson said. "It 
was a pitiful, pitiful exhibition." 

K-State's fumbles told much of the 
story. Nine fumbles, three of which 
gave Missouri the ball on the Cat 27-, 
20-, and 33-yard lines, contributed to 
the 52 to 1 5 loss. 

"We aren't the same football team 
we were three weeks ago," Gibson 
said. "I don't know why. We got back 
into the game and then we couldn't 
stop them." 

Those three games began with Iowa 
State two weeks before. Only five 
points separated the two teams at the 
end of regulation time. 

Penalties and a big play killed the 
Cats at Ames. Trailing 14 to 10, the 
Cats elected to go for an onside kick. 
The kick was recovered by ISU, giving 
them favorable field position. Seven 
plays later the Cyclones scored. 

Six precious minutes of the fourth 
quarter were used before the Cats 
scored on a 1 5-yard pass to John Tut- 
tle. Grogan made the two-point con- 
version. The Cyclone's remaining two 
points were scored when Grogan was 
caught in his own endzone late in the 
game. 

Crawling into the next week's prac- 
tice, the Cats expected the worst. The 
opponent — Oklahoma. 

Oklahoma teams do not tend to 
build egos of their opponents, and K- 
State's bout with the Sooners was no 
different. Both teams played their 
entire squad before the packed Nor- 



man Stadium, with the final score a not 
surprising 63 to Cat loss. K-Staters 
had expected it. 

Before the OU game, Gibson said K- 
State would need 12 rather than the 
usual 1 1 athletes. 

"Head Oklahoma coach Barry 
Switzer is a nice guy, maybe he'll let us 
do it," Gibson said. 

On their first series, the Cats took 
the ball to the OU 30-yard line, where 
Grogan was dropped for a 1 0-yard 
loss. From that point on the Cats didn't 
have a chance. 

K-State's record following the Mis- 
souri game was 3-5, down from the 3- 
1 record the Cats held going into the 
Big 8 season. 

There were three games left and the 
Cats were still looking for their first 
league win. 

Top left: An Iowa State runner is brought down 
by two Cat defenders after a short gain. Top 
center: Sophomore fullback Roscoe Scobey 
carries ISU defenders on his back as he 
stretches for an extra yard. Bottom left: Varsity 
Football Team — Top row: Dean Pryor, Ron 
Dickerson, Ted Heath, Dewey Warren, Bruce 
Mays, Bill Cox, Bob Weber, Jesse Branch, 
Bobby Jackson, Dick Strahm. Second row: Tom 
DeLaHunt, Axel Hedberg, Don Lareau, David 
Hernandez, Bill Crosby, Dean Williams, Bud 
Peterson, Steve Grogan, Don Parham, A. J. 
Smith, Mike Taylor. Third row: Kirk Darland, Tom 
Winchell, Johnny Andrews, Oliver Jones, Mark 
Kozak, Greg Whelan, David Cooper, Lou Weg- 
erer, Tim Wasemiller, Perry Viers, Verdell Jones, 
Mark Zier, John Tuttle. Fourth row: Kent Brown, 
Tom Merrifield, Charley Kilgore, Rocky Osborn, 
Gary Bogue, Theopilis Bryant, Bob Jeffries, Mike 
Roberts, Regan Steiner, Roger Stucky, Jim Lem- 
bright, Carl Pennington. Fifth row: Rickey Gray, 
James Couch, Carmen Trevitt, Alton Carson, 
Jim Cooper, Bill Sinovic, Ron Mersch, Ron Pay- 
ton, Greg Petree, Larry Roy, Vic Chandler, Doug 
Moeckel. Sixth row: Carlos Whitfield, L. T. 
Edwards, Dave Chambliss, David Cheves, Ray 
Long, Robert Baker, Chuck Hogan, Arthur Bai- 
ley, Marvin Switzer, Stan Ross, Shelby Hender- 
son. Seventh row: Hardden Weech, Billy Dixon, 
Roscoe Scobey, Denny Gragg, Hal Batdorf, Paul 
Smith, Art Harris, Dennis Frazee, Henry Lige. 
Bottom row: Vince Gibson, Pat Clerihan, David 
Spare, Gary Freeman, Bob Brandt, Gordon 
Chambliss, Kim Thomas, Ron Solt, Dave Specht, 
Les Chaves. 



Varsity football — 261 



Gridders end with winning note 



Football fans breathed a sigh of 
relief after the Colorado game on that 
cold, windy Saturday afternoon. K- 
State had just won its only Big 8 game 
of the season. A seven game losing 
streak — and possibly the losing jinx 
— had been broken. K-State had 
proven it could win against high cali- 
ber competition. 

For the entire regular season fans 
had seen an improving Wildcat team 
show sparks of excellence. But the 
Cats just couldn't seem to show 
enough excellence to win. Neverthe- 
less, a respectable season had been 
salvaged. 

Oklahoma State and Nebraska had 
proven too stiff of competition for the 
Cats. The purple could hold on to the 
game for little more than a half, it 
seemed, before the ball would slip out 
from under them and begin rolling. K- 
State fell to Oklahoma State, 29 to 5, 
and Nebraska, 35 to 7. 

But the season ended on a mellow 
note that cold Saturday in November. 
Kerwin Cox, a fourth string tailback 
brought up from the junior varsity, sur- 
prised many K-Staters as he led the 



Cats to a 33 to 19 victory over the 
Buffs. 

Because of injuries to two of the 
three varsity tailbacks, Cox was moved 
up to the second spot for the Colorado 
game. When starter L. T. Edwards left 
the game with an injury, Cox was 
called upon. He responded to the 
challenge with 78 yards in 14 carries. 
Cox's performance was just one of the 
headaches Colorado faced that after- 
noon. 

Grogan continually pierced the con- 
fused Colorado defense with his sharp 
throws. He managed to mix running 
plays with completed passes to attack 
the Buffs. 

K-State finished the season with a 4- 
7 record. 

Top center: Dave Specht awaits a waist-high 
pass from Steve Grogan. Top right: Jim Couch 
scores six points for the Cats against Colorado. 
Bottom left: Fullback Roscoe Scobey is sur- 
rounded by Nebraska defenders after a short 
gain. Bottom center: Coach Gibson explains a 
piece of strategy to two of his players at the 
Nebraska game. Bottom right: After the Colo- 
rado victory, K-State President James McCain 
congratulates Gibson and his team for their only 
Big 8 win. 







262 — Varsity football 







Varsity football — 263 



Grogan and football: co-existing 



By Scott Kraft 

Football at the college level is a 
rough game. K-State quarterback 
Steve Grogan has been in the midst of 
it four years. 

Grogan, who stands 6'2" and 
weighs 200 pounds, looks like the typi- 
cal football player. His big hands and 
rugged appearance indicate long 
hours of hard grid work. He is a gradu- 
ating senior, and like several other ath- 
letes his age, is looking forward to the 
pro draft. 

Grogan has seen many sides of 
football. He has seen the little league 
and high school sides of the game 
from his home town of Ottawa. He has 
seen K-State football from the bench 
as well as the starting lineup. 

Not surprisingly, Steve Grogan 
wants to be a physical education 
teacher some day. Coaches and foot- 
ball have done many things for him 
during his life, he said. 

Fans rarely get to know football from 
the inside, that is, the rifts, the happi- 
ness, the depression, or the drawn-out 
procedure of getting psyched or men- 
tally prepared for a contest. Grogan 
knows those things from the inside — 
he has been there. 

Grogan said the way a player pre- 
pares himself mentally for a contest 
can be his greatest asset or liability. 
The way Grogan prepares determines 
the way he plays. 

"When I sit in the locker room 
before going out to the field, I think of 
many things. Each of us has worked 
hard for a week in preparation for this 
game and each person knows what he 
must do. Sometimes I imagine myself 
doing something good — being the 
hero. It is an appropriate time for being 
quiet." 

The night before a Saturday game is 
a crucial one for Grogan. He must get 
his sleep, he said, and too much think- 
ing about the game can result in 
insomnia. Usually, he watches some 
old movies in the Union while munch- 
ing on candy. 

"A good laugh or funny movie 
always keeps me relaxed," he said. 
"Staying loose is the important thing." 

Not unlike other K-Staters, Grogan 
meets with his parents the morning of 
a game. The talk is usually restricted to 



nongame subjects, though. 

Positive thinking is an important ele- 
ment in success, Grogan says. "You 
must think positively to perform well 
but also to realize your potential to 
overcome the bad things you do," 
Grogan said. "There is a certain 
amount of self-respect — even cocki- 
ness — involved in gaining confidence 
and overcoming hurdles." 

Losing is nothing new to the Wild- 
cats, however, as they finished the 
season 4-7, falling to all but one of 
their conference opponents. But that 
one win, coming against Colorado in 
the final season game partly made up 
for the poor season, Grogan said. 

"We were playing for pride against 
Colorado. It was a long and frustrating 
season, but when we won one, I was 
just sorry it was all over," Grogan 
added. 

Grogan is quick to place some of the 
blame for the poor season on himself. 
"I just wish I could have done some- 
thing to help have a winning football 
season," he said. "Around here the 
fans are the greatest people in the 
world — that's one of the big reasons I 
came here." 

Grogan has a realistic attitude 
toward losing, though. 

"Part of sports is luck and part is 
making things happen. One thing 
about sports — you don't know the 
outcome and you have to play and 
accept whatever happens." 

Grogan has been accepting what 
has happened — that being consist- 
ent losing seasons at K-State — 
throughout his last two years here. But 
he still retained his optimism. 

"If the fans stick with it, I think they 
will have a winning season very soon," 
he said. 

As for Grogan, he is hopeful that his 
losing seasons have ended and that 
the sight and fruit of victory are in his 
future. 

Top center: Steve Grogan ponders his role in the 
upcoming game against Missouri. Top right: 
Grogan and his roommate Ron Solt, a defensive 
player, enjoy a movie in the Union Little Theatre 
on a Friday night. Bottom center: Grogan 
receives instructions from Coach Vince Gibson 
and an assistant. Bottom right Grogan chats 
with Gibson's son in the locker room before tak- 
ing the field for the final Big 8 game of his career 
— against Colorado. 





264 — Football profile 



: 






Football profile — 265 



?:^^m$m*-.. 



Gibson: Purple pride 

By Scott Kraft 

Football seasons are funny things. They can go by with the 
speed of a bowl game or drag with the dreariness of a rainy 
afternoon practice. Vince Gibson's K-State career began 
with the rainy practices and ended just short of the bowl 
game. It was an era K-Staters are not likely to forget. 

Seven short seasons. That's all. In just seven short sea- 
sons one man gave Kansas State a football program — plus 
a little bit of pride. 

When the crewcut Gibson walked into his office for the first 
time as K-State head football coach he looked like a take- 
charge person. His broad smile and slender tie, stylish for the 
day, more than offset his broad face and shoulders, making 
his presence unmistakable. 

There are two facets of K-State football. Before Vince and 
after Vince. 

The Gibson era began in 1967 when two fitting parts met 
each other — a coach looking for a promising program and 
a promising program looking for a coach. Gibson recognized 
K-State's untapped resources. 

In 1961, six years BV, the Wildcats' two upset wins were 
their only sparks of hope as the team finished last in the con- 
ference for the third straight year. One year BV, the mighty 
Cats finished 0-9-1 , the tie coming at Kansas. K-State frosh 
won its first game in nine years in 1 966, and the program was 
on its way up. 

After Vince came to K-State, the program immediately 
began to look up. Gibson was an excellent recruiter and an 
optimist. "We gonna win" became his byword. 

He urged alumni to wear purple, printed bumper stickers 
saying "We Got Pride", and urged mass rallies to gather stu- 
dent support. Winning football was Gibson's promise. His 
southern drawl and choppy vocabulary originated many 
football slogans. In a concentrated effort, Gibson gave the 
fans pride — "purple pride". 

Under Gibson, K-State's vibrant purple was brought to 
national fame. Purple toilet paper was thrown at the games, 
purple underwear was being sold at reputable stores, and 
well-to-do business persons were wearing bright purple 
sports jackets to work. Gibson's pride program was working. 

Gibson began his K-State career by breaking the Cat win- 
less streak with a victory over Colorado State. His 1-9 finish 
did not bother the fans. They had seen a new Cat team take 
the field in 1 967 — a Cat team with the potential to win. 

Along with Gibson's second season came the first of a 
long line of successful K-State athletes. Mack Herron, Lynn 
Dickey, and Mike Montgomery all played for that 1968 team. 
Final record for 1 968 was 4-6, the first time in 1 3 years a K- 
State football team had won four games. The Cats were 
finally out of the Big 8 cellar, tying for sixth. 

However, Gibson said he wasn't satisfied with breaking 
records which had stood for decades — he wanted a bowl 
game. In 1969, K-State finished the season with a 5-5 mark, 



mentor leaves kingdom 



losing close contests to Penn State, Missouri, Oklahoma 
State and Colorado. A 59 to 21 win over Oklahoma high- 
lighted the season. K-State's 59 points still stand as the 
most points scored on Oklahoma. After its OU win, K-State 
was ranked tenth in the Associated Press and United Press 
International polls of coaches and sports writers. The Cats 
appeared to be on their way up. 

1 970 was a crucial year for the Wildcats. Through anothei 
move of financial wizardry, the Athletic Department raisec 
the money for a guarter of a million dollars worth of synthetic 
turf. More than 27,000 season tickets were sold that year. 

Then came the turning point in the love affair between Gib- 
son and K-State: K-State was suspended from appearing or 
television or in a bowl game because of recruiting violations 
The Cats finished the 1970 season 6-5, sending more thar 
1 1 players to post-season all-star games. A 5-2 conference 
mark was good enough for second in the Big 8. It had been i 
long haul, but a Cat football team had finally become i 
power. 

Gibson's last four years at K-State were downhill. Plaguec 
by the bowl game restriction, K-State felt a recruiting pinch 
and money played a part in the downfall. The football pro 
gram simply did not have enough money to recruit all the 
good players it needed. Student support waned from disin 
terest in the football program to spiteful hatred because o 
the effects football was having on other sports. 

Some alumni were after Gibson. Most alumni were worriec 
about the lack of support Gibson was getting. Season ticke 
sales were down, and K-State had stopped winning. Fans 
who had become fat on the exhilaration of winning seasons 
were starving for more wins. Those hungry people wen 
becoming agitated. 

At the close of the 1 974 season Gibson would have a yea 
left on his contract. Athletic Director Ernie Barret 
announced in November Gibson would not be fired, leavint 
the decision up to Gibson. After six losses in the Big 8, K 
State approached its final game of the season — Colorado 
K-State won, taking Vince Gibson off the field on purpl< 
shoulders. Two days later Gibson announced his resigna 
tion. It was "best for K-State," he said. 

Ellis Rainsberger, offensive line coach at Wisconsin, wa 
chosen in late December as Gibson's replacement. 

He began his rule in the purple kingdom by tapping threi 
of Gibson's staff members — Jesse Branch, Bob Weber, ant 
Dean Pryor — to join his own staff. Although he began hi 
recruiting later than other coaches, Rainsberger said he wa 
optimistic about his chances in the Big 8. 

Gibson, meanwhile accepted a head coaching position £ 

Louieville. 

Would purple pride die? No one knew for sure but on 
thing was certain: Gibson had whetted K-State's victor 
appetite, and it was ready for more. 



■Gibson 




Gibson — 267 







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sITATE 1 



STATE 



-STATF 



,: iTtfE 






JE 







K-STATE 



Yearlings down Kansas twice, finish season 3-1 



While other universities were either 
deemphasizing or cutting out their jun- 
ior varsity programs completely, K- 
State's JV football team was busy 
compiling a 3-1 record for the season. 

Two victories over Kansas Univer- 
sity highlighted the season for the 
young Cats. In their season opener 
they beat the Jayhawks at Lawrence, 
20 to 1 4. Then in a rematch at Manhat- 
tan, they again handed KU a defeat, 
this time by a score of 27 to 16, in a 
game which was more of a rout than 
the final score indicated. K-State's 
other win was also a runaway, this 
time over Tulsa by a score of 45 to 20. 
Their only loss was to Nebraska, 24 to 
10 at Lincoln. 

Coached by Ron Dickerson, the 
Cats were led in rushing by Kerwin 
Cox. The speedster ended the season 
with a 4.8 rushing average. Quarter- 
back Joe Hatcher was also an impor- 
tant part of the offense as he threw for 
four touchdowns and completed a 



sizzling 57 percent of his passes, 21 of 
37. Larry Roy was the leading receiver 
on the team as he hauled in 10 recep- 
tions for 277 total yards, good enough 
for a nifty average of 27.7 yards per 
catch. David Cooper, another 
receiver, tied Hatcher for the team's 
scoring lead with 1 8 points. 

The defense was also an important 
part of K-State's success. They 
allowed only 18 points a game and 
caused their opponents to fumble a 
total of 23 times. Their pass defense 
was particularly tough as they allowed 
only 453 total yards through the air 
and allowed the opponent to complete 
only about 33 percent of its passes. 

All in all, Coach Dickerson termed 
the season very successful. 

"I'm really pleased with my 
players," he said. "They never let 
down — they gave 100 percent at all 
times: There are a couple of players on 
this team that are definitely Big 8 mate- 



rial. This group of players can really go 
far." 

Top left: Junior Varsity Football Team — Top 
row: Sam Chambliss, Charles Green, Ron Dick- 
erson, Roy Johansen, Joe Mitner, Lloyd Nor- 
wood. Second row: Mike Hamsher, Jim Coch, 
Jerry Peterson, David Reynolds, Joe Brown, 
Kerwin Cox, John Yeagly, Manzy King, John 
Lattney. Third row: Mike Mugredge, Steve 
Holmi, Jeff Beason, Glenn Plotkin, David Long, 
Tom Price, Jim Scott, Chris Hoag, Mark Sam- 
mari, Mike Rasley. Fourth row: Floyd Dorsey, 
Fred Axrak, Jon McClay, Mike Merrifield, Chris 
Malgren, David Myer, Mark Norsing, Jim Rogers, 
Ernie Navarro, Paul Coffman, David Bright. Fifth 
row: Scott Casey, Standford Cherry, James Rey- 
nolds, Gary Spani, Randy Lorrenzen, Joe 
Louche, Ron Ringer, Gregory Plowe, Scott 
Steuwe, Joe Hatcher. Bottom row: Mike 
Osbourn, Mike Remple, Stu Duncan, Tim Com- 
mings, Rick Pusa, Don Osburn, Ken Degramo, 
Thomas Foster, Phillip Ahl. Top right: Tom Price, 
Greg Daily, and Ray Long smother a Kansas 
runner. Bottom center: A KU defender collars JV 
quarterback Mike Merrifield. Bottom right: A 
Kansas back loses the ball after he is sand- 
wiched between Mark Cossack and another Cat 
defender. 



268 — JV football 






JV football — 269 



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Two-wheelers pedal into vogue 



By Greg Doyle 

Striding and gliding and striding and 
gliding. It's so in-tune-with-the-times. 
So vital. So fresh. So naturally back to 
nature. Bicycling. 

As if it were a new idea, masses 
have taken to this striding and gliding 
in the last few years. 

Myriads of gas-saving, pollution- 
solution minded, shifting-geared, 
speed-freaking, economical, back- 
pack-strapping, self-propelled stream- 
liners. 

In the park, on campus, on a coun- 
try road, they ride, providing the 
weather is fair. Striding up the hills — 
gliding down. 

Older couples with younger cou- 
ples, younger couples with tykes in 
attached toddler seats, students and 
businesspersons with books and 
papers in pack — all striding and glid- 
ing to class, to work, for pleasure. And 
it's the awareness. 

Ecology awareness, that is. Sierra 
Club and Whole Earth Catalog. Envi-. 
ronmental Awareness Week, ecology 
clubs, the energy crunch, and Heart- 
land Cereal. Euell Gibbons and wild 
hickory nuts. Turning back to nature. 

"Self-propelled sports for self-pro- 
pelled people," says an ad for a Den- 
ver bike shop. 

That's it! The pollution solution. Rid- 
ing — striding and gliding — self-pro- 
pelled, with a belly full of granola- 
whole-milked, stone-ground nutrition 
surging wholesome energy into the 
junk-filled, pre-processed, preserved 
and bloated, malnourished veins of a 
technologized society. 

Bikes, the official transportation of 
the aware generation. The official 
European racer with five, ten, or is it 
15 speeds? The ones equipped with 
whirring generated lights for night, and 



whipping and swaying safety-orange 
pennants for the day. 

And bike shops are like sports car 
supply palaces, carrying all the latest 
stuff. American bikes, like Seawood 
and Schwinn, and the Monkey Ward 
specials, and AMF roadsters compet- 
ing with the finer, lighter-weight for- 
eign models of Stella, Gitane, Peugot, 
and Campagnolo. 

No one-speed, box-handle-barred, 
knobby-tired, paper bikes for this gen- 
eration. No sir. Sleek, cheetah-like 
bikes with simplex derailleurs and pre- 
cisely tuned alloy wheels. That's the 
vogue. 

Up the hills in first gear. 

On the straight aways in tenth. 

On all the in-between slopes with all 
the in-between gears. 

And down the hills, not striding. Just 
gliding. 

Watch that racer! Crouched intently 
over curved, non-adhesive, plastic- 
taped handle bars in only the finest 
aerodynamic tuck position. 
Swoooshshshing to lower elevations. 

As the wind — nature's burst of 
pure vitality — pastes the cyclist's 
flowing hair close against his head, 
making it flap at the back like wings of 
the bird. The bird of freedom - — flying 
low. 

Then, squeeezzzing the center-pull/ 
cable-connected brakes ever so gently 
and gradually, slowing at last squeak- 
ing to a halt. 

The cyclist pants and sweats, as his 
legs internally burn and swell. 

He could have driven to his destina- 
tion, burrroooming out pollutants, into 
the air. But no. He chose to pant and 
sweat, and on a chilly morning, shiver. 
He's roughing it — fresh, and natural, 
and clean. Roughing it back to nature. 

Striding and gliding and striding and 
gliding. 



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272 — fntramurals 





Every year hundreds of high school jocks flood the cam- 
pus, fresh from their heydays as a hometown sports page 
hero/heroine. Rather than drop out of competitive athletics 
completely, many of these K-State students, 42.3 percent 
to be specific, participate in organized intramurals, and 
once again push their adrenalin to its limit — in the name of 
sport. 



6,500 play the non-varsity field 



K-State is nationally known for its 
varsity basketball team, yet more bas- 
ketball is played here on week nights 
than any other time, and not all on the 
varsity court. In fact, intramural bas- 
ketball games last past midnight, Sun- 
day through Thursday. 

More than 40 percent of the stu- 
dents at K-State participated in the 
intramural program during 1974, and 
Raydon Robel, director of Recrea- 
tional Services, said he doesn't see 
any let-up in future participation. 

Since the intramural program was 
started at K-State in 1967, there has 
been a 70 percent increase in the 
number of basketball teams participat- 
ing. When the 1975 season began, 
298 teams had entered the basketball 
division. 

Three divisions are offered for com- 
petitors: men, women, and co-rec. 
Faculty and staff also have a competi- 
tion division and are encouraged to 
participate in free-time physical activi- 
ties, Robel said. The rec department 
keeps tabulations of points earned 
through intramural competition by 
each team and compiles standings at 
the end of the school year. 

In the area of free-time recreation, 
the department offers Ahearn gymna- 
sium, the fieldhouse, and the natato- 
rium to students during special times. 
An outdoor facility complete with ten- 
nis and handball courts, and softball 



and football fields is located north of 
the campus. Students can check out 
tents, canoes, jump ropes, basketball, 
gas lanterns, and other recreational 
equipment from the department. 

Recreational Services offers four 
sports clubs which, Robel said, do not 
promote intercollegiate sports. Fenc- 
ing, ju jitsu, canoe-kayak, and a Cen- 
tury Club for joggers are opeated by 
students with special interests. 

Twenty-six different intramural activ- 
ities including badminton and water 
basketball, are available to students. 
Student officials for the sports are 
hired by Rec Services. 

"Right now, we only sponsor physi- 
cal activities," Robel said. "Someday 
we may have chess, cards, snooker, 
and other non-physical recreation." 

Recreational Services distributes a 
desk calendar at the beginning of each 
school year. Standings from the previ- 
ous year, fees, rental equipment 
charges, and the schedule of activities 
are included. 

"There is a direct correlation 
between mind and body," Robel said. 
"If the body is in good condition, I 
think it will help the student in his stud- 
ies. Our philosophy is that everything 
nonacademic should be recreational- 
ized. This is what we are shooting for 
— more participation and better facili- 
ties, but for now we'll have to settle for 
what we've got." 



Intramurals — 273 



Physical exertion, or the lack of it, can be read on the 
pudgy faces and flabby middles of many Americans today. 
In a society rapidly approaching the push-buttons we used 
to read about in sci-fi novels, people have found many 
exercises for their fingers but few for their bodies. Some 
K-Staters, however, are making use — through both com- 
petitive and individual sports — of existing facilities. You 
can find them there, with beads of sweat glistening on their 
foreheads, trying to trim down and tone up. 






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Intramurals — 275 






276 — Wrestling 






Flu, injuries grapple wrestlers 



Wildcat grapplers never quite 
recovered from their slow start, finish- 
ing the season by taking sixth in the 
Big 8 Tournament in Stillwater, OK. 

K-State split its first eight duals, and 
took a 4-4 mark to Southern Illinois. 
The team then lost five straight duals. 

Coach Fred Fozzard said then, 
"Right now we aren't blessed with 
enough healthy, quality wrestlers to 
perform well as a team." He said he 
was concentrating on getting his bet- 
ter individuals ready for the Big 8 Tour- 
nament. 

Fozzard began having more prob- 
lems than just mediocrity on his hands 
toward the middle of the season. He 
was faced with illness and injuries 
sweeping his team. 

"We plain just looked terrible in the 
Northwest Missouri State 

Tournament," Fozzard said. "We had 
several guys who were sick with the 
flu, others had to cut weight and were 
sub-par physically. We didn't react 



well — in fact, it was quite depressing. 
I thought we had a lot of injuries last 
year, but this year is a record." 

The flu had taken its toll on the 
squad as it struggled to gain some 
respectability in the tough Big 8 con- 
ference. By the tournament time, only 
one K-State wrestler, 190-pound Rich- 
ard Taylor, had grappled in a Big 8 
championship meet. So, the next-to- 
last place finish in that tournament was 
no surprise. 

Top left: Mike Adams tries in vain to keep the 
upper hand on his opponent. Top center: John 
Stroble wins another match in the 167-pound 
weight class. Top right: Richard Taylor contem- 
plates a way to escape from his opponent's 
grasp. Bottom left: Varsity Wrestling Team — 
Top row: Fred Fozzard, Tony May, Dan Demo, 
Dale Gallaway, Arthur Alexander, Paul Nelson. 
Second row: Kirk Schottler, Clint Stueve, Keven 
Son, Ron Bartlett. Third row: Mike Adams, John 
Stroble, Mark Jackson, Keith Sides, Bruce Ran- 
dall. Bottom row: Larry Thaw, Mark Schottler, 
Terry Farley, Dan Hamby, Richard Taylor, Leon 
Younger. Bottom center: Mark Jackson uses his 
strength to get a Nebraska wrestler off his back. 



Wrestling — 277 




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278 — Women's swimming 








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Rough waves slow swimmers 



Tension. Anticipation. Racing heart- 
beats. The gun explodes, and they 
plunge into the pool. Every swim meet 
is different. There are new obstacles to 
overcome, new frustrations and new 
joy. 

Wildkitten swimming team members 
experienced those feelings in their 
opener against Kearny State. Ineligibil- 
ity, lack of depth, and three months of 
uncompetitive practice doomed the 
Kittens to a 87 to 43 defeat. Similarly, 
the team couldn't get into the swim of 
things when leading paddlers from the 
Kansas Jayhawks overcame the Wild- 
kittens, 90 to 40. 

The season's first win came when K- 
State swimmers took a close 66 to 64 
meet with Missouri. Gaining confi- 
dence, the Wildkittens out-swam their 
opponents in the triangular against 
Missouri and Iowa State. K-State 
scored 77 points, followed by 
Nebraska with 52 and Iowa State with 
51. 



The women swimmers were 
psyched for Kearny State's second 
season meeting, capturing a 77 to 54 
K-State victory. However, powerful 
Kansas came back in the season's last 
dual meet to stop the Wildkitten win- 
ning streak with an 89 to 40 victory. 

Even though the Wildkittens placed 
a disappointing fourth in the Big 8; the 
100-yard butterfly, 200-yard individual 
Medley, and the Medley relay did qual- 
ify for national competition. The train- 
ing had paid off as the Wildkitten swim 
team walked away with a 4-3 winning 
season. 

Top left: Wildkitten Judy Streeter begins a last 
lap surge in the breaststroke event. Top center: 
Nan Thornton and Rita Buchanan, in the white 
caps, prepare for the starter's command. Top 
right: Streeter takes deep breaths after a particu- 
larly fast heat. Bottom left: Rita Buchanan, Mari- 
lyn Zwego, Jane Elias, and Teresa Biery view 
the action from poolside. Bottom right: Barb Lee 
does a stretching exercise. 



Women's swimming — 279 




280 — Minor sports 



Sport policy czars axe scholarships, gymnastics 



A problem was brewing at K-State, 
and brewers of athletic policy hadn't 
yet spotted the foam of impending dis- 
aster. 

But finally, when it seemed a vat 
would break, the athletic council, 
those gods of sport policy, made what 
would become a hot and controversial 
decision relative to minor sports at K- 
State. 

The problem was a debt which 
amounted to more than $300,000 — 
and no relief in sight. A solution was 
needed by athletic council, a body of 
student and faculty policy-makers. 

In a surprise move in early Decem- 
ber 1974, the council voted to abolish 
scholarships for all non-revenue prod- 
ucing sports. Basketball and football 
are the only money-making sports of 
nine National Collegiate Athletic Asso- 
ciation sports the athletic department 
sponsors. 

State-wide uproar followed the deci- 
sion, and coaches claimed it would 
ruin any chances they had to build a 
respectable program. Cutting of the 
budget was not questioned, but the 
council's choice of areas in which to 
make the cuts disheartened many ath- 
letes. 

At the same time, the council also 
eliminated the sport of gymnastics 
from the department's financial 
responsibility. If, the council said, the 
department could come up with more 
money, gymnastics would be reins- 
tated. 

Nevertheless, the bare facts were 
out — K-State's athletic department 
was in financial trouble. The depart- 
ment had borrowed on future ticket 
sales in past years with the expecta- 
tion that the financial setup would 
improve. That, coupled with the proba- 



tion dealt Oklahoma, was enough to 
nearly sink the department. Oklaho- 
ma's bowl game proceeds, which are 
split eight ways under Big 8 confer- 
ence rules, would not be helping other 
Big 8 schools for a while. 

But, faculty senate, the last stop for 
the council's decision, was reluctant 
to take such drastic measures to halt 
the department's slide. The senate ref- 
used to accept the minutes of athletic 
council's crucial meeting. 

And as a result, the council recon- 
sidered its action. During the interim 
between the council's first and second 
decisions, money was donated to the 
track program and local merchants 
expressed a desire to financially help 
certain teams. The council decided to 
allow non-revenue producing sports to 
offer scholarships from any funds they 
could find. If the team coach could cut 
his budget, the council reasoned, he 
could use the extra money for scholar- 
ships. 

Several coaches were still worried 
that the lack of scholarships would 
reduce varsity athletic competition to 
an intramural state. 

On the horizon were several possi- 
ble solutions to the problems. 

Tuition waiver legislation was still in 
the works but didn't appear to be get- 
ting its feet off the ground. The tuition 
wavers would save the department a 
lot of money, but not enough to make 
up for the 1974 deficit. 

A new Intercollegiate Athletic Coun- 
cil was to be formed. It would serve 
many of the same functions of athletic 
council, and would abolish that body. 
Although staffed with different people 
and bearing a new name, the council 
would still have to face the same old 
problems — and solve them. 



Under the new IAC, minor sports 
coaches and women's athletics would 
be included in discussions regarding 
their policies. It was voted to have vot- 
ing representatives from all groups 
affected by its decisions. 

The new IAC would also be charged 
with determining how much money 
women's athletics must spend to pro- 
vide equal opportunity to females, as 
ordered by law under the United 
States Department of Health, Educa- 
tion, and Welfare Title IX guidelines for 
federal funds. 

Also, the IAC can decide to fund 
non-Big 8 sports if it so desires, while 
determining the policy for those 
sports. 

Phil Wilson, baseball coach and 
assistant athletic director, tried his 
hand at concert promotion to raise 
additional money department. His first 
concert try, Helen Reddy, earned con- 
siderably less than the needed funds. 
That was a solution he would continue 
to seek, in spite of the vehement pro- 
tests from the Union Programming 
Council concert committee. 

But, in the final analysis, it was foot- 
ball ticket sales that would be needed 
to bring the department above water. 
In actuality, the final solution wasn't to 
come down to local merchants, phi- 
lanthropic sports buffs, or concert 
producers. The answer seemed to lie 
with new head football coach Ellis 
Rainsberger and his team. Could they 
fill the stadium like they fill the athletic 
dorm? 

Football, in this way, was to be the 
father of the non-revenue producing 
sports. And filling the stadium after 
seven years of Vince Gibson football 
was not going to be easy. 



Minor sports — 281 







282 — Gymnastics 




Gymnasts shoulder setbacks, acquire thick skins 



A happy season must have not been 
in the cards for K-State's men's and 
women's gymnastics teams in 1975, 
as both suffered disheartening sea- 
sons. 

The Wildkittens were slowed with 
only two returning gymnasts from last 
year's state championship team. 

"One of our better persons was on 
probation, and we had a lot of 
injuries," Loraine McKeeman, Wildkit- 
ten coach, said "It was rougher this 
year than last year." 

Even though they qualified handily 
for the state tournament, the Kittens 
took a disappointing fourth out of four. 
After a season-opening loss to the 
Kansas Jayhawks, the Kittens found 
the schedule tough, with a loss at the 
hands of Central Missouri State and 
low finishes in invitational tourna- 
ments. 

Their losing streak was caught off 
balance with a win at their first dual 
meet with Fort Hays State, defeating 
South Dakota State 66.3 to 47.3, and 
placing third in the Washington Invita- 
tional. After the state tournament, K- 
State sent four competitors to regional 
competition. 

McKeeman said many of the women 



were busy this year with other organi- 
zations, leaving little time for gymnas- 
tics. But, she added, "We should be 
tough next year." The team loses only 
one gymnast to graduation. 

The men's team had two strokes of 
bad luck. First, it suffered a losing sea- 
son at the hands of many schools, and 
secondly, its funding was totally elimi- 
nated from the athletic department's 
1976 budget. Gymnasts were told of 
the cut early in the season, and their 
performance was predictable in light of 
the decision. 

After semester break, the team suf- 
fered an academic casualty, losing two 
players because of grades. However, 
gymnastics coach Randy Nelson said, 
"We've got a busy two months ahead. 
We're shy of depth — but we'll keep 
plugging away." 

The Cat's setback by Kansas, 185.6 
to 128.85, was one of the team's bet- 
ter duals. 

"Against Kansas we looked the best 
we have all year," Nelson said "We 
would have scored in the 150s if we 
wouldn't have lost so many high bar 
people at the semester. Mike Wixson 
finished the highest of any K-Staters in 
the meet, capturing second in vault- 



ing. 

Nelson called the season a good 
learning experience for the Cats. Wix- 
son, an upstart freshman from Shaw- 
nee Mission, earned a handful of firsts 
in dual competition and may prove to 
be gymnastics' link to future season's 
success. 

Football ticket sales would be the 
answer to gymnastics' longevity at K- 
State. If the sales produced heavy 
earnings in spring and summer, the 
athletic council indicated it would be 
in favor of reinstating gymnastics as a 
recognized varsity sport. It seemed 
gymnastics would follow other sports 
and be reduced to club status. 

Top left: Wildkitten Gymnastics Team — Top 
row: Marcia Sandy, Margaret Romig, Lorine 
McKeeman, Marilyn Neilson, Marcia Green. Bot- 
tom row: Rhonda Sawhill, Jan Harder, Patty 
Drom, Shellie Wallace, Dee Small. Top center: A 
gymnast tries to boost team points in the vault- 
ing event. Top right: Varsity Gymnastics Team 
— Top row: Randy Nelson, Jim Stegeman, Mike 
Atkinson, Mike Wixson, Wayne Oatman, Kevin 
Reilly, Jeff McDade. Bottom row: Jon Portell, 
Mark Stroda, Terry Morin, Roger Oatman, Tim 
Schaid, Ben Strafuss Bottom left: Morin per- 
forms his routine in the dual against Kansas. 
Bottom center: Small shows concentration as 
she competes on the horizontal bars. 



Gymnastics — 283 




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284 — Soccer 




Athletic, musical talents boost soccer season 



Two K-State teams have a regional 
prestige usually reserved for varsity 
athletics, not tor sports clubs. 

Rugby and soccer are relatively new 
to the campus, but each has worked 
its way to the top ot its respective com- 
petitive ladder at one time or another 
during its stay here. 

During 1974, the two teams' sea- 
sons were dipolar. The Kansas State 
University — Ft. Riley rugby team had 
a disappointing season, while the soc- 
cer club fought for first place in its 
league. 

In the championship game of the 
Big 8 season, K-State's soccer team 
defeated Kansas 5 to 1 to capture the 
league soccer title. The win culmi- 
nated a 7-1-1 spring season for the 
club. 

Dean Zagortz, Most Valuable Offen- 
sive Player in Big 8 soccer, said, "We 
really got hot toward the end of spring 
season. Many of our guys played their 
best games of the season and 



because of that we smoked Kansas." 

The fall season was not so prod- 
uctive, although the team returned 12 
starters from the spring season. "Inju- 
ries were our biggest problem, and we 
had four starters out for the entire sea- 
son," Zagortz said. 

Since the Big 8 soccer teams only 
have club status they cannot compete 
in the National Collegiate Athletic 
Association tournament. Because of 
this, they have trouble scheduling high 
quality teams outside of the Big 8, Zar- 
gortzsaid. 

Several K-State soccer players may 
be playing professional soccer soon. 
Mark Nobrega, forward, Dennis Cook, 
fullback, Dean Zagortz, forward, and 
Frank Sauerwein, halfback, will be try- 
ing out for pro teams after graduation. 

The soccer club has jumped from 
pocket to pocket trying to salvage 
enough money to continue its pro- 
gram. Before soccer moved under the 



wing of the intramural program in 
1971 , it was being funded by the for- 
eign students who make up most of 
the squad. 

Soccer is no longer funded by the 
recreational services department, and 
was denied funding by the student 
senate in 1 974 Fall allocations. But the 
team has received help from a local 
business-person who sponsored ben- 
efit concerts. 

Rugby season was a different story. 

Throwing what some considered all 
sanity to the wind, the KSUFR rugby 
squad geared itself for another promis- 
ing campaign during the fall semester. 
But because of team inconsistency 
and poor weather conditions, KSUFR 
suffered a season record of 6-7 com- 
pared to last year's 1 5-4 record. 

"We played tougher teams this 
year," Steve Coffey, club president, 
said. "Also, half of our team is new 
and they have been learning a lot." 



Soccer rugby — 285 



As the northern breeze sifts through the 
blanket-covered corduroy pants of the fan, 
so does the spirit of football and the excite- 
ment of competition permeate these people 
drawn there to view a fluctuating phenome- 
non — varsity athletics. 



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Pre-game hoopla is fan's sport 







"How long till they open the doors?" 

"About five hours, I think." 

"Then why are you standing in line 
now?" 

"Man, we want a good seat." 

Wind and brisk weather did not stop 
these sports fans from arriving a con- 
siderable time before the gates 
opened to see the Wildcats tangle with 
the Kansas Jayhawks. 

An empty bottle of Lord Calvert, a 
few cans of Pepsi, a three of spades, 
and an English assignment were part 
of the residue left by people as they 
stood in line. Even though the doors 
hadn't opened yet, the line moved for- 
ward until persons toward the front 
were no longer comfortable. 

"Hey, quit shoving." 

"Keep cool, man." 

A young man sitting on the rough 
sidewalk was not disturbed from his 
studying by idle distractions from the 
crowd. 

After tripping over the man's out- 
stretched legs, a young woman mum- 
bled a quick apology. He just smiled 
and resumed the intent survey of his 
book. 

And then, a fervor resembling a cre- 
scendo drum roll built in the crowd — 
only one hour left. 

As celebrities arrived, their names 
were echoed through the tunnel of 
faces. 

"Look, there's Fred White, the radio 
announcer. Hey Fred, what's happen- 
ing baby?" 

Some fans seemed more dedicated 
than the rest. 

"You mean you spent the whole 
night in front of the entrance?" 

"I was walking to my 7:30 this morn- 
ing and saw people sleeping in front of 
thefieldhouse. I couldn't believe it." 

The garage-door entrance was 
finally opened, creating a stampede. 
Officials' warnings to fans were not- 
heeded and chaos broke out. Even 



though they were inside the field- 
house, there were still three hours until 
tipoff. 

Large crowd activities were gener- 
ated. A frisbee floated lazily from 
grandstand to grandstand, long arms 
reaching to snare it from its flight. 

A hearty laugh came from a section 
where someone, perhaps with a little 
too much of the good stuff in him, 
stumbled on a bench. 

During the three pre-game hours 
the nonstudent fans arrived. 

An aging female fan, dressed in 
bright purple, slowly climbed the 
grandstand stairs with an attendant 
escort. 

Moving bodies dressed in purple 
permeated the jeans-clad student area 
and moved methodically to seats in the 
reserved section. 

There were the usual diehard fans 
lacking the standard purple sports 
coat but who made up for it with purple 
socks, usually bright and with short 
pants, and a purple tie to match their 
brown shirts. 

When the band began its "fan 
warmup" the excitement mounted. 
After a foot-stomping rendition of 
"Wabash Cannonball" the crowd was 
ready to yell. 

A cheer rose from the K-State fans 
as the Wildcats began their warmup — 
which seemed to do as much for the 
crowd as it did for the players. 

Questionable calls from the officials 
drew sounds of disapproval from the 
fans and a long stare from Coach Jack 
Hartman. But as the fans found out, 
officials rarely change their minds. 

With the final buzzer, the team left 
the hardcourt and fans streamed from 
the crowded fieldhouse — the ring of 
the K-State fight song still stung their 
ears. 

A disheveled purple booster voiced 
the opinion of many, "I can hardly wait 
'til next week." 




Fans — 28S 






290 — Rowing 









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Cat Crew: a bit o 



By Scott Kraft 

"Let's go," the coxswain yelled as 
he rapped the skin of the shell with the 
boat's knockers. His action caused a 
sharp crack of sound to reverberate 
across the water. 

A tingle crawled up my spine as I 
saw the bright purple shirts with the 
big white "K" pull to an early lead. I 
was at the Wichitennial Water Festival 

— the sport was rowing. 

"When you think of rowing," Coach 
Don Rose said, "you think of Eastern 
and Ivy League schools — those 
where the sport originated." 

But championship rowing has come 
to the Midwest. Although the K-State 
crew has not been recognized or 
funded by the athletic department, it 
still participates in regional and 
national collegiate tournaments. 

"Our crew members finally realize 
they belong at national championships 
and really can compete with those 
schools," Rose said. "We were 
tougher in 1 974 than the year before. " 

Rowing has been at K-State 12 
years, and the crew has been invited 
to the Intercollegiate Rowing Associa- 
tion nationals for the last six years; fin- 
ishing among the top ten teams two of 
those years. 

Before writing about rowing, I 
needed to be briefed on the ancient 
sport's rules and language. 

— A competition meet is called a 
regatta, and the standard entries in a 
regatta are the varsity eights, varsity 
fours, and the varsity pair. 

— There are eight persons and one 
coxswain in the varsity eight shells; in 
the varsity four races there are two 
divisions — those rowers with a cox- 
swain and those without a coxswain; 
and varsity pair shells contain only two 
rowers, each with two oars. 

— A shell is the hull or body of the 
craft, and the outside of the shell is the 
skin. 

— The coxswain holds two wooden 



knockers attached to tiller lines which 
operate the rudder to keep the craft on 
course. 

— The coxswain yells instructions to 
the rowers. He sits in the stern of the 
boat facing the rowers. The coxswain 
is the navigator. "He acts as coach, 
quarterback, cheerleader, and jockey 
all in one," Rose said. 

— Stroke is the name of the rower 
immediately facing the coxswain. He is 
the leader and sets the race's pace. 
The coxswain follows this pace by hit- 
ting the knockers against the knocker 
plates on the outside of the shell. 

At the national regatta in Syracuse, 
NY in June, K-State cap 
place in the varsity ei< 
he was encouraged tt 
been invited to m 
years — indie 
strong rowinn r 

"There is 
ing than in am 
said. "Rowing takes 
amount of guts and detei 
the mental phase deter 
can, do in the actual rac 

Money has been 
burr in the rowin'- 
hopeforawinni 

Even though 
didn't get the reqi 
student senator 
by elections, - 
funding. 

But back to the 
win of less t 
Nebraska was ultimately recorded. 

There have been many close wins 
for the Wildcat crew — but their adver- 
saries, both in Senate and on water, 
have not yet proved too much for the 
fledgling team to handle. 

Top left: Varsity Crew — fop row: Don Rose, 
Dave Chamberlin, Brad Myers. Larry Bonczkow- 
ski. John James, Kevin Jennison. Second row- 
John Eplee, Ron Dyke, Roger Hill, Jack Byers 
Top center: William Blaschke follows the 
stroke's pace Bottom center: Crew prepares for 
the start of a regatta on Tuttle Creek 



over 



Rowing — 291 







292 — Basketball 



: 






Cats surprise glum followers 



Varsity athletics at K-State were in a 
state of turmoil following football sea- 
son. Scholarship money for all minor 
sports had been curtailed and the 
Wildcats were slowly looking for a new 
football coach to fill the shoes of the 
resigning Vince Gibson. 

Out of this chaos came a quiet man 
and a quiet team. 

Jack Hartman, who has always been 
totally honest about his basketball 
team's chances, wouldn't even wink 
when he told newsmen early in the fall 
this was going to be a year of rebuild- 
ing for the Cats. He asked them not to 
expect too much. 

After losing four starters to gradua- 
tion and the fifth to a summer car acci- 
dent, Hartman had every reason to 
believe the rebuilding might cost him 
some games. Nobody expected a 
great team — but most expected the 
well-disciplined kind of team Hartman 
has become regionally famous for. 

Well, Cat fans got more than they 
bargained for. Few seemed to miss the 
steady ball handling of Lon Kruger. An 
upstart freshman from North Carolina, 
Mike Evans, and last year's steady 



substitute, Chuckie Williams, gave 
Wildcat fans all the excitement they 
needed. 

After seven games, the basketball 
team was 5-2. Williams and Evans 
were high scorers, averaging 18 
points per game. And the Cats hadn't 
played any pushovers. 

Montana State, Southern Methodist, 
Hofstra, and Texas Tech all fell by 
handy margins in the Cats' den. K- 
State then hit the road, playing three 
games in less than ten days. Two of 
those three were against nationally 
ranked teams — Arizona and Arizona 
State. 

K-State fell to both Arizona teams, 
losing to Arizona on a last second shot 
Coach Hartman described as "a 12- 
foot off-balance shot from the base- 
line", and then went on to defeat 
Houston. 

Top left: Cheerleaders help the official. Top cen- 
ter: Carl Gerlach sets a pick for Bobby Noland 
against Hofstra. Top right: A young fan watches 
the action. Bottom left: Fans view the action with 
a variety of expressions. Bottom center: A Texas 
Tech guard snares a rebound from Noland. 



Basketball — 293 





294 — Basketball 





Roun 



ings prove sorcerers 



error 



Jack Hartman's athletes went to the 
controversial Big 8 pre-season tourna- 
ment in Kansas City carrying a low 
touting, but a high standing. After 
defeating Missouri in the opener, it 
looked as if the traditional K-State-KU 
rivalry might be exhibited early. 

However, the Cats were soundly 
beaten by Iowa State in their second 
match while Kansas was winning a 
squeaker from Nebraska. Kansas con- 
tinued its flimsy hold on the tourna- 
ment by edging Iowa State in the 
championship game. 

The Cats defeated a Nebraska team, 
downcast from its close game with 
Kansas, for the third place slot — bet- 
ter than most had expected. Most, that 
is, except for the K-State players. 

After losing to Tulane and Nebraska, 
and beating Colorado on the road fol- 
lowing the tournament, the Cats 
returned to Ahearn Field House for 
their second season game. And, as 
Mike Evans, Cat guard, said, "I get the 



feeling you can't lose at home." True 
to that statement, the Cats edged 
Arkansas on the home floor, 73 to 71 
in overtime. Also at home the Cats 
defeated a strong Oklahoma team, 87 
to 72. 

But the home series was short-lived 
as the basketballers travelled to Ames, 
IA. The inspired Cats defeated the 
tough Iowa State team while racking 
up more than 100 points. There was 
no stopping the duo of Evans and 
Chuckie Williams. Their high scoring 
from the outside soothed Hartman's 
worries about K-State's lack of size 
underneath for rebounding power. 

Four days after the Iowa State 
game, the Cats and a packed Ahearn 
Field House faced off against the Jay- 
hawks from Kansas. Hartman said he 
was worried about the strength of Kan- 
sas under the boards — and he had a 
good cause to be. Kansas teammates, 
Danny Knight and Rick Suttel, were 
two of the premier performers on last 



year's Kansas team that took third in 
the national championships. 

It was at the Kansas game that Carl 
Gerlach, the 6'10" Cat center, discov- 
ered he could handle the Kansas 
giants. He grabbed 12 rebounds and 
was later named the Big 8 offensive 
player of the week. That, and a com- 
bined total of 32 points from the Cat 
guards was enough to down the Jay- 
hawks, 66 to 56. 

The Cats were sitting in a good posi- 
tion, having defeated Kansas and 
Oklahoma at Manhattan, and trounc- 
ing Iowa State at Ames. 

K-State's conference mark of 4-1 
put them in a tie for first place in the 
Big 8. 

Top left: Players prepare to go after a loose ball. 
Top right: A campus patrolman holds back exu- 
berant students after K-State defeats Kansas. 
Bottom left: Dan Droge loses a tip to a tall 
Husker. Bottom center: Coach Jack Hartman 
gives instructions to his players and looks for 
someone to go in for the foul-plagued Carl Ger- 
lach. 



Basketball — 295 






296 — Basketball 




Hawks slaughter sluggish Cats; 
K-State still tied for Big 8 lead 




Fresh from a decisive victory over 
the Kansas Jayhawks, the Cats rolled 
over the Missouri Tigers, 91 to 84, in a 
home win. Carl Gerlach continued his 
outstanding play exhibited in the previ- 
ous week's KU game with 27 points 
and 1 5 rebounds. 

The Cats then traveled to Stillwater, 
for their second match against the 
Cowboys. Chuckie Williams led the 
Cat scoring with 32 points as K-State 
swept to a 87 to 74 win from 
Oklahoma State. 

Before the Colorado game, Gerlach 
suffered a chest injury in practice, and 
although the injury was kept from the 
news media at the time, Gerlach's per- 
formance was beginning to suffer. 
Nevertheless, the Cats defeated a cel- 
lar-dwelling Colorado team 80 to 66. 

However, a tough road game was in 
the wings for the Wildcats. Oklahoma, 
one of the better Big 8 teams, was anx- 
ious when the two met at Norman to 
avenge its early season loss to K- 
State. Before 4000 fans, the Sooners 
outrebounded, and eventually outs- 
cored, the Wildcats. K-State trailed by 
more than 10 points for most of the 
game, losing 78 to 71. In spite of its 
loss to Oklahoma, K-State was still 
holding onto a share of the conference 
lead. 

Nebraska brought a good defensive 
performance into Ahern Field house. 
And while K-State was winning a 
down-to-wire contest against 
Nebraska, Kansas was falling to the 
Missouri Tigers in Columbia. 

K-State led most of the way in the 
Nebraska duel, but the Cornhuskers 
were close on the heels of the number 
one-ranked Wildcats. Gerlach drop- 
ped in a hot one from under the basket 
as the last second ran out. K-State had 
not been decisively victorious — but 
victorious nonetheless. 

"We got real cautious toward the 
end," Coach Jack Hartman said. "We 
didn't have a real good shooting night 
against Nebraska but we played well 



overall." 

This turning point of the season put 
the Cats in sole possession of first 
place in the Big 8. How long that reign 
would last was a question only another 
contest — KU vs. K-State — could 
answer. 

Kansas was ready for the Wildcats' 
invasion of Allen Fieldhouse in Law- 
rence. Before a statewide grandstand 
viewing audience, the Jayhawks 
showed off what had made them 
highly ranked earlier in the season, 
displaying the potential many basket- 
ball fans knew they had. The likes of 
seniors Rick Suttle, Roger Mornings- 
tar, and Dale Greenlee would not face 
the Cats again as they finished their 
last game against the cross-state rival 
Wildcats, winning 91 to 53. 

K-State was outrebounded 50 to 22, 
and shot a poor 29 percent from the 
field. Hartman praised the Kansas 
team for playing a superior game. KU 
jumped to an early 12 to 4 lead and 
never let down, leading by more than 
20 points most of the game. 

The Big 8 conference was again in a 
state of limbo. The Wildcats fell back 
into a tie for the Big 8 lead with Kansas 

— Missouri being only one game 
behind. Both Kansas and K-State had 
crucial games left. Kansas would meet 
Nebraska at Lincoln and the Wildcats 
would meet Missouri at Columbia. 

Top left: Varsity Basketball Team — Top row: 
Jack Hartman, Bobby Noland, Frank Walsh, Carl 
Gerlach, Tom Maurer, Billy Robinson, Chuck 
Garrett, Marvin Adams. Bottom row: Craig 
Cooper, Mike Evans, U. S. Davidson, Doug Sni- 
der, Dan Droge, Chuckie Williams, Jim Molinari, 
Tyron Thompson. Top center: Doug Snider 
looks tor a teammate to pass to during the K- 
State — Kansas game in Lawrence. Kansas 
went on to win, 91 to 53. Bottom left: Carl Ger- 
lach takes a spill when he tangles with a Mis- 
souri player in Ahearn Fieldhouse. The Cats 
beat the Tigers, 91 to 84. Bottom center: A Mis- 
souri player is determined to hold onto the ball 

— even if it results in a traveling violation. Bot- 
tom right: Snider puts his layup over the out- 
stretched hand of a Colorado Buffs defender. 
Colorado was defeated, 80 to 66 



Basketball — 297 



K-State shows nation its stuff 



One second. 

Sometimes basketball games can 
come down to that tinal second. That 
time when the fate of each team is 
hinging on something else — be it 
some extra determination or some 
supernatural force. 

K-State's roundballers saw the 
whole thing come down to that last 
second, and so did a national viewing 
audience on NBC. 

One second was all Syracuse Uni- 
versity needed to destroy a sure K- 
State win and send the game into over- 
time in the NCAA eastern regional 
finals at Providence, Rl. 

The fantasy game ended when 
Chuckie Williams, outstanding since 
the first NCAA game, popped in a 
bucket from the corner to give the 
Cats a two-point lead with seven sec- 
onds remaining. 

Syracuse bravely brought the ball 
down, fed to Rudy Hackett who bob- 
bled the ball, then dumped in a hook 
shot. 

Foul plagued Cats were drowned in 
that overtime. Carl Gerlach fouled out 
with more than eight minutes remain- 
ing, leaving Mike Evans and Bobby 
Noland with four fouls each, and they 
succumbed during that depressing 
overtime. 

K-State started the NCAA tourna- 
ment because of new NCAA tourna- 
ment rules that allowed the second 
place team in each conference to go 
to the regionals. The additional 16 
teams this created caused the NCAA 
to have sub regionals — one win 
meant going to the regionals. 

K-State defeated the best of the Ivy 
League, the University of Pennsylva- 
nia. In the game at Penn's home court, 
the Cats gave Penn a sound beating. 

Meanwhile, the other Big 8 repre- 
sentative, Kansas Jayhawks, were 
being embarassed by Notre Dame in 
Tulsa, OK. 

So, K-State became one of 1 6 teams 
in the nation to make it to the regional 
competition. It was to compete in the 
Eastern regional and its first draw was 
Boston College. 

Williams damaged the Boston Col- 
lege backcourt to the tune of 32 
points, and Gerlach turned in one of 
his better season performances with 



20 points and 1 3 rebounds. 

At that point, the Cats were one of 
the select eight teams in the nation. A 
win over Syracuse, which had scored 
an upset win against North Carolina to 
get to the finals, would assure the Cats 
plane tickets to the finals in San Diego. 
There they would have played Ken- 
tucky, who also scored an upset by 
defeating number-one-ranked Indiana. 

They said K-State couldn't do it. The 
Cats were picked at the beginning of 
the season to finish fourth in the Big 8 
or worse. Hartman was reluctant to 
say different. After all, the Cats had no 
returning starters and only one senior, 
Doug Snider. 

One thing was consistent in the 
NCAA games. All of K-State's oppo- 
nents were taller, bigger men. Except 
for the Syracuse game, it didn't show. 
The Cats outrebounded every team it 
faced in regional competition, includ- 
ing Syracuse. 

The Cats were not always a certain 
second place Big 8 finisher. After tak- 
ing Iowa State in a close home game, 
70 to 68, the Cats traveled to Missouri. 
While Missouri was devouring 
the Cats, Kansas was winning a dou- 
ble overtime game from Colorado. For 
the second year, the Cats title hopes 
were dashed by their neighbors down 
the Kaw. 

Then, the final game of the Cats' 
regular season, Oklahoma State, was 
to be the determining contest. K-State 
won, in a game that included the ejec- 
tion of Dan Droge from the game for 
exchanging blows with an Oklahoma 
State player. 

Missouri's loss that same night 
secured a second place finish for the 
Cats, and more importantly, a shot at 
an NCAA sub regional. 

K-State would return that team, 
minus only Snider, when Hartman 
reconvened his coaching sessions in 
the fall. 

Top center: Chuckie Williams has his defender 
blocked from the goal, giving him an open shot. 
Top right: Carl Gerlach and Doug Snider are 
caught in the middle after the ball gets loose 
from an Iowa State player. Bottom center: The 
Crowd shows how it feels to go ahead late in the 
game. Bottom right: Bobby Noland grabs a 
clean rebound from Gerlach and a Cyclone 
player. 





298 — Basketball 







Basketball — 299 



Quarterback turns to roundball 



By Scott Kraft 

Doug Snider looks like a basketball 
player. He's got the size, even though 
he claims he's too small, and the phy- 
sique of an athlete. And it's no wonder 

— he's been participating in sports 
since he was five years old. 

On an average game day afternoon, 
you can probably find Snider window 
shopping in downtown Manhattan or 
milling around the zoo, because that's 
the way he prepares mentally for the 
game. 

"After the pre-game meal at 3 pm, I 
usually pile in my truck and go some- 
where — usually just to window shop, 
I can't afford anything else." But Sni- 
der's only purpose is not to price 
goods for possible purchases. He also 
thinks about the game. 

"I usually think about my opponent 

— what I have to do against him," Sni- 
der said. About 4:30 Snider heads 
back, listens to music with his feet 
propped up on a pillow, or cleans his 
gun. The team heads to the fieldhouse 
at 5:30, watches the JV game until 
6:15, then goes to the locker room to 
prepare for the game. A player's pre- 
game routine is important, Snider said. 

Team members are usually suited 
up by 6:50. "We have until that time to 
get ready — and then the man comes 
in and tells us what we have to do," 
Snider said. That man is Coach Jack 
Hartman. Hartman has become known 
for his coaching ability along with his 
professional attitude toward coaching. 

"I think he's a damn good coach — 
even though I don't think some of his 
philosophies are too whippy," Snider 
said, "He's aloof and therefore he gets 
a lot of respect from the team. All he 
thinks about is the team. ' ' 

Hartman coaches a team to play a 
patient, controlled, and pattern-ori- 
ented game. Snider said, "I believe I fit 
into Hartman's philosophy of basket- 
ball pretty well. I don't think I could 
have played on a run and shoot type of 
team." 

Hartman wasn't the first K-State 



coach to latch onto the senior from 
Xenia, OH. Snider first came to K-State 
on a football scholarship from Vince 
Gibson; he was a quarterback. 

"When basketball season rolled 
around, I missed it so much that I just 
decided to walk on, Snider said. "I 
always thought I had about equal abil- 
ity in football and basketball, but I 
thought I'd have a better chance to 
play if I went out for football. A 6'4" 
quarterback is pretty good sized, but a 
6'4" forward is not that big." 

Hartman offered him a basketball 
scholarship after that first year, and 
Snider was happy to accept. 

"I love the game. It's not a job to me 
at all, like football was," Snider said. 
"I'm just used to playing sports all year 
round." 

Being a Big 8 basketball player 
hasn't gone to his head, though. "Get- 
ting exposure is just part of sports," he 
said. "They forget about you after the 
season's over. I know it's not a perma- 
nent thing so there's no use getting all 
big-headed about it." Reading the 
newspapers after a game doesn't usu- 
ally bother him — unless they lose. 

"After losing a game we try not to 
think about it," he said. "I don't even 
read the papers — all you read about 
is excuses people give." 

But winning, particularly at home, is 
a different situation. "You come out 
hearing the fight song and everybody 
yelling — it makes a big difference in 
game momentum." 

Even though he has played Big 8 
championship caliber basketball for 
three years, he still gets "butterflies" 
before the game. It's not like the first 
game he started for the varsity. "I was 
so nervous I couldn't tie my shoes," 
Snider said. "But when the game 
starts, I always settle down." 

Top center: Doug Snider does some stretching 
exercises to loosen up before the game. Top 
right: Snider comes on the court to face Iowa 
State before a capacity crowd. Bottom center: 
Snider and teammates go through their final 
drill, bringing the fans to their feet. Bottom right: 
Snider leafs through the sports pages in his 
room. 







»2iL23lfiG»&S@FS^mBs^HRBEnHEHK23££d* 



300 — Basketball profile 








Basketball profile — 301 









302 — JV Basketball 




Varsity abducts yearling quality 



With the varsity basketball team hav- 
ing no returning starters, Coach Jack 
Hartman dipped into the junior varsity 
ranks in search ot a lineup. 

This resulted in only one senior, 
Doug Snider, among the five varsity 
starters. The other four were freshman 
Mike Evans, sophomore Darryle Win- 
ston, and juniors Chuckie Williams and 
Carl Gerlach. 

Despite those potential player 
losses, JV was able to go into its final 
game with a winning record of 5-4. 

"The main emphasis, of course, is 
on execution, not winning," JV coach 
Marvin Adams said concerning his 
team's priorities. 

Three players paced the team in 
scoring averages. Scott Langton aver- 
aged 14 points a game, Tom Maurer 
contributed about 13 points a game, 
and Ron Henry, who was ineligible 
during second semester, averaged 13 
points a game first semester. 

Maurer proved his worth as not only 
a scorer but also as a rebounder as he 
led the team with 1 2 rebounds a game. 

Midway through the season Hart- 
man again looked to the junior varsity 



for help, this time for a third guard to 
back up Evans and Williams, and 
came up with Mark Baxter. Though 
Baxter scored only 7.7 points per JV 
game, Hartman was impressed with 
his defensive play. 

As a team, the Wildcats averaged 76 
points a game compared to the oppo- 
nent's 69 points, shooting 40 percent 
from the field. 

JV's biggest win was a 90 to 56 vic- 
tory over Colby Junior College, and its 
worst defeat an 80 to 63 loss to Dodge 
City Juco. An 89 to 87 double over- 
time loss to Kansas City Kansas Junior 
College proved JV's closest game. 

Even though some schools abol- 
ished their JV teams, K-State's JV was 
still helping train young players. 

Top left: Terry Garrett keeps an eye on a 
Nebraska playmaker. Top center: Players look 
for a loose ball. Bottom left: JV Basketball Team 
— Top row: Michael Schaeffer, Tony Pau- 
zauskie, Dan Otto, Frank Walsh, John Lindholm, 
Steve Nichols, Gary Olds. Bottom row: Terry 
Garrett, John Elmore, Scott Langton. Bottom 
center: Frank Walsh cocks his arm for a long 
pass. Bottom right: Cats begin to set up their 
offense. 





JV Basketball — 303 







304 — Women's basketball 




After slow start, Kittens growl 




Seven returning veterans, including 
four starters, provided a strong foun- 
dation for the Wildkitten basketball 
team. Rebounding from three straight 
losses in the season's beginning, the 
Kittens had only three more losses in 
their last 19 games. 

Jan Laughlin and Peggy Johns, last 
year's captains and both seniors, pro- 
vided team leadership. Laughlin ended 
her final season as the Wildkitten's 
highest scorer, and raised her point 
average to 14.5. 

A minus for this team was the loss of 
four experienced reserves through 
graduation. A host of newcomers, 
among them Kristi Short and Ellen 
Sapp, were an advantage for the team 
in spite of their lack of college-level 
game experience. 

In their first season game against 
Wayland Baptist College, the Wildkit- 
tens fell 97 to 57. The Wayland Baptist 
Queens, returning three All-Ameri- 
cans, displayed a starting line-up that 
averaged 5'10", opposing the Kittens' 
5'7". Top Kitten scoring honors went 
to Janet Reusser who had 18 points, 
while Marsha Poppe ended the game 
with nine. 

Still looking for its first win of the 
season, the Kittens fell 53 to 44 to Wil- 
liam Penn College in that college's Tip 
Off Tournament in Oscaloosa, IA, dur- 
ing Thanksgiving vacation. In their 
third place tournament bout, the Kit- 
tens lost to the highly regarded John 
F. Kennedy College in Wahoo, NB. 

Judy Akers, Wildkitten coach, said 
she believed K-State faced the tough- 
est opponents early in the season. 
However, the Kittens ended their long- 
est losing streak in history by claiming 
back-to-back victories. Breezing by 
Midland Luther College of Freemont, 
NB, 81 to 30 in Ahearn Field House 
was the first of the victory pair. 

The next came the following eve- 
ning when the Kittens dumped North- 
west Missouri State 66 to 58, pushing 
the season record to 2-3. 

The K-Staters continued their tradi- 
tion of handling Wichita State with 
ease, bringing the conference record 
to an overall mark of 3-3. Wildkitten 
Susie Norton displayed a remarkable 



72 percent from the floor in this chal- 
lenge. 

To bring the record to 4-3, the Wild- 
kittens out-scored Southwest Missouri 
State, 90 to 35. Poppe brought her 
record to a career high of 23 points. 

The first Wildkitten Classic was 
dominated by the host Kittens with 
convincing victories over Nebraska, 
82 to 31 , and a championship victory 
of 67 to 55 over highly-ranked Illinois 
State. 

The Kittens slipped by Fort Hays 
State the following Monday, 67 to 59. 
Norton led K-State's attack with 1 8 
points. Reusser added 1 3 points at 
guard. Johns, the other guard, had 12 
and Poppe added 10. 

The victorious Kittens then out- 
scored Kansas, 80 to 37, followed by a 
76 to 69 victory over the Southwest 
Missouri Bearcats at Springfield, MO. 

K-State then suffered its first loss 
after seven straight victories when it 
fell to Grandview with a close 55 to 57. 
Boosting their record to 12-5, the 
Wildkittens defeated Iowa State in a 
see-saw game in Ames, IA. Norton, 
who suffered an ankle injury and was 
not expected to see action, led the Kit- 
tens by scoring 1 5 points. 

In the ninth home game of the sea- 
son, the Kittens were defeated by Wil- 
liam Penn. The Wildkittens finished the 
season by beating John F. Kennedy in 
Manhattan, and Kansas at Lawrence. 
Jane Schroeder, assistant Wildkitten 
coach, said the JFK game was quality 
competition, adding that JFK plays 
controlled ball and seldom makes mis- 
takes. 

The Kittens culminated the season 
by taking first place in the State Tour- 
nament hosted by Kansas in Law- 
rence. 

Top left: William Penn College puts impressive 
defense up against Wildkitten passes. Top cen- 
ter: Jan Laughlin fights for a loose ball in the 
second half of the Nebraska game. Bottom left: 
Wildkitten Basketball Team — Top row: Deb 
Hempill, Judy Akers, Jan Laughlin, Greta Sigel, 
Deb Mabin, Kathy OToole, Jane Shroeder. Mid- 
dle row: Sharon Brock, Marsha Poppe. Susie 
Norton, Ginger Thull. Bottom row: Ellen Sapp, 
Janet Reusser, Peggy Johns, Kristi Short. Bot- 
tom center: Wildkitten ballhandling was effective 
as they rolled over the Nebraska Cornhuskers. 



Women's basketball — 305 




306 — National sports 



Picketing, new blood mark 1 974 sports panorama 



While K-State athletes were making local, and sometimes 
national headlines, the traditional sport professionals were 
experiencing transition and excitement. 

Johnny Miller, the blond-haired wizard ot the greens, was 
giving another blond-haired giant, Jack Nicklaus, a run tor 
his money and position as the world's premier golf per- 
former. Miller wasn't winning major championships, but he 
was putting on one of the more outstanding exhibitions in 
recent golf history. Winning three of the first four 1975 tour- 
naments, Miller appeared well on his way to the top of the 
money-making charts for the second consecutive year. 

Concurrently, the tradition-steeped golfers were still taking 
the major championships, as Gary Player won the British 
Open and Lee Trevino took the Professional Golf Association 
tournament. 

Another minor sport previously considered less important 
than golf — tennis — got its feet wet in the realm of national 
coverage. Most outstanding among the young tennis stars 
playing for ever-growing purses across the world was Jimmy 
Connors. Connors and his fiance of that time, Chris Evert, 
won their respective divisions at Wimbledon. Connors, the 
brash, young American, was hard to put down all year. His 
engagement to Evert, however, was curtailed. 

In the baseball realm, Hank Aaron of the Milwaukee 
Braves, did the impossible — hitting 733 home runs, topping 
Babe Ruth's record set in the 1 920s. 

Aaron's expertise didn't help the Braves, however, as they 
fell short of the playoffs. The Oakland Athletics took four of 
five games from the Los Angeles Dodgers for the World 
Series. The A's became the first non-New York Yankee team 
to win three consecutive World Series. 

Forty-two days of picketing highlighted the beginning of 
professional football season, as the National Football League 
Players Association ended its contract negotiations in at 
least partial satisfaction. Players were holding out for more 
benefits and security in their contracts. Fans were treated to 
some sloppy exhibition games as a result of the strike. Fans 
did not enjoy watching 22 no-names play. 

At the same time of the NFL scuffle, the newly formed 
World Football League was taking players from the NFL. 
Some of those bribes were in the form of million-dollar con- 
tracts. The Miami Dolphins were hit hardest by the WFL, los- 
ing many good personnel. Beginning with the 1975 season, 
these contracts are effective and the WFL should be sporting 
better football. 

But during 1974, WFL teams were saddled with problems. 
Most were plagued with unpaid bills and unfulfilled promises. 
World Bowl I was a close game, however, and the Birming- 
ham Americans defeated the Florida Blazers, 22 to 21 . 

Other things were not changing in 1974. Colleges were 



still leaning toward professionalism in sport as college ath- 
letes were getting as much national coverage as any other 
sportspersons. 

Oklahoma's football team was lauded as the "best team 
you never saw" by Sports Illustrated, indicating the fact that 
because of recruiting violations OU was on probation for two 
years. The Big 8 was crying over the income loss this was 
causing while the Associated Press and United Press Inter- 
national polls of the top 20 college teams were trying to 
decide if OU should be ranked at all after getting caught with 
its hands in the till. 

And Ohio State, a perennial Big Ten powerhouse was 
defeated 16 to 13 by Michigan State in an upset thriller. But, 
the Buckeyes beat Michigan and won the tie-breaking vote 
for Big Ten Rose Bowl representative. 

As always, there are the outstanding college players who 
are asked to prove themselves all over again in the pros. Bill 
Walton the highly touted center for the University of Southern 
California Bruins, was such a player. Drafted as the National 
Basketball Association's number one choice by the Portland 
Trailblazers, Walton grew his red hair long, wore hiking 
boots, and remained on his non-meat diet. 

Finally, there were two outspoken people on the sports - 
scene in 1974. One did as he said he would. The other 
proved to be a miserable fluke. 

The first, Muhammad Ali, the man who had his national 
heavyweight boxing championship taken away because of 
his anti-war action, grabbed that title back by knocking out 
George Foreman. Ali had become the world's heavyweight 
champion again, but not before his audiences were sub- 
jected to the infantile verbiage that is Ali's trademark. He was 
enjoying his reign. 

The second outspoken personality, Evil Knievel, a self- 
acclaimed daredevil who jumped cars with his motorcycle, 
went on to bigger and better things. At his last performance, 
he was going to jump the Snake River Canyon — a distance 
of approximately two miles. His vehicle was to be a motor- 
bike-rocket, equipped with a parachute. After million-dollar 
publicity, numerous endorsement offers, and several televi- 
sion specials, it was a sure bet that Knievel wasn't going to 
kill himself. With national viewers watching $1 0-a-seat 
closed-circuit television across the nation, Knievel went up 
and then down. With his parachute trailing, he landed softly 
in the Snake River. The parachute had accidently disen- 
gaged, he told his followers. 

But Knievel's flop shouldn't be associated with the whole 
spectrum of sport, as national athletes were still reaching for 
the stars and fans were still enjoying the spectator's view of 
sport. 



National sports — 307 



mm 




Scores — 309 



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HAUSER. W MAXINE Houseparenl 

BLEVINS. MICHAEL F Topeka 

Architecture Junior 

BRASHEAR, STEPHEN A Cotfeyville 

Architecture Structures Freshman 

BROCKMEIER, CRAIG A Topeka 

Electrical Engineering Senior 

BRUNING, KEITH D Ellsworth 

Agricultural Mechanics Sophomore 

CAUGHRON, RICHARD N Dodge City 

History Sophomore 

CHAMBERS, EDWARD W Salma 

Journalism and Mass Communications Freshman 

COLONEY, STEVEN J Wichita 

Physics Sophomore 

DUNCAN, JOHN D Overland Park 

Commercial Art Junior 

EKHOLM, DAVID Little River 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

FLYNN, MICHAEL W Russell 

Secondary Education Senior 

GLASS. THOMAS E Overland Park 

Physical Education Freshman 

GREENE, EARL F Manhattan 

Speech Junior 

HAPGOOD, CURTIS R McPherson 

Architecture Freshman 

HAPGOOD, JAMES D McPherson 

Psychology Senior 

HIEBSCH, CARL T Wichita 

Agricultural Engineering Junior 

HOLLADAY, SCOTT J , .Wamego 

Nuclear Engineering Freshman 

HUELSKAMP, CLINTON A Garden City 

Animal Science and Industry Freshman 







IRWIN, JOHN W Wichita 

Architecture Junior 

JACKSON, H TOM Topeka 

Landscape Horticulture Junior 

KARNES, HOWARD A Hoxie 

Nuclear Engineering Freshman 

KRIZEK, CRAIG L Ellsworth 

Pre-Dentistry Sophomore 

LINDENMUTH, LESLIE D Salina 

Building Construction Sophomore 

McCLAIN, GARY D Russell 

Accounting Sophomore 

McNEIL, RICHARD I Wichita 

Business , . . . Junior 

MARTIN. JOHN C. . . Overland Park 

Speech Sophomore 

MOHENG, MITCH Wakeeney 

Medical Technology Sophomore 

NELSON, ROD Salina 

Radio and Television Sophomore 

NEWKIRK, ALAN D . . Shawnee 

Math Junior 

O'NEILL, RICHARD J. .... Salina 

Business Administration Freshman 

RANDALL, PHILIP D Scott City 

General Freshman 

SCHOTT, L JOHN St. Louis, MO 

Architecture Junior 

SHAFER, BRADLEY J, Dodge City 

Animal Science and Industry Freshman 

SMITH, KEITH L . . . . Dodge City 

Architecture Sophomore 

SNEATH. ALLEN L. Kanopohs 

Civil Engineering Junior 

STABLES. DAN R Wichita 

Fisheries Biology Junior 

STACHELBECK. KENNETH E Topeka 

Electrical Engineering Junior 

WAGONER, STEVEN J ... Harper 

Journalism and Mass Communications Sophomore 




Alpha Chi Omega 



WALTON, CAMILE Houseparent 

ALDERTON, MELISSA I Sedgwick 

Interior Design Senior 

ALLEN, LISA A Overland Park 

Interior Architecture Freshman 

ANDERSON, JANET K Wichita 

Horticulture Sophomore 

ANDERSON, KRISTEN K Topeka 

Art Education Junior 

ARMSTRONG, TERI A Prairie Village 

Special Education Freshman 



BACHMAN, AMY D. . . Moundndge 

Pre-Design Protessions Sophomore 

BALES, ANN E Emporia 

Journalism and Mass Communications Senior 

BARNARD, JUDY A Oswego 

Journalism and Mass Communications Senior 

BEARLY, ELIZABETH A Olathe 

Clothing and Retailing Junior 

BOWEN, BETH S Lenexa 

Business Freshman 

BURGESS, LYNDA K Omaha, NB 

Pre-Nursing Junior 



BUTCHER, SHARON L Hays 

General Freshman 

CABLE, KAREN L Cedar Vale 

Family and Child Development Junior 

CLARK, ANN M Salina 

Textile Research Sophomore 

CORNELIUS, PATRICIA J Sidney, NB 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

DICKERSON, SARA F Prairie Village 

French and Business Junior 

DOWELL, DIANE M Salina 

Interior Design Sophomore 



DURST, BECKY L, Emporia 

Wildlife Biology Sophomore 

EHRSAM, JULIE A Bern 

Family and Child Development Junior 

ETZEL, CONNIE S Topeka 

Pre-Nursing Junior 

FELDKAMP, CINDY M Manhattan 

Business-Accounting Freshman 

FEYERHERM, CAROL A Manhattan 

Biology Senior 

FIREBAUGH, NANCY A Kansas City 

Consumer Interest Senior 



HAACK, PAMLA J Bird City 

Clothing and Retailing Junior 

HARDER, MELINDA Garden City 

Pre-Law Junior 

HEFFEL, SHELLY D Manhattan 

Music Education Senior 

HOEFGEN, DEBRA K Topeka 

Horticulture Communications Sophomore 

HURLEY, MARTHA L Glasco 

Medical Technology Junior 

JOHNSON, SHERILL Prairie Village 

Physical Education Freshman 



KERN, LINDA E Osage City 

Physical Therapy Junior 

LACEY, PENNY S Topeka 

Home Economics Freshman 

LARSON, CHARYL D Medicine Lodge 

Family and Child Development Junior 

LEWIS, MARTY A St. Paul, NB 

Dietetics Freshman 

LICHTENHAN, ELAINE M Junction City 

Home Economics Education Junior 

LINDSAY, JANE E Manhattan 

Home Economics Education Senior 



LUEKER, DEBBIE St. Joseph, MO 

Elementary Education Sophomore 

McFARLAND, ROBERTA J Norton 

Social Work Sophomore 

McGRANAGHAN, MEG . . , Overland Park 

Business Education Junior 

McKIMENS, BEVERLY J Sedan 

Pre-Pharmacy Sophomore 

MESSMER, DEANENE S Norwich 

Accounting Junior 

MEYER, LAURIE A Salina 

Business Junior 



MINTEER, NANCY H Shawnee Mission 

Special Education Senior 

MORSE, ROANNA L Joplm, MO 

Clothing and Retailing Junior 

MOSS, MISSY Prairie Village 

Philosophy Sophomore 

MUSTOE, N DALENE Rextord 

Home Economics and Liberal Arts Junior 

OCHS, CHERI A Newton 

Radio and Television Sophomore 

OLDFIELD, ANN E Topeka 

Family and Child Development Senior 




314 — Alpha Chi Omega 




O'ROURKE, MAUREEN P Overland Park 

Business Sophomore 

PEACH, ELIZABETH D . . . ' ipe Ka 

Art Freshman 

PURINTON, VICKI D Olathe 

Special Education Senior 

REID, JENNIFER J TopeKa 

Social Science Senior 

ROBINSON, CINDY M Overland Park 

Clothing and Retailing Freshman 

ROWE, CAROLYN D. Overland Park 

Journalism and Mass Communications Freshman 

RUGGLES, BARBARA L Manhattan 

Psychology and Sociology Senior 

SATTERLEE, JANE E Assana 

Secondary Math Education Junior 

SHAWVER. JUDYE, Wichita 

General Sophomore 

SILCOTT, JEANNINE Wichita 

Special Education Junior 

SMITH, DANA E Wichita 

Family and Child Development Senior 

STOCKSTILL, KRISTIN A. . . Geneseo 

Physical Education Sophomore 

STOVER, BARBARA J Wichita 

Family and Child Development Junior 

STUART, SUSAN K Olathe 

Music Education Junior 

TRUMP, SHERYL A, Wichita 

Clothing and Retailing Sophomore 

VEDROS, VALERIE Mission 

Business Administration Junior 

VINCENT, LINDA L Garden City 

Business Sophomore 

VINING, FRANCIE B St Joseph, MO 

Clothing and Retailing Sophomore 

WANNEMACHER, JO ANN Bloommgton, IL 

Accounting Sophomore 

WEHRWEIN, BARBARA C Overland Park 

Pre-Nursing Sophomore 

WHITE, BEVERLY Norton 

Clothing and Retailing Sophomore 

YOUNG, LINDA J Overland Park 

Business Administration , Freshman 

ZARDA, MARLAJ, Kansas City 

Consumer Interest Junior 







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Alpha Delta 




BOVARD, ANNA-MARIE Houseparent 

ALBRIGHT, JULIA C Winfield 

General Freshman 

ANDERSON, SUSAN D Overland Park 

Early Childhood Education Sophomore 

ANSTINE, MARY FRAN Bartlesville. OK 

General Business Junior 

ATLAKSON, KAREN J Atchison 

Family and Childhood Development Sophomore 

BACHMAN, MELISSA J Centralia 

Business Education Junior 

BAETZ, CINDY L Salina 

Clothing and Retailing Freshman 

BAKER, DEBRA D Syracuse 

Special Education Junior 

BECK, BARBARA M Kinsley 

Early Childhood Education Sophomore 

BEECHER, BARBARA J Baxter Springs 

Elementary Education Senior 

BENNETT, M CLAIRE St. Joseph, MO 

Art and French Junior 

BINGHAM. CINDY B Manhattan 

Physical Education Freshman 

BOSCH, TERESA J Council Grove 

Fashion Design Freshman 

BURCHAM. LINDA K Goodland 

Interior Design Junior 

BURDEN, BETSY L Garden City 

Biological Science Senior 

BYER, CYNTHIA D Ingalls 

Accounting Junior 

BYRON, PAULA K Prairie Village 

Pre-Elementary Education Freshman 

CARPENTER, DENISE Overland Park 

Retail Merchandising Sophomore 

CARR, PAMELA L Mulvane 

Elementary Education Junior 

CASSING, NANCY E Merriam 

Pre-Elementary Education Freshman 

CONN, SHELLY C Stockton 

Foods and Nutrition Sophomore 

COOK, GINGER . Overland Park 

Recreation Junior 

CRAMER, CANDACE K Glasco 

Pre-Nursing Sophomore 

CRAMER, LISSA F Glasco 

Physical Therapy Sophomore 

CURRY. ANDREA J Topeka 

Speech Pathology Junior 

DOYEN, CAROL J Concordia 

Horticulture Therapy and Journalism Senior 

DUNN, PATRICIA D Overland Park 

Physical Therapy Sophomore 

EMIG. SHARON S Abilene 

Business Administration Sophomore 

ENGEL, MARYANN Hays 

Home Economics Extension Junior 

FICKES, KAREN L Overland Park 

Dietetics Senior 

FITZGERALD, MARGARET L Shawnee Mission 

Computer Science Sophomore 

FRAZELL, BECKY L Salina 

Clothing and Retailing Sophomore 

FREWEN, CYNTHIA J St. Francis 

Medical Technology Sophomore 

FRY, CYNTHIA L Topeka 

Home Economics Freshman 

GILLETT, CATHERINE A Kinsley 

Home Economics Extension Junior 

GLANVILLE, BETH A Kansas City 

Pre-School Education Sophomore 






GORMAN, JANET C Overland Park 

Child Psychology . Sophomore 

GOWEN, JULIE Overland Park 

Art and Spanish Senior 

GRANBERRY, PEGGY L. . Libertyville. IL 

Landscape Architecture Junior 

GRICE, CARAM Topeka 

Business Junior 

GRISSOM, JONI F Wichita 

Clothing and Retailing Freshman 

HAERTLING.SALLYA Overland Park 

Interior Architecture Freshman 

HALLS, KRISTEN J Wichita 

Business Administration Senior 

HILLEBRANDT. CAROL A Overland Park 

English Junior 

HRABE, CHRISTY L Plamville 

General Freshman 

KENDALL, CHARLENE S Topeka 

Food and Nutrition Senior 

KESSLER. BARBARA E Leawood 

Speech Pathology Sophomore 

KIERNAN. THERESA M . . . . Salina 

Pre-Law Sophomore 

LaPLANT, BARBARA R Manhattan 

Art History Senior 

LINE, GAYLEL Lakm 

Physical Therapy Junior 

LUCKEROTH, MICHELE Senaca 

Business Freshman 

LUDER, JENNIFER H Overland Park 

Social Work Senior 

LUTTRELL. VICKI F. Great Bend 

Business Junior 

MAY, SUZIE Overland Park 

Math Junior 

McCARTER, BECKY B Topeka 

General Freshman 

McCARTER, SUSAN J Topeka 

Extension Home Economics Sophomore 

MEDILL. CAROL M Seneca 

Special Education . . Freshman 

MEDILL, SUSAN J Seneca 

Clothing and Retailing Senior 

MILLER, JEANINE Lyons 

Home Economics Junior 

MILLER, SANDRA L Fopeka 

Elementary Education Sophomore 

MILLS, MARGARET A Gordon, NB 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

MOORE. SUZANNE K Caney 

Pre-Nursing . . Freshman 

MUELLER, THELMAG- Hanover 

Business Junior 

MURRAY. JEREL Salina 

Home Economics Extension Junior 

MYER. MELINDAA Kansas City 

Psychology Sophomore 
NELSON. GRETA E, St Joseph. MO 

General Freshman 

OLIVER, SARA L Hutchinson 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Sophomore 

PARKER, DEBORAH K Clearwater 

Speech Pathology Senior 

ROBB. REBECCA L Kansas City. MO 

Clothing and Retailing Freshman 

SALLEE, DEANNE K Great Bend 

Family and Child Development Senior 

SPITSNAUGLE. SHERRY L WaKeeney 

Journalism and Mass Communication Junior 

STEWART, SARAH S Salina 

Accounting Junior 

TRUE. RONI M Shawnee Mission 

Dietetics Sophomore 

TUREK, SALLY A Kansas City 

Elementary Education Sophomore 

UNKEFER, DALEEN Leawood 

Clothing and Retailing Freshman 

VEAZEY. LINDA J Wichita 

Art Freshman 

WAGNER, CAROL E Leawood 

Elementary Education Senior 

WALSH. MARY J Onaga 

Journalism and Mass Communications Sophomore 

WARNOCK, MARY F Shawnee Mission 

Home Economics . . . Freshman 

WELLS. STEPHANIE J Wichita 

General Freshman 

WHITMORE, RHONDA L Goodland 

Elementary Physical Education Senior 

WINSKY, DEBORAH A Merriam 

Accounting Junior 

WOMBLE, SHELLEY J Overland Park 

Speech Pathology Senior 

YOUNGER, GLENDA F Great Bend 

Family and Child Development Senior 



Alpha Delta Pi — 317 



Alpha Gamma Rho 



KAISER, FLIZITA Houseparent 

BENNETT, DAVID E Oregon, IL 

Building Construction Freshman 

BUCHANAN, JAMES C Little River 

Agricultural Economics Senior 

CARLSON, MARK W, Smolan 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

CHANDLER, GARY L Richmond 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore 

CHESTNUT, ALLAN B Clay Center 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

CHESTNUT, MERLIN B Clay Center 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

COMBS, STEPHEN H Paradise, PA 

Feed Technology Junior 

DEAN, RICHARD L LeRoy, IL 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

DILL, STEPHEN R Olathe 

Agricultural Economics Senior 

DILL, THOMAS A Olathe 

Agricultural Economics Sophomore 

FISH, PETE R Cedarburg, Wl 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore 

FLETCHER, PETER S, Westford, MA 

Dairy Production Sophomore 

FLICKNER, RAYMOND G Moundndge 

Agricultural Education Sophomore 

FRITZ, G, RANDY Medicine Lodge 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore 

GALLE, JACK G Moundridge 

Agricultural Engineering Freshman 

GEORGE, PHILIP D Lebo 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

GIGSTAD, ALFRED O, , Nebraska City, NB 

Veterinary Medicine Junior 

GIGSTAD, ROBERT E Nebraska City, NB 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore 

GREEN, DAVID D. . Melvern 

General Agriculture Sophomore 

HELLER, RON W Hunter 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

HOLSTE, JAY H, Norton 

Agronomy Junior 

HURLEY, ALLEN L Republic 

Agricultural Economics Junior 

JESSUP, RICKY L Phillipsburg 

General Agriculture Freshman 

KELLER, DANIEL J St Francis 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

KELLY, WESLEY P Sylvan Grove 

Agricultural Engineering Freshman 

KiMPLE, KRIS G Little River 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

KLAASSEN, MATT K Whitewater 

Agricultural Economics Freshman 

KLAASSEN, THOMAS D Whitewater 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

KLINE, RODERICK A LeRoy, IL 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

MAXWELL, RODNEY L Admire 

General Agriculture Freshman 

MAYO, STEVE A Garden City 

Agricultural Economics Freshman 

McCORGARY, LARRY W Arkansas City 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

McNETT, DAVID L Piqua 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore 

MILES, STEVEN W Burlingame 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore 

MILLER, VIRGIL K Klncald 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

MORGAN, THOMAS H Greeley 

Agricultural Economics Senior 

NELSON, BRETT E. Lincoln 

General Agriculture Junior 

NIELSEN, DANNY L St Paul, NB 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Sophomore 

PARK, G NOEL Burlingame 

Agricultural Economics Sophomore 

PETERSON, RICK L Assaria 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore 

POSS, GARY E Richmond 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore 

PRICE, BRIAN F Reading 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

RAWSON, KENT E Llndsborg 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

ROENBAUGH, JOHN B Lewis 

Agronomy Sophomore 

RUSSELL. LEROY W Eureka 

Agricultural Economics Sophomore 

SCHOEN, RODNEY R Downs 

Veterinary Medicine Junior 

STEEPLES, JOHN C Zurich 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 



318 — Alpha Gamma Rho 






STRICKLER, DARRELL L Colony 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

STRICKLER, DUANE J . . Colony 

Agricultural Economics Graduate Student 

STRICKLER, THOMAS S lola 

Agricultural Economics Junior 

WEYER, JAMES P Barneston, NB 

Agricultural Economics Junior 

WILLIAMS, J. SCOTT Dodge City 

Building Construction Sophomore 

WINTER, KENT T Andale 

Agricultural Economics Sophomore 




Alpha Gamma Rho — 319 




Alpha Kappa Lambdo 

ATWELL, DAVID C Overland Park ^^fc^ 

Computer Engineering Sophomore «f4^Bk /cSBfek 

BLATTNER, STEVEN L Rozel ,; "^^Sk 

Civil Engineering Senior s .j jmB l^^-Ji 

BRANDENBURG, ALBERT L Wakeeney i» TK .f 3 " *. 

Interior Architecture .Junior \'-T~, * ^ ■*" «Jm « >-3M -~z& -*• 

ERICKSON.TIMJ Wichita -* 7 0| \»^K 

FARRELL, RITCHIE L Scandia JBlBl ▼ ^ || j . JB^. Ml *?-W • J9i ^/ A| 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Freshman MM illMWh. t '■, ' A ' JBk JHf > Mk 

FEHR DAVID I Topeka BBH^lrfll V '£&£ M i ' ■Bk i «W J| 

Wildlife Biology .Junior y'J g| B\ B 1 ■ Bk BJ 

GORDON, STEVE J. Winfield 

Wildlife Biology Freshman 

HERRINGTON, WALTER B Tonganoxie 

Journalism and Mass Communications Junior 

HOSTIN, GARY L Olathe 

Business Administration Junior 

HOSTIN, LONNIE D Olathe 

Business Administration Freshman ''" ^MR- 
JACOBS. CARL L Augusta JMMf^ JHB W*W J & s ■ -**& M^ 

Mechanical Engineering Graduate Student jfc < ISI * S t ,: "r?* |: \ /flM 

JENKINS, ROBERT E Montrose, IA :, < / F / " i '- ! Jl 

Aeronautical Engineering Freshman BJBJH f / a? 

KRAFT, SCOTT C . Wichita 

Journalism and Mass Communications Sophomore 

KRAMER, CHARLES M Norrlstown, PA jpP^k Wm M^W Mm" 

Physical Education Senior Z .--■■ WZl— 

METZINGER, JOSEPH W Dexter 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Freshman ^ •* BJ \ HL Wf ...' &> )jL J$J§ 

MIDDLEKAMP, RICK D Overland Park " :f T j?^. ~~~ Jkk. ^Gm 

Computer Science Sophomore .fcri^lk^bsw **'' ^^Bx^Pli^k, "P^f 

MYERS. BRADLEY R Topeka , g§ Bk JlBBk 

Natural Resource Management Senior W / W TmmBm ] ' / BMffl Bk 

NYKAZA, SCOTT M Darien, Wl ' ) J iaBJ JBBBB ,■ Bk 

Agricultural Economics J IbMES «■■ £*"' i II 

_ WSKmJSmi W mm ....... ... 








320 — Alpha Kappa Lambda 





OPPITZ, LAWRENCE W Topeka 

Architecture and Design Senior 

OPPITZ, MICHAEL E Topeka 

Natural Resource Management Junior 

PETERSON, WILLIAM C Tonganoxle 

Agricultural Economics Senior 

POTTER, JON H Winfield 

Civil Engineering Sophomore 

PRUITT, DON E Topeka 

Architecture Senior 

SCHLUP, JOHN R Tonganoxle 

Chemical Engineering Senior 

SEITZ, FORREST S Allen 

Electrical Engineering Freshman 

SPARKS, MARVIN E Kingman 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

SWANSON, ERNEST V Gates Mills. OH 

Horticulture Senior 

SWOB, BRUCE C Albert 

Animal Science and Industry Freshman 

TURNER, KEITH E Lmdsborg 

Horticulture . Junior 

VAUTRAVERS. RANDY A Wichita 

Journalism and Mass Communications Sophomore 

VOIGT, BRUCE E Topeka 

Journalism and Mass Communications Senior 

WALL, WILLIAM H Montezuma 

Business Administration Junior 

WEISS, RUSS W Overland Park 

Floriculture Freshman 

WIXSON, MICHAEL G Overland Park 

Industrial Engineering Freshman 

WRIGHT, RON E Trenton, MO 

Geology Senior 



Alpha Kappa Lambda — 321 



Alpha Tau Omega 



ACHTEN, PHILIP B Wetmore 

General Freshman 

BARTAK, GARY J Cuba 

Accounting Senior 

BAUMGART, STEVEN G Overland Park 

Pre-Dentistry Sophomore 

BEYER, TED Overland Park 

Journalism and Mass Communications Senior 

BLOOMER, RICHARD J Overland Park 

Accounting Senior 

BOWDEN, MARK I Gypsum 

Dairy Production Sophomore 



BURNETTE, WILLIAM C McPherson 

Business Administration Senior 

CHILDS, BARRY K Belleville 

Agricultural Economics Junior 

CHILDS, JAMES A Belleville 

Architecture Sophomore 

CONNOR, MARC S Prairie Village 

Interior Architecture Senior 

DALRYMPLE, RANDY W Paola 

Building Construction Senior 

DEUTSCH, JOHN L Hoisington 

General Sophomore 



DIKEMAN, D. GENE Syracuse 

Business Finance Senior 

DIKEMAN, W. CARY Syracuse 

Business Administration Junior 

DONOVAN, SHERMAN L Hoisington 

Business Senior 

DOWLING, DAVID F Prairie Village 

Psychology Senior 

DUNBAR, STEVEN D Wichita 

Biology , . Sophomore 

EDIGER, DUANE M McPherson 

Accounting Senior 



EIKENBERRY, KENT R Leoti 

English Junior 

FLETCHER, MICHAEL T Leotl 

Social Work Senior 

FORSYTH, C, BRADLEY Medicine Lodge 

Business Administration Junior 

FUNKE, M. WILLIAM Wichita 

Business Administration Sophomore 

GARRISON, STEPHEN J Osborne 

Agriculture Freshman 

GLATT, ANDREW K Salina 

Business Administration Junior 



GROSDIDIER, MICHAEL J Kansas City 

Business Administration Senior 

HAHN, DOUGLAS E Overland Park 

Pre-Design Sophomore 

HILDERHOFF, GARY B Overland Park 

Architecture Junior 

HILT, RODNEY D St. Francis 

Architecture Junior 

HILTON, BARRY P Leawood 

Architecture Junior 

HUTCHINSON, ROBERT H Wichita 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman 







JOHNSON, STEVEN C Prairie Village 

Industrial Engineering Senior 

KEITH, RAY E. . Chillicothe, WO 

Architecture Sophomore 

KNOX, DOUGLAS B Boulder. CO 

General Agriculture Sophomore 

KOGLER, LARRY R Klpp 

Electrical Engineering Freshman 

LOVE, ROBERT D Prairie Village 

Political Science Senior 

MANN, LARRY V Overland Park 

Business Administration Sophomore 

MATHEWS, MARK R Sharon 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore 

MILLIKAN. JOE A. . . Wichita 

Business Administration Sophomore 

MORTS, R. SCOTT Chillicothe. MO 

Architecture ... Sophomore 

PIKE, KEITH E Medicine Lodge 

Chemical Engineering Junior 

RADEMACHER. DENNIS W Prairie Village 

Accounting Senior 

RUFF, DAVID E Fairway 

Sociology and Psychology Senior 

SCHMIDT, RICHARD W Overland Park 

Business Administration Junior 

SMALL, BILL E. Conway Springs 

Horticulture Junior 

STRUNK, RANDY J Manhattan 

Sociology Sophomore 

SUNDGREN, DONALD W Salma 

Agricultural Economics Sophomore 

TATE, MARK D Medicine Lodge 

Finance Senior 

VOORHEES, JOHN J Canton, IL 

Biology Senior 

WALLACE, ROGER W Luray 

Agriculture Economics Freshman 

WILLIAMS, RANDY E Red Oak, IA 

Geology and Geophysics Senior 



Alpha Tau Omega — 323 



Alpha Xi Delta 



RYAN, LOIS . . Houseparent 

ADAMS. DEBORAH L Overland Park 

Interior Design Junior 

ALBERS, PAMELA D Bendena 

Pre-Pharmacy Sophomore 

AMRINE, ROBIN D Kansas City 

Social Science Junior 

ANDERSON, CYNTHIA Manhattan 

Chemistry _ Senior 

ANTWEILER, MARILYN B. .... Overland Park 
Business Freshman 

ATWELL, LINDA M Norton 

Home Economics Sophomore 

BAKER, CHERYL L. . . Shawnee Mission 

Special Education Sophomore 

BECKERLE, HOLLY L . . Shawnee Mission 

General Sophomore 

BELL, MARY G Wichita 

Public Relations Freshman 

BISHOP. DEBI L Wichita 

Social Work Junior 

BLOMQUIST, DENISE I Assana 

Mathematics Sophomore 

BOYD, DEBRA A Osborne 

Special Education Freshman 

BOYD, JEAN A Overland Park 

Special Education Junior 

BURIK, KIMBERLY A Ottawa 

Home Economics Freshman 

BUXTON, SHELLY A Assarla 

Family and Child Development Senior 

CARLSON, JENNIFER L Smolan 

Clothing and Retailing Freshman 

COLE, MARILYN R Garnett 

Clothing and Retailing Senior 

CRAIG, DEBORAH L Topeka 

Home Economics Senior 

CRAMER, JANE L Wichita 

Special Education Junior 

DAVIS, DEBORAH D Hays 

Speech Pathology Freshman 

DAVIS, SALLIE K . . Manhattan 

Chemistry Junior 

DENZEL, SUSAN J Leawood 

Social Work Junior 

DUNCAN, BRENDA S McPherson 

Elementary Education Senior 

EDWARDS, JANICE A Amsworlh, NB 

Psychology Sophomore 

ELSEA, CONNIE D Manhattan 

Interior Design Freshman 

ERWIN, TERRY L. . . St. Anne. IL 

Elementary Education Junior 

FARHA, CONNIE A Wichita 

General Freshman 

FLYNN, KATHY Leawood 

Speech Sophomore 

FORSBERG. ROCHELLE L Lindsborg 

General Freshman 

GARRETT. ELAINE G Shawnee 

Clothing and Retailing Sophomore 

GRAHAM, PAULA J Overland Park 

Art Freshman 

GRIMES, GAIL M. Cimarron 

Speech Freshman 

GUNZELMAN, RITA Topeka 

Business Accounting Freshman 

HAMILTON, KARLYNN K Great Bend 

Speech Education Senior 

HENDERSON, SUSAN B Kansas City 

Home Economics and Journalism Junior 

HUTTON, LACINDA G Overland Park 

General Freshman 

ISAACSON. MARSHA R Belleville 

Family and Child Development Junior 

JOHNSON, ROBERTA R Wichita 

Journalism and Mass Communications Senior 

JUNO, JULIE A Prairie Village 

Clothing and Retailing Junior 

KAPPELMANN, MARY F Topeka 

General ... Freshman 
KELLY, KAREN L Overland Park 
Elementary Education Junior 

KILLE, BARBIE Hardtner 

Home Economics Freshman 

KITTNER. JANE E Blue Rapids 

Architecture Junior 

KROUPA, SHARON L. Marion 

Music Junior 

LAFFERTY, TERRIE L Desoto 

Elementary Education Sophomore 

LALA, BRENDA J. Smith Center 

Family and Child Development Junior 

LAND, BETH Cedar Vale 

Business Administration Junior 



324 — Alpha Xi Delta 






LARSEN. LINDA L Manhattan 

Political Science Freshman 

LAUGHLIN, JAN L Manhattan 

Physical Education Senior 

LITTLETON, CYNTHIA L Wichita 

General Freshman 

LIVINGSTON, DIANA J Independence, MO 

Business Administration Senior 

LOVE, SARA E Prairie Village 

Sociology Sophomore 

LOWE, SHEREE R , Wichita 

Radio and Television , Freshman 

LYON, BARBARA J Sallna 

Physical Education Senior 

MARSH, DEBRAK . . Manhattan 

Clothing and Retailing Junior 

MATLACK. ROXANNE Clearwater 

Spanish Junior 

MATTINGLY, KATHLEEN A Clay Center 

Accounting . . Freshman 

McCANDLESS. TERESA D Manhattan 

Horticulture Therapy Sophomore 

McCUNE, MARCIA E Mlnneola 

Home Economics Senior 

McDANIEL, PAMELA D Hutchinson 

Special Education Junior 

McLEOD, DEBORAH S Wichita 

Family and Child Development Junior 

MEAD, MARY E ... Wchita 

Elementary Education Freshman 

MEHL, KAREN A Prairie Village 

Computer Science Freshman 

NELSON, CATHY L ... Olathe 

Pre-Medicine Sophomore 

NELSON, KARLA B Manhattan 

Interior Design . Freshman 

NEWCOMER, JANET E Overland Park 

Clothing and Retailing Senior 

OLANDER, JANE A Little River 

Elementary Education Junior 

OLIVER, BARBARA A El Dorado 

Clothing and Textiles . . Graduate Student 

PARKS, CYNTHIA L Wichita 

General Sophomore 

POLANSKY, ANDREA A Belleville 

Clothing and Retailing Senior 

RHOADES, DEBORAH L Wakeeney 

General Freshman 



Alpha Xi Delta — 325 



ROWLAND, PAM K Great Bend 

Business Administration Senior 

RUCKER. MYRA J Burdett 

Elementary Education Freshman 

RUNDQUIST, AMY J Assaria 

Speech Freshman 

RUNDQUIST, EVE L Assaria 

Clothing and Retailing Junior 

SCHROCK, DEBBIE Kiowa 

Clothing and Retailing Senior 

SCHULTZ. CAROL A Prairie Village 

Clothing and Retailing Junior 

SHIELDS, CYNTHIA M Overland Park 

Physical Education Junior 

SNELL, VICKI D Manhattan 

Medical Technology , Junior 

SNYDER, MELINDA K Sabetha 

Medical Technology Junior 

SONTAG, CHARLOTTE M Derby 

Clothing and Retailing Junior 

STANLEY, CHRIS J Emporia 

Art Education Sophomore 

STILES. MARY C Jefferson City, MO 

Clothing and Retailing Sophomore 

STROWIG. CATHY A Abilene 

Sociology Sophomore 

TJADEN, DENA S Clearwater 

Home Economics Freshman 

TOMPKINS, SHERI K Topeka 

Clothing and Retailing Junior 

TWIETMEYER, CYNTHIA D Goddard 

Business Administration Freshman 

UKENA, KAREN S Manhattan 

Business Administration Junior 

WHITE, PEGGY M Kansas City 

Music Education Junior 

WILCOX, JANE L Junction City 

Theatre Freshman 

WOOLERY, JOETTA S Wichita 

Physical Therapy Junior 

WRIGHT, ELIZABETH A Webster Groves, MO 

Home Economics Senior 

ZUTAVERN, ANN L Abilene 

Elementary Education Senior 





326 — Alpha Xi Delta 



Beta 




Sigma Psi 

BIEHL, CINDY K Houseparent 

BIEHL, DAVE L Houseparent 

ADAMS, R. DAVID Sallna 

Sociology Senior 

ALLERHEILIGEN. STEVEN R . Marysville 

General . Freshman 

BAREISS, LOREN D Atchison 

Physics Freshman 

BARGMANN, STEVEN K Marysville 

Accounting Senior 

BECKER. CURTIS J ... Garden City 

Electrical Engineering Junior 

BIEL, KENT A Hays 

Business Administration Sophomore 

BOMAN, ROGER J Garden City 

Electrical Engineering Freshman 

BOSCH, JOHN F Clay Center 

Political Science Freshman 

I| CARLSON, DARVIN A Salina 

Civil Engineering Sophomore 

CROSSWHITE, DARRELL L LaGrange, IL 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Sophomore 

DESCHNER, BRUCE K Natoma 

a Pre-Law Sophomore 

W^ DEUTSCH, STEVE L Hoisington 

£, General Sophomore 

*„. ,«">iP FABRIZIUS, KARL F Hutchinson 

Chemical Engineering Freshman 

GRAUERHOLZ, MARCUS R ... Kensington 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

HAROLD, BRYAN D Salina 

Architecture Freshman 

■ HOLTHUS, MICHAEL D Smith Center 

V Biology Junior 

KARST, DAVID S. Rush Center 

Agricultural Economics Junior 

KLEMA, FRANK A Russell 

Business Administration Senior 

KRUG, JOHN R Hoisington 

Pre-Dentistry Sophomore 

KRUG, PHILIP C Hoisington 

Business Administration Junior 

LUCKE, GREGORY A Girard 

Speech Sophomore 

LUPTON, JAMES W Haylet, NJ 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Sophomore 





LUST, KEITH M Hoisington 

Architecture Junior 

MARSCHMAN, KENT L Marysville 

General Freshman 

MASKUS, BILL G Jetmore 

Agricultural Economics Senior 

McDANIEL, BILLY G Sallna 

Agricultural Economics Senior 

McLELAND. DAVID A Wichita 

Music Education Sophomore 

MEIN, JOHN C Walnut 

Electrical Engineering Senior 

MEIN, STEVE G Leavenworth 

Horticulture Junior 

MEYER, ALLEN D Hiawatha 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Sophomore 

MEYER, GAIL A Burlington 

Geology Senior 

MILLSAP, TIMOTHY M Bonner Springs 

Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

MURPHY, DANIEL D Alton 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

NEWMAN, RICHARD C Basehor 

Business Administration Senior 

PETERS, BRUCE L Elllnwood 

Electrical Engineering Senior 

PITMAN, PAULA Wichita 

Business Administration Senior 

POPP, ROYCE R Hutchinson 

Social Science Senior 

REESE, MARKC Sallna 

Psychology and Business Senior 

RIGGERT, MARTIN J Naperville, IL 

General Business Freshman 

ROGGE, WILLIAM S Salina 

Sociology Sophomore 

SCOTT, STEVEN P Kansas City 

Architecture Sophomore 

SIMS, RONNIE L Berryton 

Electrical Engineering Freshman 

SOEKEN. SHANE A Claflin 

Mathematics Sophomore 

SORRICK, WILLIAM A Eskridge 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

STARK, KENNETH P Perryvllle, MO 

Architecture Senior 

WAGNER, RANDELL G Kinsley 

Industrial Engineering Sophomore 

WILMS, RICHARD N Topeka 

Nuclear Engineering Senior 

WISE, SCOTT G Linwood 

Animal Science and Industry Freshman 

YOST, JOHN M Moundridge 

Agriculture Junior 




328 — Beta Sigma Psi 



Beta Theta Pi 







' m 







$ Q <f 



i / 



' 




BASOM, GARY D Larned 

Secondary Education Sophomore 

BASOM. THON A Larned 

Pre-Medicme Sophomore 

BLEAKLEY, TODD E Overland Park 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Sophomore 

BOUCHER, ROBERT A Wichita 

Political Science Senior 

BROWNLEE. DOUG D Paola 

Business Administration Sophomore 

CAFFREY, DANNIE T Franklort 

Business Administration Senior 

CALHOUN, RICHARD R McPherson 

Business Administration . Junior 

CAMPBELL. JOHN R Manhattan 

Accounting Sophomore 

CASE, BRAD Marlon 

Accounting Senior 

COLLINS. CHARLES P Junction City 

General Agriculture Freshman 

CRISWELL, JIMH CoHeyvllle 

Architecture Senior 

EICHMAN, JAMES J . ... Wamego 

Biology Freshman 

ELWELL, DANIELS Topeka 

Business Management Senior 

FAULKNER, TOM Manhattan 

General Freshman 

FISHER, GARY W Eutaula. OK 

Arts and Sciences Sophomore 

FONCANNON, ROBERT G Prairie Village 

Electrical Engineering Senior 

FORKE, SCOTT L Lincoln, NB 

Pre-Design Profession Freshman 

FRAZIER, MICHAEL C McPherson 

Pre-Dentistry Junior 

GAST, CHUCK Jerseyville, IL 

Animal Science Junior 

GOLD, DAVID N Goff 

Engineering Freshman 

GOODYEAR. KENNETH D Russell 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore 

GREENLEAF, JOHN P Greensburg 

Agricultural Economics Senior 

GROVES, RANDY D Salma 

Electrical Engineering Freshman 

HALL, EDWARD H Overland Park 

Accounting Freshman 

HAMILTON. JAMES J Wakeeney 

Biochemistry Sophomore 

HANNAFORD, ROGER W Marion 

Business Administration Junior 

HANSON, DIRK A Concordia 

Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

HARTMAN, ANDY S Westport, CT 

Accounting Sophomore 

HAWKINSON, PAUL G McPherson 

Sociology Junior 

HENDERSON, KEVIN S Almena 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

HENSLEY, JOHN L Dodge City 

Business Administration Senior 

HILDEBRAND, REX E Stafford 

General . . Freshman 

HIRLEMAN, GREG P Wichita 

Accounting Senior 

HUMPHREYS, RANDY B. . Lake Winnebago, MO 

Civil Engineering Sophomore 

JONES, JEFFERY R Salma 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

LEE, JIM Prairie Village 

Accounting Senior 

LOYD, JAMES G Sedgwick 

Industrial Engineering Senior 

LOYD, THOMAS W Newton 

Business Administration . . .Freshman 

MASSEY, RANDY St. John 

Secondary Education Junior 

MERTZ, ROBERT D Wamego 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

MERTZ, TOM D Manhattan 

Agricultural Economics Senior 

MUCK, FRED T Leawood 

General Engineering Freshman 

NEWCOMER. RICK V Overland Park 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

NICHOLS, RONALD D McPherson 

Natural Resource Management Senior 

OSWALD, ANDREW L Hutchinson 

Political Science Junior 

OTTO, DANIEL L Arlington, NB 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

PEARSON, GEORGE H Prairie Village 

Business and Pre-Law Freshman 

PITZER. RODNEY J Liberal 

Fashion Design Junior 



Beta Theta Pi — 329 



PRINSLOW, KURT D Arlington Heights, IL 

Landscape Architecture Senior 

REICH, TIMOTHY D Paradise 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore 

REINHARDT, RANDALL D Great Bend 

Accounting Sophomore 

RIDDELL, M GOTZ McPherson 

Veterinary Medicine Sophomore 

ROBERTS, DAVID E Dodge City 

Psychology Senior 

SARGENT, DAVID W Wichita 

Pre-Medlclne Senior 

SCHLAEGEL, KEITH W Paola 

English Senior 

SCHWENSEN. JOHN C Clay Center 

Business Administration Junior 

SHEARER, RICHARD M Wichita 

Geography Freshman 

STEWART, RICK R Klrksvllle, MO 

Landscape Architecture Senior 

STITES, JERRY R Manhattan 

Business Administration Sophomore 

SWEET. ROBERT L Hutchinson 

General Freshman 

TEICHGRAEBER, ART C Eureka 

Industrial Engineering Freshman 

THOMPSON, GREGORY N Manhattan 

Accounting Junior 

UPSON, RON W Manhattan 

Business Administration Junior 

WAMPLER. JEFF W Overland Park 

Political Science Sophomore 

WATERS. CLARENCE E Junction City 

Industrial Engineering Freshman 

WILSON, GARTH W Kansas City 

Natural Resource Management Junior 




* .,# _ I *A. Mmm-i 




330 — Beta Theta Pi 







Bcxjd Hall 



AHLQUIST. LILA E Clay Center 

Pre-Music Education Freshman 

ALEXCITES, CHARLOTTE E Lenexa 

Sociology Senior 

ANDERSON, JOLEEN Clay Center 

Family and Child Development Junior 

ANDERSON, SUSAN B Belleville 

Medical Technology Freshman 

BAILEY, NOZELLA L Kansas City 

Home Economics and Journalism Junior 

BALCOM, RAMONAJ Merriam 

Office Administration Sophomore 

BAUGHAN. KIM M Salina 

Physical Education Sophomore 

BEACH. KIMBERLY J, Lincoln, NB 

Medical Technology Sophomore 

BEALS, CONSTANCE L. Runnells, IA 

Home Economics and Journalism Junior 

BEEOLES, JANET E Great Bend 

Elementary Education Senior 

BENSON, REBECCA J Clay Center 

Family and Child Development Freshman 

BENTLEY, JANE K Chanute 

Psychology Junior 

BEVERLY, GEORGIANA Topeka 

Sociology Junior 

BLASKE, KATHY J Marysville 

Pre-Elementary Education Freshman 

BOGART, M. CANDACE Wichita 

Geography Senior 

BOOTH, JANE A Prairie Village 

Art Freshman 

BRAXMEYER, PATRICIA J Atwood 

Accounting - Sophomore 

BREEN, GAILL Augusta 

Art Sophomore 

BROWN. DONNA D Kansas City 

Vocal Music Freshman 

BURGER, SHEILA M Clay Center 

Family and Child Development Freshman 

BYARLAY, DEBBIE J Lincoln. NB 

Recreational Leadership Freshman 

BYRD, ARLENE Kansas City 

Sociology Senior 

CARPENTER, DONNA E Westphalia 

Retail Floriculture Junior 

CARR, CAROL A Overland Park 

Elementary Special Education Freshman 

CARR, CATHY S Overland Park 

Civil Engineering Senior 

CARVER. ROSE M Kennedy. NY 

Mathematics Education Junior 

CASHMAN, KATHLEEN A Council Grove 

General Sophomore 

COCHRAN, MICHELER Fopeka 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Freshman 

COMBS. DEBORAH A Hiawatha 

Pre-Nursmg Freshman 

CRAMER, LOIS J Overland Park 

Pre-Nursmg Sophomore 

CROSLEY, DEBBIE A Pretty Prairie 

Home Economics Education Junior 

DALSING.CINDYA Greeley 

General Freshman 

DEAN, JENNIFER L Kansas City 

Family and Child Development Senior 

DEAN, PAULA K Kansas City 

General Freshman 

DIETRICH, MARSHA L Junction City 

Home Economics Liberal Arts Senior 

DONNELLY, ELIZABETH M Kansas City 

Bu -mess Administration Sophomore 

ELLIOT, DEBBIE J Shawnee 

Home Economics Freshman 

ERICKSON, SHELLEY A Wichita 

Elementary Education Sophomore 

ERNI, CHRISTINE E Logan, UT 

Special Education Graduate Student 

FEENEY, CAROLYN C Topeka 

Family and Child Development Sophomore 

FRICK, NANCY L, Durham 

Home Economics Junior 

FRY, ROSELYNG Sedgwick 

Physical Education Freshman 

FULLER, VIRGINIA E Shawnee Mission 

Music Education Sophomore 

GILL. LISA A Mission 

Commercial Art Sophomore 

GILLESPIE, PAM G. Overland Park 

General Freshman 

GLICK, DENISEL, Topeka 

Clothing and Retailing Junior 

GREEN, DEBBIE Hutchinson 

Biology Junior 

HARDER. JAN A Merriam 

General Sophomore 



Boyd Hall — 331 




HAYDOCK, MARY L Ashland 

General Freshman 

HEFNER, ROSE M. . Sublette 

Special Education Freshman 

HELINE, LINDA F Salma 

Home Economics Junior 

HENNE, PAM M , Roxbury 

Home Economics Freshman 

HOLEMAN. LINDA L. . . Seneca 

Special Education Junior 

HOLLE, BARBARA R Ludell 

Home Economics Education Junior 

HOOVER, CONNIE J Chapman 

English Education Junior 

HUNT, BRENDAS, Lyons 

Home Economics Education Junior 

JACKSON, ANNE Topeka 

Special Education Graduate Student 

JAMES, MERILU l,,,,fka 

Early Childhood Education Freshman 

JAPP, SUSAN R, Hays 

Dietetics Sophomore 

JELINEK. NANCY A Bluff City 

Home Economics Junior 

JILKA, CATHERINE M Ellsworth 

Journalism and Mass Communications Sophomore 

JOHNSON, DEBRA S Fort Leavenworth 

Floriculture , . . . Freshman 

JONES, CHARLOTTE A Independence 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

KARLIN, JULIE A Grinnell 

Home Economics General Freshman 

KARST, CATHY R Manhattan 

Recreation Freshman 

KIRBY, CHERYLS LaCrosse 

Psychology Freshman 

KOETTING, CONSTANCE S Lenexa 

Business Administration Junior 

KROEGER, ANNA M Marysville 

Elementary Education Junior 

KROEGER. HEDWIG Marysville 

Family and Child Development Sophomore 

LALLEMENT, LINDA J Wichita 

Mathematics Junior 

LANDRITH, MELANIE A Bartlett 

Engineering Freshman 

LANG, CHERYL J Chapman 

Pre-Elementary Education Freshman 



332 — Boyd Hall 




LEACH. ANN J 

Animal Science and Industry 

LEAR. NANCY L 

Foods and Nutrition 

LEWIS, JANENE 

Community Services 






Chesapeake. VA 

Junior 

Overland Park 

Freshman 

Emporia 

Sophomore 

LINDBERG, TERESA J Leawood 

Spanish Senior 

MAHONEY. PATRICIA A Edma, MN 

Applied Piano Freshman 

MALIR. LYNNM Wilson 

Pre-Nursing Freshman 



MARTIN, NANCY J. . Hays 

Music Freshman 

MCCARTHY. PHYLLISA Topeka 

Pre-Nursing Freshman 

McCLURE, B GAY . Kingman 

Family and Child Development Freshman 

McCOSH.CATHYJ Chapman 

Sociology Freshman 

McNEIL. MARCIAF Hays 
Institutional Management . Graduate Student 

MEEHAN. BARBARA L Abilene 

Dietetics . . . Junior 



MEISTER, BARBARA J Great Bend 

Family and Child Development Senior 

MICHAELS, JUNE A Burlmgame 

Dietetics Junior 

MILLER, MARILYNS Wichita 

Journalism and Mass Communications Junior 

MORGAN, KATHY A Wichita 

Home Economics Sophomore 

MOTHES, CHARLOTTE D Sylvia 

General Sophomore 

MULLER, SUZANNE K Council Grove 

Interior Design Freshman 



MYLKS, KHISTY A Hutchinson 

History Junior 

NICHOLS, NANCY A Sterling 

Speech Pathology Junior 

NOREN, ALICE V Oberlin 

Elementary Education Sophomore 

NUTTER, JUDITH A Los Alamos. NM 

Applied Voice Freshman 

O'DELL, LEORAH Rozel 

Physical Therapy Sophomore 

ONELLO, MAUREEN E Fort Leavenworth 

Pre-Elementarv Education Freshman 



OSBORN, MONA D El Dorado 

English Senior 

PALMER, KIM K Shawnee 

General Freshman 

PARRISH.GLENDAW lola 

Clothing and Retailing Junior 

PERCY, AUDREY D Shawnee Mission 

Music Education . Sophomore 

POHLHAMMER, PATT E Beloit 

Theatre Junior 

PRIDEAUX, DEBRA L Derby 

Horticulture Junior 



REED, KAREN S. Ottawa 

Family and Child Development Junior 

REED, NANCY D Wakefield 

Home Economics Education Freshman 

ROBERTS. PATRICIA G Norton 

Pre-Secondary Education Freshman 

RODERIQUE, LEIGH A Overland Park 

Engineering Freshman 

ROTH. JO ANN J Green 

Home Economics . Freshman 

ROTHMAN, CHERYL A Prairie Village 

Home Economics Education Senior 



SANDERS. VIRGINIA L Wichita 

Fashion Design Freshman 

SAWHILL, RHONDA R Valley Center 

Family and Child Development Junior 

SCHMIDT, MARILYN K Independence 

Home Economics Education Senior 

SCHOOLEY, KAROLYN K Clay Center 

Pre-Nursing Freshman 

SCHULER. JUDY A. . Ness City 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine . . Freshman 

SCHWAB. DEBBY J Norcatur 

Physical Therapy Freshman 



SCHWEITZER, JOANN Derby 

Family and Child Development Senior 

SCOTT, KATHRYN A Salina 

Piano - Freshman 

SELVY. JANIE M Topeka 

Sociology - Sophomore 

SHANK, DEBRA D Shawnee Mission 

Clothing and Retailing Freshman 

SHARP, DIANE Woodbridge. VA 

General . Freshman 

SHAUGHNESSY. CATHERINES Oberlin 

Sociology Sophomore 



Boyd Hall — 333 




SHAW, DIANA J Menden 

Social Work Freshman 

SHIRER. VIRGINIAS Lawrence 

Horticulture . Freshman 

SHOOK. MARTHA J Mission 

Physical Therapy Freshman 

SMITH, MARTHA K Topeka 

Textile Research Sophomore 

STEWART, JANINE L Franktort 

Floriculture ... Freshman 

STOLZ, DEBBIE K , Wichita 

Pre-Elementary Education Freshman 

SVAGLIC, SUSAN J Kansas City 

Business Education Senior 

SWANSON. JENITAL Salina 

Business Administration Sophomore 

TANDY. CECELIA A Roswell, NM 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore 

THOMAS. CYNTHIA J Atwood 

Psychology and History Sophomore 

THOMPSON. DIANE K South Euclid. OH 

General Freshman 

TITMAS, BARBARA A Prairie Village 

Education Senior 

WALKER. DIANNA L Shawnee Mission 

Home Economics Junior 

WALLACE. LEESA M Barnard 

Physical Education Freshman 

WARREN. ELAINE M Galva 

General Business . Freshman 

WEBSTER. ELAINE L Overland Park 

Recreation Junior 

WEIXELMAN. ELIZABETH A Menden 

Pre-Nursmg Freshman 

WEST, JULIE E Tulsa, OK 

Elementary Education Senior 

WILLIAMSON, NANETTE K Basehor 

Floriculture Freshman 

WILTFANG, WENDY S. Topeka 

Consumer Interest Junior 

WISE.CRISS . . . Louisburg 

General Freshman 




»» 



334 — Boyd Hall 







Chi Omega 

_^*^ EIDSON, ESTELLA Houseparent 



AALBREGTSE, SUZANNE H. Leawood 

Home Economics Education Junior 

ARMSTRONG, JAN P Overland Park 

Business Administration Junior 

BAKER, BRENDAG Topeka 

Business Junior 

BARBER, SUE M Overland Park 

Clothing and Retailing Freshman 

BAUMGARTEN, FRITZ Buhler 

Sociology Junior 



BAXTER, DEBRA Salma 

Biology Sophomore 

BAXTER, PRISCILLA Sallna 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

BOCK, JODEE L Wichita 

Physical Therapy Sophomore 

BONTZ, EVANL Wichita 

General Freshman 

BOOMER, KATHY L , , Dortis 

Physical Education Junior 

BRAMMER, LIZ M Wichita 

Dietetic and Institutional Management Junior' 



BROWN, JODI J, ... Manhattan 

General Freshman 

BROWN, SANDRA L Salma 

General Freshman 

BURNS, LINDA D Leawood 

Art Freshman 

BURKHARD, KATHY D Manhattan 

General Freshman 

CARSON, JANA L Wichita 

Family and Child Development Senior 

CARTER, JAN L Shawnee Mission 

Early Childhood Education Senior 



CLARK, NANCY E Sedgwick 

Pre-Nursing Sophomore 

COLE, KATHLEEN A Prairie Village 

Consumer Interest Senior 

COOPER, COLLETTE R . Wichita 

Family and Child Development Junior 

DRING, SUSAN E Topeka 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

FEESE, COLLEEN G. Wichita 

Family Economics Junior 

FLAMING, NANCY F Olathe 

Clothing and Retailing Sophomore 



SsSS 




■3K 




e 



,-i 



■l-; 



V 



u. 



|M 



m 




■ i'"', « i — . i 



d&& 




FOLTZ, BECKY L Topeka 

General Sophomore 

FORCUM, SHERRI D Eureka 

Clothing and Textiles Senior 

FREELY, DEBBIE L. . Overland Park 

Physical Therapy Freshman 

GATZOULIS, PAULA L Prairie Village 

Fashion and Retailing Freshman 

GEHLBACH, DEBBIE L Shawnee 

Home Economics and Journalism Sophomore 

GERHARDT. AIMEE G Kansas City 

Home Economics Freshman 



GIESCH, NANCY L Leawood 

Foods and Nutrition Junior 

GREENBANK, JANET El Dorado 

Elementary Education Freshman 

HAASE, SUZANNE M Plalnvllle 

Interior Design Senior 

HALL, MAUREEN L Overland Park 

General Sophomore 

HARSH, ALICIA K El Dorado 

Family and Child Development Junior 

HARROD, G. KIM Leawood 

Special Education Senior 



HIRNING, MARY L Wichita 

Clothing and Retailing Junior 

HOFFMAN, JOAN K Hoisington 

Pre-Dentistry Freshman 

HOLLOMON, JUDY G Manhattan 

Psychology Senior 

HOOKER. HOLLY K Garden City 

General Sophomore 

INGRAM, SHERYL A Overland Park 

Pre-Nursing Freshman 

JADERBORG, SONJA A Lawrence 

Clothing and Retailing Freshman 



KELLY, NINA M Olathe 

General ' Freshman 

KENNING, ELEONORE Spring Hill 

Modern Languages Freshman 

KNOP, AMY J Prairie Village 

Home Economics Education Junior 

LEISTER, MICHELLE D Salina 

General Sophomore 

LOUCKS, CYNTHIA G Manhattan 

Journalism and Mass Communications Junior 

MANNING, MARY KAY Wichita 

Microbiology Senior 



MARTENS, BETH D El Dorado 

Elementary Education Senior 

McCLURE, SUSAN J Topeka 

Architecture Freshman 

McCRILLIS, MARILYN E Wichita 

Home Economics Freshman 

MOSS, MELINDA A Shawnee Mission 

Home Economics and Journalism Freshman 

MUSICK, NANCY L Overland Park 

Biology Sophomore 

PALMER, CHRISTINE Garden City 

Special Education Senior 



PEGUES, GENNY A Parsons 

Speech Senior 

PELTZER, CATHY L Wichita 

Clothing and Retailing Senior 

PELTZER, CHRISTY H Wichita 

Family and Child Development Senior 

PLAGGE, DAWNETT L Springfield, MO 

Physical Education Junior 

PYKE, DARA R Wichita 

Interior Design Senior 

RAMSEY, MARSHA P Garden City 

Elementary Education Sophomore 



RANALLO, PAULA M Leawood 

Family and Child Development Junior 

RAY, VIRGINIA A Leawood 

Elementary Education Sophomore 

RINNER, KAREN L Topeka 

Elementary Education Freshman 

ROBINSON, LISA K Topeka 

Elementary Education Sophomore 

ROBY, JOAN E Wichita 

Family and Child Development Junior 

SCHABEL, SUSAN M Severna Park, MD 

Elementary Education Junior 



SCHLOERB, MARILYN A Prairie Village 

Speech Pathology and Audlology Senior 

SCHMALE, ROBYN G Garden City 

General Freshman 

SCHOENLEBER, LESLIE A Wichita 

Home Economics and Liberal Arts Senior 

SHEPARD, PATRICE D Manhattan 

Sociology Junior 

SHETTER, MARILYN B Abilene 

Biology Education Senior 

SHOCKEY, LYNDA C Kansas City 

Elementary Education Junior 




336 — Chi Omega 








SIMCOX. MARCINE M Salina 

Pre-Law Freshman 

SMITH, KARENS . Wichita 

Advertising Freshman 

STANLEY, DEE ANN ... Topeka 

Home Economics Freshman 

STEWART, PATRICIA K Denver, CO 

Math Senior 

TOBLER, JILL E Olathe 

Modern Languages Junior 

TRIPP, DEBORAH Leawood 

Elementary Education . . . Junior 

UTTER, NANCY C Wichita 

Family and Child Development Sophomore 

WEST, RITA A. ..Wichita 

Journalism and Mass Communications Sophomore 

WILSON, MICHELE D Lawrence 

Architecture Freshman 

WINGER, ANNE E Wellington 

Pre-Nursing Freshman 

WOMBLE, SANDY L Overland Park 

Pre-Nursing Freshman 

ZAHNER, BETH A Leawood 

Family and Child Development Junior 




Chi Omega — 337 



Clovia 

FRANCIS, MARY LOUISE Houseparent 

BAEHLER, VICKIE S Sharon Springs 

Home Economics Senior 

BAKER, DORIS R Erie 

Office Administration Sophomore 

BALZER, NANCE R Arkansas City 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

BIRK, SANDRA S Grldley 

Family and Child Development Senior 

BOWERS, BEVERLY A Marion 

Retail Floriculture Sophomore 

BURKHART, TERESA M Newton 

Business Freshman 

CARNAHAN, NANCY S Wamego 

Home Economics Extension Sophomore 

CARSWELL, CAROL S Alton 

Home Economics Education Senior 

CARSWELL, CATHY L Alton 

Home Economics Senior 

CARTER, DEBRA L Emporia 

Home Economics Junior 

CASE, ELAINE L McPherson 

Nursing Freshman 




338 — Clovia 




CAUBLE, DEADRA L Mt. Hope 

Music Education and Pre-Veterlnary Medicine Senior 

CAUBLE, OEANA R Mt. Hope 

Home Economics Senior 

CLARK, DEBORAH E Clinton, MO 

Bakery Science and Management Junior 

COPE, CHERYL E Topeka 

Clothing and Retailing Senior 

CRAIG, CYNTHIA C Natoma 

Consumer Interest Junior 

DAVIS, PATRICIA A . . Lyons 

Family and Child Development Junior 

DETTMER. DEBORAH J Leawood 

Home Economics with Liberal Arts Junior 

DIETRICH, MARYS Hiawatha 

Dairy Production Sophomore 

DUETHMAN, MARY JO Paola 

Family and Child Development Junior 

FISHER, MARY L Harper 

Home Economics Education Sophomore 

GERKEN, GAYLE L LaCygne 

Elementary Education Senior 

GOECKEL, CAROL L. Washington 

Physical Therapy Junior 

HAGENMAIER, MARSHA A Randolph 

Home Economics Extension Freshman 

HANKS, GLORIA A Shields 

General Home Economics Freshman 

HARBACH. EVELYN J Scott City 

Social Science Freshman 

HASKINS, JUDY K, Meade 

Business Administration Junior 

HEFTY, ELAINE C. Valley Falls 

Pre-Nursing Freshman 

HUNT.SHERIA. Osawatomie 

Home Economics Extension Sophomore 

JOHNSON. ANN R Scandia 

Home Economics Extension Sophomore 

JONES. SUSAN C. Frankfort 

Home Economics Education Junior 

KAISER, ROSE M . . Hoismgton 

Office Administration Freshman 

KETTLER, DENISE L Paola 

Home Economics and Liberal Arts Junior 

MACY, CINDY M. AltaVista 

Home Economics Education Junior 

MADDUX, MITZI Scott City 

Music Freshman 

McBOYLE, DONNETA K Abilene 

Elementary Education Senior 

McCRARY, SHARON L Shawnee Mission 

Family and Child Development Junior 

MEYER, DONNA R . Hanover 

Home Economics Education Sophomore 

MILLS, JAN A Enterprise 

Home Economics Education Senior 

MORGAN, SHERYL J Wichita 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Sophomore 

MURPHY, MARCIA A Lyndon 

Family and Child Development Senior 

NELSON, ALINE G. . . Goodland 

Home Economics and Liberal Arts Junior 

NORMAN. LAURIE A Waverly 

Home Economics Freshman 

PARKS, VICKY J Manhattan 

Elementary Education Senior 

PECKMAN, CAROL J Paola 

Dietetics Sophomore 

REED, SARA M Assana 

Secondary Physical Education Junior 

ROBITAILLE. MARY K , . , Carbondale 

Food and Nutrition Science Sophomore 

ROBSON, DIANE M Abilene 

Pre-Nursing Freshman 

SHAW, SUZANNE C Topeka 

Horticulture Sophomore 

SMITH. GAIL A Garden City 

Elementary Education Junior 

STORY, CONSTANCE L Udall 

Consumer Interest Senior 

TOWNSEND. AMY L Goodland 

Family and Child Development Junior 

UNRUH, JANICE E Goessel 

Home Economics Education Junior 

VANHORN. CRYSTAL A. Glen Elder 

Medical Technology Junior 

VISSER, ADELL Riley 

Housing and Equipment Sophomore 

WEDEL. VICKI D Tonganoxie 

Clothing and Retailing Junior 

WHITEHAIR, DONNA J Abilene 

Family and Child Development Junior 

WINGERT, TERESA A Emporia 

Home Economics Education Senior 

WISE. PATRICIA A. . Emporia 

Biology Junior 



Clovia — 339 



Delta Chi 



BALTZER, PAUL W Mission 

Journalism and Mass Communications Sophomore 

BARRETT, JOHN T Hiawatha 

Civil Engineering Junior 

BERGNER, THOMAS W Pratt 

Chemical Engineering Junior 

BODENHAMER, DANIEL G Kansas City 

Psychology Senior 

BOKERMANN, NEIL C Overland Park 

Business Administration Sophomore 

BORDMAN, STEVE S Overland Park 

General Sophomore 



BRAMLAGE. RON E Frankfort 

Radio and Television Junior 

BRANT, WES O Luray 

Mechanical Engineering Junior 

CATO, RICHARD C Prairie Village 

Pre-Vetermary Medicine Freshman 

CRAGHEAD, STEVEN K Mexico, MO 

Architecture Sophomore 

DAVIS, DENNIS L Overland Park 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Sophomore 

DAY, MICHAEL J Overland Park 

Business Freshman 



DILLE, DAVID P Brownsburg, IN 

Biology and Secondary Education Senior 

DUFFE NDACK, SCO! i a . Kansas ( ity 

Business Administration Sophomore 

ECKENBERG, ROBERT N Overland Park 

Pre-Dentlstry Senior 

FOSTER, JOHN S Horton 

Business Administration Junior 

FOSTER, THOMAS J. . Washington 

Business Administration Sophomore 

FULKERSON, KEVIN L Manhattan 

Civil Engineering Senior 



GOLDHORN, PAUL E Cherokee, IA 

Psychology Senior 

HALE, MICHAEL A Kansas City 

Journalism and Mass Communications Sophomore 

HAMLETT, CHARLES A Derby 

Business Administration Freshman 

HUSKA, MIKE V Kansas City 

Speech Senior 

KNABE, STEVEN Olathe 

Journalism and Mass Communications Sophomore 

KNOWLES, KENTON V Salina 

Architecture Freshman 






KRISMAN, DAVID L Overland Park 

Business Administration Freshman 

MAISCH, MARK A Lenexa 

Business Administration Senior 

MILLER, MARK A Meade 

General Sophomore 

MORTON, STEPHEN C Frankfort 

Business Administration Freshman 

MOSLEY, KIM D Kansas City 

Pre-Law Freshman 

NOYES, BRAD A Osborne 

Radio and Television Freshman 

OLSON, JOHN E Sallna 

Business Administration Senior 

OLSON, RANDY D Sallna 

Mechanical Engineering Senior 

PALMER, MICHAEL L ... Derby 

Chemical Engineering Freshman 

RANDALL, THOMAS W Kansas City 

Education Junior 

SCHILDHAVER, JOE L Leawood 

Business Administration Senior 

SMITH, DOUGLASS S Leawood 

Agriculture Freshman 

SONTAG. WILLIAM M Derby 

Business Administration Sophomore 

STRAUB, JOSEPH W Kansas City 

General Junior 

STROUSE, DWIGHT L Merriam 

Radio and Television Junior 

VICK, STEVEN A Kansas City 

Business Administration Sophomore 

VOSICKY, JOSEPH E Overland Park 

Journalism and Mass Communications Sophomore 

YARSULIK, ROBERT G Kansas City 

Architecture Freshman 



Delta Chi — 341 



Delta Delta Delta 



JEFFRIES, ELINOR Houseparent 

ALLEN, CHRISTINE A Valley Center 

Elementary Education Sophomore 

ALLEN, MARY L Valley Center 

Pre-Law Senior 

BATT, SHELLY L Marlon 

Music Senior 

BELL, DEBORAH L Fort Scott 

Pre-Nursing Sophomore 

BLYTHE, JANA B Manhattan 

Political Science Freshman 

BOAND, VICKI A Prairie Village 

Elementary Education Sophomore 

BOWMAN, MICHELLE L Overland Park 

Psychology Freshman 

BROADIE, ANNM Lamed 

Elementary Education Sophomore 

BROADIE, MARILYN K Lamed 

Pre-Nursing Freshman 

CAMPBELL. MARY D Topeka 

French Junior 

CASE, DIANA L Marion 

Business Education Freshman 

CASEY, DONNA L Hays 

Recreation Freshman 

CLARK, SARA J Hays 

Accounting Freshman 

CRISPELL, BECKY J Parsons 

Art Education Senior 

DOTSON, DEBORAH Wichita 

General Freshman 

DUNLAP, MARY E Merrlam 

Biology Senior 

ELLIS. LUANN Manhattan 

Pre-Nursing Sophomore 

GONTERMAN, PAMELA J Leawood 

Elementary Education Sophomore 

HAMLIN, JILL L Wichita 

Interior Design Senior 

HANCOCK, KAREN J Topeka 

Commercial Art Sophomore 

HITZ, LOTTIE M , . , .Great Bend 

Business Freshman 

HOCH, SYDNEY A Wilson 

Fashion Design Sophomore 

HOCH.TONI Wilson 

Liberal Arts Senior 






HOGE, DEL G Shawnee Mission 

Interior Design Junior 

ISCH, ELLEN M Morrill 

Speech Pathology . . . , Junior 

ISCH, LISA I Morrill 

Accounting Freshman 

JOHNSON, JANICE Belle Plame 

Home Economics Education Sophomore 

JOHNSON, KAREN M Springfield, MO 

Family and Child Development Senior 

KELLY, SHAUNA L. Overland Park 

Speech Pathology Sophomore 

KORB, BECKY J Stockton 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine . . . Junior 

LANCASTER, MARCIA J Overland Park 

Clothing and Retailing Junior 

LAUCK, DEBRA D Topeka 

General Freshman 

LINE, NANCY S Shawnee Mission 

Family and Child Development Sophomore 

LYNAM, LINDA B Burdetl 

Music Education Senior 

LYNAM. PATRICIA A. Burdett 

Music Education Freshman 

MALONEY, LUANNE E Shawnee Mission 

Family and Child Development Junior 

MAUPIN, KIMBERLY A Manhattan 

Pre-Dentistry Freshman 

McCUNE, LINDA D Stafford 

Journalism and Mass Communications , Sophomore 

McCUNE, SUSAN L Stafford 

Pre-Pharmacy Junior 

McMILLEN, GWEN S Wichita 

Physical Therapy ... Freshman 

McNEIVE, KATE Topeka 

Journalism and Mass Communications Freshman 

MELHUS, MELINDA Concordia 

Theatre Junior 

MEYER, SUSAN D Chapman 

Family and Child Development Junior 

MILLER, KATHRYN A Manhattan 

Pre-Nursing Sophomore 

MODDRELL. NANCY A Wichita 

Psychology Freshman 

MONK, GWEN A Overland Park 

Elementary Education Junior 

MONTGOMERY, NANCY J Leawood 

Special Education Junior 

MOORE, JUDY L Prairie Village 

Pre-Nursing Sophomore 

MOORE, KIMBERLY J Topeka 

Business Administration Freshman 

MUCKENTHALER, TERRY M Overland Park 

Accounting Freshman 

MURPHY, SHERRIE A Great Bend 

Clothing and Retailing Junior 

NEDWED. JAN L Manhattan 

General Freshman 

NEUHAUS, ROBIN M Leawood 

Interior Design Senior 

NORTON, SUSIE M Manhattan 

Physical Education Junior 

NUSS, SUSIE Topeka 

Home Economics and Journalism Senior 

OETINGER, CYNTHIA L Tacoma, WA 

Clothing and Retailing Sophomore 

PETERS, LEIGH C Wichita 

Interior Design Sophomore 

PHELPS, LOU ANN Normal. IL 

Clothing and Retailing Junior 

POLLOM, JULIE A Topeka 

Family and Child Development Senior 

REAMES, DEBORAH E Overland Park 

Family and Child Development Sophomore 

RUCKER, DEANNA M Burdetl 

Physical Education Freshman 

RUMBLE, DEBBIE A Great Bend 

Family and Child Development Sophomore 

SAGESER, SUSAN J Overland Park 

Clothing and Retailing Sophomore 

SAPP, ELLEN M Valley Center 

Home Economics Freshman 

SAUDER, DIANA K Sallna 

Family and Child Development Senior 

SCHWARTZ, CINDY Hutchinson 

Journalism and Mass Communications Senior 

SEAMAN, CYNTHIA J Liberal 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

SHELLEY, KAREN L Wichita 

Business Administration Senior 

SIMMONS. LEE ANN Olathe 

Elementary Education Sophomore 

SMITH, GAYLA J Burdett 

Elementary Education Junior 

STIGALL, JANET A St. Joseph, MO 

Medical Technology Junior 



Delta Delta Delta — 343 



STREETER, JUDITH A Palos Verdes Estates, CA 

Home Economics Freshman 

SWENSON, DEBI R Salina 

Fre-School Education Junior 

THIES, SANDRA S Salina 

Elementary Education Sophomore 

THOMAS, REBECCA J Overland Park 

Pre-School Education Junior 

UNGEHEUER, BETH L Centerville 

Business Administration Junior 

VANOVER, MARGO L Council Grove 

Journalism and Mass Communications Senior 

VINT, NANCY N Overland Park 

Clothing and Retailing Senior 

WAELDIN, JOAN K Salina 

Family and Child Development Junior 

WALTER, DEBRA L Great Bend 

Clothing and Retailing Freshman 

WEIDENHEIMER, AMY J Kinsley 

Home Economics Senior 

WINKLER, JANIE Paola 

General Home Economics Senior 

WINKLER, MELISSA A Paola 

Horticulture Therapy Freshman 

WINKLER, NANCY C Salina 

Learning Disabilities Sophomore 

WOELLHOF, DANA J Oakhi 

Statistics Sophomore 




Delta Sigma Phi 




ALEXANDER, LANCE A Marlon 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology Senior 

ALISON, DALE L Halstead 

Journalism and Mass Communications Sophomore 

ARENSMAN, MICHAEL G. Southfield, Ml 

Pre-Velennary Medicine Freshman 

ATKINSON. DONALD St. John 

Physical Education Junior 

BATT, CARL New York, NY 

Microbiology Junior 

BLEISH. STEVE Leawood 

Veterinary Medicine , . . Sophomore 



BUNDY, ALAN L Goddard 

Agriculture Freshman 

COLE, STEVEN N Auburn 

Biochemistry Freshman 

COLLETT, KEITH Marion 

Music Education Junior 

CUMMINS. WALTER S Olathe 

Pre-Law Sophomore 

DENKER, TERRY Pomona 

Natural Resource Management Junior 

DICKMAN. CHARLES E Webb City. MO 
Journalism and Mass Communications Freshman 



FOSTER, DON M Manhattan 

Building Construction Freshman 

GROSSENBACHER, JEFFERY A . . Bern 

Engineering , , Freshman 

HINCHEY, CHARLES E Kansas City 

Electrical Engineering Freshman 

HOWE, DAVID Manhattan 

General Sophomore 

INGRAM, JAMES R Overland Park 

Business Administration Senior 

LeCLERC, BYRON W Wichita 

Pre-Medicme Junior 




Delta Sigma Phi 




LOBER. TERENCE A Leavenworth 

Political Science Junior 

LOTZ, STEVEN J Manhattan 

Pre- Veterinary Medicine Senior 

MANN, GEORGE W Yorktown Heights, NY 

Physical Science Junior 

McGIVERN, MICHAEL R Topeka 

Building Construction '. Freshman 

NALL, BRUCE N Topeka 

Electrical Engineering Senior 

PEPOOM, MICHAEL Paola 

Pre-Law Senior 

PIGIEL, JOHN Bridgeport 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

REINHARDT, GREG Bison 

Accounting Senior 

REIST, RANDALL D Seneca 

Computer Science Junior 

SMITH, KORD S Rapid City, SD 

Nuclear Engineering Junior 

SMITH. WILLIAM L Olathe 

Natural Resource Management Freshman 

STONE, DAVID R Valley Stream, NY 

Pre-Medicine Junior 

STRATHMAN, TIMOTHY A Winnebago, IL 

Physical Education Junior 

TORTORA, RICHARD A Syracuse, NY 

Building Construction Senior 

WALKER, ANTHONY Manhattan 

Business Administration , Freshman 




346 — Delta Sigma Phi 



Delta Tau Delta 




CHAPPELL. MARY BELLE Houseparent 

ANDERSON. MICHAEL B Holton 

Building Construction ... Junior 

BAIRD, JIMR Logan 

Business Sophomore 

BERGER, RICK Atchison 

Pre-Law Sophomore 

BLATTNER, STUART E Rozel 

Secondary Physical Education Junior 

BOISSEAU, ROGER K Coldwaler 

Agriculture Economics Senior 



BRUCKER, L RANDALL Valley Center 

Public Relations Junior 

CAREY, CALVIN M Sterling 

Business Junior 

CHEATHAM, THOMAS K Oklahoma City, OK 

Radio and Television Sophomore 

CLARK, JON T Leawood 

Accounting Sophomore 

CONRAD, KELLY E Clay Center 

Accounting Sophomore 

COSSMAN, DOUGLAS T. , Baton Rouge. LA 

Pre-Vetermary Medicine Freshman 



CURRIE, CURTIS G Gypsum 

General Agriculture Freshman 

CURRIE, MIKE ...... Gypsum 

Dairy Production Junior 

CURRIE. RALPH A Manhattan 

Business Administration . Junior 

DAVIS, CLARK H. Overland Park 

Business Administration Sophomore 

DIERKING, MARK C Atchison 

Business Administration Freshman 

DROWN, BRADFORD D Overland Park 

Radio and Television Senior 



DUNNE, PATRICK J Manhattan 

Pre-Law . . . . . Junior 

FARNSWORTH, RONALD J. Overland Park 

Architecture Junior 

FARRINGTON, KIP E . Chanute 

Civil Engineering Freshman 

FOLEY, BOB L Atchison 

Radio and Television Freshman 

FOLEY, WILLIAM J Atchison 

Journalism and Mass Communications Senior 

GEBHART, BRUCE E Salina 

Business Sophomore 



GERLACH. CARL R . Leawood 

Business Administration Junior 

GOWDY, STEPHEN R Overland Park 

General Business Freshman 

HARVELL, EVERETT W Leawood 

Agriculture Freshman 

HENDERSON, MARK W Prairie Village 

Pre-Dentistry Freshman 

HOFMEIR, DENNIS G Assaria 

Accounting Sophomore 

KEELER, PATRICK D Salina 

General Sophomore 



KELLER, MARK R Manhattan 

Business Administration Junior 

KELLOGG, KENNETH K Phllllpsburg 

Civil Engineering Senior 

KNIGHT, JOEY D ...... . .Salina 

Mechanical Engineering Freshman 

KOCH. KEVIN E. . . . Manhattan 

Pre-Law Sophomore 

KROH. ROGER L Merriam 

Business Junior 

LARSON. THAYNE A Scandia 

Agricultural Economics Junior 



LIETZAN, CHRISTOPHER E Clay Center 

Accounting Junior 

MANLEY, JIM T Powhattan 

Civil Engineering Junior 

MARTIN, SCOTTY J Attica 

Business Sophomore 

MclLHON, STEPHEN J Des Moines, IA 

Pre-Law Junior 

NOLAND, BOBC. . Fayetteville. AR 

Business Administration . Junior 

OLIVER, MIKE P Shawnee. OK 

Accounting Sophomore 



OLSON, JOHN T Manhattan 

Psychology Sophomore 

O'NEAL. KELLY D Prairie Village 

Pre-Dentistry Sophomore 

ORMISTON, ROCK A Kismet 

Agricultural Engineering Freshman 

PARKER, MARSHALL D Overland Park 

Accounting Freshman 

PARR, HOWARD F. Rossville 

General Freshman 

PROFFITT, MICHAEL J Sterling 

Horticulture Senior 



Delta Tau Delta — 347 



RICHARDS, DAN W Manhattan 

Business . . Freshman 

RIORDAN, ROBERT T Solomon 

Accounting Freshman 

SANKEY, CHRIS Sterling 

Animal Science and Industry Freshman 

SANKEY, LEE Sterling 

Business Junior 

SHANK, Ray A Overland Park 

Journalism and Mass Communications Senior 

SHERMAN, BRAD S Coldwater 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

SLIFER, RICK D Duncan, OK 

Recreation Senior 

SMITH. GREGORY V Burdett 

Accounting Freshman 

STEIN, CHRIS L Gypsum 

General Agriculture Freshman 

STEIN, DAVID E Gypsum 

General Agriculture Sophomore 

SWEENEY, RICHARD L Salma 

Civil Engineering Freshman 

THOLSTRUP, DAVID B Salina 

Agronomy Sophomore 

THORTON, ROGER D Coldwater 

Agricultural Economics Junior 

TODD, DAVID M Sabetha 

Engineering Sophomore 

VAUGHAN, DOUG C. Minneapolis, MN 

Political Science Sophomore 

VEREEN, WILLIAM N Shawnee Mission 

Business Freshman 

WAGNON, T LYNN . Coldwater 

Agriculture Freshman 

WENGER, GREGG D Sabetha 

Pre-Medicine Junior 

WESTBERG, JAMES H Salina 

Business Senior 

WINDSOR, D. MARK Atchison 

Business Senior 

WINGER, JOSEPH A Prairie Village 

Business Sophomore 

WOLFERT, HENRY J Prairie Village 

Horticulture Sophomore 

WRIGHT, KEITH A Topeka 

Pre-Medicine Junior 

ZILLMAN, JOHN J Leawood 

Business Senior 

ZIPP, CARY L Overland Park 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore 



348 — Delta Tau Delta 




Delta Upsilon 




ANDERSON, STEVEN E Mentor 

Civil Engineering Junior 

BAUER. BRAD L Burdett 

General Sophomore 

BAUER, THOMAS L Burdett 

Psychology Senior 

BAUGHMAN, MICHAEL J Salma 

Pre-Medicine Freshman 

BAUMGARTNER, DAVID E .Topeka 

Chemical Engineering Freshman 

BERQUIST, ROGER A Bridgeport 

Business Administration Senior 

BOKERMANN, BRIAN F Overland Park 

Biology Freshman 

BOLAN, JOHN E Manhattan 

Secondary Education Junior 

BOLERJACK, STEVEN M Shawnee 

Architecture Sophomore 

BROWN, ROBERT P Ulysses 

Accounting Junior 

BRUMBAUGH, STEVEN J Hutchinson 

Chemical Engineering Junior 

CARTER, STEVE L Wichita 

Accounting Sophomore 

CARTER, WILLIAM C Mernam 

Civil Engineering Junior 

CAYWOOD, DOUGLAS C Raymond 

Agriculture Economics Senior 

COCKE, MICHAEL J - Wichita 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Junior 

COOPER, EARL T Bonner Springs 

Journalism and Mass Communications Junior 

CURTIS, KEVIN J Topeka 

General Freshman 

DRAKE, RICHARD L . . Sterling 

General Sophomore 

DUTRO. KENNETH R Lees Summit, MO 

Architecture Sophomore 

EBRIGHT, ALAN J Lyons 

Business and Finance Sophomore 

EDGERLEY, PAUL B Overland Park 

Accounting Freshman 

EGBERT, DOUGLAS A Dighton 

General Engineering Freshman 

EPLEE, JOHN R Fredonla 

Pre-Medlclne Senior 

FUNK, BOYD R Garden City 

Agricultural Mechanization Senior 

FLEISCHMAN.LEEB Hillside, NJ 

General Sophomore 

HAYDEN, RICHARD G Wichita 

Psychology Sophomore 

HEIMAN.TIML Seneca 

Architectural Structures Senior 

HOOVER, STEVEN Chapman 

Psychology Sophomore 

HURLEY, JAMES A Glasco 

General Engineering Freshman 

JENKINS, JAMES B Leavenworth 

Wildlife Biology Freshman 

JOHNSON, DAVID O Hutchinson 

Elementary Education Senior 

JONES, CLIFTON C Manhattan 

Microbiology Sophomore 

KRISS, PHILLIP S Prairie Village 

Pre-Dentistry Sophomore 

LEWIS, JOHN G Gardner 

Accounting Junior 

MARSHALL, MARK L Mlnneola 

Architecture Senior 

MATHIESEN, BOB A Wichita 

Architecture Freshman 

McGRANAGHAN, THOMAS J Overland Park 

Business Freshman 

McNORTON. KEVIN E Topeka 

General Freshman 

MILLER. ROBERT T Leawood 

Industrial Engineering Sophomore 

MOWRY, GERALD S Manhattan 

Pre-Medicine Sophomore 

NORTON, DON I Dodge City 

Architectural Structures Senior 

ORLOFF, DOUGLAS F Shawnee 

Journalism and Mass Communications Junior 

PATRICK, KERRY L Leawood 

Political Science and Economics Junior 

PLANK, CRAIG A Wichita 

Architecture Sophomore 

PLEGGE, JAMES D Marysvllle 

Music Education Senior 

PLUMB, BRAD L Overland Park 

Business Administration Senior 

PRATT, ROBERT D Topeka 

Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

REED, LARRY C Hutchinson 

Landscape Architecture and Horticulture Senior 



Delta Upsilon — 349 



SCOTT, CASEY M Wichita 

Journalism and Mass Communications Sophomore 

SELL, RICHARD D Pacific Grove, CA 

Engineering Freshman 

SHEELY, MICHAEL R Manhattan 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore 

SHULL, MICHAEL W Manhattan 

Pre-Mediclne and Psychology Senior 

SON, KEVIN V Fredonia 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

STEIDER, TOM W Overland Park 

Engineering Freshman 



STROBERG, JEFFREY A Hutchinson 

Nuclear Engineering Freshman 

SWENSON, JAMES W Topeka 

Economics and Political Science Sophomore 

TEETER, JOHN H Hutchinson 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Sophomore 

TENHOLDER, TiMOTHY N Topeka 

Business Freshman 

THOMPSON, TAD M Manhattan 

Life Science Junior 

TUCKER, KEITH D Wichita 

Civil Engineering Junior 



WILLIAMS, DENNIS M Kansas City, MO 

Architecture Sophomore 

WILSON, JON R lola 

Political Science Sophomore 

WITT, BERNIE T Wichita 

Architecture Sophomore 

WOOLPERT, BRUCE D Topeka 

Arts and Sciences and Pre-Law Sophomore 




350 





Delta Zeta 



JOHNSON, VEDA Houseparen! 

AHRENS, JUANITA J Powhattan 

Clothing and Retailing Senior 

BARKER, CINDY A Arkansas City 

Vocal Music Education Senior 

BELL, LINDA L Great Bend 

Natural Resource Management Senior 

BROWN, ANNE K. Prairie Village 

Business Administration Freshman 

BURKE. WANDA J Swedesboro, NJ 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine , . . . Sophomore 

BURNS, CHERIEA Manhattan 

Business Education Junior 

DIEHL, LINDA M Junction City 

Recreation Senior 

EVERS, PAMELA S Lake Quivira 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Freshman 

FIGURSKI, MARCIA L Manhattan 

Physical Therapy Freshman 

GOBBER, JANAS. , Manhattan 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

GREEN. PAMELA Y Overland Park 

Bilingual Education Sophomore 

HAMEL, ANNETTE M Sallna 

Secondary Math Education Senior 

HATHAWAY, MELISSA K Kansas City 

Home Economics Education Sophomore 

HEINEN, ROBERTA S Concordia 

Elementary Education Senior 

HOBBLE, DEBORAH F Wichita 

Economics Sophomore 

HOLLIS. ANNEK Prairie Village 

Physical Therapy Junior 

JOHNSON, LAUREL L Fairfax, VA 

History Senior 




Delta Zeta — 351 



KAPPELMANN, CAROLYN J Topeka 

Pre-Veterlnary Medicine Senior 

KENAGY. LEIGH ANN Lenexa 

Accounting Sophomore 

LEMAN, CARI S Sabetha 

Landscape Horticulture Sophomore 

LIPPELMANN, KAREN R Lyons 

Business Administration Junior 

MARSHALL, PAULA F Ackley, IA 

Home Economics Senior 

MURRAY. JANINNE M Junction City 

Chemistry Education Freshman 

NEIBLING, MARJORIE M Highland 

Music Education Junior 

NEUHARTH, BELINDA R Wichita 

Home Economics Education Senior 

RUSSELL, JOY J. . Overland Park 

Clothing and Retailing Sophomore 

SCHILLER, ELIZABETH A Claim 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Freshman 

SCREEN, RITA M Wichita 

Chemistry Senior 

SINCLAIR, MARCY A Manhattan 

Humanities Senior 

STADEL, DEBORAH J Riley 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

TELTHORST, LISA A Topeka 

Nuclear Engineering Freshman 

VEST, CINDY L Overland Park 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Sophomore 

WILNER, JOI L Prairie Village 

Journalism and Mass Communications Senior 





352 — Delta Zeta 



Farmhouse 




BUCK. JOHN B Andale 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Sophomore 

BOYINGTON, JOHN W Goodland 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Junior 

BRENSING, RICHARD H Stafford 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

BRINKMAN. BRUCE E Arkansas City 

Business Administration Junior 

COTT, RICHARD H Clay Center 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

COTT, TOM W Clay Center 

Agronomy Sophomore 

DEWERFF, DON M Ellinwood 

Agricultural Education Junior 

DREITH. JON R Randolph 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore 

EDWARDS. WILLIAM R Olsburg 

Agricultural Economics Sophomore 

ENGLER, VERLYN R Holcomb 

Agricultural Economics Junior 

ETHERIDGE. WARREN A Medicine Lodge 

Agronomy Sophomore 

FLESKE, DAVID H Garfield 

Accounting Senior 

FRITZEMEIER, RANDY J Stafford 

Agricultural Economics Freshman 

GARTRELL. GREGORY A Phillipsburg 

Agricultural Engineering Sophomore 

GILLILAND, RANEY L Holton 

Political Science and Pre-Law Senior 

GOOD, CRAIG A Manhattan 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

HANDS, CEDRIC K Garden City 

Physical Education Senior 

HARVEY, ROGER A Beaver, OK 

Radio and Television Senior 

HELLER, MICHAEL W Hunter 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

HENRY, TERRY W Randolph 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

HILDEBRAND, DONALD S Stafford 

Agricultural Mechanization Sophomore 

HOUGHTON, LEON D Tipton 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

JACKSON, BRIAN C Elsmore 

Agricultural Economics Sophomore 

LATTA, DAVID W Harper 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

LAWRENCE, TERRY L Wlntleld 

Agricultural Economics Senior 

LINVILLE, RANDAL L Holcomb 

Agricultural Economics Junior 

MAYDEW, BRIAN J Lebanon 

Agricultural Economics Junior 

MAYER, GREG L Gypsum 

Accounting Freshman 

McNICKLE, TIM A Stafford 

Agricultural Mechanization Junior 

McWILLIAMS, ROBBEN L Sharon Springs 

Architecture Junior 

MERRITT, RANDALL E Lebanon 

Physical Education Junior 

MICHELS, GARY L Hunter 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore 

MILLER, KIM A Burdett 

Landscape Horticulture Senior 

MUNDEN, DAVID G Wichita 

Fisheries Biology Junior 

MUNSON, GAYLORD R Junction City 

Agriculture Economics Junior 

NULIK. RODNEY L Arkansas City 

Agriculture Education Junior 

NUSS, LYMAN L Wilson 

Agronomy Sophomore 

O'CONNOR, WILLIAM M Blame 

General Freshman 

OLSON, DAN S Morganvllle 

Electrical Engineering Senior 

OLTJEN, JAMES W Robinson 

Physics Senior 

PARKER, JAMES W Mulvane 

Food Science and Industry Sophomore 

PATTON, LEON J Riverton 

Geography Graduate Student 

PAULSEN, DANIEL B Stafford 

Veterinary Medicine Sophomore 

PELTON, LYNN F Burdett 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

RAMSEY, JAMES W Arkansas City 

General Agriculture Freshman 

RIFFEL. STEVEN K Stockton 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore 

RILEY, JAMES C Dexter 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

ROTH, ROBERT A, Green 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 



Farmhouse — 353 



ROTMAN, DENNIS J Downs 

Economics Senior 

SMITH, DAVID C Wlnfleld 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

SPEER, ROBERT W Mulvane 

Agriculture Education Junior 

STOSKOPF, N. DEAN . . . Hoisington 

Crop Protection Sophomore 

SUELLENTROP, RICHARD J Colwich 

Forestry Sophomore 

SYLVESTER, LEON E Wamego 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

SYLVESTER, NOEL D Wamego 

Music Education Freshman 

THOMPSON, STEVEN L Medicine Lodge 

Computer Science Junior 

TREXLER, BRAD A Hill City 

Agricultural Economics Junior 

TURNER, TOMMY K Stafford 

Agricultural Education Senior 

VanGUNDY, MIKE W Amencus 

General Agriculture Freshman 

VOLKER. BOYD L Stafford 

Agricultural Economics Junior 

WEAVER, JACK R Hiawatha 

Agricultural Economics Freshman 

WILSON, RONALD J Manhattan 

Agricultural Education Sophomore 





354 — Farmhouse 



' 



Ford Hall 




MILLER, LUCILEW Director 

ACHTERBERG, DONNAS Lincoln 

Retail Floriculture Freshman 

ADAMS, MALINDA M Salina 

Fine Arts Freshman 

ADKISON, MARLENES Topeka 

Journalism and Mass Communications Junior 

ALBERS, REINETTE M Oakley 

Secondary Math Education Sophomore 

ALEXANDER, JUANITA . , . , Gardner 

Ottice Administration Freshman 



ALLDRITT, CELESTE L Halstead 

Anthropology Freshman 

ANDREW, CYNTHIA L Kansas City 

Music Education Freshman 

ANDREW. DEBORAH A Kansas City 

Physical Education Sophomore 

ANDREWS, JULIE A Salina 

General Home Economics Freshman 

APPEL, JANET E La Crosse 

Secondary Education Sophomore 

ARMSTRONG, JODY Overland Park 

Family and Child Development Senior 



Salina 

Freshman 

Overland Park 

Freshman 



ARNOLD, DENISER 

Elementary Education 
ARTH.KARENA, . . 

General 

ATZENHOFFER, BETH A Great Bend 

General Sophomore 

BABINGTON, WENDY L Overland Park 

Clothing and Retailing , Freshman 

BAILEY, REBECCAS. Garnett 

Home Economics Education Graduate Student 

BALBINOT. LINDA J Prairie Village 

Physical Education Freshman 



BALDWIN, DORENE F White City 

Modern Languages Senior 

BARRETT, MICHELE Belleville 

Medical Technology Freshman 

BARRETT, SHERYL A Colby 

Clothing and Retailing Senior 

BEADLES, SHERRI L ... Fall River 

Business Finance Junior 

BEATSON, JACKIE R Prairie Village 

Business Sophomore 

BECKER, CAROL L St Louis, MO 

Horticulture Therapy Junior 



BECKERDITE, CLAUDIA E Kmgsdown 

Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

BENNETT, NEISHA L Oregon. IL 

Home Economics Freshman 

BERGKAMP, EVELYN S. Garden Plain 

Horticulture Junior 

BERKLEY, JACQUE K Abilene 

Math Freshman 

BERRY, RHONDA L. Rossville 

General Freshman 

BICHELMEYER, JANE C Shawnee 

Home Economics Freshman 



BIEKER, CYNTHIA S v . Sharon Spring* 

Home Economics and Journalism Senior 

BLACKABY, CHRISTINA L Kansas City 

Family and Child Development Junior 

BLAIR, SALLY R Erie 

Journalism and Mass Communications Senior 

BLISS. ELIZABETH A Bonner Springs 



Clothing and Retailing 
BLOCK, JAYNES. 
General 

BLUME.TINAM 
General 



Sophomore 

Atchison 

Freshman 

Scott City 

Freshman 



BOEHM, SHARON A Olathe 

Clothing and Retailing Junior 

BOLIN, DEBORAH J Wichita 

Home Economics Sophomore 

BOLDER, DANIELLE Prairie Village 

Home Economics Education , Senior 

BOWE, SUSAN E Pratt 

Dietetics Senior 

BOWMAN, MARY M Kansas City 

Business Education Sophomore 

BOYD, BECKY L Topeka 

Interior Design Sophomore 



BRANDT, JOANN Prairie Village 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 



Rossville 
Freshman 
El Dorado 
Junior 
Liberal 
Freshman 
Kansas City 
Junior 
Beloit 
Sociology Sophomore 



Ford Hall — 355 



BRENNAN, LISA A 

Pre-Medicine 

BRISON, LEAH J. 

Clothing and Retailing 

BROUSSARD, CYNTHIA A 

Physical Therapy 

BROZANIC. LINDA M. 

Journalism and Mass Communications 

BRYANT, RENE 



BUCHANAN. UNA J Spring Hill 

Family and Child Development Sophomore 

BUCHMAN, SUSAN K Burdick 

Family and Child Development Freshman 

BURNS, LU A Fowler 

General Sophomore 

BURR, MARLENE K St. Francis 

Clothing and Retailing Sophomore 

BURTON, ANNE Mulvane 

Psychology Sophomore 

BUTIN. SANDRA L Halstead 

General Sophomore 

CAMPBELL. JAN L Cheshire. CT 

Clothing and Retailing Junior 

CAMPUZANO, MARIA A Prairie Village 

Pre-Medicine Freshman 

CANNELL, VICKI L Montrose, CO 

Spanish Sophomore 

CANNY, REBECCA R. Johnson 

Home Economics Education Sophomore 

CARSON, KENNAS Clearwater 

Home Economics Education Sophomore 

CHAFFEE, NANCY Overland Park 

Elementary Education Sophomore 

CHARLES, CHERYL A Chicago, IL 

Journalism and Mass Communications Freshman 

CHARTRAND. LUCY A Leawood 

General . Sophomore 

CHEATUM, JODY A Syracuse 

General Home Economics Sophomore 

CHUBB, DANA E Baxter Springs 

General Home Economics Freshman 

CHUBB, SALLY A Baxter Springs 

Pre-Nursing Freshman 

CLARK, CHERYL G Shawnee 

Home Economics Freshman 

CLARK, PATRICIA L McPherson 

Pre-Vetermary Medicine Freshman 

CLINE.KYML Kansas City 

Arts and Sciences Sophomore 

CONNOR, BRENDA C Prairie Village 

Home Economics Freshman 

COOK, LINDA J Hope 

Public Relations Sophomore 

CORY, LINDA M Wichita 

Elementary Education Sophomore 

COX, REGINA D Overland Park 

Music Education Freshman 

COX, SARAH C Medicine Lodge 

Accounting Sophomore 

CRAWFORD. GAY V Rossville 

General Freshman 

CROCKETT, GAYLE A Lyons 

General Freshman 

CROSS, DEBORA L Kansas City 

Dietetics Sophomore 

CROUCH, MARTY L Topeka 

Elementary Education Freshman 

CUDNEY, NANCY Trousdale 

Psychology Sophomore 

CURLEY, CHRISTINE A Prairie Village 

Physical Therapy Senior 

CURTRIGHT, PAULA R Leawood 

Accounting Sophomore 

DAMMANN, KAREN S Marysville 

Special Education Freshman 

DARLING, WENDY Prairie Village 

Family and Child Development Freshman 

DAVIS. MARY J. Overland Park 

Fisheries and Wildlite Biology .... Sophomore 

DAY, TRACY .... Overland Park 

Business Finance Junior 

DAYLOR. PAULA K Wamego 

Social Work Sophomore 

DEBRICK. RITA B Garnett 

General Freshman 

DELIMONT, BARBARA G Stamford, NB 

Home Economics Extension Sophomore 

DENHOLM, CAROL J Tonganoxie 

Dietetics and Institutional Management Sophomore 

DENTON, DEBORAH D Prairie Village 

General Freshman 

DIKEMAN, SANDY A Syracuse 

General Freshman 

DLABAL, DEBORAH K Ellsworth 

Physical Therapy Sophomore 

DREW. LISA B Jefferson City, MO 

Architecture Junior 

DUGUID, PAMELA F Williamsburg, VA 

Speech Pathology Freshman 

DUNLAP, SHERRY Olathe 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology Freshman 

DYE, REBECCA A Goodland 

Business Freshman 

EDDY. ADELL L Syracuse 

Accounting Junior 




356 — Ford Hall 








EDIGER, CHARLOTTE A. Buhler 

Home Economics Junior 

EDWARDS, SUSAN F Emporia 

Home Economics Freshman 

EHRLICH, JOANNA L Mission 

Pre-Education Freshman 

EKART, KIMBERLYA Henngton 

Pre-Nursing Freshman 

ELDER, SUSAN R . . . Fredonia 

Home Economics Freshman 

EVANS, D. KATHLEEN , Hutchinson 

Physical Education Sophomore 

EWING, JANICE L Independence 

Home Economics Education Junior 

FAUBION, LU A Smith Center 

Pre-Nursing Freshman 

FINEGAN, MARLA K Goodland 

Home Economics Extension ... Freshman 

FOHEY, MICHELLE L Leawood 

Fashion Merchandising Sophomore 

FREDERICK, SUSAN G. . Topeka 

Home Economics Education Sophomore 

FREELAND, GAILA M Burns 

General Sophomore 

FURNISH, SUSAN J Shawnee Mission 

Clothing and Retailing Sophomore 

GALLE, KAY A Moundndge 

Interior Design Junior 

GARINGER, SUSAN L Buhler 

English Pre-Education Freshman 

GARRETT, CHRISTINE E Shawnee 

History Senior 

GARRISON, VICKI L Salma 

Special Education Sophomore 

GEORGE, ANN E. Colby 

Physical Therapy Freshman 

GIBSON, BARBARA M Salma 

Medical Technology Freshman 

GILLIAM, PEGGY A. . . Greenleat 

Agricultural Engineering Junior 

GOERING, REBEKAH Wichita 

Secondary Physical Education Graduate Student 

GOERING. SARA Wichita 

Speech Pathology Graduate Student 

GOERING, SELMA Wichita 

Pre-Nursing Sophomore 

GRAFF, BARBARA J. . Marienthal 

General Freshman 

GRAVES, KATHY A Mission 

Interior Design Freshman 

GRIDER, NANCY E Shawnee Mission 

Fashion Retailing Sophomore 

GROTHUSEN. JANET S . . . Ellsworth 

Family and Child Development Sophomore 

HAIFLEIGH.DEBRA. . Goodland 

Correctional Administration Sophomore 

HAMMEKE, SUSAN M Belpre 

Physical Therapy Junior 

HAMMOND, SUSAN L Easton, CT 

Housing and Equipment Sophomore 

HARLIN, MAUREEN C Overland Park 

Business .... . . Freshman 

HARRINGTON, NANCY K. . . Overland Park 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

HARTFORD, LYNN . . . Wichita 

General Freshman 

HEINZ, RITA L Overland Park 

Elementary Education Senior 

HELFERSTAY, CYNTHIA M Mulvane 

Theatre Junior 

HEMBERGER, BRENDA J Argonia 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore 



Ford Hall — 357 



HENDERSON, SHERILYN S Eskndge 

Dietetics Sophomore 

HENG. MARILYN L Liberal 

General Freshman 

HENKE. MAUREEN L Shawnee Mission 

Family and Child Development Sophomore 

HENKE, NANCY J Shawnee 

Home Economics Education Sophomore 

HENTZLER, CAROL L Eskndge 

Interior Design Sophomore 

HERBERS, SUSAN K Rose Hill 

Physical Education Junior 

HERBERT, MARY C Lawrence 

Dietetics Senior 

HESS, CONNIE J Burns 

Family and Child Development Sophomore 

HIGGINS, DIANE E Topeka 

Clothing and Retailing Senior 

HILL, BARBARA J San Jose, CA 

Physical Therapy Freshman 

HITE, JULIE J Wichita 

Dental Hygiene Freshman 

HfTT, BARBARA J Overland Park 

Dietetics and Institutional Management Senior 

HITTLE, LISA L. Wmtield 

Pre-Music Education Freshman 

HODNEFIELD, LORI L Mission 

Clothing and Retailing Freshman 

HOLCOMB, DEBBI K Hutchinson 

Physical Education Sophomore 

HOLMES, LU A Tehran, Iran 

Interior Design Freshman 

HORACK, ANDREA M Oxford 

Home Economics Sophomore 

HORNBAKER, PAMELA S Stafford 

Clothing and Retailing Sophomore 

HORNECKER, SUSAN L Topeka 

Interior Design . Sophomore 

HOSKINSON, DIANA M Statlord 

Music Education Senior 

HOWARD. RUTH E Topeka 

Elementary Education Junior 

HOWE, MARCIAL . Overland Park 

General Home Economics Sophomore 

HUDSON, JUDY M Falun 

Elementary Education Junior 

HUETTENMUELlER, JEANNE Paola 

Interior Design Freshman 

HUMFELD, SUSAN M Beloit 

Art Sophomore 

HUNTER, BARBARA J Scott City 

Business Freshman 

HURD. JANIS S Shawnee Mission 

Psychology Freshman 

HURT, LINDA L Ellis 

Elementary Education Junior 

HURST, DEBBIE K Johnson 

Art Education Sophomore 

HUXMAN, MARILOU Morland 

Journalism and Mass Communications Sophomore 

ISENBERG, MARGIE E Overland Park 

Home Economics Freshman 

JACKSON, DEBORAH L Detroit 

Spanish Senior 

JACKSON, SHARYL L Kansas City 

Social Work Sophomore 

JACOB. KATHRYN A Halstead 

Music Freshman 

JAQUES, NANCY A Wichita 

Family and Child Development Senior 

JOHNSON, HEATHER K Dwight 

Urban Horticulture Junior 

JOHNSON, KATHY L Kansas City 

Business Junior 

JOHNSON, SUSAN J Lindsborg 

Home Economics Sophomore 

JOHNSTON, BRENDAS Goodland 

Home Economics Freshman 

JOHNSTON, DENISE R Glen Elder 

Medical Technology Sophomore 

JONES, JANA M Washington 

Accounting Freshman 

KAUFFMAN, NOREEN H, Abilene 

Sociology Freshman 

KAUFMAN, NATHALEA J Great Bend 

Secondary Math Education Junior 

KEETEN, JAN S Phillipsburg 

Family and Child Development Junior 

KELLER, CHERYL J Halstead 

Home Economics Junior 

KERSHAW, KAREN L Hutchinson 

Elementary Education Junior 

KILBY, PAM J Wichita 

General Freshman 

KIMMELL, KAREN A Kiowa 

Home Economics Freshman 



358 — Ford Hall 




I 





KING, MARILYN A Newton 

Clothing and Retailing Sophomore 

KINGSTON, ARLETTA M Hoisington 

Business Freshman 

KLENKE, SUE M Hutchinson 

Physical Education Sophomore 

KLOPFENSTEIN. CAROLS . Mulvane 

History Sophomore 

KOHAKE, MARCIAR , .Goff 

Dietetics and Institutional Management Sophomore 

KOHMAN, PAMELA J Gypsum 

Home Economics Freshman 



KOLTERMAN, MARIAN J. ....... . Onaga 

Pre-Nursing Freshman 

KONICEK, JEANETTE M McPherson 

Clothing and Retailing Freshman 

KORVER, KIM D Overland Park 

Computer Science Freshman 

KOSSOY, FAITH S St Louis, MO 

Bakery Science and Management Freshman 

KOSTELEC, MAUREEN A Kansas City 

Accounting Sophomore 

KREHBIEL. DEBBIE K Pretty Prairie 

Music Education Sophomore 



KREHBIEL. PEGGY A Kingman 

Commercial Art Junior 

KROENING, MARY L Overland Park 

Family and Child Development Sophomore 

KRUEGER, KATHY A Yates Center 

Retailing and Fashion Design .... Junior 

LAWRENCE, CAROL S Shawnee 

Dietetics . . . . Junior 

LENZ, CAROLYN J Mission 

Business and Home Economics Sophomore 

LESH, LOU A Norton 

Physical Therapy Junior 



LEWIS, DEE A 

Home Economics Education 

LEWIS, JANET M 

Math 

LEWIS, KAYLEEN C 
Animal Science and Industry 
LEWIS. SHANNON M 
Clothing and Retailing 



Sharon Springs 

Junior 

Wichita 

Freshman 

Concordia 

Sophomore 

. Piedmont 

Freshman 



LIBBY, DEANNA J Smith Center 

Home Economics Education Senior 

LILLY. SHIRLEY G. Mentor 

Pre-Nursing Freshman 



LINDBERG, JEANETTE D Courtland 

Elementary Education Junior 

LOFIN, JOANN A Ogallah 

Interior Design Junior 

LONG, LYNA Eureka 

Interior Design Junior 

LOVSETH. ROXANN J Kansas City 

Business Administration Junior 

LOWDON, JANET R Cawker City 

Sociology Sophomore 

LOWRY, TAMARA R Topeka 

General Freshman 



LUCK, JANET K Lincoln 

Home Economics Education Freshman 

MALINOWSKI, PATTI S Shawnee 

Business Sophomore 

MALONE, KATHLEEN A . . , Overland Park 

General ....... Freshman 

MARKHAM, MARCIEL Osborne 

Business Administration Junior 

MARSH, MARY A Leavenworth 

Family and Child Development Freshman 

MARSH, RHONDA S Fowler 

Industrial Counseling , Sophomore 



Ford Hall — 359 



MARSH. SUSIE M Overland Park 

Recreation Sophomore 

MARTIN, CHRISTINA A Lenexa 

Business Sophomore 

MARTIN. NANCY A Olathe 

Family and Child Development Junior 

MAWHINEY, LISA K Hoismgton 

Home Economics Junior 

McAFEE. CHERYL L Wichita 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

MCALLISTER, CINDY S Bridgeton, NJ 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore 

McAULIFFE, SUSAN B Shawnee Mission 

Special Education Junior 

McCLARNON, SUSAN G Wichita 

Elementary Education Junior 

McCLURE, ANNE L Kingmann 

Elementary Education Junior 

McGRATH, JULIE A Overland Park 

Dietetics Sophomore 

McKEE, JUDY A Brewster 

Family and Child Development Junior 

McMURRAY. DEE A Hutchinson 

Elementary Education Junior 

McNERNEY, COLEEN A Lenexa 

Special Education Junior 

McREYNOLDS, JEANICE A Burlington 

Dietetics Senior 

MEENGS. MARYL . .. . Annandale. VA 

Biochemistry Sophomore 

MERRIMAN. CYNTHIA A Salina 

Retail Floriculture Freshman 

MICHEL, VICKIE L Manhattan 

Business Administration Sophomore 

MILLER, KATHY P Rossville 

Accounting Freshman 

MILLER. STACEYJ Eureka 

Home Economics Education Junior 

MITTS. PAMELAS Bonner Springs 

Family and Child Development Junior 

MOHLER, PAULA J. Atchison 

Music Education Sophomore 

MORRIS, MARY F Minneapolis 

Special Education Sophomore 

MOSER. THERESA K Tribune 

Ottice Administration Freshman 

MUELLER, JILL E Paola 

Medical Technology Sophomore 

MUMMERT, KATHY A Pittsburg 

Early Childhood Education Sophomore 

MYERS, KATHLEEN A Overland Park 

Pre-Elementary Education Freshman 

MYERS, SUSAN M Marquette 

General Engineering Freshman 

NEADERHISER, JANINE K Topeka 

Psychology and Social Work Sophomore 

NELSON. ANN K Emporia 

Horticulture Freshman 

NESBIT. MARY J . .. Kansas City, MO 

Nuclear Engineering . . . Junior 

NEUMANN, YVETTEX Merriam 

Electrical Engineering Sophomore 

NICHOLS, ANITA J McPherson 

Business Freshman 

NIGHTENGALE, PEGGY J Cedar Point 

General Freshman 

NORMAN, SARA J Scott City 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology Sophomore 

NOVY, CINDI L Maize 

Medical Technology Freshman 

O'BRIEN. MARY V. . Leawood 

Fine Arts Freshman 

OCONNELL, BARBARA A Lake Qulvlra 

English Senior 

OFFICER. DAWN C McPherson 

Pre-Elementary Education Freshman 

OLOPAI. MARGARITA R. . Cholan Laulau. Saipan 

Educational Psychology Graduate Student 

ONELLO. ANN L Leavenworth 

Business Education Sophomore 

O SHEA, SUSAN E Jetmore 

Deal Education Senior 

PAINTER. KRISTIE A Kansas City 

Accounting Sophomore 

PARKS. WENDY H Leawood 

Mathematics Freshman 

PARR.PATTIA Rossville 

Clothing and Retailing Sophomore 

PAULICH. CHERYL L Troy 

Pre-Elementary Education Sophomore 

PERSINGER, SUSAN D Norton 

Home Economics Education Senior 

PETERSON, SHIRLEY J McPherson 

Accounting Sophomore 

PETITJEAN. JOYCE D St. Francis 

Physical Therapy Sophomore 




360 — Ford Hall 





PFOLTNER, KIMBERLY K. Prairie Village 

General Sophomore 

PITNER, KOLEAN A Goodland 

Art Junior 

PLEGGE, JEAN M Marysville 

Speech Therapy Sophomore 

PLETCHER, CHERYL L Overland Park 

Accounting Sophomore 

PRESTA, PAULAS. . ..Scott City 

Pre-Education Freshman 

PROCKISH, JOYCE M , . Wamego 

Social Work Freshman 



PYPES, ELIZABETH R Prairie Village 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

QUINN, TERESA A Shawnee 

Special Education Junior 

RALEIGH, NANCY J Wmdom 

Marketing Junior 

RATZEL, CAROL J Prairie Village 

Family and Child Development Junior 

REICHENBERGER, JEANNE L Andale 

Pre-Nursing . Junior 

REID, SUSAN A , Leawood 

Medical Technology Freshman 



REYHLE, LINDA L 

Clothing and Retailing 
RICE, JENNIFER L. .' 

Agriculture 

RICHARDSON, KATHY L. . 

Biology 

RICHARDSON, KIMBERLY 
Interior Design 



Prairie Village 

Junior 

Overland Park 
Junior 

Salina 

Freshman 

Wichita 

Sophomore 



ROACH, NANCY C Wichita 

Clothing and Retailing Freshman 

ROBERTS, CINDA L Wintield 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman 



ROUSE, MELINDAA Wichita 

History Sophomore 

ROUSH, CATHERINE M Bartlesville 

Business Management Sophomore 

RUEBKE, JUDITH A Pretty Prairie 

Accounting Junior 

RUSSELL, PATRICIA E Olathe 

Accounting Sophomore 

RUTLEDGE, CINTHIAS . Dover 

Pre-Nursing Freshman 

SAMUELSON, JOYCE A, Overland Park 

Accounting Freshman 



SASENICK, SHERYL M Overland Park 

Business Freshman 

SAVAGE, MARY M Dodge City 

Business Administration Junior 

SCHALLER, CECILIA N. Kinsley 

Dietetics and Institutional Management Junior 

SCHNEIDER, BRENDA J. . Summerlield 

Physical Education Sophomore 

SCHAAP, LARIE L Cottonwood Falls 

Interior Design ...... Freshman 

SCHREURS, KATHY M Hays 

Physical Education Sophomore 



SCHROEDER, LYNN Y Pretty Prairie 

Home Economics Junior 

SCHUETTE, SHARON S Topeka 

Political Science Freshman 

SCOTT, TEENA Council Grove 

Retail Floriculture . Freshman 

SEDLACEK, JANE E Hanover 

History Freshman 

SELEY. DEBRA J Abilene 

Accounting Freshman 

SHEEHAN, JOAN M Kansas City 

Accounting Junior 



Ford Hall — 361 



SHELITE, BELINDA K Anthony 

Family and Child Development Sophomore 

SHERRARD, DIANA L Winfield 

Physical Education Junior 

SHORT, KAREN A Stamford, CO 

Fashion Retailing Freshman 

SHORTER, VICI D Leavenworth 

Pre-Elementary Education Freshman 

SIMARI, GAIL E Overland Park 

Home Economics Education Sophomore 

SINGLETON, SUSAN J Independence 

Speech Pathology Junior 

SMITH. JENNIFER J Goodland 

Home Economics Freshman 

SMITH, KATHE J Macksville 

Special Education Freshman 

SMITH, MARY L Kansas City 

Elementary Education Senior 

SMITH, REBECCA J Mankato 

Early Childhood Education Sophomore 

SORENSEN, SUSAN E Ness City 

Pre-Secondary Education Freshman 

SOUKUP, NANCY A Haven 

Bakery Science Sophomore 

SPERRY, JANET C Shawnee Mission 

Business Freshman 

STAINBROOK, NANCY E Fontana 

Family and Child Development Junior 

STAUB, RITA J St, John 

Modern Languages Sophomore 

STEIN, SUZETTE E Gypsum 

Physical Therapy Freshman 

STEINER, SUSAN K Beloit 

General Freshman 

STEINHARDT, DEE A Stafford 

Computer Science Junior 

STEPHENSON, JANET S Prairie Village 

Food Service and Industry Freshman 

STRAWN, CINDY J Sallna 

Architecture Senior 

STREIT, ALVERNA D Downs 

Home Economics Senior 

STREIT, NADINE J Downs 

Clothing and Textiles Freshman 

STRICKER, MARY J Prairie Village 

Home Economics Sophomore 

STRICKLAND, KAY L Dodge City 

Home Economics Education Junior 

STUEVE, BONNIE L Abilene 

Interior Design Sophomore 

TALIAFERRO, CLAUDIA H Shawnee 

Home Economics Education Senior 

TEDROW, JAN M Overland Park 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Sophomore 

TEETER, VICKY L Lyons 

Fashion Design Freshman 

TEICHGRAEBER, PAM A Emporia 

Family and Child Development Sophomore 

THIEROLF, LINDA L Overland Park 

Recreation Junior 

THOMAS, KIMBERLY A Salina 

Psychology Sophomore 

THOMAS, LESLEE K Springfield, VA 

Business Freshman 

THOME, JANE A Viola 

Speech Pathology Sophomore 

THOMPSON, MELINDA L El Dorado 

Elementary Education . . . Junior 

THWEATT, ANGELA P Hazen, AR 

Pre-Veterlnary Medicine Senior 

TOMS, LORETTA S Overland Park 

Elementary Education - Junior 

TOPLIFF, BECKY A Goodland 

Floriculture Freshman 

TUCKER, BRENDA K Kiowa 

Accounting Freshman 

TURNER, PEGGY L LaCrosse 

Business Sophomore 

VACEK. KAREN L Overland Park 

Business Sophomore 

VanLERBERG, DIANE M Shawnee 

Medical Technology Sophomore 

VanWINKLE, DAPHNE L Junction City 

Journalism and Mass Communications Sophomore 

VILLINES, CATHY I Salina 

Family and Child Development Freshman 

VOCK, DIANE S Mission 

Business Freshman 

VOGELMAN, TRESA D Burns 

Grain Science Freshman 

VOGT, PATRICIA K Valley Center 

Home Economics Education Senior 

VOIGTS, MARTHA L Lenexa 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore 

VOSS, SHERRI D St, Louis, MO 

Home Economics Freshman 




362 — Ford Hall 



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VOTH, PRISCILLA F Inman 

Early Childhood Education Senior 

WALKER, DENISE K Kansas City 

Family and Child Development Junior 

WARD, DEBORAH D Newton 

Speech Pathology Sophomore 

WARD, NANCY J Ulysses 

General Freshman 

WAUGH. MARCIA L Goodland 

Business Freshman 

WEISS, SUSAN M Overland Park 

General Freshman 

WENDT, SANDRA C Hermgton 

Pre-Elementary Education Freshman 

WESSON, CYNTHIA A Kansas City 

Pre-Elementary Education Sophomore 

WHERRY, MARTHA L Wichita 

Art Sophomore 

WHITE, DEBORAH L Colby 

Music Education Junior 

WHITMORE, IVEY L Fall River 

Accounting . . Freshman 

WHITNEY, CAROL A Phillipsburg 

Home Economics Education Junior 

WHITT, PATRICIA D Wichita 

Pre-Music Education Freshman 

WILKERSON, WANDA L Council Grove 

Pre-Secondary Education Sophomore 

WILLIAMS, D. JILL . . Wichita 

Family and Child Development Junior 

WILLIAMS, DEBBIE K Shawnee Mission 

Home Economics Freshman 

WILLIAMS, JERRILEE Abilene 

History Freshman 

WILSON, CARRIE A Hutchinson 

Business Administration Sophomore 

WILSON. LORI L Wichita 

Speech Pathology Freshman 

WINTEROTH, SUZANNE E Norton 

Elementary Education Freshman 

WISNER, DIANA L Shawnee Mission 

Physical Education Junior 

WITTSTOCK, JANE A Wichita 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Sophomore 

WOODY, CARMELLA A Blue Rapids 

English Education Junior 

WYSONG, VALENDA D Prairie Village 

Fashion Design Freshman 



Ford Hall — 363 



Gamma Phi Beta 



BLAIR, JESSE Houseparent 

ANDREWS, KATHY J Kansas City 

Journalism and Mass Communications Junior 

ANSPAUGH.NIKKIS \ . . .Ness City 

Fashion Design Junior 

BADGLEY, J. JAYNE Manhattan 

Clothing and Retailing Senior 

BARHAM, EMILY K Wichita 

Horticulture Therapy Senior 

BEATY, CAROL L Manhattan 

Family and Child Development Senior 

BELL, THENA M Fowler 

Recreation Senior 

BERGER, CARLA A Atchison 

Business Junior 

BRAUN, DEBORA J Atchison 

Physical Therapy Freshman 

CARTER, BETH L Overland Park 

Family and Child Development Senior 

CHAMBLISS, TERRY A Lawrence 

Family and Child Development Freshman 

CORBIN, CYNTHIA A Leawood 

Recreation Sophomore 

DALLMAN, NANCY C Prairie Village 

Physical Therapy Freshman 

DANIELS, KATE Leawood 

Elementary Education Junior 

DEINES, JANET S Garden City 

General Freshman 

DIZMANG. BELINDA G Leoti 

Interior Design Freshman 

DURRIE, JUDITH A Kansas City 

Music Junior 

EATON, LESLIE S Santa Rosa, CA 

Clothing and Retailing Senior 

EDGERLEY, SUSAN Overland Park 

English Junior 

ERICKSON, DEBRA J Assaria 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

FARNSWORTH, MARILYN A Overland Park 

Clothing and Retailing Junior 

GAMBA, JULIE A Osage City 

Accounting Junior 

GARDNER, POLLY A Derby 

Interior Design Senior 

GARDNER, REBECCA C Derby 

Dietetics Sophomore 

GLOTZBACH, SUSAN M Leavenworth 

Business Management Sophomore 

GRAHAM, KAREN D Emporia 

Elementary Education Senior 

GRAY, BARBARA J Overland Park 

Medical Technology Freshman 

HAY, KIM A Lawrence 

Special Education Senior 

HEAD, MELAINE Topeka 

Special Education Sophomore 

JONES, NANCI K Overland Park 

Secondary Education Sophomore 

KELLY, NANCY S Leawood 

Special Education Junior 

KERR, PATRICIA A Wichita 

Pre-School Education Junior 

KILL, COLLEEN P Overland Park 

Special Education Freshman 

KING, PAMELA J Manhattan 

Elementary Education Senior 

KNECHT, LINDA K Shawnee 

Social Science Junior 

KOEPKE, LESLIE A Wichita 

Social Work Junior 

KUEBELBECK, KATHY K Kansas City 

Clothing and Retailing Senior 

McKEE, CHARLOTTE A Colby 

Pre-Nursing Freshman 

NIELSEN, MARILYN Shawnee 

Physical Education Freshman 

PAGE, PAMELA R Wichita 

Journalism and Mass Communication Freshman 

PARSONS, MARTHA L Wichita 

General Freshman 

PATRICK, KAY D Leawood 

Mathematics Sophomore 

PAULSEN, DEANAC Stafford 

Home Economics Education Sophomore 

PRICE, BECKY A Overland Park 

Special Education Senior 

REUSSER. JANET K Viola 

Physical Education Junior 

ROBBEN, MARY A Oakley 

Elementary Education Junior 

RONNING, LUCI L Overland Park 

Mechanical Engineering Junior 

ROUSE, ROBIN L Leawood 

Journalism and Mass Communications Senior 




364 — Gamma Phi Beta 





SAUNDERS, JAN A Wichita 

Sociology Junior 

SCHROCK, SUSAN R Kiowa 

Art Education Junior 

SLOAN, MICHELE E Overbrook 

Clothing and Retailing Junior 

SNOW, CATHY L Wichita 

Home Economics Senior 

SNOW, CINDY M Wichita 

Speech Pathology Sophomore 

STOCKTON, MARY D Leawood 

Family and Child Development Freshman 

TOWNSEND, SU M Leoti 

Recreation Sophomore 

VARNEY, SUSAN R Manhattan 

Computer Science Sophomore 

WHITTIER, BETH A Kansas City 

Business Administration Senior 

WINDSOR, N LYNN Atchison 

Biology Sophomore 

WOOD, SUZANNE E Prairie Village 

Elementary Education Junior 

WOODWARD, SUSAN L Manhattan 

Business Junior 

YEAGER, NANCY L Norton 

Home Economics Junior 

ZATEZALO, LINDA L Kansas City 

Mathematics Education Freshman 



Gamma Phi Beta — 365 



Goodnow Hall 



ACOSTA, VICKI A Merriam 

Business Freshman 

ADAMS. REBECCAS Welda 

General Freshman 

AHRENS, LESLEY L Topeka 

Elementary Education Senior 

ALBERS, DEBBIE A Topeka 

General Sophomore 

ALDRED. LYNNE Olathe 

Elementary Education Junior 

ALDRICH. LISA K Wichita 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

ALEXANDER, PATRICIA C. . . . Council Grove 

Pre-Nursing Freshman 

ANDERSON, DEBRA K Meriden 

Physical Therapy Sophomore 

ANDERSON. FRANK E Chanute 

Engineering Junior 

ARMITAGE, SUE E Olathe 

General Freshman 

ARMSTRONG. MECHELLE M Onaga 

Pre-Medicine Freshman 

ASPELIN, NYLA J Dwight 

Psychology Freshman 

ATCHITY, JANET S Kansas City, MO 

Pre-Education Freshman 

BAHRE, SUSAN M Lyons 

Pre-Elementary Education Freshman 

8AHRUTH, SHELIA D Arkansas City 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology Senior 

BAILEY, MARILYN A Emporia 

Civil Engineering Sophomore 

BAKER, SUSAN L Buhler 

Mathematics Sophomore 

BALDWIN, LYNN W Galva 

Recreation Junior 

BALLUCH, EDDIE E Lincoln 

Business Administration Senior 

BAUERBAND, STEVE Junction City 

Engineering Freshman 

BEAL, DEBORAH A Overland Park 

Home Economics Education Senior 

BEASTON, MARTHA K Marion 

General Freshman 

BERGES, CATHERINE A Onaga 

Family and Child Development Senior 

BERRY, RALPH C Prairie Village 

Political Science Freshman 

BICHEL, MARK A Kansas City, MO 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

BIEBERLY, DAVID D. Salma 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

BIEHL, LINDA K Davenport, IA 

Psychology Senior 

BLAIR, KATHLEEN B Wichita 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology Senior 

BOGGS, PAMELA J Arkansas City 

Family and Child Development Freshman 

BOHRER, THERESE M Kansas City 

Art Senior 

BOTTOMS, MONA J Derby 

Horticulture Senior 

BRADLEY, BECKY L Goff 

Physical Education Freshman 

BRAND, JEAN M Welda 

Art Freshman 

BRECHEISEN. KURT D Garnett 

General Freshman 

BROWN, RHONDA J Lansing 

Interior Design Sophomore 

BURRIS, JILLM Wichita 

Pre-Nursing Freshman 

BUSCH, JANET L Overland Park 

Chemistry Senior 

BYARD, SHERYL D Lyons 

Music Freshman 

CARRIKER, CATHY R Lewis 

Social Work Sophomore 

CARSON, COLETTE A Wetmore 

Wildlife Biology Freshman 

CARSON. SHARON J Ulysses 

Accounting Sophomore 

CHANDE, DILIP D Bombay, India 

Mechanical Engineering Graduate Student 

CHURCH, CHERI J Haysville 

Biology Freshman 

CLAIBORNE, DARIA A Baxter Springs 

General Engineering . . . Freshman 

CODDINGTON, KATHERINE J . Paola 

Pre-Law , Freshman 

COLLIER. AVAT Lenexa 

Restaurant Management . Freshman 

COOK, TERESA M Gardner 

Horticulture Freshman 

COOLEY.AMYS Prairie Village 

General Freshman 



366 — Goodnow Hall 





COTTS, VIRGINIA C Merlon, PA 

Sociology Senior 

COX, CHERYLN D Topeka 

Pre-Nursmg Freshman 

CRAWFORD, MARY P Salina 

Clothing and Retailing Freshman 

DALE, MICHELLE M Kansas City 

Arts and Sciences Freshman 

DANIELS, JUDITH A. Overland Park 

Foods and Nutrition . Freshman 

DESCHNER, KIMM Natoma 

Psychology Sophomore 

DOEBELE, DEBRA K Hanover 

Pre-Nursing Freshman 

DONKER, DEBRA L Newton 

Home Economics Senior 

DOUGLAS, WANDA J . Leavenworth 

Medical Technology Sophomore 

DOWNING, KARENS Atwood 

Pre-Nursing Freshman 

DROM, PATRICIA J. Manlius. NY 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Freshman 

DUDLEY, JULIA A Overland Park 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Freshman 

DUKICH, MARSHA L Leawood 

Sociology Junior 

EDDY, SUSAN M Marysville 

General Freshman 

EDWARDS, JANET L. Overland Park 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Junior 

ELDER, MONA J Lawrence 

Psychology Freshman 

ELDER, SANDRA S Llnwood 

Elementary Education Senior 

ENSLEY, CHARNA L Topeka 

Art Freshman 

EVANS, ELIZABETH I Overland Park 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Sophomore 

EVANS, LEE A Hays 

Business Sophomore 

EVANS, ROBIN R Kansas City 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Junior 

FASNACHT, GLEN F Galva 

Physical Education Junior 

FELTON, RICHARD E Junction City 

Psychology Junior 

FELTS, BARBARA A Lawrence 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

FIELDEN, MARY L Kansas City 

Interior Design Senior 

FLINN, JERYL A Glen Elder 

English Junior 

FORNAL, VIRGINIA A Kansas City 

Clothing and Retailing Senior 

FOWLER, DONNA L Prairie Village 

Clothing and Retailing Sophomore 

FRAUENFELDER, JOE Chapman 

Physical Education Freshman 

FRENCH, DEBORAH K Carbondale 

Sociology Senior 




a 

D 




FRICK, CHRISTINE E Atwood 

Family and Child Development Senior 

FRIEDERICH, MARLA J Green 

Social Work Sophomore 

FRISBIE, LINDA S Kingman 

Floriculture Senior 

FRYE, DARCY L Kingman 

Family and Child Development Freshman 

GALLIHER, DENISE L Junction City 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Freshman 

GANTZ, ALICE J Marion 

Pre-Nursmg Freshman 

GHERE, DEBRA J Council Grove 

Pre-Nursmg Junior 

GIANOS. JIM G Overland Park 

Pre-Law Freshman 

GIBLIN. ANNE M Leawood 

Fine Arts Freshman 

GILLASPIE, JUDYM ...... Rozel 

Recreation Sophomore 

GRAY. KATHERINE E Overland Park 

Family and Child Development Freshman 

GREEN, CHERYL E. Kansas City 

Social Sciences Junior 

GROUT, PAMELAS Arkansas City 

Journalism and Mass Communications Freshman 

GRUBER, BETTY J Bennington 

Music Freshman 

GURSS, BETTE E Leavenworth 

Elementary Education Senior 

HABIGER, GRACE C Sallna 

Mathematics Senior 

HAHN. SHERRY LYNN Olathe 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Freshman 

HAMILTON, NANCY A Dodge City 

Clothing and Textiles Junior 

HAMPL, JULIE L Russell 

Pre-Pharmacy Freshman 

HARDEN, MICHELLE E, Rossville 

Horticulture Junior 

HARDMAN, KRISTI J, Home 

Pre-Secondary Education Freshman 

HARGUS, HERSCHELLA K Kansas City 

General Freshman 

HARMAN, PATRICIA O Kansas City 

Accounting Senior 

HART, CANDY A Andover 

Accounting . . . Senior 

HASLETT, LISA S Junction City 

Pre-Nursmg Freshman 

HASS. KENNETH J Lyons 

Electrical Engineering Freshman 

HAY, REBECCA J Ottawa 

Modern Language Freshman 

HEIN, MARGARET M Andale 

Engineering . . Freshman 

HELLER, SALLY A Abilene 

Elementary Education Sophomore 

HENKE, VIRGINIA L Cuba 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 










A 




mm 



















ii&^. 









368 — Goodnow Hall 




HENSLEY, DEBRA M Kansas City 

Pre-Elementary Education Freshman 

HICKS, MARCIAE Garnett 

Food and Nutrition Science Freshman 

HILL, BRENDAJ .Plains 

Music Education Sophomore 

HINDMAN, KRISTI Junction City 

Music Freshman 

HODGE, SHARON D Salma 

Home Economics Sophomore 

HOFFINE, SUEL . Prairie Village 

Family and Child Development Sophomore 

HOFFMAN, CALVIN C . Abilene 

Psychology ... Sophomore 

HOLBROOK, LORINDAS Washington 

Home Economics Education Freshman 

HOLT, SUSAN E Topeka 

Family and Child Development Sophomore 

HOLZRICHTER, CAROL M Moundrldge 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology Senior 

HORNUNG, MARYG Spearville 

Clothing and Retailing Sophomore 

HUGHES, KATHLEEN S Elmhurst, IL 

Interior Design Senior 

HUMBOLT, MARSHA A Mulvane 

Agriculture Junior 

HUSTON, TERRY A Overland Park 

General Freshman 

IMBODEN, KATHYB. Clayton 

Clothing and Retailing Sophomore 

INGRAM, KAREN A . . Salma 

General Freshman 

JAECKEL, SUZANNE M Dusseldorf, Germany 

Pre-Elementary Education Freshman 

JAMISON, MONTE D Quinter 

Business Administration , Junior 

JENSEN, PEGGY M Hays 

Family and Child Development Sophomore 

JESTER. VICKI M Chapman 

General Freshman 

JEWELL, TRUDY L Prairie Village 

General Freshman 

JOHANNSEN, NANCY J Lawrence 

Biology Sophomore 

JOHNSON, MARK A Ellingwood 

Political Science Senior 

JOHNSON, MARY J Sterling 

Music Education Sophomore 

JOLLY, JANISL Oakley 

Fine Arts .... Sophomore 

JORDAN, COLLEEN S Overland Park 

Special Education Freshman 

JOSS, DELMA D Holcomb 

General Sophomore 

JUAREZ, JOYCE A Junction City 

Social Work Freshman 

KARNES, BRUCE L Wakeeney 

Pre-Medicine Freshman 

KEIL, GLENDAR Russell 

Health Freshman 

KEMPER, ANNETTA M Garden City 

Music Education Junior 

KENT, MARY J Overland Park 

Horticulture Sophomore 

KIRTON, SARAH E Newton 

Chemistry Senior 

KNOCHE, JANE E Gardner 

General Engineering . Freshman 

KNOWLES, MELODIE S Kirwin 

Modern Languages Freshman 

KORBELIK. JILL Kansas City 

Home Economics Freshman 

KRANTZ, WADER Lyons 

General Freshman 

LAMBERT, KRISTIN D Kensington 

General Freshman 

LAMPHEAR, PAMELA K Mission 

Music Education Freshman 

LAWRENCE, CINDY D Gardner 

Business Administration Si phomore 

LAWRENCE. KRISTINE L Winfield 

Biology Junior 

LEWIS, STEVE J Salma 

Business Administration Freshman 

UNDER, VICKY M Abilene 

Clothing and Retailing Freshman 

LISTON, PATRICIA A Great Bend 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Freshman 

LOUGHRIGE, KATHY J Larned 

Medical Technology Junior 

LOVE, MARY L Partridge 

Computer Science Senior 

LOWERY, COREEN E Larned 

Pre-Nursing Freshman 

LUND, KATHY J Osborne 

General Sophomore 



GoodnowHall — 369 



MAGNESON. DARCI M. . . . ... Prairie Village 

Pre-Law Freshman 

MAHONEY, JANET A Dorrance 

Special Education Sophomore 

MALL, DENISEE Topeka 

Family and Child Development Freshman 

MARCHETTI. DAVID A Riverside, Rl 

Pre-Vetermary Medicine . Junior 

MARSTON, BARBARA D Canton 

Home Economics Freshman 

McCANON. JAN J ... Winfield 

Pre-Dentistry . Freshman 

McCRAY, CHRISTI A Salina 

Horticulture Freshman 

McGRIFF, P SUSAN Liberal 

Accounting Sophomore 

McKEE, SHARON A Topeka 

Physical Education Freshman 

Mclaughlin, kathleen m Danvers, ma 

Medical Technology Sophomore 

McNERNEY, FRANCES M Cornwall-on-the-Hudson, NY 

Political Science Freshman 

MEANS, R MARLENE Fulton. MO 

Horticulture Therapy Junior 

MEYER, CATHY J Ruthven, IA 

English Education Senior 

MEYER, NANCY L Emporia 

Elementary Education Senior 

MILBERGER, MARY L Ellis 

Home Economics Sophomore 

MILLER, KATHLEEN Topeka 

Recreation Sophomore 

MILLER. MARY B Kensington 

Family and Child Development Sophomore 

MONTGOMERY, SUSAN F .... Burlmgame 

Horticulture Freshman 

MOORMANN, BETTY M Wichita 

Business Management Sophomore 

MORAIN, MICHELLE A Liberal 

General Freshman 

MORGAN, PEG . Greeley 

Agricultural Journalism Sophomore 

MORRIS, DANA S Bucklin 

' Chemical Engineering Junior 

MUELLER, KATHLENE R Lakln 

Special Education Senior 

MURET. WILLIAM E . ... Winfield 

Education Graduate Student 

MURPHY. KATHYL Eureka 

Pre-Elementary Education Freshman 

MURRELL. LYDIAG Shawnee 

General Sophomore 

MYRACLE, E DIANE Leavenworth 

Pre-Medicine Junior 

MYSZKA, KAREN S Kansas City 

Psychology Senior 

NASH. ELIZABETH E Garden City 

Architecture Junior 

NAVE, SHERRY M Belle Plame 

Home Economics and Journalism Sophomore 

NEAL. LINDA L Wellington 

Pre-Nursing Freshman 

NELSON. LILY J. Salina 

Clothing and Retailing ... Freshman 

NICHOLS, POLLY A. Overland Park 

Interior Design Freshman 

NICHOLS, TIM Garden City 

Nuclear Engineering Sophomore 

OLSON, RENET A Marquette 

General Sophomore 

O'TOOLE. KATHLEEN A. Lawrence 

Physical Education Sophomore 

PALMER. CAROLYN L Orange, CA 

Pre-Nursing Freshman 

PARKS, MAX H . Johnson 

Agronomy Freshman 

PARMELY, TERESA J LeRoy 

Physical Therapy Freshman 

PENNY. SUSAN M Emporia 

General Freshman 

PERILLA, ALBERT Junction City 

Accounting Senior 

PERRY, DONNA G. Chapman 

Elementary Physical Education Sophomore 

PETERSON, JANET L Delavan 

General Freshman 

PFEIFER, BELINDA A Topeka 

Clothing and Retailing Junior 

PHILLIPS, TERESA A Olathe 

Journalism and Mass Communications Sophomore 

PILAND, ANNAG Abilene 

Home Economics Sophomore 

POTTS. CYNDI Belleville 

Spanish Freshman 

PRUITT, COLLEEN M Overland Park 
Special Education Junior 




370 — GoodnowHall 




QUALIZZA, AMY Bucyrus 

General Freshman 

RAAB. LINDA L Topeka 

Physical Education . Sophomore 

RATHBUN, RANDALL K Ellsworth 

Pre-Law Senior 

REDENBAUGH, ELAINE M Spring Hill 

Home Economics . . . Sophomore 

REED, LINDA A Lyons 

Home Economics and Journalism Junior 

RICHARDS, DENNIS S Greensburg 

Speech Education Junior 

ROBBINS, LYNN M Omaha, NB 

General Sophomore 

ROBINSON, CINDY M Overland Park 

Clothing and Retailing Freshman 

RODERICK, AMANDA S Garden City 

Business Administration Freshman 

ROLES, SANDRA K Desoto 

Speech Education Freshman 

ROWLEY, CHERYL A Eskndge 

Family and Child Development Freshman 

RUMOLD, KARIN D Hope 

Early Childhood Education Freshman 

RUNDLE, KATHLEEN E Logan 

Sociology Freshman 

RUPP, SYLVIE A Wakeeney 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

RUST, BARBARA A, Richardson, TX 

Dietetics and Institutional Management Junior 

SAETZ, PATRICIA E Bonner Springs 

Psychology Freshman 

SCHAFFER, BARBARA J Dodge City 

Interior Design Senior 

SCHAFFER, JILL R Garden City 

Retail Floriculture Freshman 

SCHANKER, NEIL B Prairie Village 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology Freshman 

SCHIERLING, DUANE A Quinter 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

SCHLEY, JOANNE F Stratford, SD 

Interior Design Senior 

SCHRADER, DEBORAH K Oskaloosa 

Business Administration Junior 

SCHREIBVOGEL, BECKY A Holcomb 

Special Education Sophomore 

SCHREUDER, MARILYN A Cawker City 

Music Sophomore 




Goodnow Hali — 371 



SCHULER, MARIANNE K. . . Waldo 

Family and Child Development Sophomore 

SCOTT, CHARMAINE B Overland Park 

Interior Design Freshman 

SEVERANCE, JEAN E Belolt 

Music Education Senior 

SEVERANCE, SARA J Beloit 

Journalism and Mass Communications Junior 

SHIELDS, MARTHA M Olathe 

Interior Design ..Sophomore 

SHIPPERS, KATHRYN M Fort Leavenworth 

Physical Therapy Sophomore 



SHIVERS, MARY B. 
Business Administration 
SIMONSON, CYNTHIA J 

Music 

SKINNER, KIMBERLYR 
Pre-Vetennary Medicine 
SMITH, ASHANNAM 



Holton 

. .Sophomore 

Hillsboro 

Freshman 

Overland Park 

. Freshman 

Wilmore 



Pre-Elementary Education Sophomore 

SMITH. EDNA F White City 

Accounting Freshman 

SMITH, MAUREEN E Junction City 

Radio and Television Sophomore 



SMITHEE, LINDA K . . Salma 

Interior Design Sophomore 

SORRICK, CYNTHIA J Washington 

Home Economics Freshman 

SPARKS, SUSAN E. . . . Mission 

Floriculture Freshman 

SPOHN, JULIE A Salma 

Horticulture Therapy ..Sophomore 

SPRADLING, LINDA L Cherryvale 

Crop Protection Junior 

SPRATT, DEBRAS Leawood 

Accounting Junior 



STALCUP, NANCY K Stafford 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

STEENBERG, DON-ANN R St. Paul, MN 

Elementary Education Senior 

STEGMAN, KIM J Spearville 

General Freshman 

STEIL, CHRISTY E Baldwin 

Speech . . Freshman 

STEPAN, SHAUNA J Junction City 

Psychology Junior 

STEWART, GAYL Washington 

Music Education . . Freshman 



STILLWELL. JAN L Salma 

General Freshman 

STUCKY, SYLVIA L Moundrldge 

Radio and Television Senior 

SWEET, LISA S Leawood 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Junior 

TAYLOR, SANDRA E . Lawrence 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Freshman 

TEEL, DOUGLAS J Topeka 

Mechanical Engineering Senior 

THARP, TONI K Trenton, MO 

General , Freshman 



THIELEN, JULIE M. , Dorrance 

General , . Sophomore 

THURMAN, PAMELA A Potosl, MO 

Architecture Senior 

TOWNSEND, STEVEN E Oberhn 

Business Administration Junior 

TROWER, GAY L Abilene 

English Freshman 

TRUDE, BECKY L Perry 

General Freshman 

TUBBS, KEVIN L Long Island 

General Sophomore 



TUCKER, BONNIE F Elkhart 

Computer Science Senior 

TUCKWOOD, TOM E Stafford 

Business Administration . Freshman 

TUSH, CATHRYN L Garnett 

History Sophomore 

TYLER, DENNIS R Eudora 

Food Science and Industry Senior 

UKELE, PAULAS ., .Sabetha 

Medical Technology ,....„ Junior 

UMBEHR, NKIHM Singapore 

General Freshman 



VINDUSKA, DARLENE C Marion 

Clothinq and Retailing Junior 

VOGEL" CYNTHIA K Newton 

General Freshman 

VOHS, PATRICIA D, ....... . Ozawkie 

Home Economics , . . .Sophomore 

WADE, JACOUE L Topeka 

Art Education Junior 

WAGNER, GREGORY C Atchison 

Agriculture Freshman 

WALKER, DAVID T Syracuse 

Agronomy Freshman 




372 — GoodnowHall 





WALLACE, KAREN J Overland Park 

Speech Pathology Freshman 

WALTERS, BARBARA E Undsborg 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

WAMPLER. DEBORAH L Andover 

Business Administration Freshman 

WASINGER, KAREN L Ness City 

Recreation Junior 

WATKINS. JEFFREY P. Newton 

Pre-Vetermary Medicine Freshman 

WEBER, MARY J Mission 

Music Education Junior 

WEGMAN. ELAINE R Hoxie 

Physics Freshman 

WEST. KERRI J Rush Center 

Medical Technology Freshman 

WHITE, MARY A Shawnee 

Pre-School Education Freshman 

WILTZ, PATRICIA A St Marys 

Biology Junior 

WINFREY, PAMELA K ........ _ Eureka 

General Freshman 

WINTERSCHEIDT. RITA M Junction City 

Elementary Education Sophomore 

WITTMEYER. GAYLE J Ottawa 

Pre-Music Education Freshman 

WOLF, CAROL J Kensington 

Home Economics Freshman 

WURST, GREG J Sterling 

Pre-Law Senior 

WURST, WEN W Sterling 

Pre-Law Sophomore 

YEE, PAT A Topeka 

Journalism and Mass Communications Freshman 
YOUNG, RHONDA G Shawnee Mission 

Secondary Physical Education Junior 

ZIEGLER, DENISE J Hesston 

General Freshman 

ZIMMERMAN. DEBORA A Wellington 

Psychology Freshman 



Goodnow Hall — 373 



Haymaker Hall 



PETERSON, VALERIE H Co-Director 

ABBOTT, GARY L Salina 

Accounting Sophomore 

ADAMS, DAVID E El Dorado 

Business Administration Freshman 

ADAMS, STEVE O El Dorado 

Mathematics Junior 

AESCHLIMAN, DAVID C. . . Centralia 

Agricultural Journalism Junior 

ALBRECHT, WALTER L Chesterfield, MO 

Pre-Design Professions . Sophomore 

ALLEN, KEITH R Sublette 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine . . . . Freshman 

ALLEN, MICHAEL D Salina 

Horticulture Senior 

ALLER, JERRY C Hiawatha 

Agricultural Economics Junior 

ANGELL, SCOTT W Atwood 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

ARMAGOST, STEVE M Cottonwood Falls 

Medical Technology Sophomore 

ARNETT, DOUGLAS A Overland Park 

Business Finance Junior 

ATKINSON, ERIC J, Winfield 

Radio and Television Freshman 

ATTAWAY, JACK A El Dorado 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

ATWOOD, WILLIAM D LaCygne 

Animal Science and Industry Freshman 

BABB, SAMUEL M Wakeeney 

Agricultural Engineering Junior 

BADGER, CHRISTOPHER J Carbondale 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

BADGER, DAVID A Carbondale 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore 

BAILEY, BRUCE G Overland Park 

Electrical Engineering Senior 

BAKER, JAMES W Goodland 

Pre-Dentistry Junior 

BAKER, MARC F Tecumseh 

Engineering Freshman 

BAKER, RANDAL W Scranton 

Milling Science Junior 

BALDINGER, STEVEN G . . St. Paul, MN 

Bakery Science and Management . Freshman 

BARTEL, DOUGLAS F Hlllsboro 

Agronomy Senior 

BAUER, CHRISTOPHER H. Wichita 

Architecture Junior 

BAUER, MICHAEL E Florissant, MO 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

BEARNES, BYRON K Culver 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore 

BELL. THOMAS N Hoismgton 

Social Science Sophomore 

BELLAR, MICHAEL D Howard 

Agricultural Economics Freshman 

BIEDERMAN, GLENN T Independence 

Agricultural Mechanization Senior 

BIGGS, BRYAN E Leavenworth 

Journalism and Mass Communications Senior 

BIRDSONG, DAVID A Salina 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

BLANDING.DAVIDA Topeka 

Business Administration Freshman 

BOLLIER, ERICL . .. Prairie Village 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Sophomore 

BOLLINGER, MICHAEL G Wichita 

Agricultural Economics Junior 

BOOTH, DAVID W Overland Park 

Business Administration Freshman 

BOSTER, KENT A Bennington 

Physical Education Freshman 

BOYLE. RANDY E Leawood 

Biology . . Freshman 

BRADSTREET. TERRY E Hutchinson 

Pre-Pharmacy Junior 

BRECHEISEN, BEN S Olathe 

Agriculture Freshman 

BROWN, BRYAN C Topeka 

Music Education Senior 

BROWN, LEON Haysville 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

BROWNBACK, ALAN L. Parker 

Veterinary Medicine Junior 

BROWNE, CHARLES R. , . Colby 

Art Junior 

BRUNGARDT, TERRY W Atchison 

Public Relations Freshman 

BRUNKER, ELMER R Olathe 

Agricultural Mechanization Junior 

BUA-AIM, SOMJETANA Nonthaburl, Thailand 

Architecture Senior 

BURGDORFER, ROGER D Gardner 

Anthropology Senior 



374 — Haymaker Hall 





BURKE, MARTY K Prairie Village 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology Sophomore 

BURNS, WILLIAM H Hutchinson 

Business Administration Sophomore 

BURR, STEVEN K St. Francis 

Marketing Senior 

BURTIS, JOHNO, Olathe 

Speech and Political Science Sophomore 

BUSSE, DONALD H Goodland 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

BUSSE, GARY A Kansas City, MO 

Architecture Senior 

BUSSE. KENNETH R Goodland 

General Freshman 

BUSSE. RONALD P. Goodland 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

CAFLISCH, LEONHARD R Independence 

Architecture Junior 

CALL, KEITH B Cedar Vale 

Agricultural Mechanization Junior 

CAMPBELL, CHRIS C Overland Park 

Physical Education Sophomore 

CAMPBELL. WILLIAM A Norton 

Pre-Pharmacy Junior 

CAMPBELL, WILLIAM R Topeka 

Pre-Medicme Freshman 

CAMPFIELD, MORRIS L Centralia 

Feed Science and Management Freshman 

CAPPS, JIM R St Louis. MO 

Pre-Design Protessions Sophomore 
CAREY, ROBERT E Shawnee Mission 

Business Administration Sophomore 

CARL. TONY A Wilsey 

Agricultural Economics Junior 

CARLSON, MARK D Overland Park 

Biology Sophomore 



CARPENTER. DAVID H Ottawa 

Agricultural Mechanization Senior 

CARR, DAVID A Belen, NM 

Architecture Senior 

CARTER, JOHN C Jamestown 

General Sophomore 

LASE, JAMES G Overland Park 

Business Administration Freshman 

CASTRIANNI, RON Overland Park 

Accounting Junior 

CATLIN, MAURICE A Minneapolis 

Agricultural Education Junior 

CATLIN, MICHAEL W Minneapolis 

Agricultural Education Junior 

CHRISTESEN, DENNIS E Osage City 

Journalism and Mass Communications Senior 

CHRISTY, RAY A Kansas City. MO 

Building Construction Junior 

CINDRIC. RICHARD Kansas City 

Nuclear Engineering Sophomore 

CLINE, CHARLES K Shawnee Mission 

Journalism and Mass Communications Junior 

CLINE. RICKY J Dodge City 

Electrical Engineering Junior 




COCHRAN, JOHN A Mernam 

Business Administration Sophomore 

COMBS, R JACK , , . . Mission 

Business Administration Sophomore 

CONWAY, JOHN F Overland Park 

Management Junior 

COOK, ROBERT P Topeka 

Geology Junior 

CRAVEN, RICHARD D Prairie Village 

Pre-Design Prolessions Sophomore 

CROSSON, RUSSELL D Minneapolis 

Mathematics Senior 

CURRIER, MARK A Salina 

Management ... Junior 

CURRIER, MARTIN L Salina 

Management Junior 

CURRY. GREGG E Madison 

Animal Science and Industry Freshman 

DAISE. RICHARD L Kanorado 

Veterinary Medicine Junior 

DAVIDSON, STEPHEN R Wichita 

Architecture Senior 

DAVIS, RANDY N Lamed 

Pre-Dentistry Junior 

DEBENHAM, RANDY R Clay Center 

General , . Sophomore 

DEDONDER, EUGENE F Reading 

Pre-Medicine Senior 

DEFFENBAUGH. ERIC P Manhattan 

Radio and Television .... Sophomore 

DENTON. ROGER W Atchison 

Landscape Architecture Fifth Year Student 

DEPENBUSCH, KENNY E Zenda 

Agricultural Education Senior 

DEPENBUSCH. LAWRENCE J . . . Zenda 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

DICKEY, HALLEY K Lake Lotawana, MO 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

DIVELEY, ROBERT R Severance 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

DOKKEN. DAN P Derby 

Architecture Junior 

DOLAN, PATRICK E Kansas City 

Architecture Junior 

DOLD, JEFF J Kansas City 

Business Administration Sophomore 

DOLLER. DALE E Madison, NJ 

Architecture Fifth Year Student 

DONMYER, JOHN E Palatine, IL 

Mathematics Sophomore 

DONNELLY, KEVIN J .Hope 

Agronomy Graduate Student 

DORSEY, JOHND Salina 

Horticulture Sophomore 

DUENSING, DAVID T Liberal 

Engineering Freshman 

DURBIN, RANDALL Moline 

Agricultural Economics Junior 

DYE, TIM J, Kansas City 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

ELLIOTT, CAMERON M Philhpsburg 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

ELLIOTT, CRAIG P. Republic 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

ELLIOTT, ROBERT L Wichita 

Pre-Vetermary Medicine , . . . Sophomore 

EVANS, LES W Valley Center 

Electrical Engineering Sophomore 

EVANS, RANDALL K Topeka 

General .... Junior 

FANKHAUSER. TONY H Madison 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore 

FEHLMAN, DAVID E Wakefield 

Agricultural Mechanization Senior 

FENTON, GARY K Leawood 

Pre-Vetermary Medicine Freshman 

FISCHER, GREGG K Seward 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

FOELSCH, DOUGLASS. Hilton, NY 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

FORET, GREGORY W ... Shawnee Mission 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

FOWLES. NEAL E Clay Center 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore 

FREDERICK, TOM A Kansas City, MO 

Food Science and Management Freshman 

FREEMAN. BRUCE R. . . Hutchinson 

Pre-Vetermary Medicine Sophomore 

FREY, EDWARD H Albion. NB 

Pre-Vetermary Medicine Sophomore 

FUNKHOUSER, JACK R. Prairie Village 

Pre-Vetermary Medicine Freshman 

GALE. MARK Topeka 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

GARTEN, MARK L Abilene 

Horticulture Sophomore 



376 — Haymaker Hall 






GEERS, PETER L Topeka 

Business Administration Senior 

GIBSON, ROGER E Wichita 

Horticulture Junior 

GLEASON, MARTIN J Kinsley 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Sophomore 

GLUECK, BILL Overland Park 

Building Construction Sophomore 

GNAEGY, DAVID L St. Louis, MO 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

GOFORTH, GREGORY L Topeka 

Business Administration Sophomore 

GONZALEZ. MICHAEL L Mexico, MO 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

GOTTSCHALK.GARYM Leavenworth 

Accounting Junior 

GRAHAM. LLOYD R Bellev lie 

Chemistry Junior 

GRAHAM. STEVEN H Belleville 

Architecture Junior 

GRANBERRY, GEORGE S Libertyville. IL 

General Sophomore 

GRAPENGATER, DANA L Newton 

Accounting Sophomore 

GRAY, JOHN S Shawnee Mission 

Business Administration Senior 

GREER. WILLIAM L Elk City 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Freshman 

GRIER, CHRISTOPHER A Wichita 

Nuclear Engineering Senior 

GROSS, WILLIAM M Hays 

Electrical Engineering , . . , Junior 

GRUBER, TERRY M Hope 

Agricultural Education Senior 

HADDOCK, MICHAEL J. Beloit 

Journalism and Mass Communications Sophomore 

HADEN.MARKD Hope 

Radio and Television Junior 

HAJOVSKY, ROBERT J Elkhart 

Engineering Freshman 

HAMILTON, STUART A Topeka 

Interior Architecture Junior 

HANNA, DONALD W Liberal 

Nuclear Engineering Freshman 

HARMS, ROYCE L Newton 

Social Work Sophomore 

HARRIS, CURTIS D McPherson 

Electrical Engineering Freshman 

HART, BARRY T Kansas City 

Architecture Junior 

HARTMAN. MATTHEWS Topeka 

Engineering Freshman 

HAYDEN. WILLIAM D Goodland 

Chemical Engineering Junior 

HECHT, JOHN L Andale 

General Freshman 

HERMRECK, DAVID K Osawatomle 

Electrical Engineering Senior 

HERRIG, BRENT W Wichita 

Veterinary Medicine Senior 



Haymaker Hall — 377 



HERRING, QUENTIN J Highland 

Business Administration Junior 

HESS, MICHAEL H Lawrence 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

HETTENBACH. BRUCE E Abilene 

Accounting , . . . Sophomore 

HILL, BRIAN K Salina 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

HINKSON, CRAIG Q Wichita 

Electrical Engineering Senior 

HODGSON, MICHAEL L Wetmore 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Freshman 

HOLSTE, CURTIS A Ludell 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology . .. . Sophomore 

HOLTON, GEORGE M , , Kansas City, MO 

Architecture Junior 

HOOPER, THOMAS K Hiawatha 

Agricultural Mechanization Senior 

HOSKINSON, REX A Stafford 

Animal Science and Industry Freshman 

HOUF, WILLIAM G, Lamed 

Nuclear Engineering Junio 

HUBALEK. VERNE A Wakeeney 

Agricultural Mechanization Sophomore 

HUGHES, LONNIE J Sublette 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Sophomore 

HUMFELD, TERRY L Belolt 

Horticulture Senior 

HURRELBRINK, DAVID W Kansas City 

Agricultural Economics Senior 

HYMER, MICHAEL G Overland Park 

General Sophomore 

IMEL, TERRY L Shawnee Mission 

Pre-Dentistry Junior 

INGMIRE, WAYNE L Jollet, IL 

Veterinary Medicine Senior 

JACKSON, GALEN H Wichita 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

JACKSON, MICHAEL A Baxter Springs 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Freshman 

JANSSEN, DAVID M Solomon 

Civil Engineering Sophomore 

JANSSEN, STUART P Lorraine 

General Agriculture Freshman 

JANTZ, MERLE F Wichita 

Architecture Junior 

JENKINS, EDWARD L Cape Girardeau. MO 

Architecture Junior 

JEWETT, RANDALL P Hutchinson 

Psychology Senior 

JOHNSON. DONALD R Tecumseh 

Accounting Junior 

JONES. CLAY G Overland Park 

Electrical Engineering Sophomore 

JONES, RICK L Newton 

Physical Therapy . Junior 

JORDAN, MICHAEL D . Beloit 

Agronomy Junior 

KADAVY, DAVID J Belleville 

Secondary Education Senior 





KARR. STEVEN D . . . Emporia 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

KASTER, LARRY V Kansas City 

Crop Protection Sophomore 

KAUFMAN, DEAN A Atchison 

Accounting Sophomore 

KAUFMAN, RUSSELL F Dorrance 

Business Administration Freshman 

KAUFMANN, RODNEY D. Topeka 

Business Administration Sophomore 

KEARNEY, BOB C Hutchinson 

Art ... Junior 

KEBERT, JOHN R Fredonla 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

KELLY, KENT C Phillipsburg 

Engineering Freshman 

KELSEY, RICHARD M Rossville 

Electrical Engineering Junior 

KING, MICHAEL E Osage City 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

KISER, KIMBALL P Argonla 

Architecture Senior 

KITE, JOHN G St. Francis 

Biology Senior 

KLIEWER, GLENM Hillsboro 

Dairy Production Junior 

KNOPP. MAX E Chapman 

General , , Freshman 

KOHMAN, KURT A, . Soloman 

Agriculture Freshman 

KORTE, STEVE G Augusta 

Agriculture Economics Senior 

KOST, JOHN A Eagle Butte, SD 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Sophomore 

KREHBIEL, BRADLEY J North Newton 

Electrical Engineering Junior 

KUBIE, BRUCE D Mernam 

Mechanical Engineering Sophomore 

KURTZ, ALLEN D Burlingame 

Agricultural Education Freshman 

KUZILA, CHRISTOPHER P Kansas City 

Mechanical Engineering Freshman 

LAMBIE, JAMES R Overland Park 

Building Construction Sophomore 

LANDON, TIM E Sallna 

Political Science Senior 

LEHMAN, ROBERT L Brewster 

General Freshman 

LIEBL, STEVE A Dodge City 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Freshman 

LINDAU, JOHN H Shawnee Mission 

Business Administration Senior 

LINDERLAD, ROBERTO Hutchinson 

Landscape Architecture Fifth Year Student 

LINN. BRIAN G Wichita 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

LINN, GARY D Wichita 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

LOWREY. DREW I Norwich 

General Agriculture Junior 

MacKENDER. STEVE R Olathe 

Business Sophomore 

MANGAN, STEPHEN L Tribune 

Animal Nutrition Junior 

MARK. STEVE D Overland Park 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

MARLOW, DENVER D Eskridge 

Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

MARTIN, JOHN W Fairway 

Business Administration Sophomore 

MARTZ. TIM R Wichita 

Urban Horticulture Junior 

MASON, RONALD C Kingman 

Business Sophomore 

MASSOTH, GLEN F. Piqua 

General Agriculture . .Junior 

MASTIN, GARY A Wichita 

Nuclear Engineering Junior 

MCALLISTER, R DOUGLAS Prairie Village 

Chemistry . Junior 

McCLANAHAN, ALAN J Overland Park 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

McCLUGGAGE. MARK D Douglass 

Architecture and Design . Junior 

McCOY, MARK S Argonia 

Agriculture Economics Sophomore 

McFADDEN, PATRICK M Natoma 

Pre-Law Sophomore 

McFALL, LARRY D , , Sabelha 

Journalism and Mass Communications Sophomore 

McFALL. RONNY D. ..... . Sabetha 

Business Administration Junior 

McKINLEY, GREG E Topeka 

Building Construction Senior 

McNISH.JOHNJ . Clay Center 

Economics Sophomore 



Haymaker Hall — 379 



MEACHAM, FRANK D Newton 

General Sophomore 

MEDLEY, MURRAY K Great Bend 

Philosophy Sophomore 

MENSCH. PAUL C Leawood 

Computer Science Sophomore 

MIDDLETON, JEFFEREY P. Overland Park 

Geology Junior 

MILLARD, PHIL B Prairie Village 

Marketing Junior 

MILLS, DAVID J Indianapolis, IN 

Accounting Senior 

MILLS, EARL E Centralla 

Agriculture Sophomore 

MINOR, CORT A Kansas City 

Natural Resource Management Freshman 

MISKIMINS, JOEL A Overland Park 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Sophomore 

MITCHELL, DALE D Wichita 

Physical Therapy Senior 

MITCHELL, GREGORY D McLouth 

Architecture Sophomore 

MLINEK.KIRKA St, Francis 

Pre-Forestry Sophomore 

MOLZEN, MYRON A Cedar Point 

Agriculture Junior 

MORRAY, BRIAN S Madison 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Freshman 

MORTON, DAVID L Yates Center 

Recreation Sophomore 

MULLEN. KEVIN M, Hutchinson 

Accounting , , Junior 

MYERS, JOE C Menden 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Freshman 

NASH, ALVIN E Enterprise 

Psychology Senior 

NASS. TIM J .'. . . Atchison 

Business Administration Sophomore 

NEASE. DENNIS A . Olathe 

Architecture Junior 

NEIBLING, DAVID L Highland 

Agricultural Mechanization Senior 

NEMECHEK, EUGENE C Goodland 

Veterinary Medicine Junior 

NEMECHEK, MICHAEL C Goodland 

Accounting Sophomore 

NEMECHEK, VICTOR M Goodland 

Business Administration Senior 

NEWBY, STEVEN L Haven 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

NOLTE, THOMAS R Jefferson City, MO 

Architecture Sophomore 

NOTTINGHAM, DAVID L . . Lawrence 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Junior 

OCHS, ROGER K Leavenworth 

Business Administration Sophomore 

ODOM.GREGD Elkhart 

Physical Education Freshman 

ORTMANN. MICHAEL F Augusta 

History . . . . Sophomore 

OSBORNE, DAVID F Overland Park 

Building Construction Junior 

O'TOOLE, PATRICK J Lawrence 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Freshman 

OTT. JON S. Kiowa 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

OVERGAAVD, GLENN A Luverne, MN 

Agriculture Education Junior 

PALMER, BRUCE E Wichita 

Architecture , , . Junior 

PARR, KELLEE R Delia 

Animal Science and Industry Freshman 

PARSONS. JOHN A Mexico, MO 

Architecture Freshman 

PENDLETON, DAVID E. Union, MO 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

PENG.VICTORI Emporia 

Architecture Junior 

PERSINGER, STEVEN W Norton 

General Agriculture Freshman 

PHILLIPS, EDWARD W Valley Falls 

Agricultural Education Senior 

POELL. TIMOTHY M Hanover 

Business Administration ....... Sophomore 

POLSON. DOUGLAS R Halstead 

Business Management Junior 

PRATHER, NORMAN T Kmcaid 

Agriculture Freshman 

PRINGLE, RICHARD K Yates Center 

Pre-Law Sophomore 

PRYOR, WILLIAM D Kansas City 

Mechanical Engineering Sophomore 

RADER, RON L Wichita 

Natural Resource Management Sophomore 

RAILE, RICHARD W . ... Edson 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore 




380 — Haymaker Hall 




RANDALL, MICHAEL D Rockport, MO 

Architecture Senior 

REED. CARL I Pomona 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

REED, DANIEL W Gardner 

Electrical Engineering Sophomore 

REID, LANCE E Brewster 

Physical Education Graduate Sluden! 

REID, NATHAN D Brewster 

Business Administration Junior 

REIF, ALAN F Holslngton 

Civil Engineering Senior 

REIF, EUGENE A Holslngton 

Accounting Senior 

REMINGTON, PAUL R San Jose. Costa Rica 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

RICHARDS. STEVEN H Mission 

Accounting Sophomore 

RICHARDSON, DAVID E Kansas City 

Fine Arts Junior 

RICHARDSON, TONY L Logan 

Business Administration Freshman 

RIDER, GARY R Abilene 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore 

RIEB, MARK L St. Francis 

General Sophomore 

RIPHAHN. BILLD Copeland 

Pre-Design Professions . . Freshman 

ROBBINS, FRANCIS V Yates Center 

Agricultural Engineering Junior 

ROBERTS, WILLIAM D Norton 

Engineering Freshman 

ROBSON, KENNETH E Abilene 

Agriculture Education Sophomore 

ROGERS, RICHARD N Olathe 

Marketing Senior 

ROSETTA. VICTOR F Topeka 

Industrial Engineering Freshman 

RYAN, JOHN R Solomon 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore 

SAILSBURY, JOHN T Parsons 

Recreation Sophomore 

SALINAS, JOE S Kansas City 

Business Administration Senior 

SAPP, JON L Holton 

Elementary Education Senior 

SCHIEFEN, JAMES C ... Goodland 

Pre-Medicine Junior 

SCHLATTER, CHARLES W Overland Park 

Business Administration Sophomore 

SCHMID, ANTHONY C Atwood 

Crop Protection Sophomore 

SCHWAB. STEPHEN R Kansas City 

Architecture . Junior 

SCRIBNER, CRAIG W Caldwell 

Biology ... Junior 

SEARS, ROBERT E Newton 

Physical Science Senior 

SELM. MICHAEL E Salma 

Mechanical Engineering . Sophomore 




SETH, DARYL L Council Grove 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

SHERLOCK. PETE St. Francis 

Pre-Vetermary Medicine Junior 

SHIDELER, ROBERT J Topeka 

Pre-Design Protessions Sophomore 

SHILLING, GREGORY L Westphalia 

Dairy Production Junior 

SLIFE, CURTIS L. .... Princeton. MO 
Pre-Design Professions , . . . Sophomore 

SLAGLE, CHARLES E Overland Park 

Pre-Law Sophomore 



SMITH, ERIC A Macksville 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore 

SMITH, PAUL R Shawnee 

Business Administration Freshman 

SMITH, RICHARD D Shawnee 

Medical Technology Senior 

SRISUTHEP.SATHORN Pichlt, Thailand 

Industrial Engineering Senior 

STANLEY, NEAL M, Dighton 

Agricultural Economics Sophomore 

STEGEMAN, JAMES F Overland Park 
General Sophomore 



STEPS, STEVEN C Topeka 

Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Senior 

STEVENS, LARRY W Harper 

Nuclear Engineering Junior 

STEWART, PAUL D Olathe 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology Junior 

STILES, DALE W Spring Hill 

Electrical Engineering Freshman 

STOCK, GREG L Kansas City, MO 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

STOCK, STEVEN J St, Joseph, MO 

Architecture Graduate Student 



STOLLER. BRENTTON G. . . . Sabetha 

Art Junior 

STORY, CLAYTON J Udall 

Agricultural Education F reshman 

STOUT. RICK G . McPherson 

Chemical Engineering Freshman 

STRANGE, JAMES M Libertyville, IL 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

STRAWN, BARRY W Salina 

Mechanical Engineering Sophomore 

STRUTHERS, DAVID L Hutchinson 

Sociology Senior 



STUART, LEE C Blue Rapids 

Journalism and Mass Communications Sophomore 

STUCKER, DAVID L Leavenworth 

Nuclear Engineering Junior 

SUITER, KERRY R St. John 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Junior 

SUTTON. JEFFREY J Atchison 

Medical Technology Sophomore 

SWANSON, RICHARD D. . Yates Center 

Electrical Engineering Sophomore 

TALLEY, RONNIE Kansas City 

Physical Education Freshman 



TAYLOR, BRADLEY H El Dorado 

Horticulture Junior 

TAYLOR, KEVIN D El Dorado 

General Sophomore 

TAYLOR, MARK K Topeka 

Engineering Freshman 

TAYLOR, T. J Goodland 

Music Education Senior 

TESKE, RICHARD R Kansas City 

Psychology Senior 

THOMPSON, DOUGLAS C Wichita 

Architecture Junior 



TILGHMAN, RICHARD K Topeka 

Architecture Junior 

TREASURE, MARK A Kansas City, MO 

Horticulture Senior 

TRYON, CHARLES P Marysville 

Architecture Sophomore 

TURNER, RONALD E Overland Park 

Corrections Administration Sophomore 

TUXHORN, DOYLE P Kingman 

Business Administration Sophomore 

TYHURST, JOHN R Carrollton, MO 

Civil Engineering Senior 



UNRUH. VIRLONN Earned 

Elementary Education Junior 

VAN LOENEN, RODGER L Prairie View 

Business Administration Freshman 

VAUPEL. WILLIAM E Salina 

Civil Engineering Junior 

VERNON, LARRY E , , McPherson 

Physical Education Freshman 

VINING, MARK A Horton 

Business Administration Senior 

WAINWRIGHT, DENNIS A AltaVista 

Chemical Engineering Freshman 



382 — Haymaker Hall 





WALDMAN, SAM Park 

Radio and Television Senior 



Atwood 

Sophomore 

Salma 

Sophomore 

Roeland Park 

Junior 

St Francis 

Sophomore 



WALKER, MARC L 

General Agriculture 

WARDEN, PAUL G. 

General Agriculture 

WARNER, JAMES S 

Business Administration 

WATKINS, GARY L 

Accounting 

WEATHERBIE, WILLIAM K, lola 

Business Administration . . Junior 



WEIDMAN, GARYW Salma 

Mechanical Engineering Sophomore 

WEIDMAN, JOHN H Salina 

Electrical Engineering Freshman 

WEIDNER, JAYP Sublette 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Sophomore 

WELLONS, MATHEW W Kansas City, MO 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

WENGER, RONALD E Powhattan 

Agricultural Education Junior 

WHITLEY, MARK E Ness City 

Agronomy Senior 



WILBECK, TONYA South Hutchinson 

General Business Freshman 

WILEY, ALAN Lawrence 

Civil Engineering Senior 

WILLE. MARK H, Overland Park 

Education and Modern Languages Freshman 

WILLIAMS, ROBERT D Leawood 

Industrial Engineering Senior 

WILSON. MARK D Mission 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Sophomore 

WINKLER, TOM F Salma 

Architecture Junior 



WINTER, BRIAN F Andale 

Business Administration Freshman 

WOLF, WILLIAM E St. Louis, MO 

Architecture Senior 

WOLTERS, MARK A Atwood 

Business Administration . . . Sophomore 

WOODALL, DENNIS C Salma 

Pre-Medicine . Freshman 

WRIGHT. JOHN H Overland Park 

Business Administration Junior 

WUTHNOW. MARK L. ...... . Manchester 

General Agriculture Freshman 



YEAGER, STEVE E Topeka 

Business Administration Sophomore 

YLANDER, DAVID M Omaha. NB 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Freshman 

YODER, DAVID D Denton 

Education Graduate Student 



YOUNGER, LESTER A ... 

Radio and Television 

ZERBE. STEVEN C 
Animal Science and Industry 
ZUK. ERICA 
Pre-Vetennary Medicine 



Lebanon 

Sophomore 

Council Grove 

Junior 

Hutchinson 

Junior 




Kappa Alpha Theta 

THOMAS, CLARA E Houseparent 

ABBOTT, BRENDA D Overland Park 

Clothing and Retailing Junior 

ARMSTRONG. SUZANNE Shawnee 

General Sophomore 

BALES, REBECCA J Emporia 

Clothing and Retailing Junior 

BANTA, SUSAN E Wichita 

Interior Design Junior 

BEAN, MARSEE L Wellington 

Dietetics Junior 

BERNASEK, JANICE M Manhattan 

General Sophomore 

BIGELOW, LANA J Ottawa 

Elementary Education Junior 

BODECKER, BARBARA J Wichita 

General Freshman 

BUCHANAN, LOIS A Lewis 

Recreation Sophomore 

BUCHANAN, RITA M Manhattan 

Physical Education Sophomore 

BUCHANAN, ROBIN M Manhattan 

Pre-Nursing Sophomore 

COFFMAN, GERALDINE A Ottawa 

Family and Child Development Freshman 

CORKRAN. DEBBIE S Fairway 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Junior 

COX, ALLYSON Wichita 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

CURRIE, MARTY R Stockton 

Textile Research Sophomore 

DANIELSON. CANDY Ponca City, OK 

Pre-Pharmacy Freshman 

DAVIS, AMY K Fanwood, NJ 

Speech Pathology Junior 










K A o 




384 — Kappa Alpha Theta 




DENGLER, PATRICIA M Wichita 

Clothing and Retailing Freshman 

DENYER. DANA L Manhattan 

Pre-Physical Therapy Sophomore 

DIXON, LINDAS Prairie Village 

Family and Child Development Junior 

EATON. NATALIE J. Wichita 

Clothing and Retailing Freshman 

ENGEL, CAROL B Liberal 

Fashion Design Sophomore 

ETTER, DOT A Olathe 

Wildlife Biology Senior 



FAVILLE, SUSAN C Littleton, CO 

Clothing and Retailing Senior 

FELLOWS, PATRICIA L Manhattan 

Textile Research Senior 

FOWLES. RITA K Clay Center 

Home Economics Education Sophomore 

FULLERTON, JULIA A Overland Park 

Elementary Education Freshman 

GRAHAM, JUDITH L Prairie Village 

Computer Science Senior 

HAGAN, KIMBERLEY A Manhattan 

Elementary Education Senior 



HANKAMMER, JENNIFER Topeka 

Interior Design Senior 

HAUSE, JANE C Manhattan 

Recreation . . Freshman 

HETER, SARAH L Sterling 

Family and Child Development Senior 

HILL. CHARLOTTE J McPherson 

Elementary Education Freshman 

HILL, JACKIE K Wellington 

Special Education Junior 

HOENER, CAROLYN St, Louis, MO 

Home Economics Freshman 



HULL. CINDY K Manhattan 

Accounting Sophomore 

JUNGMANN, JENNIFER A Prairie Village 

Accounting . . . Junior 

JUNGMANN, LAURIE Prairie Village 

General Business Junior 

KAUFMAN, TERESA A Dorrance 

Medical Technician Junior 

LECKRON, DEBBIE D Abilene 

Journalism and Mass Communications Senior 

LENTZ, NANCY JO Topeka 

Physical Education Sophomore 



LONG, SUSAN K Overland Park 

Clothing and Retailing Senior 

LUX, ANN C Wichita 

Clothing and Retailing Senior 

LUX, LYNN M Carmel. IN 

Medical Technology Sophomore 

MAACK, MARTI St. Louis, MO 

Home Economics Extension Senior 

MAYS, PENNY J . . Lyons 

Recreation Junior 

McCANDLESS, DEBRAK St. John 

Family Economics Sophomore 



MENEHAN, KELSEY D Wichita 

Journalism and Mass Communications Senior 

MENEHAN, MELISSA A Wichita 

General . Freshman 

MOORE, MELISSA G Manhattan 

Music Freshman 

MOSER, BRENDA L Winona 

Clothing and Retailing Senior 

MOSER, MARY E Marysville 

Home Economics Education Sophomore 

NOFFSINGER, TERESA L Midwest City. OK 

Pre-Law Junior 



NORTH, LINDA E, , 
Food and Nutrition Science . 
NORTH, SUSAN E ... 
Family and Child Development 
NUTTER, CONNIE D. 



Prairie Village 

Freshman 

Prairie Village 

Junior 

Wellington 



Applied Music Freshman 

OSWALT, JANE E . . . , Hutchinson 

Clothing and Retailing Junior 

PATTINSON, LINDA D Hutchinson 

Veterinary Medicine Sophomore 

PELTON, SUE L Wichita 

Family and Child Development Junior 



PETERS, DEBORAH L Overland Park 

Home Economics Education Junior 

POPHAM, DEBORAH S Wellington 

Special Education Freshman 

POWERS, LAURA J Manhattan 

Business Sophomore 

REED, KAREN L Prairie Village 

Interior Design Junior 

REEDER, KATHERINE L Troy 

General Sophomore 

REEDER, PATRICIA A Troy 

General Social Sciences Senior 



Kappa Alpha Theta — 385 




REIN, AUDREY L. Russell 

General Home Economics Freshman 

REINERT. ELLEN M Hutchinson 

Physical Therapy Sophomore 

REMBLESKE, MARGARET A Wichita 

Home Economics Sophomore 

REXROAD, LYNN J Manhattan 

Elementary Education Senior 

ROSTINE, JOAN V Hutchinson 

Home Economics Junior 

RUMSEY.JILLJ DeKalb. IL 

Learning Disabilities Sophomore 

SELBY, PATTY A Garden City 

Elementary Education Senior 

SEWELL, BARBARA A Fort Scott 

Horticulture Therapy Senior 

SHINKLE, ANGELA M Klncald 

Home Economics Education Senior 

SHIRK, BEVERLY L Wichita 

Pre-Nursing Sophomore 

STALCUP. GIAM . St. John 

Interior Design Sophomore 

STEINBAUER, MARTHA J Manhattan 

Pre-Nursing . Sophomore 

SULLIVAN, KATHY A Northbrook, IL 

Clothing and Retailing Sophomore 

TAPSAK, PAMELA A Prairie Village 

General Sophomore 

VANTU YL, CONNIE L Olathe 

Medical Technology Junior 

WESLEY, TERRI L Hutchinson 

Clothing and Retailing Junior 

WESTHUSING. JANAD. . Stockton 

Psychology Freshman 

WHITE, LIZ Emporia 

Accounting . . . Junior 

WILLIAMS. DONNA M Pratt 

Elementary Education Sophomore 

ZELEZNAK, KATHLEEN J Roeland Park 

Wildlife Biology Senior 

2IMMER. PAULA K. Shawnee 

Home Economics Freshman 




386 — Kappa Alpha Theta 




Kappa Delta 

HIMBHHBH^ HEDRICK. SALLY Houseparent 

jg^^ j*- s ALLEN, CATHY Leawood 

y^^i Special Education Junior 

J ANDERSON, JANE E Shawnee Mission 

Elementary Education Junior 

APPLEBY, TERRY L McPherson 

Accounting Junior 

ATTEBERY, J. DENISE Paola 

Speech Pathology Sophomore 

BALTZER, ELIZABETH A Mission 

Home Economics . Junior 

■ ^_ BARTLETT, KATHY L Olathe 

<^tfW, 0C3^ Home Economics and Liberal Arts Senior 

BATT, BEVERLY A Kinsley 

Family and Child Development Sophomore 

BLOOMQUIST, SALLY A Wichita 

Music Junior 

BOOK. BARBARA K Overland Park 

General Sophomore 

BURKHALTER, CYNTHIA S Bird City 

Clothing and Retailing Senior 

BURNETT, CHRISTINE K Overland Park 

Accounting Freshman 

CARNAHAN, LINDA L Altamont 

English Senior 

CONVERSE, CYNTHIA S Eskndge 

Physical Education Junior 

CRAIG, DENISE L Overland Park 

Business Administration . Junior 

DALTON, JANET L Overland Park 

General Business Junior 

DAWKINS, KATHERINE I Roeland Park 

Mechanical Engineering Sophomore 

DEAN, KINBERLYA Kansas City 

General Sophomore 

DENTON. KIM M Mmneola 

Journalism and English Literature Junior 

fjT' "^1 DEVERS, ANNE S Shawnee Mission 

I a - -Jflt Family and Child Development Junior 

K ~"^« DUPREE, JANIECE A Prairie Village 

v'~i Hft General Sophomore 

ERICKSON, MARNEY S Lake Quivira 

General Freshman 

FRIEND, LINDSAY A Augusta 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

GATES, SHELLY L Winona 

Business Administration Freshman 



SPSS® 





GATEWOOD, VICKIE J Wichita 

Pre-Nursing Junior 

GOLDSMITH, LINDA G Wichita 

Accounting Freshman 

GREGORY, JANET E Overland Park 

Family and Child Development Senior 

GRISHAM. CYHTHIA S Shawnee 

Pre-Medicine Freshman 

GUTKNECHT, DEBORAH L Overland Park 

Family and Child Development Junior 

HARBERT, CATHIE A Larned 

Special Education Sophomore 



HARRIS, SANDY A Wichita 

Pre-Dentistry Freshman 

HEDGER, MARJORIE J Overland Park 

Family and Child Development Sophomore 

HIMEBAUGH, KAREN S Wichita 

Music Education Freshman 

HOENER, LINDA St. Louis, MO 

Home Economics Senior 

HOLLOWAY, LINDA S Mission 

Food Science and Industry Freshman 

HOLT, DENISE J Manhattan 

Clothing and Retailing Freshman 



HOUGHTON, JOAN Leawood 

Speech Pathology Junior 

HOVERDER, JAMIE J Overland Park 

Journalism and Mass Communications Freshman 

KASTEN, VERONICA S Atchison 

History and Secondary Education Freshman 

KAUP, JANETTE E Manhattan 

Music Education Sophomore 

KELLY, BARBARA J Leawood 

Clothing and Retailing Junior 

KINDER, SHERRY L Topeka 

Music Education Senior 



KISSING, PAMELA K Overland Park 

Home Economics Education Senior 

KLINE, SHERRY J Wlntleld 

Accounting Senior 

KNOX, JACALYN E Topeka 

Interior Design Sophomore 

KREBS, DIANNE M Scott City 

General Sophomore 

LEMON, SUSAN D Shawnee Mission 

Family and Child Development Senior 

LOUGHBOM, DIANE M Kansas City 

Horticulture and Forestry Senior 



MAY, ROSEMARY 

Fashion Merchandising 

McBEE, SHELLY A. 

Family and Child Development 

MEALMAN, LINDA K 



Crown Point, IN 

Junior 

Wichita 

Junior 

Overland Park 



Elementary Education Sophomore 

MILLSAP, TERESA C Bonner Springs 

Physical Therapy Sophomore 

MYERS. KEETA S Hutchinson 

Medical Technology Junior 

NADON, SUZANNE L Overland Park 

Family Economics Senior 



NAY, CYNDE A El Dorado 

General Sophomore 

NORTH, SHEILA A Baldwin 

Home Economics Sophomore 

OBERLY, AMBER R McPherson 

Education Freshman 

OPPITZ, CONSTANCE C Topeka 

Home Economics Junior 

PERINE, SUSIE J Wamego 

Accounting Senior 

PETERSON, SUSAN K Abilene 

Political Science Junior 



PHINNEY, DEBORAH S Larned 

Journalism and Mass Communications Senior 

PICARDY, CATHY L Shawnee Mission 

Elementary Education Senior 

PLETCHER, JANET S Manhattan 

Consumer Interest Sophomore 

RASH, VALERIE L Wichita 

Nuclear Engineering Freshman 

REIMAN, MARGO A Byers 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

RICHARDS, PAT K Topeka 

Social Work Senior 



RIVES, ROBIN J Wichita 

Music Freshman 

ROBINSON, CARRIE L Topeka 

Interior Design Senior 

SALYER, KAREN A Ashland 

General Freshman 

SINOVIC, SUSAN M Kansas City 

Special Education Freshman 

SNYDER, DONNA L Horton 

General Sophomore 

SOMMER, DEBORAH L Overland Park 

Family Economics Senior 




388 — Kappa Delta 





bPICER, LINDA J Hutchinson 

Business Education Sophomore 

STAPLES, DEBBIE L Kaneohe Bay, HI 

Pre-School Child Development Sophomore 

STOVER, DEBORAH S Salina 

Pre-Medicine Freshman 

SULLIVAN, CATHY Kansas City 

History Education Junior 

SWEENEY, MICHELLE L Overland Park 

Elementary Education Junior 

TESTORI, KAREN A Irving, TX 

Clothing and Retailing Sophomore 

THARP, N. LYNNE Shawnee 

Home Economics Education Senior 

WAYNE, NANCY Overland Park 

Family and Child Development Senior 

WEDEL, STEPHANIE G Overland Park 

Accounting Sophomore 

WEEKS, STEFNI L Hoisington 

Early Childhood Education Junior 

WHITHAM, JANE E Scott City 

General Freshman 

WIENS, JACQUE L Lyons 

Interior Design Freshman 

WILSON, JACQUELINE S Overland Park 

Home Economics Education Junior 

WOODS, JANICE L Overland Park 

Elementary Education Senior 

WOODS, NANCY G Overland Park 

Secondary Education Junior 

WOODWORTH, NANCY J Overland Park 

Psychology Sophomore 

YOUNGBLOOD, KATHLEEN A Kansas City, MO 

Farm Management Freshman 

ZIMMERMAN, SUSIE C Manhattan 

French Junior 



Kappa Delta — 389 



Kappa Kappa Gamma 

PARKER, BONNIE M HouseparenI ^..^ 1HHHHHV — 

ALLEN, KARINS Olathe mmm\. rSmW\ ^HlB, Ifli Hk 

Medical Technology Sophomore m «H^^m * / ■ ^^Bm BK A ' ' ' ^ 

ANDERSON, KAREN R. Sallna &• *M A^'-lBI W^PB »"^A 

Clothing and Retailing Senior mtrn^ "^M '* Is ■ " "* ™ 

ARNOLDI.MARYE Overland Park .-^ V M . ,,■ V ""^*3 ■?"""* I W 

Family and Child Development Freshman jf^j^^-^f^ 

ARNOLDI, ROXANNE C Overland Park 

Pre-Nursing Junior 

BAUER, LEANN M Clay Center ^ fl 

Pre Nursing Sophomore 1 .'■ 1 S Bm 

BEEZLEY, ANN W Glrard 

Biology and Pre-Medlclne Senior 

BENEDICT, TERRI S Garden City 

Clothing and Retailing Freshman 

BOGNER, LUCILLE M Parsons JBB' ' ■ * '* ' ^9 

Elementary Education Senior Mm 'i ~ 1 a W !■ -^yjP 

BOTKINS, JOYCE E Overland Park 

Home Economics Education Freshman 

BROWN, PAMELA J Shawnee Mission 

Clothing and Retailing Sophomore 

BRISTOW, TARA J Manhattan 

Modern Language Sophomore 

* ' * US' ., Am? 4 ' 





390 — Kappa Kappa Gamma 




BUCHELE, PHYLLIS J Cedar Vale 



History . . 

BURRUS, SUSIE 
Speech Pathology 
CASE. TERESA J 
General 

CASTETTER. KIM E 
Accounting 



<Hf!$ 




Sophomore 

Wichita 

Freshman 

Marion 

Sophomore 

McPherson 

Freshman 

CASTETTER, SANDRA L McPherson 

Accounting Senior 

CHISHOLM, SUE A McPherson 

Speech Pathology Junior 



CONNOLLY, DEBBIE S. . .. Manhattan 

Elementary Education . Freshman 

CRAMER, DEBORAH S Garden City 

Speech Pathology Sophomore 

CRAMER, KARIN K. Manhattan 

Business Education Junior 

DILLER, V HEATHER Belleville 

Family and Child Development , Sophomore 

DINKEL, PATRICIA Topeka 

Family and Child Development Sophomore 

DOEBELE. BARBARA J Hanover 

Family Economics Junior 



FEILD, DIANNE Overland Park 

Accounting Sophomore 

FINK, SARA A. Topeka 

Modern Language ..Freshman 

FOSTER. CELESTE K Leawood 

Clothing Retailing Freshman 

GIBSON, MARSHA A Wichita 

Home Economics Education Sophomore 

GLIDDEN, MARY E Overland Park 

Special Education Sophomore 

GRUVER, GRETCHEN J Overland Park 

Family and Child Development Senior 



HANSON, MARCIA J Manhattan 

Interior Design Senior 

HOLLINGWORTH, MICHELE V. Hutchinson 

Speech Pathology Freshman 

HOPKINS, HOLLY A Prairie Village 

Art . Freshman 

HOWARD, BARCLAY Arkansas City 

Pre-Nursmg Junior 

KENDALL, CONNIE M Wichita 

Business Administration Junior 

KINNEY, JANIS L Garden City 

Family and Child Development Senior 



KINNEY, KAREN J Albuquerque, NM 

Elementary Education Senior 

KINNEY, KRISTI L Garden City 

Elementary Education Junior 

KNIEF. CLAUDIA A Garden City 

Family and Child Development Sophomore 

LAASER, WINI L Kansas City 

History and Modern Language . . Freshman 

LANKSTON, KATHY A Shawnee Mission 

Pre-Elementary Education Senior 

LINVILL. L GAY Tiburon. CA 

Radio and Television Junior 



LIVINGOOD. AMY L Overland Park 

History Sophomore 

LONG, KAREN E Overland Park 

Mathematics Senior 

LUNDSTED. NANCY J Columbia. MO 

Clothing and Retailing Sophomore 

McEWEN, PATRICIA A. Belleville 

Family and Child Development Junior 

McRAE, PATRICIA A Topeka 

Pre-Vetermary Medicine Freshman 

MILLER, CAROL L Leawood 

Interior Design Junior 



MILLER, CHARLISS A Wichita 

Computer Science Junior 

MOORE, SHELLY Wichita 

General ...... Sophomore 

O'NEAL, TERI L Prairie Village 

Elementary Education Senior 

PENCE, MERROLE Overland Park 

General Freshman 

PROFFITT, KAREN C. Sterling 

Home Economics and Liberal Arts Junior 

REILAND. CATHY A Wichita 

General Freshman 



ROOK, MARY A Kansas City 

General Freshman 

SCHROEDER, CONNEE B. Topeka 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

SCHUTTE, EMILY A Prairie Village 

General Sophomore 

SEIM, JANIK Gypsum 

Elementary Education Senior 

SEITZ. VICTORIA A Fort Bragg. NC 

Interior Design Freshman 

SHARP. ANN L Humboldt 

Pre-Nursing Junior 



Kappa Kappa Gamma — 391 



SHARP, JEAN C Humboldt 

Physical Science Freshman 

SHIRLEY, JULIE L Topeka 

Clothing and Retailing Junior 

SHRUM, CHRISTY S Wichita 

Accounting Sophomore 

SMITH. TRACEY L Liberal 

Engineering Freshman 

SOUTHARD. JAN S Wichita 

Home Economics Freshman 

SPEIRS, SUSAN L Dodge City 

Elementary Education Junior 

STEEPLES, CARLAJ Zurich 

Clothing and Retailing Sophomore 

SWEET, ANNA R Hardy, NB 

Speech Pathology Junior 

THOMPSON, DAWN G Manhattan 

Chemistry Junior 

TILDEN, SUE J Cedar Rapids, IA 

Economics Senior 

TRAYFORD, G MICHELLE Overland Park 

Business Administration Freshman 

TUOHEY, SUSAN D Overland Park 

Interior Design Senior 

TURNBULL, CHERYL R Stockton 

General Freshman 

TURNBULL, CYNTHIA J Stockton 

Speech Pathology Junior 

VANIER, MARTHA A Brookville 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Freshman 

VANLANDINGHAM, B. L Columbia, MO 

English Education Senior 

WARD, KAREN L Overland Park 

Interior Design Junior 

WINSTON, SHANA K St, Francis 

Physical Therapy Sophomore 

ZAWATZKI, MARY K Kansas City 

Elementary Education Sophomore 





Kappa Sigma 

CRIDER, DEBBY K Houseparent 

CRIDER, MARK Houseparent 

ALEXANDER, ROYCE Burlington 

Biochemistry Junior 

J~l Hk 1 '** V ANDERSON, SCOTT Independence 

Wl I & " ;£W J Accounting Junior 

^. _M V iJf BAKER, FRED W Hutchinson 

Accounting Freshman 

BELL, WILLIAM K Salma 

..>m ( r Business Administration , Junior 

M 

BORUCKI, JEFFREY Overland Park 

Wildlife Biology Junior 

jf*6 BURKE, TIM M Overland Park 

mbM E^k. tfS*\_«, Architecture Junior 

W$r'- i ~ 1]M SP' **!• COMMER, ROGER D Wichita 

-*\ •! I ^3 • J w Architecture Senior 

-jfl *m.'~~Jn£ ^^ "~~JP COOPER, JOHN M Topeka 

R ->&rw^^. ^^ V 1 -r"' Chemical Engineering Freshman 

) "%~ DILLON, KURT R Ozawkie 

Agricultural Engineering Freshman 

DONOVAN, GARY J Medicine Lodge 

a> ' ilJ Agricultural Business Senior 

mi 

EGGERMAN, JEFFREY N . . Green 

4 ?Jtg± A ^#" Animal Science and Industry Junior 

,^8m fci^Nm j «■». EHRSAM.ALEXG Bern 

¥ ^k Jr f Business Administration Sophomore 

*'* •■ «*-*•■ 1 1 EVANS, STEPHEN P Louisburg 

H^_ .§ > «• Natural Resource Management Freshman 

\T~Jr^ FRANK, GREGORY E Smith Center 

Radio and Television Sophomore 

HAZZARD, DANIAL M Ozawkie 

General Freshman 

HEALZER, MARK A Ness City 

Natural Resource Management Junior 

\ 
i 

HUTTON, BRAD D Topeka 

Architecture Junior 

JAVERNIG, WILLIAM J Burlington 

Agricultural Economics Junior 

W™ l-s* 0S&9 W~^W JOHNSON, TIM R Harper 

V 3 f- *KJF Agriculture Sophomore 

•&&>, 1 /, ~"~~ KAUL. THOMAS B Kansas City 

"' ^?0 \ Architecture Junior 

U <mT g£%7& M3tthu. KOTAY, KEVIN Harrisburg, PA 

/ i.m »' |W"? Business Administration Graduate Student 

W "■'*' ; -^-^l WlB KULL, DANIAL D Topeka 

S ^^i^lPffl! General Freshman 





LANGLEY, LYLE E. Ozawkie 

General Freshman 

LEHMAN, WILLIAM W Overland Park 

Business Administration Junior 

LIEURANCE, DALE K , Kiowa 

General Freshman 

McCLARY, KENT M Centralia 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Sophomore 

McCLARY, MICHAEL D Vermillion 

General Business Administration Sophomore 

MILBURN, MICHAEL W Hutchinson 

Architecture Junior 

MIX, MICHAEL J Hiawatha 

Forestry Freshman 

MOTLEY, MICHAEL E Manhattan 

Physical Education Freshman 

O'CONNOR, TIMOTHY P Manhattan 

Business Administration Junior 

OLTJEN. LARRY M Robinson 

Animal Science and Industry Freshman 

OST, KIRK D Mankato 

Business Administration Junior 

PELTON, GREGORY V St. George 

Pre-Law Senior 

PETRY, GARY L Centralia 

Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

ROBERTS, THOMAS M Manhattan 

Geography Junior 

SAYLES, CURTIS E Ozawkie 

Chemical Engineering Freshman 

SCANTLIN, MICHAEL L Pratt 

Radio and Television Senior 

SCHAIBLE, JAMES M Fairview 

Agricultural Economics Junior 

SHEIK, WILLIAM J Bern 

Business Junior 

SHOEMAKER, STEVE Manhattan 

Feed Science and Management Junior 

SOLLNER, STEPHEN L Smith Center 

Pre-Law Senior 

SPENCER, DOUGLAS M Topeka 

Engineering Freshman 

STERLING, STEVE E Hardtner 

Agricultural Economics Freshman 

STOLTENBERG, STEPHEN Hiawatha 

Agricultural Economics Freshman 

VERA. THOMAS J Manhattan 

Recreation Sophomore 

VOLLBRACHT, MARK L Valley Center 

Milling Science and Management Junior 

WATTS, TONY B Hardtner 

Engineering Freshman 

WENGER, JEFFREY D Sabetha 

Pre-Forestry Freshman 

WILKINS, THOMAS W Overland Park 

Accounting Sophomore 



394 — Kappa Sigma 




Lambda Chi Alpha 

ANSELMI, KENT E Leawood 

Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

ANTHONY, ALAN S Fort Scott 

'^ Horticulture Sophomore 

BEARDMORE, DAVID H Overland Park 

Chemical Engineering Sophomore 

BISCHOFF, EDWARD L St. Joseph, MO 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

BOGGS, MARION A Prairie Village 

Business Administration Freshman 

CLIPSHAM, ROBERT C Prairie Village 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Sophomore 

CRAIG, DOUGLAS J Natoma 

Radio and Television Freshman 

CRAWFORD, RODERICK J Topeka 

Electrical Engineering Senior 

CROSBY, MARK S Centralia, IL 

General Sophomore 

DAVIS, DALE B Garden City 

Architecture Junior 

DIETERICH, WILLIAM H Princeton 

Elementary Education Graduate Student 

DOHERTY, STEPHEN J . . , Prairie Village 

Accounting Freshman 

DRITLEY, PAUL M Fremont, NB 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

DUNN, CRAIG A Junction City 

Business Administration Sophomore 

DUNN, RONALD M Overland Park 

Business Administration Sophomore 

FOSTER, ROBERT D Olathe 

Pre-Dentistry Freshman 

FYFE, GREGORY B Wakefield 

Building Construction Junior 

HARRIS, W. RUSSELL Manhattan 

Journalism and Mass Communications Junior 

HILGER, CHARLES J Murdock 

Electrical Engineering Senior 

HOGLUND, JAY R Ottawa 

Electrical Engineering Senior 

JANKOVICH, RICHARD B Manhattan 

Marketing Freshman 

JENKINS, PHILIP W Shawnee Mission 

Electrical Engineering Sophomore 

JOHNSON, LARRY R Pittsburg 

I Pre-Veterinary Medicine Sophomore 

KNIGHT, GARY E Topeka 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 




r s « 



I 




% 



s& 












tk&ta 




-#»*•$ 



I 




LETCH, PETER E Kansas City, MO 

Science and Management Senior 

MARQUEZ, EDWARD J Topeka 

Business Administration Freshman 

MARTENS, KENT A Prairie Village 

Engineering Freshman 

McCOLLOUGH, MONTY E Kearney, NB 

Food Science and Industry Senior 

McKENNA, JEROME E Overland Park 

Accounting Senior 

McWHORTER, DANIEL M Ft Riley 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Freshman 



MEANS, DANIEL E Hiawatha 

Business Administration Sophomore 

NOLL, DAVID S Chesterlield, MO 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine and Psychology Junior 

OLDS, GARY D Junction City 

Business Administration Sophomore 

OLDS, GREGORY D . . Junction City 

English and Political Science Junior 

OTTINGER, CURTIS E Leawood 

Accounting Freshman 

PURNER, ROBERT A Rockaway, NJ 

Architecture Junior 



ROBINSON, CURTIS S Peabody 

Electrical Engineering Freshman 

ROBINSON, STEVEN R Peabody 

Mechanical Engineering Senior 

SANDERS, GARY B Prairie Village 

Business Administration Sophomore 

SCHROEDER, FRED J Overland Park 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Freshman 

SITTS, RICHARD L Independence 

Journalism and Mass Communications Junior 

TEEFEY, JEFFREY L Kansas City, MO 

Business Finance Junior 



WHITESIDE, TIMOTHY E Tulsa, OK 

Engineering Freshman 

ZERNICKOW, KENT L Abilene 

Nuclear Engineering Junior 










396 — Lambda Chi Alpha 






(Tlarlatt Hall 




HURLEY, LYLE L Lyons 

Electrical Engineering Senior 

HURLEY, PATRICIA D Fresno, CA 

Interior Design Senior 

ALGIENE, GARYL Leoti 

Pre-Law Sophomore 

ALLEN, DALE K Valley Center 

General Freshman 

ALLEN. TIMOTHY E Chanute 

Journalism and Mass Communications Sophomore 

ANNIS, JOHN R Oakley 

Chemical Engineering Freshman 

APPLEBAUGH.BRADD Olathe 

General Freshman 

ASBURY, L. KEITH Moberly. MO 

Architectural Structures Junior 

ATKINSON. ALAN J . Shawnee Mission 

Engineering Freshman 

ATZENHOFFER, MARK D Great Bend 

Journalism and Mass Communications Freshman 

BAKER. GREGORY D Newton 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

BARKER, MARTIN D Topeka 

Mechanical Engineering Senior 

BATSELL, STEPHEN G Deerfield. IL 

Physics Sophomore 

BENDA. DAVID L Atwood 

Business Administration Junior 

BIERY, RICK F Topeka 

Civil Engineering Senior 

BIGGS, BRADLEY M Kingman 

Electrical Engineering Senior 

BIGGS, GREGORY D Kingman 

Agricultural Economics and Biology Senior 

BIRD. GREGORY J Liberal 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Sophomore 

BLASCHKE. BILL A North Palm Beach. FL 

Bakery Science and Management Sophomore 

BLATT, GEOFFREY L Huntington Beach, CA 

Pre-Medicine Freshman 

BLOUNT, JOHN M Johet. IL 

Computer Science Sophomore 

BOEH, WILLIAM L Troy 

Architecture . Junior 

BOGINA, MICHAEL E Lenexa 

Civil Engineering Sophomore 

BOIS. PAUL K. Shawnee Mission 

Business Administration Freshman 

BOLDT, LARRY K Turon 

Agricultural Engineering Freshman 

BOROUGHS, HAROLD R Lyons 

Business Administration Junior 

BRACE, MARK A Wichita 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

BRACK, MICHAEL J. Ness City 

Business Administration Freshman 

BREST, GORDON A Myrtle Beach, SC 

Civil Engineering Junior 

BRIGHT. GARY R Abilene 

Biology Senior 

BRINKLEY, RICK J Louisburg 

Radio and Television Freshman 

BROWN, CHRIS P. Abilene 

Clothing and Retailing Freshman 

BROWN. DAVID L Kansas City 

Interior Architecture Junior 

BROWNBACK. SAMUEL D Parker 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Freshman 

BRUNK, ROBERT L Wichita 

Life Sciences and Pre-Medicine Senior 

BUHRER, WAYNE E Chapman 

Mechanical Engineering Senior 

BUNTEN, ROGER J Bowling Green. MO 

Architecture Fifth Year Student 

CAIN, FRED L Topeka 

History Junior 

CARDER, REX W Hoxie 

Radio and Television Freshman 

CARRIER, DAVID W Mission 

Electrical Engineering Junior 

CASEY, BARRY A Glen Elder 

Milling Science and Management Junior 

CEDERSTROM, DAYN L Blue Springs. MO 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

CHANCE. RAY D Liberal 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

CHENOWETH. DAVID R Topeka 

Natural Resource Management Sophomore 

CLARK, SAM R Hardy, NB 

Business Administration Senior 

COCKRUM, ERNIE H . Tulsa. OK 

General Freshman 

COLLING. RON D Fremont. NB 

Nuclear Engineering Sophomore 

CONES, DAVID J McPherson 

Chemical Engineering Sophomore 



Marlatt Hall — 397 



COOPER, TERRY E Wellsville 

Industrial Engineering Junior 

CORMODE. RANDY D Lancaster 

Mechanical Engineering Senior 

COURI, ROBERT M East Peoria, IL 

Landscape Architecture Junior 

CRABB, JERRY E Williamsburg 

Pre-Medicine Junior 

CRAWFORD, ALAN W Wakeeney 

Civil Engineering Freshman 

CRISLER, MORRIS F Wamego 

Horticulture Senior 

CUMMINGS, WILLIAM L Syracuse 

Sociology Junior 

D'ANTONIO, ALFRED J Overland Park 

Business Administration Sophomore 

D'ANTONIO, MICHAEL J Overland Park 

Electrical Engineering Senior 

DAVIS, LYNN A. Norton 

Geology Junior 

DAVIS, ROGER L Hutchinson 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology Senior 

DeFRIES, RICHARD B Manhattan 

Nuclear Engineering Freshman 

DEMINT, WILLIAM J Little Rock, AR 

Industrial Engineering Senior 

DICK, DAVID A Buhler 

Agricultural Mechanization Sophomore 

DIEKER. EDWARD L Wichita 

Business Administration Freshman 

DIERKS, LLOYD R Brewster 

Business Administration Junior 

DO, QUANG V Saigon, South Vietnam 

Chemical Engineering Junior 

DOKKEN, DOUG E. Derby 

General Freshman 

DOLES, DENNIS A Topeka 

Chemical Engineering Freshman 

DYER, DAVID K Overland Park 

Business Administration Freshman 

DYKE. GARY A Gridley 

Animal Science and Industry Freshman 

EHMKE, CALVIN B Dlghton 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

EHRLICH, MELVIN R Russell 

Electrical Engineering Freshman 

ENLOE, JACK L St. Louis, MO 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

EYLAR, EDWARD C Atchison 

Natural Resource Management Senior 

FINGER. GREG F Larned 

Agricultural Engineering Freshman 

FIRESTONE, DONALD D Roeland Park 

Electrical Engineering Senior 

FISHER, TERRY L ' Liberal 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

FLOURNOY, JAMES A Kansas City 

Mathematics Freshman 

FORD. C, ALAN Salma 

Nuclear Engineering Freshman 

FORD, DON T Edgerton 

Electrical Engineering Sophomore 

FRANKLIN, DOUGLAS L Wichita 

Milling Science Senior 

FREACH, STEPHEN G Tampa 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Freshman 

FRYDENDALL, DOUGLAS L Smith Center 

Accounting Junior 

FULKERSON, GLEN D Wichita 

Electrical Engineering Senior 

GILLEN, RICHARD P. Ulysses 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology Freshman 

GOOD, MICHAEL W Marlon 

Pre-Medlclne Senior 

GOOSEN, JERRY L Turkey Ridge. SD 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Junior 

GORDON, MARK D Overland Park 

Management Senior 

GRAFF, GARY M Manenthal 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore 

GREEN. THOMAS H Kansas City 

Electrical Engineering Graduate Student 

GRIEBEL, FRANCIS J Collyer 

Mechanical Engineering Senior 

GRIER, JOHN W Clearwater 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Sophomore 

GRIMWOOD. JAMES T Sedgwick 

Electrical Engineering Junior 

GROSS. JEFF L Salina 

Biology Freshman 

GUESS. LYNN King City, MO 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

HADDEN, TERRY W Topeka 

General Sophomore 

HAFLING, MICHAEL N Topeka 

Architectural Structures Junior 



398 — Marlatt Hall 


















\ ~m 


C ■ 


am 


. .(*:*■:,. .:: 


[# 


J 


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/l 




1 i ' 

! I /: 




HAKE, NOLAN F Lenora 

Engineering Freshman 

HAWTHORNE, JIM D Bushong 

Architecture Junior 

HEATHMAN. JAMES B. Ottawa 

Physics Junior 

HEINZ, RICHARD M Overland Park 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

HENLEY, JAMES B. Shawnee 

Civil Engineering Sophomore 

HENOCH, RICHARD B. , Topeka 

Elementary Education Junior 

HERRMANN, CHARLES E . . Offerle 

Engineering Freshman 

HERRMANN, DARRELL E Offerle 

Physics Junior 

HERZOG, GREGORYS Topeka 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

HILL. EDMUND G Anthony 

Civil Engineering Sophomore 

HILLMAN, REXV Wakeeney 

Business Administration Freshman 

HODGES, TERRY L Leawood 

Business Administration Freshman 

HOLMES. RODNEY E Topeka 

Business Administration , Freshman 

HOLYFIELD, JEFFREY L Piper 

General Sophomore 

HOLYFIELD, ROGER L Piper 

Business Administration Freshman 

HURST, JOHN P Independence 

History Senior 

HUTCHISON, JON M Great Bend 

Music Education Junior 

INGLE, PAUL B Topeka 

Agricultural Engineering Freshman 

JANKE, EDWARD L Chapman 

Agricultural Engineering Junior 

JENNISON,TINDELK Latham 

Chemical Engineering . .Freshman 

JONES. MARK A ... Topeka 

Business Junior 

KALIVODA, SCOTT N Agenda 

Chemical Engineering Sophomore 

KATTERHENRY, CURT A Florissant, MO 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

KEATING, RICK A Liberal 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

KISNER, MARK A Hays 

Electrical Engineering Freshman 

KITE, RONALD A. Lyons 

Nuclear Engineering Freshman 

KLOCK, EDWARD L Wichita 

Pre-Design Professions . Sophomore 

KNOPP, CLAYTON R Chapman 

Milling Science and Management Sophomore 

KNOWLES, JOHN W Sarcoxie, MO 

Architecture Junior 

KOUKOL, DARWIN L Cuba 

Agricultural Mechanization Junior 




KRAUS, DENNIS B Marlon 

Agricultural Education Senior 

LAYNE, DARYL E Atwood 

Electrical Engineering Freshman 

LEHMAN, BYRON A Newton 

Dairy Science Junior 

LEONARD, EVAN L White City 

Accounting Sophomore 

LEWIS, R PERRY . Topeka 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

LIENEMANN, ROBERT P Herkimer 

Landscape Architecture Senior 

LONDEEN, DAVIDS Arkansas City 

Music Education Sophomore 

LOW, DOUGLAS M Fowler 

Mechanical Engineering Freshman 

LOWDON, COREY G Downs 

Feed Science Senior 

LUKERT, KARL F Topeka 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Junior 

LYTLE, J. ALLEN Wichita 

Dairy Food Science and Management Senior 

MADORIN, MELVIN L Wamego 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology Senior 

MAGNER, RICHARD A Topeka 

Electrical Engineering Freshman 

MANZO, WILFRED F Mount Vernon, NY 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

MARKS, JAMES M, .Atwood 

Business Administration Freshman 

MARTENS, WENDELL A El Dorado 

Psychology Senior 

MARTIN, BLAKE G. . . Johnson 

Agricultural Engineering Freshman 

MASON, ERNIE Hays 

Electrical Engineering Freshman 

McATEE, JOSEPH M Vermillion 

Building Construction Senior 

McCLINTOCK, GARY W Louisburg 

Milling Science Freshman 

McELROY, WARREN A Mankato 

Civil Engineering Senior 

McGRIFF, ROBERT W Liberal 

Nuclear Engineering Sophomore 

McKAIG, DOUGLAS R Paola 

Chemical Engineering Freshman 

MEINKE. MICHAEL S Bonner Springs 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

MELCHER, JEFFREY L Fort Scott 

General Engineering Freshman 

METCALF, BILL L ... , Paola 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Freshman 

MEYER, CRAIG A Athol 

Agricultural Mechanization Junior 

MILLER, GREGORY B Minneapolis 

Secondary Health Education Junior 

MILLS, DAVID W Enterprise 

Business Administration Junior 

MOECKEL, MERLE J Hutchinson 

Medical Technology Freshman 

MOELLER, CHRIS R Bonner Springs 

Nuclear Engineering Sophomore 

MOHR, WILLIAM J Wichita 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology Senior 

MORFORD, QUENTIN A . Greensburg 

Mechanical Engineering Junior 

MOSSMAN, RICK L Topeka 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology Sophomore 

NAYLOR, GARY L Kansas City 

Natural Resources Management Junior 

NELSON, RICK Overland Park 

Business Administration Freshman 

NOE, BRUCE A Tecumseh 

Electrical Engineering Freshman 

NOLL, JEFFREY E Easton 

Agricultural Mechanization Sophomore 

NOONEN, THOMAS H Overland Park 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

OLDHAM, ANDREW L. Wakeeney 

Electrical Engineering Freshman 

OMENSKI, PHILIP P Kansas City 

Radio and Television Junior 

PATTON, DANNIE D Ulysses 

History Senior 

PETERSEN, ERLAND A Salina 

General Sophomore 

PFRANG, GARY F. . Oneida 

General Agriculture Freshman 

PHILLIPS, LARRY N Lyons 

Electrical Engineering Freshman 

PIEPER. DENNIS E . . Overland Park 

Business Administration Junior 

POLITO. GREGORY S Morton Grove, IL 

Horticulture Freshman 

PORTELL. JON E Mission 

Biology Sophomore 




400 — Marlatt Hall 







POTTBERG, JIMMIEL Downs 

Accounting Sophomore 

RADATZ. EDWIN W Galva 

Mathematics Sophomore 

RAMSEY, CRAIG J Scott City 

Agricultural Engineering Junior 

RELIHAN, BRUCE A ' Chapman 

Horticulture Sophomore 

RELIHAN. MICHAEL D Chapman 

Pre-Law , . . , Junior 

RIEBE. DELBERTG Girard 

Electrical Engineering Freshman 

RIEKENBERG. DARRELL R Sylvan Grove 

Civil Engineering Junior 

RILEY. WILLIAM F Shawnee Mission 

Mechanical Engineering Freshman 

ROBERTS, BRAD J Kansas City 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

ROBERTS. GREGORY W Leoti 

Animal Science and Industry Freshman 

ROESENER. W SCOTT Overland Park 

Nuclear Engineering Freshman 

ROSE. GALE J Haviland 

Business Administration Graduate Student 

RUDER, JONATHAN E . St. Louis, MO 

Pre-Design Professions . . Freshman 

SCHAMLE, RODNEY J Wellsvllle 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

SCHRADER, DANIEL J Oskaloosa 

Business Sophomore 

SCHRAG, KERRY L Newton 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

SCHREIBER.ALANN ...Home 

Music Education Junior 

SCHROEDER, CARL D Shawnee 

Natural Resources Management Sophomore 

SCHROTT. BRUCE D Rush Center 

Chemical Engineering Sophomore 

SCHULTZ, JAMES R Overland Park 

Agricultural Economics Freshman 

SEARS, R. BROC Jackson, TN 

Art Senior 

SEBA, RODNEY R , Larned 

Civil Engineering Freshman 

SIEFERT, KEITH E Parsons 

Forestry Freshman 

SEILER, CHARLES J Colwich 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine ..Junior 

SEYFERT, WARREN E Fowler 

Industrial Engineering Senior 

SHARP, ANTHONY W Annandale, VA 

Natural Resource Management Freshman 

SHARP, CHARLES E Great Bend 

Agriculture Freshman 

SHERWOOD, ROBERT L Paola 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

SHIMP, JOHN F Topeka 

Chemical Engineering Sophomore 

SHOEMAKER, KEITH A Wheeler 

Business Freshman 

SHUTE. STEVEN E. Esbon 

Electrical Engineering Sophomore 

SKIDMORE, MARK E Ottawa 

Electrical Engineering Senior 

SKIDMORE. MIKE B Ottawa 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

SMAIL. RONALD D lola 

General Freshman 

SMITH. KENNETH C Shawnee Mission 

Electrical Engineering Freshman 

SMITH. KEVIN D Hutchinson 

Natural Resource Management . . Freshman 

SMITH. STEPHEN D Prairie Village 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Sophomore 

SPAULDING, LESLIE C Liberal 

Pre-Design Professions . . . Freshman 

SPEED, DANIEL E Shawnee 

Mechanical Engineering Freshman 

STALLBAUMER, JAMES F Frankfort 

Agricultural Economics Junior 

STARCH. MIKES Wichita 

Chemistry Freshman 

STOOPS, JOHN D Prairie Village 

Biochemistry Senior 

STROM. STEPHEN C White City 

Electrical Engineering Freshman 

STUBER DENNIS K. Kansas City 

Computer Science Junior 

STUCKY, JIM M Moundrldge 

Agricultural Economics Senior 

SUDERMAN, GLENN M . . Hillsboro 

Physical Education Sophomore 

SULLIVAN, JACK L Parsons 

Chemistry Senior 

TADE, JEFFREY A Medicine Lodge 

Journalism and Mass Communications . Sophomore 



Marlatt Hall — 401 



TOHER, JAMES D Little Falls, NY 

Architecture Junior 

TOYNE, MITCHELL B Topeka 

Engineering .... Freshman 

TRUMAN, CHRISTOPHER A. ... Valley Center 

Physical Education Freshman 

TRYON, MICHAEL D Marysville 

Business Administration Sophomore 

TYSON, JEFF A Olathe 

General Freshman 

VANPELT, REGINALD A Pierce City. MO 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

VIGNERON, RUSSELL D Hesston 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore 

WALDREN, DERYL E Tribune 

Journalism and Mass Communications Sophomore 

WALDREN, VERNON L Tribune 

Agriculture Economics Senior 

WALKER, LARRY Wlnfleld 

Industrial Engineering Senior 

WALKER, LONNIE J Johnson 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore 

WALKER, TERRY L Kansas City 

Music Education Junior 

WALTON, DAVID N Ellsworth 

Computer Science Senior 

WARD, KIRK L Waldo 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

WARREN, CLETUS J Des Moines, IA 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

WEAVER, TRACY E Wmfield 

Electrical Engineering Sophomore 

WEHLING RANDY L . . Hollenberg 

Milling Science and Management . Junior 

WEHRLY, MANFRED R ' Lenexa 

Mechanical Engineering Sophomore 

WEST, MICHAEL L . . , Medora 

Chemistry Engineering Freshman 

WICK, BRADFORD J Oakley 

Electrical Engineering Sophomore 

WIESNER. ROBERT J Concordia 

Civil Engineering Junior 

WILLHITE, CURTIS R Leon 

Agricultural Mechanization Freshman 

WILLHITE, MICHAEL Wellsvllle 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology Senior 

WILLIAMS, DAVID O Ulysses 

Social Sciences Senior 

WINGFIELD, GREG A McDonald 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology Sophomore 

WINTER, DAN H Columbus 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

WRIGHT, LARRY G Home 

Restaurant Management Junior 

YERBY, PHILS Overland Park 

Civil Engineering Senior 

ZAHN, MARTIN E Abilene 

Anthropology Senior 

ZIMMERMAN, JACK B Kansas City 

Building Construction Freshman 






fTloore Hall 



ALAMOUDI, KHALID AHMED Jeddah. Saudi Arabia 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

ALBERS. TREGAN P. Davenport. NB 

Pre-Velennary Medicine Freshman 

ALFINO. TONYF Overland Park 

Business Administration Junior 

ANDERSON. MICHAEL R Jamestown 

Business Administration Junior 

ANDERSON. REX M Wheaton. IL 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology . Freshman 

ATTEBERRY, DONALD G Tecumseh 

Veterinary Medicine Junior 

AUER. KIM El Dorado 

Family and Child Development Sophomore 

AYLWARD, JAYNE A Salina 

General Freshman 

BACH, REX C Jetmore 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Sophomore 

BARKER, EDWARD L Junction City 

Political Science Senior 

BARNES, JOHN W Kansas City 

History Senior 

BARGER. ROBERT E Madison 

General Freshman 

BARRERA, JOHN M Kansas City 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

BARTH, JEFFS Belleville 

Electrical Engineering Junior 

BAXTER, DARRELL J Clay Center 

Accounting Junior 

BEATY, JO A Leonardville 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Freshman 

BECKERDITE, ANN E Klngsdown 

Family and Child Development Senior 

BELL. ANTHONY W Albuquerque. NM 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Sophomore 

BELL. CYNTHIA A Wichita 

Business Administration Junior 

BENGTSON, KENNETH R Salina 

Mechanical Engineering Senior 

BERRA, RONALD J Bridgeton. MO 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

BLACKWOOD, SANDRA S Belleville 

Home Economics Extension Sophomore 

BLOOM, ADALEEA Clay Center 

General Sophomore 

BLUME.ANNM Sublette 

Accounting Sophomore 

BLUME, DEBRAD Scott City 

Accounting Junior 

BOECKER. PATRICIA I Parsons 

Fashion Marchandismg Junior 

BOWE, PETER S Stratford, CT 

Biology Senior 

BRANSGROVE, GENE . Liberal 

Agricultural Science Freshman 

BRECHEISEN, NEAL C Lyndon 

Business Management Sophomore 

BRENNAN. GEORGE L Huntington. NY 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Sophomore 






BRINK, LINDA J Tecumseh 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Sophomore 

BRUBAKER. STUART C Cortez, CO 

General Agriculture Freshman 

BRUNNER, TRACY L Ramona 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Freshman 

BRUNT, JANE E. Wall. N J 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Sophomore 

BULLOCK, ROBERT A Berryton 

Business Administration Senior 

BURTON, KENNETH R Wichita 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Sophomore 



BUTLER, BRADLEY J Eureka 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore 

CAMPBELL, JUDITH A Overland Park 

Architecture Senior 

CAMPBELL, MARC A Wichita 

Industrial Engineering Senior 

CAMPBELL, MICHAEL W Big Bow 

Geology Senior 

CAMPBELL, RONALD A Big Bow 

Pre-Pharmacy Freshman 

CAMPBELL, STEVEN G Ulysses 

Business Freshman 



CANTRELL, CANDY C Kansas City 

Computer Science Freshman 

CARR, ROB Prairie Village 

History Sophomore 

CASADY, PAUL S Hutchinson 

Animal Science and Industry Freshman 

CHELLGREN, STEVEN E Kansas City, MO 

Pre-Design Profession Junior 

CHENEY, CHARLENEL St Joseph, MO 

Architecture Fifth Year Student 

CHIPMAN, JAMES T Wichita 

Psychology , Graduate Student 



CHRISTENSEN. DENAR Maxwell, NB 

Foods and Nutrition Graduate Student 

CLARK, BRADLEY E Newton 

Business Administration Sophomore 

CLARY, CINDY L Hill City 

Interior Design Special Student 

CLAUS, RUSSELL S Baltimore, MD 

Speech Pathology Senior 

COLLINS. WANETTA L Kansas City 

Music Junior 

COLSON, CONNIE J Wheaton. IL 

Speech Pathology Freshman 



CONRAD, PATRICK B Gaylord 

Engineering Sophomore 

COOK, NIXIE M, Manhattan 

Business Administration Sophomore 

CORNELIUS. PATRICIA J Sidney. NB 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Freshman 

CREVISTON, DAVID A Overland Park 

Accounting Freshman 

CUNNINGHAM, CLAUDIA M Catoosa, OK 

Special Education Senior 

CURRIER, ROBERTA K Salina 

Family and Child Development Senior 



DANIELS, NORMAN E Lecompton 

General Freshman 

DAVILA, GASPAR M , Guaynabo. Puerto Rico 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Junior 

DAVIS, GARETH S Overland Park 

Engineering Freshman 

DENNIS, DANIEL L Meadville. MO 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

DETRICK, WILLIAM R Kansas City 

Music Education Junior 

DIETZ, RANDY F Satanta 

Business Administration Junior 



DIXON, MICHAEL E Junction City 

Journalism and Mass Communications Freshman 

DOUD. VICKIE A Wakarusa 

Home Economics Junior 

DRUMM, ROBIN D Bushfon 

Engineering Freshman 

DUERKSEN, LUETTA A Hlllsboro 

Horticulture Therapy Senior 

DUMLER, SYLVIA J Russell 

Physical Therapy Freshman 

EHLERS. BRUCE J Fori Atkinson, Wl 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 



ELDER, RODERIC L Arkansas City 

Architecture Junior 

EVANS, LINDA A Shawnee Mission 

Business Administration Freshman 

FAGAN, DAN J Benton 

Pre-Forestry Freshman 

FAGERAH. ADNAN H Meccah. Saudi Arabia 

Business Administration Sophomore 

FAWCETT, KIM M Ree Heights, SD 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Sophomore 

FELDHAUSEN, BRUCE A Frankfort 

Agricultural Engineering Senior 




404 — MooreHall 





FELDHAUSEN, JON R Frankfort 

Chemical Engineering Freshman 

FERRO, FRANKS Ottawa 

Pre-Vetermary Medicine Sophomore 

FETTER, ROXANNE Wathena 

Pre-Nursing Freshman 

FITCH, GREG K Caldwell 

General . Sophomore 

FORBES, LAURIE A Lawrence 

General Freshman 

FORREST, KEITH P. Oakdale, NY 

Pre-Vetermary Medicine Sophomore 

FOWLER, DON K McLouth 

Pre-Forestry Sophomore 

FOWLER. RONALD K McLouth 

Pre-Forestry Sophomore 

FRANKLIN, WAYNE L Wichita 

Political Science Sophomore 

FRASER. BARRY R Belleville 

Pre-Dentistry Freshman 

FRENCH, RUSSELL W Sublette 

Engineering Freshman 

FRIESEN, BRADW Inman 

Physical Education Junior 

GAHAGEN. ROBERT D McLean. VA 

Business Finance Freshman 

GARTEN. CASEY D Abilene 

Agricultural Engineering . . Freshman 

GARTEN. GARY F. Abilene 

Bakery Science and Management Freshman 

GENTRY. ROBERT H ' : pet a 

Pre-Vetennary Freshman 

GIANFORTE, THOMAS J Racine, Wl 

Microbiology Senior 

GILBERT. SCOTT A, Council Grove 

Business Administration Sophomore 

GODSEY, BRUCE F. ... Waterville 

Electrical Engineering Graduate Student 

GODSEY. JULIE A Waterville 

General . Freshman 

GOVERT, JULIE L Kingman 

Pre-Secondary Education Freshman 

GRAPENGATER, RICHARD B Newton 

Industrial Engineering Senior 

GRIMES, DEBORAHS Louisburg 

Nursing Junior 

GULLICKSON, MIKEW Shawnee 

Business Administration Sophomore 

HAHNER, BtTSY A Shawnee 

Home Economics Freshman 

HAMMERLE. BETTY J Piedmont 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Freshman 

HANSEN, NANCY J. Augusta 

Business Freshman 

HARRIS, JEAN A. Manhattan 

Medical Technology Freshman 

HAUSMANN, GARY J Butte. NB 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Sophomore 

HAVERKAMP, BRYCE F Elkhart 

Journalism and Mass Communications Sophomore 



Moore Hall — 405 



HAWN, RAYMOND B Eureka 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

HAYES. MONTE L Poplar Bluff, MO 

Bakery Science and Management Junior 

HENRY, FRANK J. Enterprise 

Pre-Vetermary Medicine Sophomore 

HETZEL, ARMAN D Elkhorn, Wl 

Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

HILL, CHARLES D Kansas City 

Electrical Engineering Sophomore 

HILL, JEFFREY C Bushton 

General Freshman 

HJETLAND. PEGGY L Everest 

Family and Child Development Junior 

HOFFMAN, GAROLD J Chapman 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

HOLL, DIANE K Great Bend 

Pre- Veterinary Medicine Sophomore 

HOPKINS, THOMAS L Washington 

Electrical Engineering Junior 

HOSHOR, BRUCE W Westboro, MO 

Milling Science Senior 

HUAMAN, ROSA I Topeka 

General Freshman 

HUMBERT, C ERIK Kansas City 

Landscape Architecture Junior 

HUSTEAD, DAVID R Leawood 

Pre-Vetermary Medicine Sophomore 

HUTCHERSON, DANNY A Salma 

Pre-Vetermary Medicine Sophomore 

JESPERSEN, JEAN M Hampton, IA 

English Graduate Student 

JOECKEL, STEVEN L Paola 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

JOHNSON, BRIAN W Fort Leavenworth 

Chemical Engineering Freshman 

JOHNSON, KRISTY M Oakland, NB 

Microbiology Senior 

JOHNSON, RICHARD L Waterville 

Business Administration Junior 

JOINER, DAVID L Overland Park 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

JONES, DENNIS R St. Louis, MO 

Music Education Senior 

JUDGE, PATTY Overland Park 

Clothing and Retailing Freshman 

KARNES, KATHLEEN K Lincoln, NB 

Fine Arts Freshman 

KAUTZ, MICHAEL G Atchison 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

KEALING, JAMES H Leawood 

Radio and Television Sophomore 

KETTER, DOROTHY W Meriden 

Clothing and Retailing Sophomore 

KING, PHILLIP N Kinsley 

Electrical Engineering Junior 

KLENDA, SUSANNA Marion 

Speech Pathology Junior 

KOLICH, MARGIE J .... Kansas City 

General ... Freshman 

KUCHEN, CHRIS L Leawood 

Mechanical Engineering Sophomore 

KUCZYNSKI, JOANN M Grosse Point Shores, Ml 

Pre-Vetermary Medicine Freshman 

LANE, MARY JO Belleville 

History Sophomore 

LEA, LESLIE C Kansas City 

Journalism and Mass Communications Freshman 

LEAVITT, WALLACE C Mound City 

Agronomy Junior 

LIND, DEBBIE D. Strong City 

Psychology Freshman 

LINDSHIELD, CHARLES A Smolan 

Electrical Engineering Freshman 

LINDSTEN. KAREN G Goodland 

Mathematics Freshman 

LJUNGDAHL, MARILYN Dodge City 

Family and Child Development Junior 

LOCKE, MARK A Arlington 

Chemical Engineering Junior 

LOEHR, CHRIS S Salina 

Radio and Television Freshman 

LOWERY, DENNIS M Overland Park 

Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

MANCE, THOMAS E Prairie Village 

Horticulture Sophomore 

MARTIN, DEBORAH L Garden City 

Psychology Junior 

MARTIN, GARY L Colorado Springs, CO 

Chemical Engineering Sophomore 

MARTINSON, CHERYL K Shawnee Mission 

English Senior 

MASSOTH, JOE J Yates Center 

Physical Science Freshman 

MATHIS, SAMUEL E Wichita 

Architecture Junior 




406 — Moore Hall 




MATLACK. TERRY C Clearwater 

General Freshman 

McCANDLESS, DOUGLAS C Sallna 

Computer Science Senior 

McCLINTOCK. WILLIAM G Louisburg 

Pre- Veterinary Medicine Junior 

McFEE, ROB R Atwood 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Freshman 

McGHEE, DAVID R Ellsworth 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Sophomore 

McGUGIN. TERRY C Dodge City 

Biology Junior 

MclNTYRE, ROBERT R Meadville. MO 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

MEISENHEIMER, JOHN P Pretty Prairie 

Agronomy Senior 

MELSON, CHRIS A. Potwin 

General Agriculture Freshman 

MIROCKE, ANNETTE C Shawnee 

Sociology Junior 

MISNER, JOANN Salma 

Fashion Design Freshman 

MOORE, GREGORY D Holton 

Accounting . . . Freshman 

MORRISON. DONALD P Scituate, Rl 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

MYERS, MELANIE L Lenexa 

Retail Floriculture Freshman 

NELSON, BRUCE A Holton 

General Freshman 

NELSON, CARLAD . .. . Goodland 

Family and Child Development Graduate Student 

NELSON, RONW Salma 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Freshman 

NELSON, WAYNE E Onawa, IA 

Agronomy Senior 

NOVOTNY, BRUCE J Winner, SD 

Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

OEHMKE, GARYD Linn 

Veterinary Medicine , Junior 

OGLE, LESLIE D. ., Harrold, SD 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Freshman 

QLBERDING. DANIEL J Olathe 

Engineering Freshman 

O'NEIL.JANEE . ., Newton. MA 

Animal Science and Industry , . . Junior 

OWEN, DAVID R Topeka 

Mechanical Engineering .... Freshman 

PARHAMOVICH, JEFFREY L Garlield Heights. OH 

Bakery Science and Management Freshman 

PASCHAL, MARK J Luray 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

PATRICK, CHRISTINE L Overland Park 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore 

PEAVLER, GARYD Topeka 

Biology Senior 

PEMBER, MARIANNE A. Ness City 

Animal Science and Industry . Freshman 

PENNY, BEVERLY A Lawrence 

Home Economics Freshman 

PERRY, RUTH A Wakarusa 

Home Economics Freshman 

PETERSON, BRADLEY D Topeka 

Nuclear Engineering Freshman 

PICKUP. CHERYL L Kansas City 

Art Freshman 

PIGG. SHERRY K Topeka 

Home Economics Junior 

POOLER, VAN E Greensburg 

Chemical Engineering Senior 

PRATT, TYLER P Eureka 

Business Administration Sophomore 

PRICE. AMY A. Fori Scott 

Home Economics Education . Sophomore 

PRICE, SUSAN B Overland Park 

Art Freshman 

PRINGLE. BARBARA A Topeka 

General Freshman 

PUGLIESE, JOSEPH Locust Valley. NY 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Freshman 

PULLIAM, GARY D Freeport 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore 

PUTNAM, JAMES C Newton 

Architecture Junior 

RECTOR, STEVEN P Leavenworth 

Music Education Freshman 

REHME, EDWIN L Elllnwood 

Electrical Engineering Senior 

REIMER, MICHAEL W Inman 

Accounting Senior 

RIEPL, GREG A Cimarron 

Physical Science Freshman 

ROBB, LORINDA L Overland Park 

Horticulture Therapy Sophomore 

ROBINSON, TOM A, Superior. NB 

General Sophomore 



Moore Hall — 407 



ROGERS, GLEN W McCune 

Civil Engineering Senior 

ROMIG, RONALD L Leavenworth 

Electrical Engineering Sophomore 

RUSSELL, STEVEN F Eureka 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore 

SADAUSKAS, JOHN W Kansas City 

Electrical Engineering Senior 

SAGER. KIMS Mission 

Pre-Education Freshman 

SAWYER, DOUG McPherson 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 



SCATES. RANDY L Eureka 

Physical Education Junior 

SCHIMPF. CHARLES W Woodbridge, NJ 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

SCHMIDT, SUSAN R Russell 

Family and Child Development Freshman 

SCHUL, JILL D Topeka 

Home Economics Freshman 

SCHWARZ, MICHAEL D Carlton 

General Engineering Freshman 

SCHWERTFEGER, DEEDRA Satanta 

General Sophomore 



SCHWERTFEGER, E, KELI Satanta 

Speech Pathology Junior 

SHAW, REBECCA L Kansas City 

Institutional Management Graduate Student 

SHEPARD, NANCY J Clearwater 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Freshman 

SHUMAN, DEBBIE A Salina 

Elementary Education Junior 

SIDIC, DINKA D Canberra, Australia 

History Sophomore 

SKOGLUND, GARY A Arkansas City 

Business Administration Senior 



SMITH, MARTI J Salina 

Interior Design Junior 

SNYDER, JEFFREY A Prairie Village 

General Freshman 

STAFFORD. MARK W Wichita 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

STANDING, JAMES M St Louis, MO 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

STAUFFER, JOHN R Emporia 

Radio and Television Junior 

ST CLAIR, CHRISTINE A Salina 

Biology Freshman 



STONECIPHER, GREG D Overland Park 

Nuclear Engineering Sophomore 

STRANEY, DOROTHY J Oskaloosa 

Family and Child Development Senior 

STROUPE, PHILLIP J Fort Atkinson, Wl 

Dairy Production Junior 

SULLIVAN, H, DAVID Prairie Village 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

SWAIN, LEILA G El Dorado 

Business Administration Freshman 

SWANSON, JOHN E Kansas City 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore 



THANAWONGRAT, VICHAI Bangkok, Thailand 

Civil Engineering Junior 

TOBALD, JOHN A Glasco 

Agronomy Junior 

TORRES, ABDON M Junction City 

Psychology Junior 

TUCKER, GREG A Wichita 

Civil Engineering Freshman 

UNGLES, RALPH L Satanta 

Geography Sophomore 

VACZI, JAMES A Overland Park 

General Freshman 



VANDAELE, STEPHEN W Spring Hill 

Business Administration Junior 

VANDERVORT, RANDY B Elkhart 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

VANDEWIELE, SCOTT J New Providence, NJ 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Sophomore 

VOEGELI, JOHN J Peck 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Junior 

WAGNER, ROGER K Wappingers Falls, NY 

Pre-Forestry Sophomore 

WALTERS, DELBERT A Langdon 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Freshman 



WARREN, THOMAS D Mason, Ml 

Pre-Law Senior 

WARRIOR, JOHN D Shawnee Mission 

Building Construction Senior 

WHISTON, KAREN A Kansas City, MO 

Fashion Design Junior 

WHITESELL, PAM Shawnee Mission 

Dietetics Senior 

WIENS, TERESA A. , Meade 

General Freshman 

WILCOX, DIANNE L.I Burlington 

Education Junior 



408 — Moore Hall 




WILDER, GREGG A Prairie Village 

Business Administration Sophomore 

WILEMAN, STANLEY .. . Texas City. TX 

Animal Science and Industry Graduate Student 

WILLIAMS, ALICE M Overland Park 

Home Economics Education Senior 

WILLIS, RODNEY D Sterling 

Agricultural Education Junior 

WILSON, PAUL R Burr Oak 

Accounting Sophomore 

WINFREY, RANDY Wichita 

Business Administration .... Freshman 

WINTER, CHARLES L Garden City 

Engineering . Freshman 

WOHLCKE, FREDERICK A Holslngton 

Civil Engineering Senior 

WOOLERY, SUSIE K Wichita 

Home Economics . . . Freshman 

ZARDA, LILLI A Kansas City 

General Freshman 




Moore Hall — 409 



Phi Delta Theta 



BURKHART, DORIS L Houseparent 

ANDERSON, JOHN M Garden City 

Business Administration Junior 

ANDERSON, PAT Topeka 

Business Administration Senior 

ARRIGHI, DAVID A Belolt 

Pre-Medlclne Senior 

BAY, RANDALL S Topeka 

Physical Education Freshman 

BEERS, RAY Topeka 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore 

BEINS, MAX A Shawnee Mission 

Building Construction Sophomore 

BENSON, JAY B Garden City 

Architecture Freshman 

BOL, DAVE G Leawood 

Electrical Engineering Sophomore 

BROADFOOT, JEFFREY A Olathe 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Sophomore 

BRUCE, ROBERT P. Shawnee Mission 

Pre-Medicine Sophomore 

CAMPBELL, JEFFREY A Topeka 

Radio and Television Freshman 

CREVISTON, JAMES M Topeka 

Social Science Senior 

DAWES, MICHAEL A Topeka 

Pre-Dentistry Sophomore 

DOSIEN, ANTHONY R Halstead 

Agricultural Mechanization Junior 

DOUGLASS, JASON J Ottawa 

General Freshman 

DUDLEY, MARK G Kansas City 

Accounting Senior 

ENGELS, GLENN M Rose Hill 

General Agriculture Freshman 

ERWINE, STAN W Garden City 

Business Management Freshman 

GALLUP, DONALD R. . . . Blue Rapids 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

GALLUP, GEORGE A Blue Rapids 

Business Administration Sophomore 

GRAY, DAVID C Overland Park 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Junior 

GREELEY, PAUL K West Lafayette, IN 

Architecture Freshman 

HALL, ROBERT F Topeka 

Accounting Senior 

HART, MICHAEL A Holland, Ml 

Business Freshman 

HOWARD, GREG W Kansas City 

Psychology Sophomore 

JENSEN, HOWARD A Holton 

Veterinary Medicine Senior 

JOHNSON, STEVEN D Salina 

Mechanical Engineering Junior 

KAUP, STEVE C Manhattan 

Business Administration Sophomore 

KEARNY, MICHAEL A . . Leawood 

Finance Sophomore 

KILLOUGH, JOHN E Ottawa 

Architecture Freshman 

LEGLER, DONA Overland Park 

Pre-Law Junior 

LEWIS, GREG K St. Johns 

Landscape Architecture Senior 

MESSALL, JOHN M El Dorado 

Political Science Junior 

MOEHLENBRINK, LARRY D Blue Rapids 

Radio and Television Sophomore 

MOORE, JEFFREY W Overland Park 

General Freshman 

MOSER, BRADLEY C Marysvllle 

Accounting Senior 

MOSER, JEFFREY C Marysville 

Business Management Sophomore 

MUSIL, DONALD E Blue Rapids 

Veterinary Medicine Sophomore 

NELSON, D. CRAIG . . . - Rose Hill 

Building Construction Junior 

NESBIT, TERRY L Topeka 

Secondary Education Senior 

NICHOLSON, WILLIAM G McPherson 

Business Administration Sophomore 

OLNEY, BRAD W Manhattan 

Pre-Medicine Junior 

OLNEY, BRENT E Manhattan 

Accounting Senior 

PARKER, RICHARD W Prairie Village 

Pre-Medicine Junior 

PATTON, LEWIS A Overland Park 

Pre-Medicine Sophomore 

REED. MICHAEL A Bucklin 

Agricultural Economics Freshman 

RUNGE. MARK S Garden City 

Horticulture Freshman 




410 — Phi Delta Theta 



SCHREIBER. JEFFREY A Wichita 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

SCHULER, ANDREW J Chapman 

Electrical Engineeung Fifth Year Student 

SCHULER, STEVEN J Chapman 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

SEATON, ALAN J Wichita 

Pre-Dentistry Freshman 

SLOAN, WAYNE R Manhattan 

Building Construction Senior 

SMITH, MARK E Ottawa 

General Freshman 

STAUFFER, WILLIAM H Topeka 

Business Freshman 

TUCKER, THOMAS C Carbondale 

Agricultural Engineering Freshman 

WATSON, DAVID E Manhattan 

Accounting Sophomore 




Phi Delta Theta — 411 



Phi Gamma Delta 



DUNCAN, HELEN M Houseparent 

ALLISON, DOUGLAS A Riverside, CA 

Building Construction Junior 

ANDERSON, RONALD G McPherson 

Electrical Engineering Freshman 

BAILEY, THOMAS F Mission 

Mechanical Engineering Senior 

BERVERT, TIM Topeka 

Business Freshman 

BOATWRIGHT, TODD Topeka 

History Freshman 

CAMPBELL. MICHAEL W Westmoreland 

Electrical Engineering Sophomore 

CARTER, DAN R El Dorado 

Political Science » Senior 

DAWDY, DAVE A Salina 

Economics Freshman 

EELLS, STEPHEN A Frankfurt, Germany 

Pre-Law Freshman 

FAY. RICHARD D, Topeka 

Architecture Sophomore 

HARRISON, PAUL D Shawnee Mission 

Business Junior 

HAUG, TOM L Abilene 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Freshman 

HELLMAN, JOHN E Manhattan 

Pre-Design Sophomore 

HERMAN, JOHN D Abilene 

Finance . . Sophomore 

JANSSEN. ROYCE C Little River 

Accounting Junior 

KENNEY, MARK E Topeka 

Political Science Sophomore 

KRUGER, JAY B Salina 

General Freshman 

LEE, DON D Manhattan 

Journalism and Mass Communications Sophomore 

LUSTGARTEN, ED H Overland Park 

Chemistry Sophomore 

MALLON, MICHAEL J Manhattan 

Business Administration Sophomore 

MORRIS, MICHAEL E Westmoreland 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Sophomore 

PAUSTIAN, DONALD Manhattan 

Family and Child Development Sophomore 

PFEILER, MARK K Topeka 

General Freshman 













A / Jb^2 



ROBSON, R MICHAEL . . Abilene 

Pre-Dentistry Sophomore 

ROME. DONALD L. . . Holcomb 

Agricultural Economics Junior 

RUFENER, JEFFL Abilene 

General Sophomore 

SEARS, LARRY L. Smith Center 

Finance Junior 

SHAW, WILLIAM D Prairie Village 

History Sophomore 

SMITH, RICHARD J Elliot, IA 

Physical Education Junior 

SMITH, ROD A Manhattan 

General Sophomore 

SWITZER, GREG C Abilene 

Radio and Television Senior 

UNDERWOOD, JAMES W Cottage Grove, OR 

Journalism and Mass Communications Freshman 

VANIER, JAYD Salma 

Radio and Television . ... Freshman 

WHITE. JEFFERYH Kansas City 

Business Administration Freshman 

WHITEHAIR, STEPHEN C Abilene 

Milling Science Sophomore 

WHITMER, MONTE W Zenda 

Animal Science and Industry . Junior 

WIETHARN, GARY E Clay Center 

Feed Technology Sophomore 

WILSON, GREG H. Abilene 

General Agriculture Freshman 

WILSON, MARKT Abilene 

Bakery Science and Management Sophomore 



Phi Gamma Delta — 413 



Phi Kappa Tau 



POWERS, ROBERTA I Houseparent 

ARNOLD. RICHARD L Overland Park 

Social Work Junior 

ARPIN, SIDNEY L Stockton 

Civil Engineering Sophomore 

BEEM, PATRICK K Manhattan 

Pre-Vetermary Medicine Freshman 

BOLTON, DANIEL W Wichita 

Chemical Engineering Junior 

CARPENTER, WILLIAM R Kansas City 

Psychology Senior 

CASE, TIMOTHY G Peoria, IL 

Pre-Medicine Freshman 

CHAFFEE, PAUL D Overland Park 

Economics Senior 

CHESTER, RON J Topeka 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

CHESTNUT, JON K Topeka 

Music Education Junior 

DILLMAN, DENNIS B Wichita 

Nuclear Engineering Freshman 

DONAHUE, MICHAEL E Shawnee Mission 

Building Construction Junior 

DUNTON, STEPHEN M Topeka 

Biology Freshman 

ELLIS, WALTER C Garden City 

Agricultural Economics Junior 

FINSON, KEVIN D Clay Center 

Earth Science Education Senior 

GERLAUGH, JAMES L Manhattan 

Social Work Freshman 

GORDON, DANIEL B Overland Park 

Forestry Freshman 

GUSTAFSON, MARK M Hastings, NB 

Theater Sophomore 

GUTIERREZ, RALPH Topeka 

Architecture Junior 

JOHNSON, DAVID B Overland Park 

Electrical Engineering Sophomore 

JONES. RICHARD P Overland Park 

Business Freshman 

JONES, ROBERT T Overland Park 

Architecture Junior 

JONES, TOM M Garden City 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

KORTE, GARY M Kansas City 

Business Administration Graduate Student 









4 f/ 
< I 




LAWSON, FORREST C Valley Center 

Applied Music Freshman 

LEONARD, JOHN E Leawood 

Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

LONG, KIETH A Leavenworth 

Natural Resources Management Freshman 

LOVE, DANIEL B Prairie Village 

Business Marketing Senior 

LUCK, RICHARD D Lyons 

Architecture Freshman 

MARTIN, RICHARD A Assarla 

Architecture Senior 

OLCOTT, ROBERT H Overland Park 

Architecture and Landscaping Freshman 

PALMBLADE. FREDDIE E Leoti 

Horticulture Junior 

PASSEN, PHILIP C Leawood 

Mechanical Engineering Sophomore 

PETRUSKY. ALBERT R Topeka 

Architecture Freshman 

PURSLEY, JAMES R Springfield, MO 

Dairy Production Senior 

REDDEN, MARTY G Gypsum 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

RIFFEL, LAWRENCE D Stockton 

Pre-Medlclne Senior 

SHOEMAKER, ROBERT S Kansas City, MO 

Architecture Senior 

SNYDER, MARK G Overland Park 

Civil Engineering Junior 

SPARKS, JOHN P Mexico, MO 

Architecture Sophomore 

STEIN, GREGORY L Gypsum 

Architecture Fifth Year Student 

TIMMCKE, DANA L Shawnee 

Architecture Freshman 

VENKER, STEPHEN J St. Louis, MO 

Architecture Senior 

WEBB, BRIAN K Prairie Village 

General Engineering Freshman 



Phi Kappa Tau — 415 



Phi Kappa Theta 



ARMOUR, JACK L Viola 

Agronomy Senior 

BEIER, RICHARD A Topeka 

Mechanical Engineering Senior 

BEIER, RONALD R Topeka 

Accounting Senior 

BERG, WILLIAM M Prairie Village 

Business Administration Freshman 

BIRCH, JOHN W Shawnee Mission 

Business Administration Freshman 

BORGERDING, DAVID G Marysville 

Accounting Freshman 

BORST. ROBERTA , Wichita 

Horticulture Freshman 

CAVLOVIC, TIMOTHY A Kansas City 

Sociology Senior 

DAVIS, JOHN F Kansas City 

Civil Engineering Freshman 

ERICKSON, MICHAEL V Council Grove 

Business Administration Sophomore 

ESTRADA, PETE J. Newton 

Sociology Sophomore 

FRANGIONE, KENNETH A W, Babylon, NY 

Landscape Architecture Sophomore 

FREDERICK, LARRY S Overland Park 

General Sophomore 

FREY, TIM C Shawnee Mission 

Biology Senior 

GUNZELMAN,LEOJ Sahna 

Nuclear Engineering Sophomore 

HASTERT, ART A Topeka 

Biology Freshman 

HEIER, KENDALL R Gralnfleld 

Accounting Senior 

HELLMER, DENNIS G Roeland Park 

Physics Freshman 

HELLMER. JOHN F Shawnee Mission 

Electrical Engineering Sophomore 

HENRY, STEPHEN L Gypsum 

Agricultural Economics Sophomore 

IRONS, STEPHEN M Prairie Village 

Agronomy Junior 

JILKA, JOHN P Assana 

Anthropology Junior 

KELLNER, TIMOTHY L Littleton, CO 

Chemical Engineering Junior 

KIMBLE, JAMES C Dodge City 

Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

KUHN, DAVID F Ellis 

Psychology Freshman 

KUHN, LEE V Manhattan 

General Sophomore 

LINENBERGER, STEVEN P Hays 

General Freshman 

LLAMAS, STEVE A Newton 

Accounting Sophomore 

LOW, KENDALL C Fowler 

Architecture Sophomore 

MILLER, STEVE L Prairie Village 

General Freshman 

MORGAN, TIMOTHY J Greeley 

Physical Education Junior 

MUCKENTHALER, MICHAEL J. Overland Park 

Accounting Junior 

MUDD, FLAVIAN G Gorham 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

MUDD, PATRICK P Gorham 

Agricultural Engineering Senior 

PREISSER, DON G Haven 

Agricultural Economics Freshman 

REDD, LAWRENCE R St, John 

Mechanical Engineering , . Junior 

REICHERT, LARRY , . , Hays 

Pre-Vetermary Medicine Sophomore 

ROSEWICZ, GARY P Kansas City 

Civil Engineering Sophomore 

RUDER, HARVEY Hays 

Building Construction Freshman 

SCHAFER, GREG A Pretty Prairie 

Pre-Vetermary Medicine Freshman 

SCHLETZBAUM, JAMES V Atchison 

Agriculture Engineering Junior 

SCHMIDT, PAUL C Hays 

Dairy Production Junior 

SCHMIDT, STEVEN P . . . Caldwell 

Agriculture Freshman 

SCHROEDER, RICHARD V Hays 

Architecture Senior 

SEILER, GUY M Mt Hope 

Accounting Sophomore 

SIGLER, HAROLD W Prairie Village 

Business Administration Sophomore 

SMITH, JOHN B St. Paul 

Chemical Engineering Senior 

SOLTIS, KEITH E Wichita 

Pre-Forestry Sophomore 




416 — Phi Kappa Theta 




J 





Ulifti 







? ^ '* " „ f y- ' • y i , , 

/It 

Jfc-"" 

f a, 

WALTERS, CHUCK I Hays 

Biology Senior 

3nr &Xmk WARNICA, CHARLES A Seneca 

f*!^. L J^^^^mk General Freshman 

1 • • ' m WEIXELMAN, PAUL L Menden 

J3^ JM ^ ^ i^P Physical Education Junior 

"/^^^^ WIESNER, THEODORE F. .. . Ellis 

J jl Chemical Engineering Junior 

fl ZIEGLER, HOWARD A Collyer 

: ^fl| Agricultural Business Freshman 

ZIEGLER. LOREN A Grainfield 

jB General . . Freshman 

ZIEGLER, RALPH P Gramtield 

Physical Education . . Junior 








Phi Kappa Theta — 417 



Pi Beta Phi 



GOHEEN. DELTA G Houseparent 

ADAIR, SALLY J Overland Park 

Interior Design Senior 

BARBER, MARJORIE . Anthony 

Pre-Nursing Junior 

BARNES, DEBBIE J Wichita 

Elementary Education Sophomore 

BEARDMORE, LUANNE Topeka 

Interior Design Junior 

BENIGNUS, SARAS Hoisington 

General Freshman 



BISAGNO, S. KAY Augusta 

Accounting Freshman 

BLINN, PEGGY L Pittsburgh. PA 

Speech Pathology Senior 

BOURK, JULES Leawood 

Art Senior 

BRADBURY, DANA A Topeka 

General Freshman 

BROWN, CATHARINE A Manhattan 

Home Economics Junior 

BRUCE, SUSAN E Wichita 

Elementary Education Senior 



BUTTON, AMY L Newton 

Political Science Junior 

CAMPBELL, BARBARA L Fairway 

Spanish Junior 

CAMPBELL, JANCY S Manhattan 

Art Senior 

CAMPBELL, SUSAN J Manhattan 

Pre-Dentistry Junior 

CHRISTEY, SUSAN R Topeka 

Special Education Freshman 

CLAASSEN, CATHY R Great Bend 

Speech Pathology Senior 



COOK, CAROL S Wichita 

Business Sophomore 

COTT, KAREN M Belle Plalne 

Family and Child Development Senior 

COVERT, CAROL A El Dorado 

Secondary Physical Education Sophomore 

DANNER, D'EARL H Manhattan 

Sociology Freshman 

DAVISSON, PATRICIA J El Dorado 

Interior Design Junior 

DECKNESS, PHYLLIS D Manhattan 

Speech Pathology Sophomore 



EATHERLY, LINDA L Garden City 

Elementary Education Sophomore 

EDDY, CAROLYN Hays 

Art Education Senior 

EDDY, JAN Hays 

Physical Education Freshman 

EVANS, KAREN G Eureka 

Speech Pathology Sophomore 

FISER, CAROL S Manhattan 

Fashion Merchandising Junior 

FREY, RUTH A Manhattan 

Fashion Design Freshman 



FROMME, DEBRAJ, . . Topeka 

Music Education Sophomore 

GANTZ, KATHRYN A Ness City 

Speech Education Senior 

GREEN, MARCIA B Newton 

Physical Education Freshman 

GUTZMAN, MISSY A Leawood 

Home Economics Freshman 

HARNESS, CONNIE R Coldwater 

Recreation Junior 

HARTMAN, CHERYL A Westport, CT 

Pre-Nursing Junior 



HECHT, JANET M Seneca 

Family Economics Senior 

HILL, SHERRI A Kansas City 

Spanish Sophomore 

HUTCHISON, MARLA S Hays 

General Freshman 

IRELAND, DEBORAH A Holton 

Recreation Junior 

KANCEL. ANITA M Kansas City 

General Freshman 

KELLY, KAREN L. . r Wichita 

Business Administration Senior 



KING, ANN C . . Bartlesville. OK 

Pre-Education Freshman 

KING, JOAN A Bartlesville, OK 

Clothing and Retailing Junior 

LINDGREN, DEBRAJ Prairie Village 

Architecture Junior 

LOUK. DEBORAM. Shawnee 

Modern Languages Sophomore 

LUTHI, ALLISON J Madison 

Journalism and Mass Communications Freshman 

LUTHI, JONIR Madison 

Recreation , . . Sophomore 



418 — Phi Beta Phi 





MAIN, JENNIFER L El Dorado 

Art Junior 

McCALEB, PAM A Wichita 

Interior Design Senior 

MclNTYRE, PEGGE A Coldwater 

General Freshman 

MEADE, SANDRA A. Wichita 

Physical Education Freshman 

MITCHELL, SHELLEY D Cassville, MO 

Social Work Freshman 

MORGAN, KIMBERLY A Salma 

Social Work Sophomore 



NELSON, JAN Overland Park 

Journalism and Mass Communications Senior 

PALENSKE, JEANNIE L Alma 

Retail Horticulture Sophomore 

PESHA, CYNTHIA R , Grand Island, NB 

Interior Design Junior 

PIERCE, JEANNE L Salma 

Pre-Dentistry Sophomore 

REISTER. MARGIE Prairie Village 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Freshman 

RIEDEL, BARBARA C Topeka 

General Freshman 



RITTER, TERESA M Salina 

Pre-Nursing Sophomore 

ROE, BARBARA I Superior, NB 

Textile Research Sophomore 

SALMON, DENISE A Manhattan 

Elementary Education Sophomore 

SCHAFER, JILL K Norton 

Pre-Nursing Junior 

SCHMIDT, CYNTHIA A Kansas City 

Clothing and Retailing Junior 

SCHROCK, JO A . . Kiowa 

Agriculture Freshman 



SHEIK, JULIE Bern 

Mathematics Freshman 

SMITH, LESLEE M Wichita 

Elementary Education Senior 

SMITH, LIZ S Wichita 

Secondary Education Sophomore 

SPARKS, KATHY L Shawnee Mission 

Physical Therapy Sophomore 

SURBER, HEID! M Eureka 

Music Education Freshman 

SWAFFORD, SHERI S Hutchinson 

Biology Sophomore 



Wichita 

Sophomore 

Leavenworth 

Sophomore 

Concordia 

Junior 



TIPPIN, KIMBERLY A 

Landscape Architecture 

TOLLEFSON, ANN C, 

General 

TOWNSEND, NANCY A 

Physical Therapy 

VANALLEN, BARBARA J Philhpsburg 

Art Junior 

VAN CLEAVE, JANET H . . Kansas City 

French Junior 

WELTSCH, SUSAN G Leawood 

Business Education Senior 



WHITEHEAD. LESLEY K Lincoln. NB 

Business Sophomore 

WIAN, DEBORAH E Ft. Riley 

Elementary Education Senior 



Pi Kappa Alpha 



JOHNSON, NORMA M Houseparent 

ADAMS, GARY L Concordia 

Civil Engineering Senior 

ADAMS, W. CLAY Overbrook 

Civil Engineering Senior 

ARCHER, DOUG K Garnett 

Art Sophomore 

BURRIS. JEFF K Garnett 

Business Administration Sophomore 

CARR, JEFFREY A Wichita 

Pre-Nursing Junior 

CLESS, GARY C Prairie Village 

Horticulture Freshman 

CLESS, STEVE E Prairie Village 

Radio and Television Junior 

CORMAN, RICHARD W Wichita 

Accounting Freshman 

CORY, SCOTT E Wichita 

Veterinary Medicine Senior 

COX, HAROLD K Shawnee Mission 

Pre-Medicine Junior 

COYLE, MICHAEL D Overland Park 

Horticulture Junior 

CROFOOT, JAMES W Cedar Point 

Business Administration Sophomore 

DAVISSON, STANLEY P Mission 

Accounting Junior 

DRAKES, THOMAS M Prairie Village 

Business Freshman 

ELMER, DANA G Overland Park 

Pre-Medicine Junior 

FARRELL, MICHAEL W Chanute 

Electrical Engineering Senior 

GRIFFITH, EDWARD L Marion 

Business Sophomore 

HIPPS, ALAN H Wichita 

English Junior 

JOHNSON, ROBERT P Kansas City 

Parks and Recreation Management Senior 

JOHNSTON, JERRY D Concordia 

Building Construction Sophomore 

JONES, ALBERT R Stanley 

Commercial Art Junior 

JONES, JAMES C Stanley 

Commercial Freshman 

KEEGAN, ROBERT M Leawood 

Political Science Junior 

LAIR, GREGORY D Piqua 

General Agriculture Freshman 

LOGAN. THOMAS D Maple Hill 

Building Construction Junior 

LORENZ, MARTIN J Wichita 

General Freshman 

LYLE, DWIGHT R Overland Park 

Building Construction Junior 

MARKEE, JAMES M Franklin, MA 

Business Administration Junior 

McARTHUR, WEST K Salina 

Business Administration Freshman 

McGREW, ROBERT L lola 

Business Administration Junior 

McNITT, JAY D Ulysses 

Architecture Freshman 

METZLER, BRADLEY D Dover 

Architecture Sophomore 

MILLARD, ROBERT B Prairie Village 

Accounting Senior 

MILLS, BRIAN J Russell 

Business Freshman 

NEIGHBORS, DAVID C Olathe 

General Freshman 

NEIGHBORS, MARK S Olathe 

Business Junior 

NELSON, GARY A Chanute 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

NICHOLS, LAURENCE E Leawood 

Business Freshman 

PEPPERDINE. RONALD D Kansas City 

Bakery Science and Management Sophomore 

PUCKET, STEVEN K Ulysses 

Agriculture Freshman 

SANDERS, DOUGLAS K Concordia 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

SANDERS, RICHARD M Concordia 

Business Junior 

SAUNDERS, MITCH S Minneapolis 

Business Administration Sophomore 

SCHLICHT, MARK R Prairie Village 

Economics Junior 

SEITZ, RICHARD M Ft Bragg, NC 

General Freshman 

SHORT, FREDRICK W Kansas City 

Pre-Medicine Senior 

SINGER. PHIL B Garnett 

Business Junior 




420 — Pi Kappa Alpha 



SIPES, MARTIN J Russell 

Business . . . . Sophomore 

STANIFORTH, CHRISTOPHER J Leawood 

General Freshman 

STUBBLEFIELD, ROBERT L Rockporl, MO 

Architecture Sophomore 

TAYLOR, THOMAS E Prairie Village 

Civil Engineering Junior 

TOWELL, MICHAEL S. . Kansas City 

Marketing Junior 

WHIPPS, MICHAEL D Garnett 

Architecture . Junior 

WHITE, TRACY M Concordia 

Chemical Engineering ..Freshman 

WINDHORST. DANA J Wells 

Pre-Medicine Sophomore 

WINDHORST, DAVE A Wells 

Computer Science Senior 

ZAHN, THOMAS F Overland Park 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 




Pi Kappa Alpha — 421 



Putnam 



BURK, DANIEL J McDonald 

Electrical Engineering Senior 

DUPV, DWIGHT D Sallna 

Electrical Engineering Senior 

ALLISON. PAMELA D Basehor 

Home Economics Extension Sophomore 

ANDERSON, JUDITH L Windom 

Interior Design Junior 

ANKERHOLZ, SONYA G Lyons 

Home Economics Education Senior 

ATTERBURY, RUTH A Kansas City 

Accounting Junior 

AUST, ELIZABETH D Wichita 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

BAKER, JUDY E Humboldt 

Finance Senior 

BARNETT, CAROL J Wichita 

Foods and Nutrition Junior 

BELL, MARLYS J Kansas City 

Physical Therapy Junior 

BILLINGTON. JANNA S Wichita 

Home Economics Freshman 

BLANKINSHIP, JAN B Wichita 

Fashion Design Freshman 

BLINZLER, CAROL A Kansas City 

Special Education Junior 

BOCK, BARBARA J Overland Park 

Clothing and Retailing Senior 

BRYON, DIANA M Kansas City 

Home Economics Education Junior 

BURGDORFER, JANET L Gardner 

Foreign Languages Freshman 

CALLAHAN, ANGELA M Holton 

Dietetics Freshman 

CANNAN, S. GAIL Pratt 

Clothing and Retailing Junior 

CARNAHAN, PEGGY J Shawnee Mission 

Family and Child Development Junior 

CARPENTER, SHERA V Kanorado 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

CHISM, SABRINA A Claflin 

General Sophomore 

CLOPPSE, JOAN M Brooklyn, NY 

Special Education Junior 

CREWS, CAROL G Kansas City 

Family and Child Development Junior 

CULP, ANITA E Hesston 

Biology Senior 

DALTON, CYNTHIA D Kansas City 

Journalism and Mass Communications Junior 

DAVIS, DARCY J DeSoto 

Home Economics Education Sophomore 

DENNETT, DEBBY A Wichita 

Extension Senior 

DICKSON, DEBORA A Stafford 

Home Economics Freshman 

DUSIN, ANN M Phillipsburg 

Accounting Junior 

EICHHORN, CONNIE M Salina 

Physical Education Sophomore 

FARRELL, PATRICIA A Frankfort 

General Freshman 

FEE, SUZANNE L Stilwell 

Physical Therapy Freshman 

FERRIS, CONNIE A Kansas City 

Business and Marketing Junior 

FUESSLE, RHONDA C Overland Park 

Family Economics *. Senior 

FUNDIS, ROXANNA M LeRoy 

Music Freshman 

FURSMAN, ROXANNE E Colony 

History Education Senior 

GEORGE, DELMA L Sublette 

Social Work Freshman 

GERAGHTY, SUSAN E Lenexa 

General Freshman 

GOFF, JANET A Olathe 

American History Sophomore 

GOODRICH, TRACY J Olathe 

General Sophomore 

GRAVES, SHARON K Greensburg 

Elementary Education Junior 

GRIFFITH, SUSAN L Walton 

Radio and Television Junior 

HAMMEKE, MARY E New Providence, NJ 

Electrical Engineering Freshman 

HAMMONS, AMY L Fort Scott 

Natural Resources Management Sophomore 

HANSON, MARGARET A Leavenworth 

Accounting Sophomore 

HARDMAN, JAN E Hill City 

Dietetics and Institutional Management Freshman 

HART, DIANNEL Prairie Village 

Modern Languages Sophomore 

HAWK, DEBORAH A lola 

Journalism and Mass Communications Sophomore 




422 — Putnam Hall 





HAYS, LINDA S Natoma 

Pre-Elementary Education Freshman 

HEIKES, JANICE K ..Riley 

General Freshman 

HEITSCHMIDT, DIANE K Scott City 

Home Economics Junior 

HESS, JAN L Scott City 

Early Childhood Education Sophomore 

HIGGS, DEBRA S Topeka 

Chemical Engineering Freshman 

HILTZ, SUSAN M Brookfield. Wl 

Computer Science Sophomore 

HOECKLE, CHERYL L Montpelier, ND 

Clinical Dietetics Sophomore 

HOFFMAN. PAMELA E . Claflin 

Interior Design , Sophomore 

HUNT, MELODY J. Prairie Village 

Clothing and Retailing Sophomore 

ISENHOWER, DANA J Harper 

Interior Design Junior 

JAHNKE, DEBRA A Topeka 

Education Freshman 

JILKA, ROSEM . Assaria 
Retail Floriculture Freshman 

JOHNSON, LINDA K Assaria 

Horticulture Junior 

JOHNSON, SHARON D Assaria 

Elementary Education Junior 

JOLLY, SAMONE L Trenton, NJ 

Elementary Education Senior 

KALLENBACH, SUSAN L Valley Center 

Home Economics Freshman 

KARLIN, DEANNA M Salma 

Pre-Dentistry Freshman 

KELLEY, SHANNA L Overland Park 

Secondary Education Junior 

KIRN, CYNTHIA A Minneapolis 

Pre-Nursing Sophi irrv ire 

KOCH, PAULA R Scott City 

Lite Science Senior 

KOCOUR, BARBARA A Wichita 

Biology Sophomore 

KRAMER, JOYCE M. Kansas City 

Computer Science Sophomore 

KRAUSE, ROBINS . . . Modoc 

Foods and Nutrition Freshman 

KRAUSE, STARLA J Modoc 

Consumer Interest Sophomore 

KREMPA, ELLEN M Eden. NY 

Home Economics Extension Freshman 

KROUPA, JONI C Marion 

Music Education Freshman 

KYLE, SONDRA S Norwich 

Elementary Education Senior 

LOHKAMP, DEEDRAA Wichita 

Elementary Education Sophomore 

LANDIS, LAURA L Kansas City 

Architecture Freshman 

LaROSH, KYE LYN Natoma 

Spanish Junior 



Putnam Hall — 423 



LEEBRICK, LINDA C Atwood 

Art Education Senior 

LEHNER, PAMELA J Shawnee 

Dietetics Junior 

MACKEY, CHERYL A Topeka 

Accounting Senior 

MAGGARD, CAROL J Lacrosse 

General Sophomore 

MAI, MELODEEA Russell 

Animal Science and Industry Freshman 

McCANN, NANCY J . .. Gardner 

Horticulture Sophomore 

McCRANER. CAROL Overland Park 

Family and Child Development Sophomore 

McCREIGHT, JANE El Dorado 

General Freshman 

McGREW. RUTH A lola 

General Freshman 

MclVER, KRISTINE L Topeka 

General . Freshman 

McMAHON, RENEE M Overland Park 

General . Freshman 

McNEILL, ANNA L Arlington, VA 

Home Economics Extension Freshman 

MEALY, DENISE K Scott City 

Biology Freshman 

MEZGER, DENAE Wichita 

Civil Engineering Junior 

MIERAM, CONSTANCE L. Wichita 

Business Administration Sophomore 

MILLER. MARCIA A Claflin 

Family and Child Development .... Sophomore 

MILLHOUSE. NANCY K Kansas City 

Special Education Junior 

MILLION, EILEEN Phillipsburg 

Clothing and Retailing . . Sophomore 

MITCHELL, MARLENE K Frankfort 

General Freshman 

MITTS, KATHLEEN A Bonner Springs 

Horticulture Therapy Sophomore 

MOORE, DEE A Ulysses 

Computer Science Sophomore 

MORRIS, PAM L Topeka 

General Freshman 

MURPHY, NANCY J Overland Park 

General Freshman 

MURRILL. CYNTHIA A Humboldt 

Physical Science Junior 

NIVENS. MARY D Lenexa 

Business Freshman 

NOLL. JANET L. . . . Winchester 

Journalism and Mass Communications Freshman 

OLSON, CONNIE J Oberlin 

Home Economics Freshman 

PARCEL, PENNIEE Coldwater 

Music Education Freshman 

PETERSON. CHERYL L . . Bridgeport 

Family and Child Development Junior 

PETERSON, CINDY M Assaria 

Early Childhood Education Sophomore 

PFOST, OLINDA G Medicine Lodge 

Home Economics Junior 

PICKLER, SUSAN K Ulysses 

Journalism and Mass Communications Junior 

PRESTON, CAROLYN P Kansas City 

Political Science Sophomore 

RAMSDALE, JANELLE S McPherson 

Journalism and Mass Communications Sophomore 

RANDOLPH, RITA J Pratt 

Accounting Junior 

REDD, RHONDA S, Sublette 

Clothing and Retailing Freshman 

ROBB, CYNTHIA K Kansas City 

General Junior 

ROE. SUE A" Olathe 

Medical Technology Sophomore 

ROESCH, CAROLEE S. . Overland Park 

Elementary Education Junior 

ROTH, CHERIE M, Clay Center 

Family and Child Development Sophomore 

SABATKA, JANIECE M Atwood 

Modern Languages Freshman 

SANDS, DEBORAH A Wichita 

Clothing and Retailing Freshman 

SCHROEDER. CONNIE J Inman 

Physical Therapy Sophomore 

SHAUGHNESSY, TERESA J Oberlin 

Political Science . . . Freshman 

SIEMSEN, DEBRA K. Olathe 

Family and Child Development Junior 

SLOOP, SANDRA K Winchester 

English Junior 

SMITH, BECKY A Wichita 

Clothing and Retailing Freshman 

SMITH, SUSAN E Kansas City 

Elementary Education Junior 




424 — Putnam Hall 



SPARE, DONNA J St John 

Pre-Medicme Sophomore 

SPECHT, SUSAN L Overland Park 

Home Economics Junior 

SPRATT, PATTI J Leawood 

Accounting Sophomore 

STEFFENHAGEN, SUE A Overland Park 

Business Administration Freshman 

STEPHENSON, NANCY M Salina 

Music Junior 

STRADER. ELAINE E. . . . Wichita 

Home Economics Sophomore 



STRAND, CONSTANCE Leavenworth 

Journalism and Mass Communications Freshman 

SWINGLE, DIANE K Zenda 

Music Education Senior 

TIDEMANN. JEAN V Valley Center 

Horticulture Sophomore 

TRAYER, DEAUN K Garden City 

Mechanical Engineering Senior 

TURNER, KIMBERLY J Topeka 

General Freshman 

TWADDELL, JANET L Mission 

Family Economics Junior 



VanTASELL, DEBRA S I )e< tc 

Family Economics Sophomore 

VOGTS, JOAN D Girard 

Clothing and Retailing Freshman 

VOILES, DENISE A Shawnee 

Psychology Sophomore 

VULGAMORE, LINDA L Shallow Water 

Pre-Home Economics Education Freshman 

WALKER, LESLIE A Kansas City 

Psychology Sophomore 

WERNER, LISA M Merriam 

Business Administration Sophomore 



WEST, KAREN A Kansas City 

Foods and Nutrition Junior 

WILLIAMS, SHERRY L. . Kansas City 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Junior 

WOHLER, BECKY L Wichita 

Clothing and Retailing Freshman 

WOMACK, NANCY D lola 

Interior Design Junior 

WRIGHT, CATHERINE I Liberal 

Horticulture Senior 

YAUSSI, DEBBIE R . Wichita 

Medical Technology . . .Sophomore 



ZINK, JANITA M Parsons 

Interior Design Senior 




Sigma Alpha Epsilon 



FOSBERG, KATHRYN H Houseparent 

BEAGLE, BARRY T Topeka 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

BERKE, JEFFREY H Leavenworth 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

BEYMER, ROBERT K Lakin 

Business Administration Freshman 

BISHOP, BARRY W Independence 

Accounting Junior 

BREWER, STEVEN R Manhattan 

Business Administration Freshman 



BURGER, LONNIE R Bridgeport 

Agricultural Economics Freshman 

BURROW, JOEL M Topeka 

Architecture 5th Year Student 

CHANDLER, CHARLES Q Wichita 

Business and Finance Senior 

CONNELL, JOHN J Shenandoah, IA 

General Freshman 

DARLAND. KIRK L Manhattan 

Physical Education Sophomore 

DAWSON, JOHN G Medicine Lodge 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Sophomore 



DEVORE, PAUL C Independence 

Mechanical Engineering Junior 

DYKSTRA, MICHAEL A Atchison 

Business Administration Freshman 

ELDER, KENT E Mulvane 

Pre-Medicine Freshman 

ERNST, JACK R Manhattan 

Building Construction Junior 

ESTILL, BRADFORD W Arkansas City 

Mechanical Engineering Junior 

ETLING, JAMES B Garden City 

Pre-Medicine Sophomore 



EUBANK, JAMES W Coats 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Junior 

GARVERT, TERRY J, . Plainville 

Feed Science and Management Junior 

GILLETTE, CURT J Paola 

Journalism and Mass Communications Junior 

HAGEN, JIM E Shawnee Mission 

General Freshman 

HALE. STEVEN C Lawrence 

Journalism and Mass Communications Junior 

HATFIELD, JOHN R El Dorado 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 



HATTAN, MICHAEL A Concordia 

Pre-Optometry Freshman 

HAYES. ROBERTA Manhattan 

General Freshman 

HEAD. KEVIN L Manhattan 

General Freshman 

HEALY, MARK J Manhattan 

Business Administration Sophomore 

HEROLD, DON Parsons 

Architecture Junior 

HOPPAS, DOUGLAS W Lakin 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 



HUGHES, JEFFREY D Manhattan 

Business Administration Junior 

INGRAM, STEVE W Overland Park 

Physical Education Junior 

JANOUSEK, JACK R Ellsworth 

General Junior 

JONES, DAVID E Arkansas City 

Mechanical Engineering Junior 

JONES, RONALD P Mulvane 

Finance Sophomore 

KITE, EDWARD K St, Francis 

Business Administration Junior 



KUNZ, BOB Prairie Village 

Psychology Senior 

KUNZ, MICHAEL . Prairie Village 

Journalism and Mass Communications Junior 

LACY, STEPHEN M Shawnee Mission 

Accounting Junior 

LADNER, ROBIN A Topeka 

Wildlife Biology Freshman 

MARIETTA, JAMES R Salina 

General Freshman 

MARTIN, R CRAIG Overland Park 

Pre-Law Freshman 



McCUNE, GREG A Plainville 

Agricultural Journalism Junior 

MEITNER, JOHN T Lenexa 

Agricultural Economics , Junior 

MILLER. MARK W Topeka 

Mechanical Engineering Freshman 

MILLER, THOMAS E Atchison 

Business Administration Freshman 

NITZSCHKE, KEVIN J Atchison 

Electrical Engineering Freshman 

OTT, KENT A Mulvane 

Agricultural Economics Sophomore 




426 — Sigma Alpha Epsilon 







PARKER, LANDON K Atchison 

Landscape Architecture Freshman 

PIKE, ROBBI D. . . . . Ashland 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore 



RANKIN, MILTON R 
Pre-Veterinary Medicine 
ROBERTS, ROY C. 
Mechanical Engineering 

SANTEE, RAYL 

Architecture 



Ashland 
Freshman 

Ashland 
Freshman 

Parsons 
Sophomore 



SCHAID, TIM A Independence 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology Senior 



SCHUST, JAY E Leawood 

Electrical Engineering Junior 

SHAW, WILLIAM K Ashland 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

STEELE, ROBERTA Girard 

General Sophomore 

STEPHENS, DONALD D. . Ashland 

Agricultural Economics Junior 

TOBLER, JEFFREY E. . . Olathe 

Nuclear Engineering Freshman 

WEIR, RICK R Geuda Springs 

Industrial Engineering Junior 



WHITE, MARK S Leawood 

Business Administration Senior 

WORNOM. JOHN L, Chandler, OK 

Agricultural Economics Freshman 




Sigma Chi 

ATLAKSON, KEVIN K Atchison /^^^. 

Pre-Dentislry . Sophomore /« Bk 

BARBER, CHESTER I Anthony m&£m 

Life Sciences Freshman 'a**' **"*• 

BAUER. GARY B Wichita i 4 

Business Administration Sophomore "C 

BROWN. MICHAELS Liberal p 

Business Administration Junior 

BUEHLER, MITCHELL B Great Bend 

Business Administration . . Junior 

COOPER, KENT C Overland Park 

Mechanical Engineering Senior / 

'• 

COTT, JEFFREY J Belle Plaine 

Radio and Television Freshman 

DOBRATZ, STEPHEN R Belolt 

Economics Senior 

EASTER, RICHARD C Raytown, MO 

Architecture Freshman 

EDGAR, ALAN R Colby 

Architecture Sophomore 

EISENHUTH, G. SCOTT Aurora, IL 

Journalism and Mass Communications Senior 

FLICK, JOHN W Winfield 

Forestry Freshman 

FOLKERTS, DON A Great Bend 

Accounting Junior 

FOX, LARRY D Larned 

Accounting Junior 

HARMON, DAVID P, Wichita 

Business Administration Sophomore 

HAUBER, JAMES E Winfield x • . 

Forestry Junior 

HAVENS, JOHN H Olathe 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Sophomore 

HENLEY, MARK E Topeka 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Freshman 

HEUERMANN.PAUL A . .... Prairie Village 

Geophysics Freshman 

HOFFMAN, STEVEN J Kansas City 

Business Management Junior 

HONER, STEVEN L Atchison 

Radio and Television Freshman 

JACOBSON, STEPHEN B Wamego 

Architecture Freshman 

JONES, REX A Wichita 

Business Administration Freshman 

KNOPICK, THOMAS J Wichita 

Forestry Freshman 

LaPLANTE, D. KIRK Manhattan 

Bakery Science and Management Senior 

MACH, SCOTT W Peoria, IL 

General Freshman 

MANN, JOHN J Dodge City 

Mechanical Engineering Senior 

MANRY, JOHN R Larned 

Agriculture Economics Sophomore 

MARKEY, DOUGLAS B Lake Quivira 

General Freshman 

MARSH, WALLACE A Prairie Village 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology . . Sophomore 



428 — Sigma Chi 






McCOY, MICHAEL D Manhattan 

Pre-Medicine Freshman 

MORRISON. KILE R Wichita 

Architecture Junior 

NEUMAYER, ROBERT T Manhattan 

Biology Graduate 

PALMA, PHILIP F Topeka 

Pre-Medicine Freshman 

PARKER, ROBERT W Glen Elder 

Business Administration Sophomore 

PARSONS, DAVID C Wmtield 

Pre-Dentistry Freshman 

PATRICK, J BRIAN Pittsburg 

Business Administration Sophomore 

PERKY, DAVID W Leawood 

Accounting , Junior 

PETERS. MATTHEW W Wichita 

Finance - Junior 

RADEN, DAVID T Overland Park 

Accounting Senior 

REED, LAWRENCE D Prairie Village 

Pre-Medlclne Senior 

REIHER, JEFFRY D Overland Park 

Architecture Senior 

ROE, GARY G. Stafford 

Accounting Sophomore 

ROE, KEITH E Mankato 

Economics Junior 

ROEDER. H MICHAEL Peoria, IL 

Landscape Architecture Sophomore 

SKOOG, PETER R Topeka 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Freshman 

STUCKEY, D SCOTT Junction City 

Architecture Junior 

WRIGHT, LEE E Overland Park 

Journalism and Mass Communications Senior 



Sigma Chi — 429 



Sigma Nu 



BERNING. GARY L Marienthal 

Agricultural Economics Junior 

BERNING, LARRY A Marienthal 

Business Junior 

BOLIN, PATRICK J Overland Park 

Business Administration Senior 

BROTTON, LESLIE E Salina 

Mechanical Engineering Freshman 

COPE, JOHN M Leawood 

Pre-Medicine Freshman 

CRAWFORD, JEFF A Shawnee Mission 

Business Administration Sophomore 

DAHLSTROM, GEORGE H Topeka 

Accounting Junior 

DEBRICK, RON D Garnett 

Business Administration Junior 

DOERING, MICHAEL C Garnett 

Accounting Senior 

DOLLIVER, MARK T Leawood 

Business Administration Sophomore 

DUNN, MARC T St. Louis, MO 

Pre-Oentlstry Senior 

EAGLETON, MARK S Salina 

Business Administration Sophomore 

EHRHARD, MARK O Kansas City, MO 

Speech Senior 

FAIRCHILD, KIPP C Kansas City, MO 

Architecture Senior 

FELDMANN, JOHN C Overland Park 

Journalism and Mass Communications Senior 

GRIEVES, BRAD A Topeka 

General Freshman 

GRIEVES, KEVIN D Topeka 

Business Administration Junior 

HAX, CHRIS M Prairie Village 

Business Administration Sophomore 

HILLS, SCOTT W Sedan 

General Freshman 

IVES, RANDY G Salina 

Business Administration Freshman 

KUHN, KARL E Prairie Village 

Economics Senior 

LAW, ROBERT S Kansas City, MO 

Architecture Senior 

LOUGHARY, STEVEN J Topeka 

General Freshman 

MARIETTA, JOHN C Salina 

General Sophomore 





430 — Sigma Nu 





MILLER, RICHARD W Marlenlhal 

Business Administration Senior 

NORTON, WILLIAM B Haven 

Nuclear Engineering Freshman 

PATTON, WILLIAM R Troy 

Business Finance Junior 

POWELL, WILLIAM R Tampa, FL 

Elementary Education Senior 

PUKACH, WALTER S Topeka 

Civil Engineering Sophomore 

RILL, WILLIAM A Topeka 

Natural Resource Management Freshman 



RINNER, JOHN A Topeka 

Building Construction Freshman 

SCHRAG, LOREN R. . . Moundndge 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

STRATHMAN, KURT A Topeka 

Mechanical Engineering Freshman 

SUTLICK, ALBERT F Kansas City 

Wildlife Biology Senior 

TRAPP, TIMOTHY M Overland Park 

Architecture Sophomore 

TWIETMEYER, STEVEN F Goddard 

Pre-Dentistry Sophomore 



WEBSTER. RANDALL B Osawatomie 

Architecture Sophomore 

WINCHESTER. RICK M Thousand Oaks, CA 

Recreation Junior 

WITTMER, DOUG K Topeka 

Business Administration Senior 

WOOLDRIDGE, BARRY J Prairie Village 

General Freshman 

ZIMMERMAN. DAVID K Salina 

Electrical Engineering : . Junior 



Sigma Nu — 431 



Sigma Phi Epsilon 



AICHER. ERIC L Eureka 

Building Construction Freshman 

AMES, RODNEY . . Leoti 

Agriculture Freshman 

ARENSDORF, JERRY Dodge City 

Accounting Senior 

AVERILL, SCOTT G Kansas City 

Business Sophomore 

BAUCK, JERALDL. ... Leoti 

Electrical Engineering Sophomore 

BIRD, RONALD D Wichita 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman 



BISHOP, EVERETT D Bonner Springs 

Building Construction Sophomore 

BONY, PAUL S Overland Park 

Agronomy Freshman 

BOURK, GIB P Kansas City, MO 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

BRADLEY, RICK W Shawnee 

Park and Recreation Management Sophomore 

BUTTON, DANIEL J Newton 

Pre-Forestry Freshman 

CARLSON, RANDALL A Valley Center 

Business Sophomore 



CONVERSE, M WAYNE Eskridge 

Agricultural Economics Graduate Student 

CRIST, RAYMOND J Garden City 

Agricultural Economics Junior 

DIERKS, CHARLES C Leoti 

Business Sophomore 

FREES, JERRY L Great Bend 

Agricultural Economics Junior 

GERSTBERGER, JOSEPH F Leoti 

Agricultural Business Sophomore 

GILKISON, KEVIN C Manhattan 

Building Construction Senior 



GLASCO, CALVIN J Goodland 

Agriculture Freshman 

GOLDSBERRY, CARTER V Manhattan 

Radio and Television Sophomore 

GRAFF, JOHN F Marienthal 

Agricultural Education Junior 

GREENLEE, JOHN W Scott City 

Architecture Sophomore 

HATCHER, BRYAN C Goodland 

Agricultural Economics Junior 

HERSCHELL, SCOTT E Kansas City 

Pre-Medicine Junior 



HUGHES, TIMOTHY J Leoti 

General Freshman 

JOHNSON, ROBERT R Garden City 

Architecture Junior 

JOYCE, PATRIC L Garden City 

Mechanical Engineering Senior 

JOYCE, REX M Garden City 

Chemistry Freshman 

KLEIN, STEPHEN M Kansas City 

General Freshman 

LEVY, DAVID S Coffeyvllle 

Architecture Senior 



LUEBBERS, JEROME L Marienthal 

Agriculture Freshman 

LUTTRELL, CURTIS Great Bend 

General Freshman 

LYON, TIMOTHY Overland Park 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

McDONALD, JAMES P Scandia 

Business Junior 

McMANUS, DAVID M Kansas City 

Business Senior 

MEARS, TIMOTHY P Topeka 

Physical Therapy Freshman 



METHENEY, LARRY A Garden City 

Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

MOLINA. ROBERT L Kansas City, MO 

Accounting Junior 

MOOTS, CRAIG K Eureka 

Plant Pathology Freshman 

NEDERMAN, JEFF A Overland Park 

Marketing Sophomore 

NELSEN, KIRK Leawood 

Engineering Freshman 

NIEDEREE, MICHAEL C Great Bend 

Veterinary Medicine Junior 



OWEN, GREG D Sallna 

Radio and Television Senior 

PHILLIPS, GREGG W Mission Hills 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Sophomore 

REID, WILLIAM M Topeka 

Pre-Law Freshman 

ROHRER, JOHN W Kansas City, MO 

Building Construction Junior 

ROSS, FRANK J Overland Park 

Pre-Law Senior 

RYNARD. JOHN E Shawnee 

Accounting Sophomore 



432 — Sigma Phi Epsilon 





SCOBY, JOE H McPherson 

Veterinary Medicine Senior 

SEYBERT, WILLIAM W Garden City 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Junior 

SPENCER, STEVE Topeka 

Architectural Structures Freshman 

STANSBERRY, CRAIG L Sallna 

Political Science Senior 

STANSBERRY, GARY D Salina 

General Freshman 

STEPANICH, JAMES E Neodesha 

Agricultural Economics Senior 

SWARNER, JOSEPH M Shawnee 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

UNRUH, GALEN K McPherson 

Agricultural Economics Junior 

UNRUH, MILO M Wichita 

History Junior 

WEBER, STAN Tulsa, OK 

Mechanical Engineering Senior 

WOODWARD, KIRK P Leawood 

Business Administration Senior 

WOODWORTH, STANLEY N Overland Park 

Business Finance Senior 



Smith 



ATWILL, DONALD E Smith Center 

Engineering Freshman 

BARBA, DENNIS L Concordia 

Elementary Education Senior 

BEAVERS, ROBERTW Junction City 

Mechanical Engineering Freshman 

BELL, THOMAS L Holton 

Psychology Freshman 

BRUNGARDT, GREGORY N Galesburg 

Agricultural Engineering Freshman 

CARRA, EARL R Sedan 

Chemical Engineering Freshman 

CHARTRAND, DAVID V Leawood 

Journalism and Mass Communications Senior 

CHARTRAND, EDWARD E Leawood 

General Freshman 

COOPER, DAVID L Leavenworth 

General Sophomore 

CORN, DAVID A Bushton 

Agricultural Engineering Junior 

DARDIS, MARK W Eudora 

Physical Therapy Junior 

DICKSON, GARY D Dodge City 
Mathematics Junior 

FUNK, GLENN E Topeka 

Electrical Engineering Sophomore 

FUNK, JEFF L Topeka 

Journalism and Mass Communications Senior 

KELTZ, JACK D Mound Valley 

Agricultural Engineering Freshman 

LARSEN, ERIC C Wichita 

Wildlife Biology Senior 

LATTA, RONALD D Wichita 

Chemistry Freshman 

MARRS, DANNY D Clifton 

Business Administration Senior 







McCOSKEY, STEVEN L Wichita 

Chemical Engineering Sophomore 

MOORE, KENNETH D Wichita 

Mechanical Engineering Freshman 

NASON, RANDALL R . . . .Wakarusa 

Nuclear Engineering Sophomore 

NOWAK, RICK D Goodland 

Psychology Senior 

PARKER, JEFFREY J Kansas City 

Industrial Engineering Sophomore 

PAYNE, JOHN A Berryton 

Engineering , . . . Freshman 

PHILLIPS, TIMOTHY W Parsons 

Music Education Freshman 

RAYS, ARTHUR B Salina 

Pre-Law and Physical Science Junior 

RHODES, RANDY A Clifton 

Electrical Engineering Sophomore 

RODENBAUGH, STEPHAN M St. Marys 

Electrical Engineering Freshman 

ROGERS, DANNY H Topeka 

Agricultural Engineering Junior 

RUARK, ROGER L, .Coffeyville 

Mechanical Engineering Freshman 

SHUMAN, MARK W Liberal 

Accounting Senior 

SIMPSON, SCOTT A Clay Center 

Biochemistry Junior 

SIMPSON, STEVE R Dodge City 

Pre-Law and Business Administration . . . . Junior 

STUEVE, GERALD J Hiawatha 

Electrical Engineering Sophomore 

WILSON, DENNIS E Kansas City 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Junior 

WURT2. GREGORY J Topeka 

Chemical Engineering Sophomore 



Smith — 435 



Smurthwaite 



ALEXANDER, MILA A Overland Park 

Pre-Elementary Education Sophomore 

BRUEY, LOU ANN Anthony 

Elementary Education Junior 

BRUEY, PATRICIA J Bluff City 

General Freshman 

BRYAN, JUNE E Scranton 

Physical Science Junior 

BYRNES, JEANNE M Overland Park 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore 

CHANNEL, MARYANN E Soldier 

Home Economics Education Junior 

COLTRAIN, AMY L Neodesha 

Consumer Interest Freshman 

DOUGAN, PATRICIA L Pretty Prairie 

Political Science Junior 

ENGELHARDT, VICKI J Chase 

Dietetics Freshman 

FELDKAMP, TERRY L Axtell 

Dietetics and Institutional Management Sophomore 

FISHER, SHARON L Sallna 

Elementary Education Senior 

GARDNER, MARY Hartford 

Clothing and Retailing Junior 

GARRETT, ROANN K Woodbine 

General Freshman 

GARRETT, ROSANN G Woodbine 

General Freshman 

GRIFFIN, SUSAN K Natoma 

Speech and Drama Sophomore 

HADACHEK, PEGGY S Cuba 

Home Economics Education Junior 

HASE, VICKIE S Overbrook 

Horticulture Sophomore 

HERMAN, KATHERINE D St. Francis 

Modern Language Junior 

HILL, BETSY F Goodland 

Landscape Architecture Junior 

HOLMAN, BEVERLY E Winfield 

Home Economics Extension Junior 

HONIG, KAREN S Onaga 

Dietetics and Institutional Management Junior 

HOUK. JANET M Moran 

Home Economics Education Sophomore 

KOHL. VICKI M Ellis 

English Junior 

KOSTER, REBECCA A Cawker City 

Family Economics Junior 






LIEBL, LAURIE J Offerle 

Business Administration Junior 

LINDSAY, ARNITA Kansas City 

Social Work Senior 

MARIETTA, KALA Great Bend 

Electrical Engineering Senior 

MARTIN, PEGGY J Silver Lake 

Math Junior 

McCLURE, CYNTHIA A Stafford 

History Education Junior 

McCREIGHT, PAT L . . . . El Dorado 

Biology Junior 

MILLER, DEBRAK Russell 

Mathematics Sophomore 

MINTURN, MARTHA L Abilene 

Elementary Education Sophomore 

OESTERREICH, TERESA A Woodbine 

Music Education Junior 

REESE, MARJORIE L Plamville 

Elementary Education Freshman 

REXWINKLE, ANGELA C Great Bend 

Accounting Freshman 

RICHARDSON, PEGGY L Derby 

Music Education Junior 

RIESCHICK, MARTY A . . . Soldier 

Elementary Education . . . . Junior 

ROMBERGER, DEBRA J Abilene 

Medical Technology Sophomore 

SCHMIDT, JACQUE J Alma 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine ....... Sophomore 

SCHWARZENBERGER. MARY B Collyer 

Mathematics Education Sophomore 

SOLTIS.MARYE Wichita 

Milling Freshman 

SPENCER, DIANE M Overland Park 

Journalism and Mass Communications Senior 

STOFFER. JANET M. . . Abilene 

Home Economics Freshman 

TAYLOR, KARENS Waldo 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine . . . . Junior 

VINING, MARGARET A. . Horton 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Sophomore 

WARY, JOLEEN M Columbus 

Music Education Freshman 

WETTA, PATRICIA J Wichita 

Home Economics Freshman 

WEYER, DIANA L Centralla 

Home Economics Education Senior 



Smurthwaite — 437 



Straube 



BAKER, JERRY L Scandia 

Civil Engineering Sophomore 

COOPER, JAMES L St, John 

Pre-Medicine Freshman 

DENNING, DALE P Russell 

Medical Technology Freshman 

DENNING, DOUGLAS G Russell 

Accounting Junior 

DILLING, DONALD W Sallna 

Music Education Senior 

DODD. TIMOTHY J Mankato 

Milling Science Sophomore 

DRUMHILLER, STEPHEN A Milan 

Economics Junior 

ENGELHARDT, DARRYL L Chase 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore 

FORD, STEPHEN W Leonardville 

Engineering Freshman 

HOLLINBERGER, THOMAS S Belleville, IL 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

HSU, RICK C. Y Taipei, Taiwan 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

JANSEN, ROBERT J Emporia 

General Freshman 

KIRIDLY, FAROUK K Beirut, Lebanon 

Civil Engineering Senior 

LEWIS, CLIFFORD S Wichita 

Accounting Junior 

LiNK, MALCOLM K Chase 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Sophomore 

MALTBY, DANIEL P Wetmore 

Chemical Engineering Freshman 

O'TOOLE, FRANK K Marysville 

Mechanical Engineering Freshman 

PAYNE, RICHARD D Buffalo 

Chemical Engineering Senior 

PETERSON, GARRY E Basehor 

Microbiology Freshman 

ROBSON, JOHN E Abilene 

Chemical Engineering Sophomore 

SLAVIK, DOYLE R Smith Center 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

SWIFT. WILLIAM J Wichita 

Biology Education Freshman 

VANDYKE, RICK Tonganoxie 

Civil Engineering Sophomore 

WILLIAMS, DEWEY D Osage City 

Medical Technology Sophomore 





Tau Kappa Epsilon 




ANDRIST, CHRIS G. St. Francis 

Radio and Television Sophomore 

AUXIER. BRYAN E SI Joseph, MO 

Architecture Junior 

BAKER, ROGER D Topeka 

Industrial Engineering Senior 

BARRON, DAYNEC . Topeka 

Forestry Freshman 

BAUER, GREGG, Wichita 

Accounting Sophomore 

BRALEY, BILL R Wichita 

Business . . . . Freshman 



COPELAND, MALCOLM Topeka 

Political Science Junior 

DAVIS. MICHAEL C. Topeka 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

DOLLMANN, STEVEN C, McPherson 

Civil Engineering . . . ... Junior 

FERGERSON, TERRY L Dighton 

Psychology Junior 

FREED, STEPHEN W Lansing 

Horticulture Junior 

FREELY, MICHAEL S Overland Park 

Business Management Sophomore 



GALLAWAY, DALE W Topeka 

Computer Science Sophomore 

GORDON, DOUG C Sallna 

Physical Education Senior 

GOULD, JAMES D Concordia 

Education Special 

GRIFFITH, T. SCOTT Topeka 

Accounting Sophomore 

HANSEN, GARY W Horton 

Mathematics Sophomore 

HAWKINS, JAMES M Topeka 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 



HELTON, TIMOTHY M Pensacola, FL 

Business Marketing , . , Freshman 

IRELAND, RANDY W Madison 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

KARNOWSKI, RICHARDS. . Emmett 

Business Administration . Junior 

KIMMEL, HALSEY W Topeka 

Landscape Architecture Junior 

LaCICERO, JOSEPH M Leavenworth 

Marketing Research Senior 

LOVE, TOMMY R Kansas City 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Junior 



j n:M 




MAHAR, JOHN R Summit, NJ 

Psychology Senior 

MEYER, GARY W St. Louis 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

MILLS, KEITH A Yorktown, VA 

General Freshman 

MINNIX, JAMES M Scott City 

Agriculture Economics Junior 

MOHR, ERIC W Wichita 

Radio and Television Freshman 

PARKER. MARK M Kansas City 

Business Administration Junior 

PECKMAN, CLINTON H Paola 

Business Sophomore 

SANDMEYER. CARY B Topeka 

Mechanical Engineering Freshman 

SCHENEWERK, ROGER L Wichita 

Landscape Architecture Senior 

SCHMIDT, ROGER K Newton 

Architecture and Design Junior 

THOMAS, ROBERT W Mission 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

TJADEN, MAX H Clearwater 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore 

WHITE, STEVEN L Ottawa 

Physical Education Senior 

WIEGERT, BRYAN K Salina 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

WOODS, WILLIAM D Clearwater 

Animal Science and Industries Sophomore 




I tl 





440 — Tau Kappa Epsilon 



L 



Theta Xi 




GAEDE, NELL L Houseparent 

ALLEN, RANDALL G Jefferson City, MO 

Architecture Senior 

BODEN, RICHARD Bloommgdale 

Veterinary Medicine Junior 

BOGART. LEE L Wichita 

Mechanical Engineering Sophomore 

BREIPOHL, GARY Lawrence 

General Engineering Freshman 

BROWN, RONALD G Girard 

Engineering Freshman 

CAPPELMAN, DAVID W Muscotah 

Speech Senior 

CHAMBERS, CURTIS N Norton 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Sophomore 

COLLIER, JOHN N AltaVista 

General Agriculture Freshman 

COLLIER, STUART R Alta Vista 

Agricultural Economics Junior 

DAVIS, ROBERT D Greensburg 

General Freshman 

DIETZ, STEVEN D . Ottawa 

Plant Pathology Freshman 

FISHBURN. CASEY G Manhattan 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Freshman 

HEALY, MATTHEW F Manhattan 

Business Sophomore 

HORAN, TIM D, Abilene 

Journalism and Mass Communications Freshman 

HUEBERT, MICHAEL A Henderson, NB 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Sophomore 

JENKINS, JON L Potosi, MO 

Architecture Fifth Year Student 

LIPOVITZ, FRANCIS A Kansas City 

Electrical Engineering Sophomore 




Theta Xi — 441 




McDIFFETT, TIM L Alta Vista 

Radio and Television Sophomore 

McVEY, BART L Manhattan 

Journalism and Mass Communications Freshman 

McWILLIAMS, JAMES P. Shelbma, MO 

Landscape Architecture Junior 

MITCHELL, LOWELL R Marquette 

Mathematics Sophomore 

OLSON, DANA G Marquette 

General Freshman 

PIERCE, MICHAEL E Tribune 

Accounting Senior 



PULLIAM, KENDAL K Freeport 

Agricultural Engineering Freshman 

RANKIN, STEPHEN W Kanopolis 

Physical Education Junior 

ROTTMANN, RUSSELL W. . . . . Jefferson City, MO 

Architecture Freshman 

SJOGREN, KURTIS C Marquette 

General Freshman 

SMITH, MARK E Tribune 

Agricultural Economics Junior 

SOUTHWICK, CHRISTOPHER L Abilene 

Pre-Medicine Freshman 



STIGGE, DOUGLAS K Manhattan 

Pre-Medicine Sophomore 

WATT, STANLEY F Harper 

Agricultural Mechanization Sophomore 

WINGER. JOHN R Wellington 

Business Administration Sophomore 




442 — ThetaXi 




Triangle 

COX. SUSAN Houseparent 

ANDERSON, MILTON P Newlon 

Pre-Design Professions . Freshman 

BOWER, DAVID W Independence, MO 

Architecture-Building Construction Junior 

BRIGGS, PAUL N Leavenworth 

Mechanical Engineering Sophomore 

COSBY, BERNARD L Topeka 

Architectural Structures Fifth Year Student 

DOWNES, RONALD G Merriam 

Physics Freshman 

FESSENDEN, CHARLES B Clifton 

Secondary Education Junior 

FOX, WILLIAM L St. Louis. MO 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

FRANKEN, JOHN W Sedalia, MO 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

GARTNER, CHRISTOPHER L Topeka 

f Civil Engineering Junior 
GLASS, BRUCE R Independence, MO 
Architecture Senior 

GRANEY, JOSEPH S Seneca 

Architecture Junior 

I HACKER, DALE A Kansas City 
Civil Engineering Senior 
HAFFENER, JOE A ... Alta Vista 

Civil Engineering Sophomore 

HARDEN, PHILIP A Ashland 

Agricultural Engineering Sophomore 

HARDMAN, BARRY S Hill City 

IPre-Pharmacy Junior 
HART, LAWRENCE R Holland, Ml 
Pre-Design Professions Freshman 
HENRY, DEE D Coffeyvllle 
Mechanical Engineering Senior 

HEYLIN, MICHAEL T Manhattan 

t Pre-Design Professions Freshman 
HOSKINS, RICHARD A Great Bend 
Electrical Engineering Freshman 
HUBBS, TERRY D Dorrance 
Mechanical Engineering Senior 
JONES, LARRY D Hill City 
Electrical Engineering Senior 
^^ KOELSCH, RICHARD K Great Bend 

HH A H Agricultural Engineering Senior 

■ II KUNIHOLM, ALANG Athol. MA 

Architecture Sophomore 





LAND. DONALD L Osawatomie 

Architecture and Design Fifth Year Student 

LITTLE, DOUGLAS J Wichita 

Chemical Engineering Freshman 

LOHRENTZ, DAVID K Hutchinson 

Architecture Senior 

LUCAS, GARY F Great Bend 

Mechanical Engineering Freshman 

MASTERS, DAVID R Troy 

Chemical Engineering Freshman 

McCABE, FRANCIS D Tallahassee, FL 

Architecture Junior 

NEIBLING, WILLIAM H Highland 

Agricultural Engineering Senior 

PHILLIPS, DAVE B Manhattan 

Nuclear Engineering Freshman 

POLLI, STEVE Mahopac, NY 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

SMITH, DAVID R Osawatomie 

Interior Architecture Senior 

SPENCER, STEVEN H Leavenworth 

Nuclear Engineering Sophomore 

STEWARD, BYRON C Cedar Vale 

Civil Engineering Senior 

TOLIN, BRYCE A Holton 

Industrial Engineering Sophomore 

VENJOHN, RODNEY P Garden City 

Architecture Senior 

WISE, STEVEN C Clearwater 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 




444 — Triangle 




1 



Van Zile 



ANNIS, JENNIFER L Lawrence 

Dietetics Junior 

ARNOLDY, LANETTE M. . . Tipton 

Horticulture Therapy . Sophomore 

ARNOLDY. NANCYS Tipton 

General Freshman 

ASKREN, KATHY L Holton 

Psychology Sophomore 

BAKER, NANCY K .Salina 

Theatre and Psychology Junior 

BALDWIN, MARCIA J Kmgsdown 

Medical Technology Junior 

BEAMISH. CYNTHIA L Parma. OH 

Education Sophomore 

BENSON, ANN Garden City 

Architecture Junior 

BEOUGHER, DUANE V Ellsworth 

General Freshman 

BRINKMAN, JAMES F Salina 

Accounting Senior 

COLONEY, PATRICIA L Wichita 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

COOPER, ALICE E, Topeka 

Retail Floriculture Junior 

DECKER, MARILYN J Emporia 

Architecture Freshman 

DUDLEY, DEBRA J Cawker City 

General Sophomore 

EULERT, CAROL J. Topeka 

General Freshman 

FOERSTER, STEPHEN L Lmdsborg 

Electrical Engineering Freshman 

FOWLER, DANIEL L Salina 

General Junior 

GEIST, ELAINE K Minneapolis 

Food Science and Industry Sophomore 

GIBSON, DANIEL W Wichita 

Architecture Senior 

GINTHNER. NANCY C Hays 

Elementary Education Junior 

GOEHENOUR, KIM G Wichita 

Architecture Sophomore 

HANDKINS, DAVID M Overland Park 

Industrial Engineering Senior 

HEMPSTEAD. KARLA . . . Topeka 

Microbiology Sophomore 

HENDRIX, CHARLES C Leavenworth 

Psychology Senior 

HENSLEY. KEN S Overland Park 

Computer Science Freshman 

KARSTADT, BLYTHE C Llndsborg 

Music Education Senior 

KENNELLY, MICHELLE E Phoenix, AZ 

Speech and Theater Sophomore 

KIRN, BECKY L Minneapolis 

General Freshman 

LEVIN. MARTY L Leawood 

Horticultural Therapy Freshman 

LIGNITZ, LARRY G Marysville 

Chemical Engineering Freshman 

LISSON, DAVID J Mission 

Mechanical Engineering Junior 

LLOYD, STEVE W Green 

Milling Science and Management Senior 

LONG, STEVE P Mission 

Chemical Engineering Freshman 

LUNGREN, H JEFF Hays 

General , . Sophomore 

McCLELLAN, STEVEN P, Hays 

Pre-Design Professions Junior 

MIKOLS, WAYNE J Hinsdale, IL 

Nuclear Engineering Senior 

MILLER, KIM E Lawrence 

Home Economics Education Freshman 

MILLER, ROBERTO Greenleat 

Chemistry and Journalism Junior 

MOORE. LYNN A Arvada. CO 

Architecture Sophomore 

ORNDORFF, DANETTE L Topeka 

Accounting Freshman 

PATTERSON, SHARON L. ..... . . . . Garnett 

Art , , Freshman 

PETERS, SUSAN E Shawnee Mission 

Accounting Sophomore 

PIERCE, PATRICIA R Salina 

Home Economics and Journalism ....... Junior 

PROCTOR. LELA D. Ft, Riley 

General Freshman 

REUKAUF, KATHY S Larned 

Accounting Senior 

RIDGEWAY, STEPHEN D Topeka 

Computer Science Freshman 

SALTER. LORNA M Waketield 

English Junior 

SCHWAB. PATRICK R Shawnee Mission 

Nuclear Engineering Junior 



Van Zile — 445 




SEDLACEK, WANDA J Marysville 

Earth Science Sophomore 

SEDLOCK, CHERISE M Kansas City 

Secondary Physical Education Freshman 

SHEHI. LORA J Westmoreland 

Engineering Freshman 

SHOGREN, GARY N Lindsborg 

Physics Freshman 

SMITH. SHIRLEY R Big Bow 

Computer Science Junior 

SORRELL, ROGER D Garden City 

History and Anthropology Senior 

STEPHENSON, ELIZABETH E Manhattan 

Architecture Sophomore 

STUTZMAN, EMELISE D Prairie Village 

Geography Junior 

TOWNLEY, ROGER R Augusta 

Bakery Science and Management Senior 

VORAN, ROXIE L Kingman 

Geology Senior 

WATERS. MONTE G Liberal 

Mathematics Sophomore 

WEDDLE, SARA K Wichita 

Elementary Education Sophomore 

WHEELER, JANEC Shawnee 

General Freshman 

WHITE, RICHARD A Moscow 

Pre-Pharmacy Sophomore 

WINTER, MARY A Garden City 

Accounting Junior 

WOOD, PHILIP A Liberal 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Freshman 

YARROW, FREDERICK L Morganville 

General Freshman 




446 — VanZile 




West Hall 



LOWE, MARIE A. Director 

ABBOTT, JEANNE K Salma 

Accounting , Junior 

ADAMS. LUCY A Overland Park 

Pre-Dentistry Sophomore 

ADAMS, NANCY L Prairie Village 

Elementary Education Junior 

AESCHLIMAN. SUSAN D Centralia 

Floriculture Freshman 

ALTIZER, PAGE L. Overland Park 

Journalism and Mass Communications Sophomore 

ANDREWS, DEBRA L Concordia 

Business Education . Junior 

ARNOLD. JOELLEN Burlmgame 

Dairy Production Junior 

ATKINSON. BARBARA L Ft Riley 

Pre-Nursing and Social Work Junior 

AYLWARD, KATHY M Solomon 

Finance Junior 

BACKHUS, JANET L Leavenworth 

Dietetics Sophomore 

BAKER. BARBARA Overbrook 

General Freshman 

BALDWIN, BARBARA J Salma 

Home Economics Sophomore 

BARTAK, KATHRYN J Cuba 

Family and Child Development Sophomore 

BARTH, ANNEM Belleville 

Theatre Freshman 

BAYER, JENNEY L Manhattan 

Art Education Senior 

BELL.SHERYLA El Dorado 

Electrical Engineering Sophomore 

BERNHARDT, LAUREL L Tampa 

Journalism and Mass Communications Freshman 

BIERY, TERESA E Topeka 

Biology Education Junior 

BLOOM. RONI J Topeka 

Special Education Sophomore 

BRADY, KAREN K Penalosa 

Music Education Senior 

BRAUN. MARY J Edgerton 

Social Work Junior 

BROWN, JANET K Nlckerson 

Elementary Education Senior 

BROWN, PAM J Overland Park 

Biology Freshman 

BUCHER, DENISE M Overland Park 

Home Economics Education Junior 

BURKE, MARY L Overland Park 

Fashion Design Sophomore 

BURKE, PATRICIA L Overland Park 

Elementary Education Junior 

CARVER, JUDY M Beloit 

Physical Therapy Freshman 

CHAMBERS, BARBARA L Overland Park 

Dietetics Sophomore 

COADY, ELLEN J Gorham 

Sociology Senior 

COLLINS, DEBBY A Topeka 

Speech Pathology Junior 

CONARD. SUSAN E Overland Park 

Pre-Elementary Education Sophomore 

CORN, SUSAN L Bushton 

Foods and Nutrition Science Sophomore 

COUPAL, VIRGINIA R Clay Center 

Medical Technology Junior 

CURRY, KIM J Madison 

Dietetics Sophomore 

DAVIS, VICKI L Leawood 

Microbiology Senior 

DICKSON, DEBRA D Hiawatha 

Interior Design Freshman 

DONAHUE, DEBBIE J Durham 

Business Administration Freshman 

DRAKE, DEBRA L Wintield 

Fashion Retailing Freshman 

DRUMHILLER, LINDA K Hutchinson 

Textiles Research Junior 

DUBACH. LINDA D Topeka 

Home Economics Graduate Student 

ERDWIEN, MARY C El Dorado 

Spanish Sophomore 

ESCHMANN, CYNTHIA D Topeka 

Fashion Design Sophomore 

EVERETT. EVELYN A Kansas City 

Interior Design Senior 

EVERS. PAMELA S Lake Quivira 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Freshman 

FADEN, JANET L Topeka 

Home Economics Extension Sophomore 

FARNEY, JO A Hutchinson 

Consumer Interest Senior 

FERGUSON, RUTH A Abilene 

Pre-Elementary Education Sophomore 



West Hall — 447 



FLOYD, BARBARA A St. Francis 

Music Education Junior 

FRISKEL, MARY A lola 

Medical Technology Sophomore 

FURGASON. BARBARA A Plamville 

Pre-Nursing Sophomore 

GILMORE, LYNN A Topeka 

Home Economics Sophomore 

GLADDEN, LINDA C Wathena 

Computer Science Freshman 

GOBLE, ELIZABETH A Lee Summit, MO 

Architecture Freshman 

GOETZ, PHYLLIS A Kingman 

Dietetics Sophomore 

GRIFFITH, DEBRA A Topeka 

Dietetics and Institutional Management Senior 

GRIFFITH, PAMELA J Marlon 

Elementary Education Senior 

GROSS, GEORGETTE L Wllmette, IL 

English Education Senior 

GUESS, RITA L Holton 

Pre-Nursing Freshman 

GUIPRE, KEVEN A Minneapolis 

Family and Child Development Junior 

HAHN, CAROL L Gypsum 

Pre-Pharmacy Freshman 

HAMM, DANA L Topeka 

Sociology Sophomore 

HAND, TERRY L Overland Park 

Family and Child Development Senior 

HANSEN, CAROL J Ft. Collins, CO 

Pre-Elementary Education Sophomore 

HARRINGTON, CYNTHIA A Garnett 

Music Education Senior 

HARRISON, JANE A Beloit 

Pre-Nursing Sophomore 

HARTIG, MARY M Anchorage, AK 

Business Freshman 

HARTTER, DENISE E Sabetha 

Clothing and Retailing Sophomore 

HEDRICK, NANCY K Hutchinson 

Pre-Elementary Education Sophomore 

HEIDRICK, RUTH A Beloit 

Dietetics Sophomore 

HEIMER, BARBARA J Merriam 

Pre-Elementary Education Sophomore 

HENRICKS, KATHY A Topeka 

Textile Research Senior 







HENRY, CINDY K Topeka 

Interior Design . Sophomore 

HILL. KATHLEEN C Shawnee Mission 

Spanish Education Junior 

HIXSON, BARBARA J , .... Salma 

Home Economics with Liberal Arts Junior 

HQFMEISTER, PHYLLIS E Claflm 

Elementary Education Junior 

HOISINGTON. LAURA I Salma 

Recreation . . . Freshman 

HOISINGTON, PAULA J, Salma 

Music Education Junior 

HOLMQUIST, KRISTIN D . . Smolan 

Pre-Physical Education Freshman 

HOLSTE, SYLVIA N Ludell 

Art Education Junior 

HONIG, CATHERINE A. Onaga 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology Freshman 

HUERTER SUSAN M Overland Park 

Family and Child Development Sophomore 

JACOBSON, CAROL S Hope 

Medical Technology Junior 

JOHNSON. JANET E Olathe 

Pre-Medicine Freshman 

JOHNSON, NANCY J Salma 

Business Administration Junior 

JOKERST. KATHY M Salma 

Family and Child Development Junior 

JONES. CYNTHIA A Bird City 

Pre-Nursing Junior 

JONES, JANIS A Hiawatha 

Computer Science . Freshman 

KEELER, KAREN J Hutchinson 

Foods and Nutrition Senior 

KELLY, NANCY L Shawnee Mission 

Clothing and Retailing Freshman 

KENNETT, MELINDA Concordia 

Art Senior 

KIMPLE, KANDACE A Little River 

Interior Design Sophomore 

KISIELIUS, RUTHANN Park Ridge, IL 

Pre-Design Professions . . . . Sophomore 

KLAUMANN, TERESA K, Belleville 

Psychology Freshman 

KLEES, KAREN A St. Louis, MO 

Mathematics Senior 

KLEES, KRISTINAM St. Louis. MO 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

KRUSE, TERESA M. Wichita 

Home Economics Sophomore 

LANG, JANE A. , Shawnee 

Home Economics Freshman 

LANGMACHER. CINDY K. . Osage City 

Industrial Engineering . . Junior 

LESCHBER, DIANE K Hiawatha 

General Sophomore 

LIND, PATRICIA J Hutchinson 

Medical Technology Senior 

LIVINGSTON, MARSHA R Orleans, MA 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 



West — 449 




LUTHI, JANNETTE E Madison 

Home Economics Education Senior 

LUTHI, JILL K Gndley 

General Freshman 

MABEN, PAMELA S Overland Park 

Biology Junior 

MAI, MARILYN S Russell 

Biochemistry Sophomore 

MARTEN, PAULA S Onaga 

Business Administration Sophomore 

MATHEWS, PAMELA J Topeka 

Architecture Junior 



MATTINGLY, KATHLEEN A Clay Center 

Accounting Freshman 

McCASKILL, NANCY S Topeka 

Family and Child Development Junior 

McNARY, JANE E Sabetha 

Biochemistry Sophomore 

McVICKER, MARILYN M Abilene 

Clothing and Retailing Junior 

MENDENHALL, JANA B Hiawatha 

Home Economics Education Junior 

MENTZER, JEANINE M lola 

Pre-Nursmg Sophomore 



MICHEELS, MARLENE M Overland Park 

Pre-Secondary Education Sophomore 

MILLS, CINDY J Leavenworth 

Pre-Nursmg Freshman 

MITCHELL, PHYLLIS Kansas City 

Special Education Sophomore 

MONTGOMERY, JANE M Sabetha 

General Sophomore 

MOORE, GLORIA S Salina 

Pre-Elementary Education Freshman 

MORRIS, JULIA A Wichita 

Social Work Sophomore 



MORRISON, NANCY J Shawnee Mission 

General Freshman 

MUELLER, ANN E Hiawatha 

Pre-Elementary Education Freshman 

MUGLER, JANET K Wakefield 

Medical Technology Sophomore 

MURPHY. CLAIRE E Overland Park 

Chemical Engineering Sophomore 

MYERS. RAMONA L Shawnee Mission 

General Freshman 

NASH, MARGARET M Lakin 

Home Economics and Journalism Junior 




450 — West Hall 




NEUMANN, JEANETTE L Troy 

Pre-Elementary Education Sophomore 

NILES. NORMA D Lyndon 

Pre-Nursing Sophomore 

NOONEN, DENISE M Overland Park 

Fashion Design Junior 

NORDBOE, CONNIE J Salma 

General Sophomore 

NORRIS, MARY K Edgerton 

Social Work Sophomore 

OBERHELMAN. KATHY J Clay Center 

Physical Therapy Freshman 

OLANDT, VICKI I Morrowville 

Elementary Education . Junior 

OLTJEN, RITA A Robinson 

Clothing and Retailing Freshman 

ORME, KATHIE J Overland Park 

Recreation Junior 

PARAMORE, CYNTHIA J Delphos 

Sociology Junior 

PASLAY, LESAG Topeka 

Family and Child Development Junior 

PATRY, MARIAN S Peabody 

Home Economics Education Junior 

PATTON, LAREE A Ulysses 

Pre-Elementary Education Sophomore 

PENNY, NANCY L Richmond, VA 

Business Sophomore 

PETERSON, JEAN M Overland Park 

Music Education Sophomore 

PHILLIPS, JOANN Leavenworth 

Speech Pathology Sophomore 

RAMER, LOIS A Harper 

Retail Floriculture Sophomore 

REED, BARBARA J Gardner 

Foods and Nutrition Graduate Student 

RICE, NANCY L Shawnee Mission 

Clothing and Retailing . . Sophomore 

ROBBINS, CHERYL L Belleville 

Medical Technology , . . . Sophomore 

ROBERTS, SANDY K Topeka 

Home Economics Freshman 

ROE, SYLVIA A Belleville 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

RONEY, CYNTHIA D Waverly 

Consumer Interest . . . Junior 

ROOS, RITA J Shawnee 

Mathematics Junior 

ROWE, KATHY J Abilene 

Business Administration Sophomore 

RUBENICH, JO ANN Dodge City 

Home Economics Education Senior 

SAWIN, RUTH M Lyons 

Clothing and Retailing Junior 

SCHAFER, ANNETTE M Topeka 

Social Work . Sophomore 

SCHANZE, MELISSA A Prairie Village 

General Sophomore 

SCHENBERGER, NANCY L Overland Park 
Early Childhood Education Junior 

SCHIRMER, VALERIE A Holton 

Pre-Nursing Freshman 

SEXTRO, WANDA M Netawaka 

Home Economics Education Junior 

SHEPPARD, SUE A Harper 

Early Childhood Education Sophomore 

SHERMAN, DEBBIE K Overland Park 

Psychology Sophomore 

SHOGREN, KRISTIN A Lindsborg 

Pre-Nursing Sophomore 

SILER, JANET L Kansas City, MO 

Clothing and Retailing Senior 

SIMONSON, BRENDA S Hillsboro 

Art Freshman 

SKINNER, NANCY L Leawood 

Mathematics Senior 

SKWARLO, BARBARA P Shawnee 

Secondary Education Senior 

SPELLMAN, SHERRY L Madison 

Social Work . Sophomore 

SPENCE, ANN L Wichita 

Physical Education Junior 

STACH, KAREN L Hutchinson 

Mathematics Senior 

STRAUB, LINDA S Great Bend 

English Education Senior 

STUM. MARLENE S. . . - Ness City 

Consumer Interest Sophomore 

SWEENEY, FELICIA C Mission 

Special Education Sophomore 

TERRILL. PATRICIA A Topeka 

Early Childhood Education Sophomore 

THAYER, HOLLY J Belleville 

Clothing and Retailing Freshman 

THURSTON, VIRGINIA L Delphos 

Elementary Education Junior 



West Hall — 451 




TREMBLEY, SARAH J Arlington 

Family and Child Development Sophomore 

TRUEBLOOD, MARSHA L Norton 

General Freshman 

TURK. BECKY S Independence 

Speech Pathology Junior 

URISH, RENEE S Burlingame 

Home Economics Freshman 

WALTERS, CATHY J Abilene 

Social Work Sophomore 

WARNER, BETH Belleville 

Home Economics Education Sophomore 



Viola 

Freshman 

White Cloud 

Freshman 

Lenexa 



WARNER, PATTI A 

Floriculture 

WEGENER, CONNIE L 

Clothing and Retailing 

WENTWORTH, DIANE L 

Early Childhood Education Sophomore 

WEYAND, CAROL A McPherson 

Accounting Sophomore 

WHITNEY, JANA L Newton 

Elementary Education Junior 

WILEY, CRYSTAL L Lawrence 

Urban Horticulture Sophomore 



WILLIAMS, JULIANNE Molme 

Family and Childhood Development Freshman 

WILLIAMS, REBECCA A Overland Park 

Dietetics Sophomore 

WINGERSON, JOLEE Topeka 

Political Science Freshman 

WOOLERY, LANA J, . . . .Topeka 

Clothing and Retailing Junior 

WOOLLEY, LESLIE Wichita 

General Freshman 

YOUK, TERESA A Durham 

Retail Floriculture Freshman 



YOUNGLAND, DEBBIE J Salina 

Dietetics Sophomore 

ZIMBELMAN, CINDY D St. Francis 

Psychology Junior 




452 — West Hall 







campus 

ABBINETT. JOHN L . ... Terre Haute. IN 

General Freshman 

ABELL, DEBRA G Kansas City, MO 

Elementary Education Senior 

ABELL, DOUGLAS E McPherson 

->*fc W Building Construction Senior 

ABRAMS, KAREN A Overland Park 

Elementary Education Senior 

ABRAMS. STEVE E Arkansas City 

Veterinary Medicine Sophomore 

ABRAMS, WAYNE A Arkansas City 

L Mechanical Engineering Senior 

1 I 

ABUGHAZALAN. MABIL F Jeddah, Saudi Arabia 

Architecture Sophomore 

ADAMS, DIANA L Prairie Village 

Elementary Education Senior 

ADAMS, ROBERT M St. Louis, MO 

Architectural Structures Senior 

ADCOCK, PHYLLIS K Everest 

Home Economics Education Senior 

ADDIS, DEIDRE A Wichita 

Physical Therapy Sophomore 

ADKINS, DAN O St. George 

Pre-Law Senior 

AL-AMOUDI. ABDULLAIF Jeddah-Daudi. Arabia 

Business Management . Junior 

ALBERS, DIANE K Menlo 

Family and Child Development Senior 

ALDIS, DAVID F Fort Scott 

Chemical Engineering Graduate Student 

ALOIS, ROSEMARY L Fori Scott 

Horticulture Therapy Freshman 

ALEFS, BETTY S Wichita 

Family and Child Development Senior 

ALLEN, DALE D Hill City 

Agricultural Mechanization Senior 




ALLEN, LESLIE J Topeka 

Home Economics Senior 

ALLEN, MARCIA K Sallna 

Family and Child Development Senior 

ALLERHEILIGEN, CAROL A Marysvllle 

Interior Design Senior 

ALLISON, SUZANNE Omaha 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

ALMOND, MARCIA J Stafford 

Home Economics Education Sophomore 

ALUMBAUGH, MICHAEL D Overland Park 

Radio and Television Senior 

ALVIS, DAVID W Cimarron 

Business Administration Sophomore 

AMANN, JAMES A McPherson 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

AMEND, MICHAEL S El Dorado 

History Senior 

AMMEL, ALICE F Leavenworth 

Social Work Senior 

AMY, LUANN E Minneola 

Speech Junior 

ANDERSON, AMY K Darlen, CT 

Biology Senior 

ANDERSON, JACQUELINE S Manhattan 

Clothing and Retailing Senior 

ANDERSON, LLOYD B Sallna 

Political Science Senior 

ANDERSON, REBECCA S Watervllle 

Physical Education Senior 

ANDREASEN, CARL C Overland Park 

Electrical Engineering Senior 

ANDRES, JOHN L Alta Vista 

Veterinary Medicine Sophomore 

ANDRISEVIC, MARY E Kansas City 

Chemistry Education Senior 

ANKENMAN, LEE K Norton 

Natural Resource Management Junior 

ANTHONY, RUSSELL V Lexington, NB 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Sophomore 

ARAIA, TIBLEZ Asmara, Ethopia 

Business Administration Junior 

ARMOUR, G. JEAN Viola 

Retail Floriculture Sophomore 

ARNOLD, STANLEY D Concordia 

Accounting Senior 

ASHBROOK, DENISE R Shawnee Mission 

Home Economics Education Senior 






ASHCRAFT, BRENDA L Manhattan 

Psychology Sophomore 

ATHEY, GEORGE F Prairie Village 

Biology Senior 

AYLWARD, THOMAS M Solomon 

Agricultural Economics Senior 

BAALMAN, RHONDA G. Menlo 

Elementary Education Sophomore 

BADER, TERRY F Manhattan 

Architecture Senior 

BAEHLER, GARY L. Sharon Springs 
Animal Science and Industry Junior 

BAHR, KAREN L Olmitz 

Home Economics with Liberal Arls Sophomore 

BAILEY, PATRICIA A McClean, VA 

Family and Child Development Senior 

BAINTER, WARREN C Hoxle 

Accounting Senior 

BAJICH, LILLIANNA Kansas City 

Sociology Senior 

BAKER, ALAN E Tecumseh 

Accounting Senior 

BAKER, ANN F Kansas City, MO 

Elementary Education Junior 

BAKER, JILL C, Overland Park 

Home Economics Sophomore 

BALBACH, MARSHA J Warren, IL 

Clothing and Retailing Senior 

BALDWIN, CYNTHIA L Inman 

History Education Senior 

BALL, BRENDA J North Rose, NY 

Physical Education Graduate Student 

BARESEL, RENEE L Junction City 

Modern Languages . . ...Junior 

BARKYOUMB, STEVEN D Manhattan 

Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

BARNES, JOHN F Solomon 

Feed Sciences and Management Senior 

BARRETT, DEBRA S Emporia 

Pre-Medlclne Senior 

BARTA, RANDALL L Ellmwood 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

BARTELL, CYNTHIA L Moundrldge 

Lite Sciences Senior 

BARTELL, MARCUS E Moundrldge 

Physical Education Senior 

BASCOM, LYLIA K Hutchinson 

Social Work Junior 

BASCOM, ROBERT A Hutchinson 

Industrial Engineering Senior 

BASEL, BRIAN E Shawnee 

Mechanical Engineering Senior 

BASEL, CONNIE J Manhattan 

Special Education Senior 

BAUER, BRIAN M Clay Center 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

BAUMGARTNER, BOB H Overland Park 

Business Administration Senior 

BEACHLER, STEVE L Des Peres, MO 

History Senior 

BECK, DAVID W Wichita 

Fisheries and Wildlile Biology Junior 

BECKER, DUANE E Moundrldge 

Agricultural Economics Senior 

BECKER, EDWARD L DeSoto 

Political Science Senior 

BECKER, STUART D Moundndge 

Pre-Forestry Sophomore 

BECKETT, RUTH A Greensburg 

Dietetics and Institutional Management Senior 

BEECH, TERESA M Chanute 

Elementary and Special Education Sophomore 

BEERS, GARY F Lawrence 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

BEERY, JOE R Cimarron 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

BEINEKE, KAY Nickerson 

Recreation .............. Junior 

BEISEL, RUTH M Wichita 

Business Finance Senior 

BELL, CAROL A Wichita 

Journalism and Mass Communications Senior 

BELL, DAVID G El Dorado 

Veterinary Medicine Sophomore 

BELL, JUDY L Wichita 

Family and Child Development Junior 

BELL, TERESA L Wichita 

General Sophomore 

BENDA, BEVERLY J Ludell 

Accounting Junior 

BENNETT, DARRELL L Lawrence 

Business Administration Senior 

BENNETT, LINDA K Lawrence 

Elementary Education Senior 

BENTZ. ARLAN E Abilene 

Computer Science Graduate Student 



Off-campus — 455 




BERGNER, JANIS L PraM 

Business Administration Senior 

BERNEY, MARGIE Atchison 

Elementary Education Senior 

BERRY. PATTY D Wichita 

Physical Education Junior 

BERRY, SANDY K Parsons 

Elementary Education Senior 

BESSIER, LYNNE E Prairie Village 

Elementary Education Junior 

BEVER, DIANE Farllngton 

Dietetics Senior 

BEVERLY, STARLA S Sylvan Grover 

Business Education Junior 

BIBLE, C. KENT McCracken 

Math Education Senior 

BICE, PATRICE C Newburgh, NY 

Secondary Physical Education Senior 

BIEBERLY, GREGORY E Sallna 

Civil Engineering Senior 

BIEBERLY, JULIE A Manhattan 

Medical Technology Freshman 

BIENHOFF, JOHN C Kensington 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

BIENHOFF, MARK W Kensington 

Veterinary Medicine Junior 

BINDER. STEPHEN F Hays 

Grain Science Graduate Student 

BISCHOFF, ANGELA C Junction City 

Interior Design Senior 

BITLER, KAREN R Wichita 

Foods and Nutrition Senior 

BITTER, KEN D Holslngton 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

BLACKMAN, ROBIN G. . , Olathe 

Geography Junior 




/J I 1 



456 — Off-campus 




BLANDIN, LANA D Holton 

Psychology and Sociology Senior 

BLANKENSHIP, DAVID G Fori Scott 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

BLEVINS, JANET E White Cloud 

Physical Education Senior 

BLICK, JOANNE E Wichita 

Pre-Elementary Education Sophomore 

BLOCKSOME, RICHARD C Ransr m 

Agronomy Junior 

BOLINGER, KAREN G Cheney 

Recreation Senior 

BOLINGER, SHAREN K Cheney 

Recreation Senior 

BOLL, DANA L St. Francis 

Food and Nutrition Science Senior 

BONDANK, DIANNE J Leawood 

Interior Design . . . . Junior 

BONE, RUSSELL L Overland Park 

Chemical Engineering Senior 

BONEWITZ, DONALD R Manhattan 

Secondary Education Senior 

BONEWITZ, KAREN S Manhattan 

Speech Pathology and Audlology Senior 

BOOTH, JENNA S Clay Center 

English Junior 

BORHANI, MOSTAFA Shiraz, Iran 

Electrical Engineering Graduate Student 

BORHANI, RAHIM Shiraz, Iran 

Planning Graduate Student 

BORN, HOLLY A Manhattan 

Family and Child Development Freshman 

BOROVICKA, SAMMY D Greeley 

Business Administration Junior 

BORTZ, KATHRYN L Manhattan 

Medical Technology - - Junior 




BOSCH. CATHERINE E Manhattan 

General Freshman 

BOSTER, SCOTT A Bennington 

Electrical Engineering Junior 

BOUCHARD, RHEAL J Newmgton, CT 

Veterinary Medicine Junior 

BOUNOUS, TIMOTHY J Wichita 

Agricultural Economics Senior 

BOWELL, KAREN J Abilene 

Physical Education Junior 

BOWEN, KENNETH D Independence 

Political Science Senior 

BOWLES. ROBERT W Lumberton, MS 

Higher Education Administration Graduate Student 

BOWMAN, JACOLYN E Ellinwood 

Physical Education Freshman 

BOWMAN. RUSSELL C Phillipsburg 

Computer Science Sophomore 

BOYD, CHARLES R Richmond, VA 

Accounting Senior 

BOYLE, MARY J Leawood 

Sociology Senior 

BOYLE. MICHAEL T Manhattan 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology Junior 

BOYUM, RUTH A Harvey, ND 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

BRACK, KIM E Hutchinson 

Elementary Education Junior 

BRACK, LES L Hutchinson 

Electrical Engineering Junior 

BRAOEN, SHELLEY A Rossvllle 

Horticulture Senior 

BRADFORD, SHERI L Lyons 

Recreation Junior 

BRADFORD. THELMAD. Baton Rouge. LA 

Education Graduate Student 

BRADLEY, LAURIE Shawnee Mission 

Fashion Design Senior 

BRANDES, ROBERT L Brooklyn, NY 

Biology Senior 

BREITENBACH, MARJAIN L. Belpre 

Mathematics Sophomore 

BRENNEIS. DENNIS R Hollenberg 

Electrical Engineering Sophomore 

BRENNEMAN, TONYA M Solomon 

Home Economics Extension Senior 

BRIGGS, JUANITA V Blackwell, AR 

Political Science Junior 

BRIGGS, PREOLA J Blackwell, AR 

Sociology Senior 

BRIGHT, SHEILA M Meriden 

General Freshman 

BRILLHART, STEVE E Mapleton 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology Senior 

BRITO, GUSTAVO P San Juan, Puerto Rico 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Junior 

BROADFOOT, CATHY A Abilene 

General Sophomore 

BROCK, J, CARL Stafford 

General Freshman 




458 — Off-campus 



L 




BROOKOVER, LISA K Cotteyvllle 

Elementary Physical Education Senior 

BROWN, CARLAL Leavenworth 

Physical Therapy Junior 

BROWN, MARY J Walker 

Engineering Freshman 

BROWN, PHIL W Waketield 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

BROWN, RONALD L Erie, IL 

Architectural Structures Senior 

BROWN, SHIRLEY P Lansing 

Clothing and Retailing Senior 

BROWN. SUSAN L Mission 

Special Education Senior 

BRUNA, DUANE E Hanover 

Agricultural Education Senior 

BRUNGARDT, TIMOTHY L Atchison 

Business Administration Senior 

BRUNKOW, GLENDA S Onaga 

Industrial Engineering Senior 

BRUNKOW, TIM J. Onaga 

Accounting Junior 

BUCHMAN, B, REX Burdick 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

BUCHMAN, STUART E Clay Center 

Social Sciences Senior 

BUESSING, CAROL E Axtell 

Clothing and Retailing Junior 

BUETTGENBACH, TERRY L Wichita 

Natural Resource Management Senior 

BURCH, COLLEEN P Sallna 

Pre-Elementary Education Senior 

BURDEN, DAVID K. , Manhattan 

Biology . . . . Sophomore 

BURKE, MARY H Overland Park 

Mathematics Education Senior 

BURKE, NANCY J Cotteyvllle 

Clothing and Retailing Senior 

BURKHEAD, JENNI L Independence 

Horticulture Therapy Senior 

BURKHOLDER, DAVID E McPherson 

Interior Architecture Junior 

BURKMAN, GENE L Clay Center 

Art Senior 

BURRESS, T CRAIG Erie 

Recreation Junior 

BURROUGHS, BRENDA J Chanute 

Art Sophomore 

BURTON, CHARLENE J Greensburg 

Speech and Drama Education Junior 

BURTON, CHARLENE J Rozel 

Family Economics Senior 

BURTON, WILLIAM K Alta Vista 

Business Administration Senior 

BUTLER, JOANNE G Topeka 

Clothing and Retailing . ... Junior 

BUTTS, CATHY A , Humboldt 

Family Economics , ,. Graduate Student 

BYARD, MACK E Mollne 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology Senior 

BYERS. BRENDA C McPherson 

Consumer Interest Sophomore 

CAIN, CYNTHIA E Kansas City 

Elementary Education Senior 

CALHOUN, ROBERTA Hutchinson 

Vocal Music Education Sophomore 

CAMERON, JANE E Atchison 

Special Education Senior 

CAMPBELL, KIM A Wichita 

Interior Design Freshman 

CAMPBELL, MARK A Overland Park 

Civil Engineering Senior 

CAMPBELL, MICHAEL Oakley 

Pre-Law Senior 

CAMPBELL. RICHARD B Wichita 

Computer Science Senior 

CANNON. JOHN B Df.rby 

Journalism and Mass Communications Graduate Student 

CARLETON. CARLA L Manhattan 

Veterinary Medicine Sophomore 

CARLSON, EDWIN L Kinsley 

Architecture Filth Year Student 

CARMONY, PETER M Shawnee Mission 

Business Administration Graduate Student 

CARNAHAN, DAVID H, Wamego 

Animal Science and Industry Graduate Student 

CARNEY, KARLA J. Edna 

Home Economics Junior 

CARREL, DEBBIE S Shawnee 

Home Economics Education Senior 

CARSON, JULIA A Mission 

Pre-Nurslng Senior 

CARTER. CAMMIE C Paola 

Biology Junior 

CARTER, ELOISE Waterproof, LA 

Foods and Nutrition Graduate Student 



Off-campus — 459 



CARTER, RICHARD H Cape Girardeau, MO 

Architecture Junior 

CARVERM, DAVID L Miltonvale 

Chemical Engineering Junior 

CARY, SUSAN C Manhattan 

Fine Arts Senior 

CASE, STEVEN R Peoria, IL 

Finance Senior 

CATES, LARRY K Belleville 

Medical Technology Sophomore 

CATHEY, JOYCE A Kansas City 

Interior Design Senior 

CATLIN, DANIEL L Miltonvale 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

CATLIN, GARY L Medicine Lodge 

Agricultural Economics Senior 

CAVIN, MARY L Wichita 

Family and Child Development Senior 

CAZIER, SHARON K Topeka 

Pre-Nursing Sophomore 

CHALTAS, STEVE J Salina 

General Freshman 

CHANDLER, LESLIE A Lawrence 

Art Education Senior 

CHANDLER, SHEILAH V Kansas City 

Clothing and Retailing Senior 

CHAPMAN, DENNIS K Leavenworth 

Medical Technology Senior 

CHIANG, BIN-YEA Taipei, Taiwan 

Food Science Graduate Student 

CHIANG, HSIAO-LAN Taipei, Taiwan 

Computer Special Student 

CHRISMAN, DANIEL F Kansas City 

Industrial Engineering Senior 

CHRISMAN, DIANE Wichita 

Family and Child Development Junior 

CHRISTNER, REX A Hutchinson 

Physical Education Junior 

CILLESSEN, JOHN E Cotteyvllle 

Civil Engineering Senior 

CLANTON, SANDRA K Minneapolis 

Special Education Senior 

CLARE, LINDA S Merlden 

Home Economics Education Senior 

CLARK, DAVID W Burlington 

Interior Architecture Senior 

CLARK, DONNA S Sedgwick 

Clothing and Retailing Senior 

CLARK, GAY A Wetmore 

Elementary Education Junior 

CLARK, JOLENE J Belpre 

English Education Senior 

CLARK, STEVEN R Clifton 

Physical Therapy Junior 

CLAUS, JOHN H Wayne, NB 

Veterinary Medicine Senior 

CLAYTON, GWEN A Lenexa 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore 

CLEARY, MICHAEL E Overland Park 

Marketing Senior 

CLEMENTS. LAWANA G Oxford 

Home Economics Freshman 

COAD, LOREN D Cawker City 

Interior Architecture Senior 

COATS, CHARLES C Arkansas City 

Mechanical Engineering Senior 

COCHENNET, CHALLA L Emporia 

Clothing and Retailing Senior 

COLBORN, CATHY R Medicine Lodge 

Elementary Education Senior 

COLEMAN, DAWN L Merrlam 

Special Education Senior 

COLEMAN, JAMES A Overland Park 

Horticulture Graduate Student 

COLLIER, GLENDA L Wichita 

Interior Design Senior 

COLLIER, JOHN E Amarillo. TX 

Health Graduate Student 

COLLIER, MARY M Waverly 

Art Senior 

COLLIER, RAYMOND D, Wichita 

Building Construction Sophomore 

COLLINS. ANNETTE K Concordia 

Family and Child Development Junior 

COLTRAIN, TERRY L Neodesha 

English Education Senior 

COLYN, LESLIE D McPherson 

Social Work Sophomore 

COMBS, TERRI A Hiawatha 

Pre-Medicine Sophomore 

COMPAAN. MELODY L Norton 

Elementary Education Junior 

CONDRAY, SCOTT R Clifton 

Agricultural Economics Junior 

CONGER, CHARLES B Independence, MO 

Pre-Design Professions Sophomore 




460 — Off-campus 




CONKWRIGHT, KAYS Manhattan 

Commercial Art Sophomore 

CONLEY, BILL J. Groton. MA 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore 

COOK, CATHY A Goodland 

Business Administration Graduate Student 

COOK, DEBRA A Hope 

Home Economics Senior 

COOK, M. MAUREEN Gardner 

Interior Design Senior 

COOK, MELINDA A Hutchinson 

Chemical Science Senior 

COOK, WILLIAM A Stark 

Agricultural Engineering Senior 

COOPER, CRAIG W Hoxle 

Agricultural Education Senior 

COOPER. DEAN L St John 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

COOPER, JAMS A Sabetha 

General Sophomore 

COOPER. KAREN L ... Carbondale 

Business Administration . Sophomore 

COOPER. SUZANNE M Hoxie 

Horticulture Freshman 

COOPRIDER, DUANE G McPherson 

Agricultural Economics Senior 

COPELAND, FRANCES C Severy 

General Sophomore 

COPELAND, WILLIAM E Severy 

Accounting Senior 

COPP, LAURA E Topeka 

Social Work Senior 

COPPER, DAVID N Basking Ridge, N J 

Building Construction Senior 

CORCORAN, JEFFREY B Junction City 

Art Freshman 

CORNELIUS. MARY D Overland Park 

Pre-Medicme Sophomore 

CORNETT, CONNIE S Scandia 

Family and Child Development Junior 

CORNETT, JUDY L Colby 

Home Economics Education Senior 

CORNETT, VICKI L Garden City 

Elementary Education Senior 

CORNWELL, MARTHA J St. John 

Dietetics Senior 

CORNWELL, NANCY Joplm, MO 

Interior Design Junior 



Off-campus — 461 




COSSAART, CYNTHIA K Belleville 

Social Sciences Senior 

COTT, ALAN J Lincolnville 

Psychology Junior 

COTTEN, JENNIFER J Holslngton 

Dietetics Senior 

COUPAL, JAMES L Wichita 

Electrical Engineering Junior 

COVERDALE, LYNN E Hutchinson 

Elementary Education Junior 

COX. SUSAN L Topeka 

General Sophomore 

COZINE, MARK L Concordia 

Mechanical Engineering Senior 

CRAIG, THOMAS A Manhattan 

Pre-Medlclne Senior 

CRANSTON, BRADD Montrose, CO 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

CRAWFORD, CAROL S Leawood 

Family Economics Junior 

CRAYTON, CATHARINE L Junction City 

Social Work Junior 

CRONISTER, JOANN Pittsburg 

Elementary Education Senior 



462 — Off -campus 




CROPP, KENT W Lawrence 

Business Education Senior 

CROWLEY, COLLEEN M Shawnee 

Medical Technology Junior 

CROWLEY, MARK L Independence, MO 

Architecture Fifth Year Student 

CUBIT. JOHN D. Garnett 

Agricultural Education Junior 

CULBERTSON, ROBERT K Lyndon 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology Senior 

CULP, BOYD H Topeka 

Electrical Engineering Senior 

CULVER, NANCY S. Lawrence 

Early Childhood Education Junior 

CUMMINGS, DAN D Topeka 

Business Management Senior 

CURRIER, BILL R Cotfeyville 

Elementary Education Sophomore 

CURRY, SYNEVA D Topeka 

Elementary Education Senior 

DAMM, JANICE E Great Bend 

Special Education Senior 

DANLER, PATRICK J Kingman 

Pre- Veterinary Medicine Sophomore 

DARNELL, GWEN S Salina 

Secondary Education Junior 

DAVIDSON, V. DAVID Tonganoxle 

Social Science Senior 

DAVIGNON, ROGER E Hill City 

Agricultural Mechanization Junior 

DAVIS, JOANN E Salina 

Elementary Education Senior 

DAVIS, KEITH E Wichita 

Electrical Engineering Senior 

DAVIS. MARY S Manhattan 

Business Education Junior 

DAVIS, RETTAA Shawnee 

Business Administration Junior 

DAYHOFF, TERRI S Chanute 

Physical Therapy Junior 

DEAN, JANICE R Kansas City 

Interior Design Senior 

OEAN, KENT A Manhattan 

Pte-Law Sophomore 

DEAN, MARILYN K Anthony 

Elementary Education Senior 

DEBRICK, CONNIE M Paola 

Business Junior 

DECK, DONALD D Medicine Lodge 

Accounting Senior 

DEEGE, DENISE J . . Larned 

Retail Floriculture Sophomore 

DeHART, STEVEN D Topeka 

Pre-Medicine Senior 

DeHOFF, FRED M La Cygne 

Veterinary Medicine Senior 

DeJESUS. JOSE Junction City 

Business Administration . . . . Junior 

DEMPSEY, ELIZABETH A . . . Manhattan 

Accounting Junior 

DEMPSEY, MICHAEL T . . Manhattan 

Architecture Sophomore 

DENNIS, SCOTT M Olathe 

Microbiology Senior 

DEPE, KAREN M Brewster 

Clothing and Retailing Senior 

DESCH, JOSEPH P Topeka 

Veterinary Medicine Sophomore 

DESMARTEAU, STEVE F Damon 

Computer Science Senior 

DETERS, DAVID G . .. Manhattan 

Agriculture Freshman 

DETERS, STEVE H Manhattan 

Psychology Graduate Student 

DEVAUX, PAULA J Trinidad, West Indies 

Family and Child Development Junior 

DEVENNEY, DENNIS A Junction City 

Political Science Senior 

DEY, T. A Prairie Village 

Nuclear Engineering Senior 

DIAZ, CARLOS A Cayey. Puerto Rico 

Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

DIBBEN, NORMAN C . . Junction City 

Business Administration Junior 

DICKERSON. WILLIAM J Topeka 

Business Administration Sophomore 

DIECKHOFF, SUE E Salina 

Interior Design Junior 

DIKEMAN, STEVE Syracuse 

Mechanical Engineering Junior 

DIMICK, GLEN E El Dorado 

Building Construction Senior 

DIRKS, JO A Hutchinson 

Business Administration . Junior 

DIRKS, RANDALL K Dodge City 

Physical Education Senior 



Off-campus — 463 



DISSEL, EVELYN M Manhattan 

Business Education Sophomore 

DOAN, RICHARD L Mound City 

Pre-Design Professions Junior 

DOBBIE, JOANN M Kansas City 

Physical Education Junior 

DOBBIE, THERESA A Kansas City 

Elementary Education Senior 

DOBBINS, RUTH G Gotl 

Home Economics Education Senior 

DOBSON, JEAN R Manhattan 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

DOEBELE, CONNIE J . Hanover 

Radio and Television Sophomore 

DOILE, ROBERT E El Dorado 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

DOLL, COLLETTE M Garden City 

Family and Child Development Junior 

DONOVAN, KEVIN D Milton, MA 

Physical Therapy lunior 

DOORNBOS, LARRY L El Dorado 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

DORSEY. RENEA C Haysville 

Interior Design Sophomore 

DOUTHIT, STEPHEN V St. Francis 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

DOWNER, REBECCA E Atchison 

Mathematics Education Senior 

DOWNEY, JOSEPH D Dodge City 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

DOYLE, DIANA L Belolt 

Psychology Senior 

DRUMMOND, CHERYL J Nlles 

Family and Child Development Senior 

DUCH, LARRY L Junction City 

Correctional Sociology Junior 

DUGGER, RONALD R Sallna 

Business Administration Senior 

DURLER, MAURICE G Dodge City 

Accounting Sophomore 

DYKE, RONALD L Grldley 

Geology Senior 

EASTON, HELEN E Wichita 

Community Health Senior 

EATMON, CeLOIS J Kansas City 

Clothing and Retailing Senior 

EAVERSON, BOB G Overland Park 

Music Education Junior 

EAVERSON, DEBORAH J Overland Park 

Speech Education Senior 

EBERT, MARTHA J Westmoreland 

Pre-Nursmg Sophomore 

EDDY, BARBARA J Wichita 

Interior Design Senior 

EDELMAN, MARK A Sabetha 

Agricultural Economics Senior 

EDMONDS, VICKI S McLouth 

Pre-Secondary Education Sophomore 

EDSON. JAMES W Wichita 

Business Education Sophomore 

EHRET, MARTIN K Atchison 

Recreation Junior 

EILERT, BECKY L Beloit 

General . . . . Sophomore 

EISENBERG, DEBORAH S New York, NY 

Lite Sciences Senior 

EITZEN, BARBARA J Hillsboro 

Art Junior 

EKDAHL, LINDA C Manhattan 

Family and Child Development Senior 

ELDER, R. SCOTT Belolt 

Interior Architecture Senior 

ELIAS, JANE F Olsburg 

Fashion Design Freshman 

ELLIFF, CONNIE J Port Isabel, TX 

Foods and Nutrition Graduate Student 

ELLIFF, DONALD F Port Isabel. TX 

Administrative Education . . Graduate Student 

ELLIOTT, ANTHONY M Natoma 

Secondary Education Junior 

ELLIOTT, GARY A Manhattan 

Building Construction Senior 

ELLIOTT, LOIS A Wellington 

Interior Architecture Fifth Year Student 

ELLIOTT, SANDRA K Manhattan 

Physical Therapy Freshman 

ELLIS, RANDALL W Manhattan 

Journalism and Mass Communications Sophomore 

ELSEY, BRUCE D. Garden City 

Veterinary Medicine Sophomore 

ELSTON, DEBORAH J Wichita 

Correctional Administration Senior 

EMERY. BARBARA A McPherson 

Accounting Junior 

EMERY, TERRIK McPherson 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 



464 — Off-campus 




ENGELLAND, GLENN A Sterling 

Poultry Science Junior 

ENGLESON, SHERYL L Grand Rapids, Ml 

History Senior 

EPLER. DEBORAH K , .. Valley Falls 

Community Service Sophomore 

ERICKSON, DAVID W McPherson 

Chemical Engineering Senior 

ERICKSON, ROBERT D Kansas City 

Nuclear Engineering Senior 

ESAU, DEBRA L Larned 

Elementary Education Senior 

ESAU, MICHAEL M Hutchinson 

Music Education Senior 

ESFELD, GERALD L Great Bend 

Industrial Engineering Senior 

ESTES, ANN L Atchison 

Accounting Senior 

EUDALEY. LINDA E ...... Manhattan 

Pre-Nursing Sophomore 

EUKER, VALERIE D Hutchinson 

Physical Education Junior 

EVANS. DENNIS A Ottawa 

Pre-Vetermary Medicine ... Sophomore 

EVANS, JERRY R . . Dodge 

Elementary Education Junior 

EVANS, SHERYL J Chetopa 

Clothing and Retailing Junior 

EVANS, WILLIAM A Prairie Village 

Accounting Junior 

EYESTONE, GAIL L Manhattan 

Radio and Television Freshman 

EYESTONE, JIM D Manhattan 

Business Administration Senior 

EYESTONE, RICHARD L Manhattan 

Business Administration Senior 

FAIRCHILD, KAREN A Manhattan 

Journalism and Mass Communications Senior 

FANNING, GARY L Meriden 

Horticulture Junior 

FARMER, RONALD D Colby 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

FARRELL, ROGER A Wamego 

Civil Engineering Senior 

FEHR, LESLIE B Herlngton 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

FELDER, PAULA Wakeeney 

Foods and Nutrition in Business Junior 




FELTON, JAMES D. . . Jefferson, SD 

Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

FENTON.TOMA Sabetha 

Physical Education Junior 

FERNKOPF, PATRICIA J Topeka 

Early Childhood Education Senior 

FERRIS, SUSAN G Frankfort 

Home Economics Senior 

FIELD, RANDALL K Hutchinson 

Accounting Senior 

FIESER, MARGARET L Plains 

Elementary Education Senior 



FILE. JUDY J Beloit 

Speech Pathology Graduate Student 

FISHBURN, BEVERLY E Haven 

Consumer Interest Senior 

FISHER, DEANNA L Norton 

Elementary Education Sophomore 

FISHER, DEBBIE L Stilwell 

Special Education Junior 

FITZGERALD, R. THOMAS West Palm Beach, FL 

Pre-Law Senior 

FITZSIMMONS, CAREN J Medicine Lodge 
Home Economics Freshman 



FLANAGAN, EDWARD M Saugertles. NY 

Art Senior 

FLETCHER, CAROLYN S Kansas City 

Clothing Design Senior 

FLETCHER, DONNA L . Leoti 

Social Work Junior 

FLINT, JILL R Kansas City 

Education Junior 

FLORA, TRESA L Solomon 

Clothing and Retailing Sophomore 

FLUDERER, JOANN Shawnee 

Physical Therapy Junior 



FLUDERER, WILLIAM H 
Fisheries and Wildlife Biology 

FOLEY, DONNA F 

Psychology 

FOLEY, SUSAN J 

Elementary Education 



Shawnee Mission 

, Junior 

Atchison 

Junior 

Joplin, MO 

. Junior 



FOOTE, DIANE K Overland Park 

Accounting Senior 

FORD, NANCY A, , . , Wakefield 

Home Economics Sophomore 

FORE, JANE A Mission 

Pre-Nursing Junior 



FORSBERG, KENNETH E Scandla 

Accounting Senior 

FORTNEY, DEBRA L Corona, CA 

Psychology Senior 

FOSTER, KELLI I Manhattan 

Interior Design Sophomore 

FOSTER, KENT R Manhattan 

Architecture Senior 

FOURNIER, JOSEPH T Manhattan 

Bakery Science and Management Senior 

FOWLER. DOUGLAS D Centralia 

Electrical Engineering Junior 



FOY, DANA G Wichita 

Architecture Senior 

FRAISIER, DUANE W Sharon Springs 

Agronomy Junior 

FRAZIER, VAL K Wichita 

Microbiology Senior 

FREELAND, GLORIA B Burns 

Journalism and Mass Communications Senior 

FREEMAN, PATT A Topeka 

Dietetics and Institutional Management Senior 

FRERICHS, WILLIAM R Colby 

Civil Engineering Senior 



FRESE, DANIEL R AltaVista 

Pre-Medlclne Senior 

FRESE, DONNA J Council Grove 

Secondary Education Sophomore 

FREYENBERGER, STAN G Harper 

Agronomy Junior 

FRIEDRICH, RAYMOND L Leonardvllle 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

FRIEND, SUSAN C Wichita 

Elementary Education Junior 

FRISBIE, DAVID S El Dorado 

Natural Resource Management Senior 



FROEBE.DOND Independence 

Journalism and Mass Communications . . Junior 

FRUSHER, WILLIAM J Ness City 

Business Administration Senior 

FULLER. DEBI A Shawnee 

Family and Child Development Sophomore 

FULLER. LESA L Lindsborg 

Agricultural Journalism Sophomore 

GABEL. SUSAN R Manhattan 

Social Work Freshman 

GABLE, DEBORA K Manhattan 

Family and Child Development Junior 




466 — Off-campus 



■1 
! f III 





GACHES, RONALD N Manhattan 

Pre-Law Senior 

GALLAGHER, DEBE J Bonner Springs 

Family and Child Development Sophomore 

GALLE, NEAL W Moundrldge 

Food Science and Management Senior 

GALLIHER, DEBORAH A . . . . Junction City 

Clothing and Retailing Junior 

GALLON, MARY E Fredonla 

Family and Child Development Senior 

GANSTROM, SHELDON E Concordia 

Art Education Senior 

GARDNER. FRED B Hartford 

Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

GARTEN. CARL H Abilene 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

GARVIN, DAVID W Manhattan 

History and Anthropology Senior 

GATES, DANIEL T Kansas City 

Veterinary Medicine Senior 

GATES. JONI L Manhattan 

Business Administration Sophomore 

GATES, THOMAS E Junction City 

Civil Engineering Freshman 

GATTERMAN, BRUCE T Lewis 

History Senior 

GATZ, JANE A Preston 

Music Education Senior 

GATZ, KATHRYN A. Newton 

Home Economics Junior 

GEHRT, JOHN F Alma 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

GENCHAN. CHERYL A Kansas City 

Speech Pathology Graduate Student 

GENCHAN, JONETTER. Kansas City 

Fashion Merchandising Freshman 

GERARD, MARK E McPherson 

Mechanical Engineering Senior 

GERARD. ROY W. Syracuse 

Art Sophomore 

GEREN. PAMELA A Merriam 

Accounting Junior 

GERLACH, PAUL M Leawood 

Geology Senior 

GEYER, SHERRY L Sylvan Grove 

Elementary Education Senior 

GHERMAZIEN. TESFAI Asmara 

Agricultural Engineering Graduate Student 

GIFFORD. MARCHEL L Wichita 

Family and Child Development Junior 

GIGER. DEBRAL Elmdale 

Journalism and Mass Communications . Sophomore 

GILKISON, CHRIS A Lamed 

Accounting Senior 

GILL, CYNTHIA A Hays 

Elementary Education Senior 

GILL. GREGORY L. Harper 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Sophomore 

GILMORE, DEBORAH D Overland Park 

Business Administration Junior 



Off-campus — 467 




GILMORE, JAMES W Kansas City 

Architecture Junior 

GLASSCOCK, R. MICHAEL Kansas City 

Land Horticulture Junior 

GLAZE, JAMES B Augusta 

Chemical Engineering Senior 

GLOVER. DIANE K. Manhattan 

Pre-Vetermary Medicine , .Sophomore 

GLYNN, GARY J Summerfield 

Electrical Engineering Junior 

GOERING, BARBARA J Pretty Prairie 

Sociology Senior 

GOETZ, CAROL A Shawnee 

Mathematics Senior 

GOETZ, DALE J Shawnee 

Construction Science Senior 

GOETZ, RONALD E, Wichita 

Accounting . . . . Junior 

GOOD, ELLEN L New Holland, PA 

Family and Child Development Senior 

GOOD, JAMES E Horton 

Social Science Senior 

GOOD, LISA Benton 

Music Junior 

GOOD, WILLIAM E Benton 

Pre-Medlclne Senior 

GOOLEY, WILLIAM E Prairie Village 

Electrical Engineering Senior 

GORMAN, L. KEVIN Fort Scott 

Biology Senior 

GOSNELL, JONI . Kansas City 

Interior Architecture Junior 

GOSSARD. PEGGY L Wichita 

Physical Therapy Junior 

GOULD, RICHARD S Nlckerson 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology Senior 




468 — Off-campus 




GOULDING, THERESA D Shawnee 

Parks and Recreation . Junior 

GOWLER, RANDALL E Kansas City, MO 

Architecture Senior 

GRABER, DEAN A Hesston 

Natural Resource Management Senior 

GRAFF, VICKI S Marlenthal 

Corrections Senior 

GRAHAM, LAWRENCE S Cameron, MO 

Architectural Structures Senior 

GRAHAM, RICHARD L Ottawa 

Radio and Television Senior 

GRANZOW, THOMAS A Hermglon 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

GRATNY, LINDA L Alta Vista 

Veterinary Medicine Senior 

GRAVES. JOHN K Perryton. TX 

Agricultural Economics Junior 

GRAVES, RICHARD O Leon 

Business Senior 

GREEN, RONALD L Manhattan 

Veterinary Medicine Senior 

GREGWIRE, ROBERTA L. . Salina 

Pre-Medicine Sophomore 

GRIFFIN. MAXINE A Cedar Point 

Horticulture Sophomore 

GRIFFIN, STUART M Cedar Point 

Geography Sophomore 

GRONOUIST, PAUL G Alma 

Business Administration Sophomore 

GROSDIDIER, BARBARA R. Eudora 

Deitetics and Institutional Management . . Sophomore 

GROVE, NANCY K Fort Scott 

Home Economics Education Senior 

GRUBER. RANDALL R Bennington 

Pre- Veterinary Medicine Sophomore 

GUCKER, RITA D Topeka 

Fashion Design Senior 

GUDEMAN. JANEL C Wichita 

Physical Therapy Sophomore 

GUNZELMAN, KATIE S Salina 

Clothing and Retailing Senior 

GUTCHIN, ILENE New York, NY 

Computer Science Senior 

GUTSCH. JAMES L Goodland 

Mechanical Engineering Junior 

GUTSCH, KAREN M Neodesha 

Dietetics and Institutional Management Senior 

HADICKE, JONI L Arkansas City 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Freshman 

HAEN, DONNA R Neosha Falls 

Home Economics Education Senior 

HAFFENER. CONNIE A Manhattan 

Sociology Freshman 

HAFFENER. TERESA S Manhattan 

Pre-Nursing Sophomore 

HAGANS, BECKIE J Utlca 

Retail Floriculture Senior 

HAGANS, ROBIN A. . . . Overlai id Park 

Accounting Sophomore 

HAGMAN, RODNEY L Kensington 

Agricultural Mechanization Senior 

HAKE. LYNN D Tipton 

Architecture Junior 

HALE, MARJORIE L Wichita 

Social Science Senior 

HALEY, MOIRA B Manhattan 

Home Economics Freshman 

HALL, DEBORAH L Wichita 

Elementary Education Senior 

HALL, PATRICIA E White City 

Home Economics Education Graduate Student 

HALLER, BECKY L Alma 

Sociology Senior 

HALLER, PATRICIA J Leonardvllle 

Elementary Education Senior 

HALLING, MICHAEL F Severance 

Agricultural Economics Junior 

HALLIS, RALPH Erie 

Electrical Engineering . Sophomore 

HALTERMAN, DEBORAH K Manhattan 

Elementary Education Junior 

HAMBRIGHT, MARJORIE B Wichita 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Sophomore 

HAMMEKE, KEVIN F Elhnwood 

Psychology Junior 

HAMMERSCHMIDT, RITA M Great Bend 

Sociology Senior 

HAMMERSCHMIDT, SAMUEL L Great Bend 

Business Administration Senior 

HAMMOND, GENEVIEVE J Denver, CO 

Family and Child Development Senior 

HANSON, REBECCA A Concordia 

Speech Pathology Senior 

HARBAUGH, DARREL L Coffeyvllle 

Speech Senior 



Off-campus — 469 







HARDEN, PAMELA J Silver Lake 

Radio and Television Senior 

HARDENBURGER, PHILIP S Narka 

Veterinary Medicine Senior 

HARDESTY, JUDITH L Lexington, IL 

Speech Pathology Graduate Student 

HARDMAN, JANIE S Norton 

Music Education Senior 

HARDMAN, KENT L Hill City 

Mechanical Engineering Sophomore 

HARLOW, ANNE W Shawnee 

Business Administration Senior 

HARMS, WAYNE A Newton 

Chemical Engineering Junior 

HARPER, TIMOTHY R Vermillion 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

HARRELL, JOLEEN K Sallna 

Interior Design Senior 

HARRYMAN, JOAN D Roeland Park 

Family and Child Development Junior 

HARRIS, NEDRA G Kansas City 

Dietetics Senior 

HARRISON, BRENT A Kansas City 

Business Administration Senior 




470 — Off-campus 




HARRISON, PATTI L Kansas City 

Home Economics Education Senior 

HART, BRADLEY D Topeka 

Accounting Senior 

HART, GREGORY S Prairie Village 

Electrical Engineering Senior 

HATCHER, CARLA J Hutchinson 

Medical Technology Sophomore 

HAUGH, DENNIS A Topeka 

Architecture Senior 

HAUN, RANDAL D Hutchinson 

Electrical Engineering Senior 

HAUN, RUDY T Bella Vista, AR 

Pre-Mediclne Senior 

HAWKINSON, DALE P Overland Park 

Secondary Education Senior 

HEALY, FRANK G. Spring Hill 

Crop Protection Junior 

HEATON, DAVID G Great Bend 

Accounting Senior 

HEATON, JANICE O Great Bend 

Foods and Nutrition Senior 

HEATON, ROGER Larned 

Radio and Television Senior 




Off-campus — 471 



HEDGES. DAWN R Scott City 

English Junior 

HEETER, DIANE M Kansas City 

Home Economics Senior 

HEFNER, SYDNEY L Santa Ana, CA 

Art Senior 

HEIFNER, BRENDA K Topeka 

Horticulture Senior 

HELD, JON J Jamesburg, NJ 

Physics Junior 

HELLER, MARILYN J Salina 

Clothing and Retailing Sophomore 



HELMER, KENDALL J Marlon 

Architecture Senior 

HELVEY, RICHARD L Abilene 

Milling Science and Management Junior 

HEMMERLING, THERESA G Hutchinson 

Elementary Education Junior 

HEMPHILL, DEBBIE J Clay Center 

Family and Child Development Senior 

HEMPHILL, RETA R Clay Center 

Elementary Education Senior 

HEMPHILL, SUE J Clay Center 

Family and Child Development Sophomore 



HENRY, DENNIS R Corning 

Accounting Senior 

HENRY, KATHLEEN Manhattan 

Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

HENRY, RICHARD S McPherson 

Industrial Engineering Senior 

HERBERS, THOMAS L WlnJIeld 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

HERBIN, MARY L Jamestown 

Psychology Sophomore 

HERL, JACQUELINE Monument 

Clothing and Retailing Junior 



HERMAN, DOUGLAS Concordia 

Business Administration Senior 

HERMAN, KATHRYN A Concordia 

Business Administration Junior 

HERMESCH, JANE E Seneca 

Speech Pathology Senior 

HERRON, LYNDELL D Manter 

Agronomy Sophomore 

HERSHBERGER, LALEEN L Wichita 

Home Economics Senior 

HERSHBERGER, ROY D Harper 

Civil Engineering Senior 



HEYNE, DAVID E Manhattan 

Architecture Fifth Year Student 

HICKERT, DAVID R Bird City 

Agricultural Mechanization Senior 

HICKS, LINDA S Shawnee Mission 

Health Education Sophomore 

HILDEBRAND, JOHN W Stafford 

Agricultural Economics Junior 

HILEMAN, LANELL R Clay Center 

Speech Senior 

HILL, CHERYL A Kansas City 

Medical Technology Junior 



HILL, JAN E Burrton 

Family and Child Development Senior 

HILL, JEANIE E Manhattan 

Family and Child Development Junior 

HILL, LINDA J Liberal 

Pre-Law Sophomore 

HILL, R. CRAIG McPherson 

Accounting Junior 

HINTZ, DAVID J Salina 

Business Administration Junior 

HINTZ, MAUREEN K Salina 

Home Economics Senior 



HITTLE, WALTER S Hugoton 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

HO, PAUL W Hong Kong 

Regional and Community Planning Graduate Student 

HOBSON, CLIFF Hardy, NB 

Mechanical Engineering Senior 

HOBSON, SUSAN K Byron, NB 

Speech Pathology Senior 

HOCHULI, SHELDON Holton 

Business Administration Senior 

HODGES, MARILYN A Lawrence 

Veterinary Medicine Freshman 



HOERMAN, CONNIE M Manhattan 

Consumer Interest Senior 

HOFFMAN, RANDY A Overland Park 

Interior Architecture Senior 

HOLDER, BLAINE K Leona 

Milling Science and Management Junior 

HOLLAND, CONSTANCE L Shawnee Mission 

Family and Child Development Junior 

HOLLAND, KAREN M Shawnee 

Home Economics Junior 

HOLLERN, VICKI A Stockton 

Dietetics Senior 




472 — Off -campus 





HOLLOWAY. RANDALL L . Narka 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore 

HOLLOWAY, RICHARD D. Narka 

Pre-Veten nary Medicine Sophomore 

HOLT, MICHAEL T, Pocasset. MA 

Biology Sophomore 

HOLUB, GARYS Marion 

Business Administration Junior 

HOOVER, JUSTIN A Clay Center 

Physical Therapy . Junior 

HORN, BARBARA J Derby 

Electrical Engineering Senior 

HOUSE, D. LEANN Goodland 

Applied Music Senior 

HOUSH, RICHARD D Hiawatha 

Mathematics Junior 

HOWARD, BONNIE G Fond du Lac, Wl 

Chemical Science Senior 

HOWE, MICKIES- . . . . Manhattan 

Accounting Sophomore 

HOWE, STEVEN D Manhattan 

Nuclear Engineering Senior 

HOWELL, BOB J Stafford 

Mathematics Freshman 




HOWELL, RICK Independence, MO 

Architecture Freshman 

HOWELL, VAUDENE A Lincoln 

Music Senior 

HOWLETT, H. DEAN Mulvane 

Interior Design Senior 

HUBBARD, RHONDA D Hutchinson 

Mathematics Education Senior 

HUGG, JOYCE L Manchester 

Elementary Education Sophomore 

HUGHES DENNIS L Anthony 

Agricultural Economics Junior 

HUGHES, JUDY K Wakelleld 

Elementary Education Senior 

HULLMAN, KATHRYN L Great Bend 

Home Economics Education Freshman 

HULLMAN, KIM H St, John 

Accounting Sophomore 

HULTINE, VICKI K Port Chester, NY 

Reproductive Physiology Graduate Student 

HUMBARGER, GLENN E Herlngton 

Microbiology Senior 

HUMES, LARRY L Concordia 

Business Administration Senior 

HUND, MARY A Paxico 

Dietetics Junior 

HUNT, JEFFREY B Kansas City 

Business Junior 

HUNTER, STEVEN R Topeka 

Geography Freshman 

HUSEMAN, BOB E Ellsworth 

Veterinary Medicine Sophomore 

HUSEMAN, WILLIAM A Scott City 

Veterinary Medicine Sophomore 

HUTCHISON, MICHAEL C Hays 

Biology Senior 

HYNEK, KEVIN L . Hanover 

Biology Junior 

INGALSBE, PATRICIA L Manhattan 

Elementary Education Senior 

IRELAND, JAMES R . . Cottonwood Falls 

Chemistry . . . . Sophomore 

IRELAND, JOHN M Cottonwood Falls 

Pre-Law Senior 

ISAAC, DIANE W Meade 

Elementary Education Senior 

ISAAC, KENNETH D Meade 

Business Administration Senior 




474 — Off-campus 




ISERN, MARK D Elllnwood 

Pre-Law Senior 

JACKSON, DENISEM Arkansas City 

Elementary Education Junior 

JACKSON, MARK F Arkansas City 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

JACOB, LARRY E, Ottawa 

Building Construction Sophomore 

JACOB, STEVEN D Halstead 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

JACOBS. JOAN M Solomon 

Clothing and Retailing Junior 

JACQUES, ROBERT M . . Hutchinson 

Agronomy Graduate Student 

JAMES, JOHN D Dlghton 

Math Education Senior 

JAMISON, MARK A Fontana 

General Agriculture Freshman 

JANSSEN, GERALD W Geneseo 

Architecture Junior 

JARRED, JAMES L Humboldt 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

JARVIS, KATHY J Ulysses 

Elementary Education Senior 

JARVIS, VERLAN W Ulysses 

Psychology Senior 

JECHA, MARY E Tlmken 

Architecture Senior 

JENIK, STEVEN C McDonald 

Agriculture Mechanization Senior 

JENNISON, KEVIN D Latham 

Nuclear Engineering Senior 

JETER, MICHAEL A Wichita 

Mechanical Engineering Senior 

JIRAK, ANNO . Tampa 

Food and Nutrition Junior 

JOHANSEN, DAVID R Shawnee Mission 

Business Administration Senior 

JOHANSEN, JULIE A Shawnee Mission 

Clothing and Retailing Senior 

JOHNS, GERALYNN L Richfield 

Agriculture Journalism Junior 

JOHNS, NORMAN D Richfield 

Agronomy Sophomore 

JOHNSON, BRUCE E Westmoreland 

Business Administration Junior 

JOHNSON, DANI G Lawrenceburg, TN 

Social Work Senior 

JOHNSON, DIANE K Eskrldge 

Business Junior 

JOHNSON, DWIGHT W Manhattan 

Agricultural Economics Senior 

JOHNSON, ERICW Concordia 

Architecture Junior 

JOHNSON, JAMES R Mukwonago, Wl 

Veterinary Medicine Senior 

JOHNSON, JANET L Elllnwood 

Home Economics Extension Senior 

JOHNSON, LAURIE D Atchison 

Theatre Senior 

JOHNSON. MURIEL J Belleville 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

JOHNSON, RUSSELL K Sallna 

Electrical Engineering Senior 

JOHNSON, BETTY L Leawood 

Animal Science Junior 

JOHNSTON, JODYS Wichita 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology Junior 

JOHNSTON, RANDAL R Wichita 

Business Administration Senior 

JONES, DEBRAS Manhattan 

Business Administration Freshman 

JONES. GARY L- Meade 

Civil Engineering Junior 

JONES, MAX A Penalosa 

Biochemistry Junior 

JONES, PAMELA L Topeka 

History Junior 

JONES, PATSY Y Penalosa 

Pre-Vetermary Medicine Sophomore 

JUDGE, RON E Overland Park 

Business Administration Senior 

KADLEC, JUDY A Columbia, MO 

Elementary Education Senior 

KALB, BARBARA J Prairie Village 

Pre-Veterlnary Medicine Junior 

KANTACK, CAROLYN J Clifton 

Speech Pathology Junior 

KAPELLE, JUDY L Topeka 

Family and Child Development Senior 

KARR, COLLEEN F Emporia 

Elementary Education Senior 

KAUFMAN, GARY R Atchison 

Architecture Senior 

KAUFMAN, TONY D Moundrldge 

Business Administration Senior 



Off-campus — 475 



KAUP, JAMES M Smith Center 

Pre-Law Senior 

KEARN, JUDITH M Aurora 

Family and Child Development Senior 

KEAS, DENA E Plalnvllle 

Family and Child Development Senior 

KEATING, MARYC. Fort Scott 

Physical Therapy Junior 

KEIM. JERRY L Wakefield 

Electrical Engineering Sophomore 

KELLAMS, R KENT . Manhattan 

Business Administration Junior 

KELLEY, NAOMI F Manhattan 

Psychology Senior 

KELLOGG, SHARON S Phllllpsburg 

General Senior 

KELLY, GERALD Paterson, NJ 

Architecture Senior 

KELTNER, GENE H Kansas City 

Biology Senior 

KEMP, KEVIN C Oxford 

Medical Technology Junior 

KENNEDY, DEBRA J Hoxle 

Elementary Physical Education Senior 

KENNEDY, JAMES W Hoxle 

Accounting Senior 

KENT, THOMAS G Mound City 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

KERKULIET, MICHAEL F Larchwood, IA 

Sociology Senior 

KERLEY, MARSHA L Peck 

Bakery Science and Management . .Junior 

KERR, RENEE R Kansas City, MO 

Consumer Interest Senior 

KESL. PEGGY M Belleville 

Art Sophomore 

KEUNE, WILLARD H Garden City 

History Senior 

KIBLINGER, ROBERT L Neodesha 

Math Education Senior 

KIDD, DEBRA S DeLavan 

Home Economics Education Senior 

KIDWELL, JUDY M Enterprise 

Family Economics Senior 

KIERNAN, FRANCES A Sallna 

Political Science Senior 

KILGORE, PATTI A Roeland Park 

Radio and Television Junior 

KILLION, JANETTE S Prairie Village 

Physical Education . Junior 

KIMBLE, LINDA J Inman 

Speech Pathology Senior 

KIMERER, KEVIN J Belolt 

Elementary Education Senior 

KIMSEY, GWEN L Manhattan 

Family and Child Development Junior 

KING, DENIS R Syracuse 

Radio and Television Senior 

KING, EDWARD A Oakhill 

Business Administration Junior 

KING, ERICS. Winfield 

Architecture Junior 

KING, JERRIE L Ulysses 

Special Education Senior 

KING, MIKE S Overland Park 

Business Administration Senior 

KISNER, KIMBERLY A Hays 

Elementary Education Senior 

KITTELSON, MARY B Winfield 

Recreation Sophomore 

KLAHR, MICHAEL D DeSoto 

Agricultural Education Junior 

KLAVER, SUSAN K Hutchinson 

Biology Junior 

KLEC2KA, FRANK A Stlckney, IL 

Building Construction Senior 

KLEIN, KATHLEEN A Fairview 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

KLEIN, RHODA L Munich, ND 

Nutrition Junior 

KLEMA, SHARYL M Wilson 

Interior Design Senior 

KLOEFKORN, RANDY L Caldwell 

Electrical Engineering Senior 

KNETTER, PAULA P Kansas City 

Social Science Sophomore 

KNIGHT, VIRGINIA A Beattie 

Clothing and Retailing Junior 

KNILANS, MATTHEW J Manhattan 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Freshman 

KNILANS, RICHARD J Janesvllle 

Veterinary Medicine Senior 

KNIPP, SAM H Scott City 

Agricultural Journalism Junior 

KOGLER, BRADLEY W Scott City 

Business Finance Senior 




476 — Off-campus 










mm #$$1 
WbMMT 





KOHMAN, RAY J Solomon 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

KOLARIK, THOMAS J Prairie Village 

Landscape Architecture Senior 

KOLMAN, BEVERLY J Washington 

General Freshman 

KOMAREK, KIM K Ellinwood 

Business Administration Senior 

KONGS, BEVERLY J Wetmore 

Elementary Education Sophomore 

KONGS, KATHY A Wetmore 

Foods and Nutrition Senior 

KOONTZ, DEBRA K Stafford 

Elementary Education Senior 

KOSTER, RONALD G Cawker City 

Physical Education Graduate Student 

KOUDELE, LARRY J Manhattan 

Electrical Engineering Senior 

KRAMER, RONALD D. . Topeka 

Pre-Medicine Freshman 

KRAUS, NANCY J Pretty Prairie 

Economics and Modern Language Senior 

KRAUSE, BETSY Overland Park 

General Business Administration Senior 



Off-campus — 477 



KREISER, CRAIG A. . Manhattan 

Political Science Sophomore 

KROTH, MARIANNE Wlnlleld 

Accounting Senior 

KRUEGER, CINDY K Prairie Village 

Dietetics Junior 

KRUGER, DENNIS A Topeka 

Electrical Engineering Senior 

KUEKER, RICHARD J Belleville 

Pre-Medlclne Senior 

KUHN, DONNA M Atchison 

Home Economics Education Senior 

KURFISS, DEBBIE J Hutchinson 

Fine Arts Senior 

KURTENBACH, ELIZABETH S Herlngton 

Elementary Education Senior 

LAAKSO, CAROL G Manhattan 

English and Political Science Senior 

LAASER. GREGORY N Kansas City 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

LAGERGREN, RALPH E Lincoln 

Business Senior 

LANDRUM, PEGGY V Elkhart 

Interior Design Junior 

LANGE, JEFF M Conway Springs 

Agronomy Junior 

LANGENKAMP, ROBERT A Manhattan 

General Sophomore 

LANGLEY, MARILYN K Ozawkie 

Sociology Junior 

LARSEN, DENNIS K Kearney, NB 

Veterinary Medicine Senior 

LARSON, DORIS J Atchison 

Elementary Education Senior 

LARSON, KENT Scandia 

Agronomy Junior 

LARSON, PHILIP Galva 

Agriculture Junior 

LASSEN, DENNIS L Atchison 

Business Administration Senior 

LAUBER, JOHN A Derby 

Agriculture Economics Senior 

LAUDER, BARBARA Petersburg, NY 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

LAUGHLIN, MELISSA R Eudora 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

LAWRENCE, AMY L El Dorado 

Horticulture Therapy Senior 

LAWSON, SALLY J Hutchinson 

Secondary Education Junior 

LEACH, SUSAN G Overland Park 

Pre-Nursing Junior 

LEDY, MARLO J Abilene 

Music Education Senior 

LEGLER, JOHN R Overland Park 

Veterinary Medicine Sophomore 

LEIKER, JOYCE M Sallna 

Accounting Senior 

LEIKER, LEON E Wakeeney 

Chemical Science Senior 






LEISHMAN, LEON D Cottonwood Falls 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

LEM, VINCENT M McPherson 

Pre-Medlclne Senior 

LEVENSON, LEE A Manhattan 

General - Freshman 

LEWIS, ALLEN L Manhattan 

Business Freshman 

LEWIS, CHARLES C Pratt 

Recreation Senior 

LEWIS, GARY A Overland Park 

Sociology Senior 

LEWIS, JANE A Sylvan Grove 

Home Economics Senior 

LEWIS, STANELY D." Denton 

Architectural Structures Senior 

LIEBL, BARBARA E Dodge City 

Veterinary Medicine Sophomore 

LIES, STEPHEN J Colwich 

Radio and Television Junior 

LINDGREN, FRED Leawood 

General Junior 

LINDHOLM, CAROL A Great Bend 

Secondary Education Senior 

LINDSTROM, MARY A Clay Center 

Family and Child Development Junior 

LINENBROKER. MELANIE A Greensburg 

Clothing and Retailing Junior 

LINK.GERALDL ....Aurora 

Agriculture Mechanization . Junior 

LISHER, MARLA K Kansas City 

Horticulture Senior 

LIVINGOOO, DAVID H Kansas City 

Architecture Senior 

LIVINGSTON, SUSAN E El Dorado 

Business Administration Junior 



Off-campus — 479 



LOBMEYER, HAROLD L Tribune 

Agricultural Economics Senior 

LOBUNCHONGSOOK, LADOA Bangkok, Thailand 

Architecture Senior 

LOBUNCHONGSOOK, VICHET Bangkok, Thailand 

Architecture Senior 

LOCKARD, NANCY E Altamont 

Office Administration . Junior 

LOCKE, ELIZABETH K Prairie Village 

Physical Education Junior 

LOCKYEAR, WILLIAM L Lawrence 

Accounting Junior 

LOHRENTZ, MARGIE A Hutchinson 

Clothing and Retailing Freshman 

LOHREY, CINDI . ... La Crosse 

Pre-Vetermary Medicine Sophomore 

LONG, EDWARD A Wichita 

Business Administration Freshman 

LONG, KATHRYN A Overland Park 

Elementary Education Senior 

LONG. PATRICK Clifton 

Veterinary Medicine Junior 

LOSCHKE, LYNNE M Osage City 

Speech Pathology Senior 









480 — Off-campus 




LOSEY, MARILYN L Oakley 

Elementary Education Senior 

LOVE, LINDA J Overland Park 

Business Education . . Sophomore 

LOYD, CAROLYN M Powhattan 

Home Economics Senior 

LOYD, DOUGLAS R Ottawa 

Architecture Senior 

LUCAS, ANN M Lakin 

Elementary Education Sophomore 

LUDWIG, KATHRYN A Leavenworth 

Clothing and Retailing Senior 

LUDWIG, SUSAN M Leavenworth 

Clothing and Retailing Junior 

LUKERT, SUSIE K Sabetha 

Fashion Design Sophomore 

LUNBERRY. TYLER D Phllllpsburg 

Architecture Senior 

LUND, ROGER D Osborne 

General ... Junior 

LUNDBERG. DONNA Manhattan 

Pre-Law Freshman 

LUNDGREN, CHRISTINA L Norton 

Sociology Senior 

LUNDGREN, GAIL A Osage City 

Art Junior 

LUNDIN, MARSHA L Manhattan 

Family and Child Development Junior 

LUNDSTROM, DEBBIE J Topeka 

Art Education Senior 

LUTHI, HAL L Madison 

Agriculture Senior 

LUTHI, JERRY L Solomon 

Agricultural Economics Senior 

LYNCH, DENNIS R Kansas City 

Business Administration Junior 

LYSAGHT, ROSALIND A Prairie Village 

Anthropology Sophomore 

MEDILL, DIXIE L Derby 

Music Education Junior 

MAECHTLEN, STEVE W Clearwater 

Food Science and Industry Senior 

MAGERKURTH, JOHN H Topeka 

Microbiology Senior 

MAGILL, KENT B Kansas City 

Political Science Senior 

MAHANEY, JAY W Mernam 

Architecture Junior 

MALLARD, HARRY C Ottawa 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

MALLORY, PATRICIA L Drumnght, OK 

Journalism and Mass Communications Junior 

MALONE, MICHAEL J Sublette 

Microbiology Senior 

MALONE, RICK R Overland Park 

Business Administration Senior 

MANESS, MARK M St. Louis. MO 

Building Construction Sophomore 

MANN, BRENDA L Garden City 

Home Economics Education Senior 

MANN, GREGORY R Garden City 

Political Science Senior 

MARCOTTE, MARILYN R Victoria 

Family and Child Development Senior 

MARCOTTE, RENEE S Hoisington 

Music Education Junior 

MARCUSON. BRADLEY A Dresden 

General Agriculture Freshman 

MARR, DEBRA K Manhattan 

Elementary Education Junior 

MARR, STEVEN K Manhattan 

Business Accounting Sophomore 

MARRS, VALERIA L Bennington 

Home Economics Extension Senior 

MARSHALL, GLENN D San Antonio. TX 

Architecture . Sophomore 

MARTEN, LYNN E Onaga 

Economics Senior 

MARTIN, DEBORAH K Andover 

Clothing and Retailing Sophomore 

MARTIN, EDWIN D Valley Falls 

Accounting Senior 

MARTIN, ROSE MARY Sallna 

Home Economics Senior 

MARTIN, SCOTT A Garden City 

Agriculture Economics Senior 

MASON, LUCY N Hutchinson 

Elementary Education Junior 

MAST, PHILIP N Harper 

General Agriculture Sophomore 

MATOUSEK, NORALEE N Cuba 

Radio and Television Senior 

MATTHEWS, DOUGLAS A Junction City 

Pre-Law .... Sophomore 

MATYAK. JUDY M Rossville 

Interior Design Junior 



Off -campus — 481 




MATZEDER, LAURIE E. Roeland Park 

Medical Technology Junior 

MAUSOLF, DEBRA J Prairie Village 

Business Senior 

MAXSON, KRISTI G Edna 

Animal Science Sophomore 

MAYHEW, CYNTHIA A Hutchinson 

Elementary Education Sophomore 

MAYO, MICHAEL G Manhattan 

Architecture Junior 

McAFEE, GARY L Garnett 

Interior Design Sophomore 

McARTHUR, DAVID K Wichita 

Business Senior 

McBRIDE, DAN A Atwood 

Accounting Junior 

McBRIDE, PENELOPE A Prairie Village 

Elementary Education Senior 

McCALL, CYNTHIA S Phillipsburg 

History Junior 

MCCARTHY, SUSAN F Prairie Village 

Family and Child Development Senior 

McCLANAHAN, BARBARA R Wichita 

Biology Senior 

McCLUNG, JAMES H Wlnlleld 

Agricultural Education Senior 

McCLURG, ROBERT L El Dorado 

Electrical Engineering Senior 

McCOBB, CAROLYN A Russell 

Business Administration Senior 

McCOOL, MARY E Junction City 

Accounting Junior 

McCRACKEN, CAROL L Manhattan 

Family and Child Development Senior 

McCRANN, LISA P Manhattan 

Home Economics Junior 

McCREERY, SHARON K Wichita 

Business Administration Senior 

McCULLOUGH, DA'NELLA J Grlnnell 

Elementary Education Senior 

McCULLOUGH, JOSEPH B Glrard 

Business Administration Senior 

McCURDY, MARK F Hutchinson 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

McCUTCHEON, DON T Overland Park 

Nuclear Engineering Senior 

McDOWELL, RAVAE J Manhattan 

Home Economics Freshman 




482 — Off-campus 




McELROY. NORVAL R Belleville 

Business Finance Junior 

McFARLAND, CONNIES Belle Plame 

Accounting . . . . Junior 

McFARLAND, STEVEN D Osborne 

Statistics Senior 

McGRAW, MARCIAG Hutchinson 

Radio and Television Sophomore 

McGREEVY, SUZANNE Wichita 

Family Economics Senior 

McGUIRE, TERESA A ..Manhattan 

Computer Science . Junior 

McHUGH, MIKE Valley Center 

Mathematics Graduate Student 

McKAIG, SUSAN Gardner 

Music Education Senior 

McKAY, KEVIN W. . La Crosse 

Business Administration Sophomore 

McKINNEY, MARSHAL Arkansas City 

Family and Child Development Sophomore 

McKINNIS, STEVE R Lyons 

Electrical Engineering Senior 

McMURRAY, DEBBRA A Hutchinson 

Recreation Senior 

McMURRAY, LINDA A Coldwater 

Anthropology Senior 

McNEELY, CAROLYN J Kansas City 

Family and Child Development Senior 

MEADOR, PATRICIA A Overland Park 

Home Economics Education Senior 

MEEK, ARLON L Clay Center 

Journalism and Mass Communications Senior 

MEIER, STEVEN K Lincoln 

Agricultural Education Senior 

MELLIES. DAVID N Ness City 

Business Sophomore 

MENAUGH, STEVEN A Kansas City 

Journalism and Mass Communications Sophomore 

MENDENHALL, MARILYN L Wichita 

Speech Pathology Graduate Student 

MEREDITH, RODNEY L Meade 

Dairy Production Senior 

MESSENGER, EVAN S Dlghton 

Agricultural Mechanization Senior 

METRO, THERESA S Concordia 

Home Economics Senior 

MEYER. CAROLYN D Ellinwood 

Family and Child Development Sophomore 



Off-campus — 483 



MEYER. CINDY L Clearwater 

Special Education Freshman 

MEYER, LIBBY G Sabetha 

Elementary Education Senior 

MEYERS, CAROL A Olathe 

Dental Hygiene Junior 

MEYERS, PAULA K Olathe 

Journalism and Mass Communications Sophomore 

MICHEL, MICHAEL E Cofteyvllle 

Pre-Dentlstry Senior 

MICHELS, KAY L Independence 

Elementary Education Junior 

MILLER, ALAN G Alm a 

Medical Technology Junior 

MILLER, CYNTHIA L Enterprise 

Clothing and Retailing ■ Junior 

MILLER. NYLEM Belleville 

Mechanical Engineering . Junior 

MILNER. SUSAN E Ellinwood 

Art Junior 

MINOR. KATHLEEN A, Mission 

Physical Therapy Junior 

MIZE, BARBARA K Hillsboro 

Home Economics Education Freshman 

MIZE, FRANK S Hillsboro 

Geology Senior 

MOATS, BILLIE M Kansas City 

Microbiology Senior 

MOFFITT, NANCY J Topeka 

Interior Design Senior 

MOHLER, MICHAEL H Shawnee Mission 

Business Administration Senior 

MOHR, JULIE K Topeka 

Computer Science Junior 

MOLL, JANET L Olathe 

Speech Pathology Junior 

MONFORT, DARRELL R lola 

Veterinary Medicine Junior 

MONFCT.T, KATHLEEN M lola 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

MONTGOMERY, DAVID E Lenexa 

Business Administration Senior 

MONTGOMERY, JOAN M Torrlngton, WY 

Elementary Education Senior 

MONTGOMERY, MICHAEL B Barnard 

Business Senior 

MOORE, ALISA K Wichita 

Architecture Junior 

MOORE, CAROL A Kansas City 

Physical Therapy Sophomore 

MOORE, JAMES P Kansas City 

Electrical Engineering Senior 

MOORE, SHARON L Munden 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

MOORE, SHIRLEY A Munden 

Dietetics Junior 

MOORE, WILLIAM D Scott City 

Psychology Senior 

MORGAN, JOHN W Ames 

Agricultural Economics Graduate Student 

MORGAN, LINDA L Concordia 

Accounting Senior 

MORGAN, LYNN N La Canada, CA 

Home Economics Graduate 

MORRELL, JACK E Bluemound 

Physical Education Senior 

MORRIS, DERRICK E Cofteyvllle 

Business Administration Senior 

MORRIS, TRESIA E Wichita 

Elementary Education Junior 

MORRISON, BETH D Sallna 

Special Education Senior 

MORRISON, DEBRA J Colorado Springs. CO 

Sociology Senior 

MORRISON, WILLIAM R Shawnee 

Accounting Senior 

MORSE, STEVEN K Galva 

Political Science Sophomore 

MOSER, JON A Oakley 

Pre-Forestry Sophomore 

MOSES, BARBARA E Longford 

Physical Education Senior 

MOUNT, ELIZABETH A Arkansas City 

Music Senior 

MUEHLBACH. CHRIS J Mission Hills 

Business Administration Sophomore 

MUELLER, TOME Waukesha, Wl 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore 

MUIRHEAD, MIGNON E Dresden 

Pre-Nursing Junior 

MUKHEBI, ADRIAN M Bungoma, Kenya 

Agricultural Economics Senior 

MULLIN, MARY J Shawnee Mission 

Family and Child Development Junior 

MULLINS, MARSHA L Overland Park 

Family and Child Development Senior 



484 — Off-campus 





MUMMA, VICKIE L Alamota 

Dietetics . . Sophomore 

MURPHY, B. TED Topeka 

Interior Architecture Senior 

MUSSER, DANIEL F St. Joseph, MO 

Architecture Senior 

MYERS, JERRY C Chapman 

Pre-Law Senior 

MYERS, TRULA J Marquette 

Medical Technology Senior 

NEADERHISER, STEPHEN R Bennington 

Biology Senior 

NELKIN, SHERRY L Overland Park 

Elementary Education Senior 

NELSON. DENNIS F Manhattan 

Agricultural Mechanization Sophomore 

NELSON, PATRICIA J Olsburg 

Business Education Senior 

NELSON, RAEBERN L Chanute 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

NELSON, SALLY J Overland Park 

Business Administration Senior 

NEUFELD, STANTON M . . . . Inman 

Biology Junior 



NEUHOFEL, NANCY L Neodosha 

Political Science Junior 

NEWCOMB, ERICA Wichita 

Architectural Structures Fifth Year Student 

NEWELL, KAREN K Stafford 

Art Education Junior 

NEY, TIMOTHY D Kansas City 

Music Education Senior 

NICHOLS, LONNIE J Eureka 

Animal Science and industry Senior 

NIELSEN, HELEN M Overland Park 

Elementary Education Senior 

NIENHUIS, DEBRA L Spring Lake, Ml 

Bakery Science and Management Junior 

NIGHSWONGER, TED J Hill City 

Agricultural Economics Junior 

NIKKEL, LENA K Wichita 

Early Childhood Education Senior 

NIX, CECELIA A Hugoton 

Business Education Senior 

NIX, CHARLES L Hugoton 

Physical Education Senior 

NIX, NANCY M Hugoton 

Pre-Nursing Sophomore 





486 — Off-campus 



' 




NOLLER, PAMELA J Hebron 

Art Education Sophomore 

NOLTING, STEVEN P Derby 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology Senior 

NOONE, JAMES C. Jennings 

Veterinary Medicine Sophomore 

NORSWORTHY, STEVEN K Meade 

Agronomy Senior 

NOTEIS, VICKI L Kansas City, MO 

Architecture Senior 

NOTTINGHAM, BARBARA J Lawrence 

Physical Education Senior 



NOTTINGHAM, LYLE D . Lawrence 

Veterinary Medicine Sophomore 

NUESSEN, MICHAEL J Eureka 

Business Administration Sophomore 

NUTSCH, TERI L Washington 

Secondary Education Senior 

NYLUND, NANCY V Scandla 

Physical Education Senior 

NYOUIST, JAMES A Phillipsburg 

Mechanical Engineering Sophomore 

OCHS, JEANNETTE L Great Bend 

Interior Design Senior 



OCHSNER, SUSAN M St. Francis 

Dietetics and Institutional Management Senior 

O'CONNOR, YVONNE M Osborne 

Special Education Junior 

O'HARA, BRIGID D Topeka 

Physical Therapy Junior 

OHNO, TSUTAMU Manhattan 

Pre-Medicme Sophomore 

OLBERDING, DAVID L Shawnee Mission 

Civil Engineering Senior 

OLIPHANT, M. JEFF Clay Center 

Agricultural Economics Senior 



O'SHEA, THOMAS R Oskaloosa 

Psychology Senior 

PACK.JANISA Overland Park 

Education Sophomore 

PANKRATZ. BARBARA A Hillsboro 

Interior Design . Junior 

PARKER, ROBERT E Manhattan 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine ... Junior 

PARMELY, JANICE K LeRoy 

Special Education Junior 

PARSONS. EARLE M Hadley, MA 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 



PATTON, JOYCE L Abilene 

Elementary Education Junior 

PAULICH, DANA J Troy 

Foods and Nutrition Senior 

PAULIK, JOSEPH O Verdlgre, NB 

Veterinary Medicine Senior 

PAYNE, DEBORAH J Henderson, NC 

Foods and Nutrition Senior 

PAYNE, LISA A Manhattan 

Horticulture Freshman 

PEARSON. BRAD B Beloit 

Business Sophomore 



Off -campus — 487 



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PEARSON, PAMELA S Manhattan 

Physical Education Fifth Year Student 

PEARSON, STEVEN E Council Grove 

Radio and Television Senior 

PENNINGTON, GARY L Meade 

Agronomy Senior 

PERKINS, CYNTHIA L Hutchinson 

Elementary Education Senior 

PERRY, CHAD L Wichita 

Journalism and Mass Communications Junior 

PERTSCH, KATHERINE A Manhattan 

Pre-Dentistry Junior 

PETERSON, JOHN R McPherson 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

PETERSON, KATHRYN L Tonganoxie 

Business Administration Sophomore 

PETERSON, TERRY G Smith Center 

Accounting Senior 

PETERSON, TONI M Lenexa 

Pre-Nursing Sophomore 

PETTIJOHN, FRANK M Stafford 

Agricultural Economics Senior 

PHARIS, ALICE A Kansas City 

Physical Therapy Junior 

PHARR, SUSAN K Chase 

Business Education Junior 

PHILIP, SANDRA Hays 

Veterinary Medicine Senior 

PHILLIPS, CHARLOTTE A Wellington 

Business Education Senior 

PHILLIPS, DENNIS E Manhattan 

Journalism and Mass Communications Senior 

PHILLIPS, FRANCES E Hiawatha 

Home Economics Education Senior 

PHILLIPS, MARY E Manhattan 

Early Childhood Education Sophomore 

PHILLIPS, REGINALD S Syracuse 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

PHILLIPS, ROBERT N Wellington 

Recreation Senior 

PHILLIPS, RONALD E Hartford 

Building Construction Senior 

PHILLIPS, STEVEN L Carltor, 

Agricultural Engineering Junior 

PICKEL, THOMAS E Manhattan 

Accounting Senior 

PICKETT, ALAN W Council Grove 

Radio and Television Senior 

PICKETT, DELMAR V Olsburg 

Anthropology Senior 

PIERCE, CONNIE R Sallna 

Horticulture Therapy Senior 

PIPER, ANNIKA L Manhattan 

Physical Therapy Freshman 

PISTORA, CYNTHIA D Abilene 

Fashion Design Sophomore 

PITT, ALLISON M Topeka 

English Senior 

PIXLEY, CYNTHIA L Omaha, NB 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Freshman 




488 — Off-campus 




POOLER, DONALD R Greensburg 

Business Administration Senior 

POPE.GINNYA Kansas City, MO 

Fashion Design Freshman 

POPE, LIZ L Kansas City, MO 

Medical Technology Junior 

PORTER, RONALD E Manhattan 

Architecture and Design Senior 

PORUBSKY, GARY L Topeka 

Physics Senior 

POTTBERG, CRAIG E Downs 

Biology Senior 

POTTER, ROBIN F Rochester, MN 

Pre-Dentlstry Senior 

PRETTYMAN, MARTY H . .. Omaha, NB 

Restaurant Management Junior 

PRETZER, JAMS R Manhattan 

Horticulture Therapy Freshman 

PRIDEY, RONALD E Delphos 

Agricultural Economics Freshman 

PROCHASKA, BRETT A .Ada 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

PROCTOR, ROBERT D Viola 

Architecture Junior 

PROTHE, SUSAN E Medicine Lodge 

Home Economics Extension Junior 

PRUS, WANDA R Manhattan 

Fine Arts Junior 

PUCKETT, JUDY L Manhattan 

Journalism and Mass Communications Junior 

PUKRUSHPAN, THANONG Bangkok, Thailand 

Food Science and Industry Graduate Student 

RAATZ. JAMES L Hebron 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Junior 

RADER, TREVA J Wichita 

Physical Therapy Senior 

RAILE, MARVIN L St. Francis 

Veterinary Medicine Senior 

RAILSBACK, CYNTHIA J Langdon 

Radio and Television Junior 

RANKIN, PAM R Larned 

Interior Design Senior 

RATHERT, SUSAN L Junction City 

Elementary Education Sophomore 

RATLIFF, JERALD Kensington 

Agricultural Economics Senior 

REBER, REBECCA J Anthony 

Accounting , Junior 

REDEKER, JAN J Olpe 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Sophomore 

REED, DONNA D Peabody 

Chemical Engineering Senior 

REED, MARK E Oakhlll 

Business Administration Senior 

REED, RICHARD L Topeka 

Business Junior 

REED, RONALD W Colorado Springs, CO 

Business Administration and Management Senior 

REHME, ERWIN L Elllnwood 

Computer Science Senior 




REICHLE, ANNALENER. Manhattan 

Elementary Education Freshman 

REID, JOYCE A Topeka 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

REINERT, BILL D Lincoln 

Business Administration Senior 

REITER, LINDA J Beloit 

Special Education Junior 

REMUS, MICHAEL L Downs 

Special Education Senior 

RENSNER, GARY D Wichita 

Nuclear Engineering Senior 

RETHORST, DAVID N Smith Center 

Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

REVELS, KATHY L Sallna 

Business Senior 

REYES, CARLOS J Managua, Nicaragua 

Agricultural Engineering Graduate Student 

REYNOLDS, JOHN M Paradise 

Veterinary Medicine Junior 

REYNOLDS, JORJEAN A St. Francis 

Microbiology Senior 

REZAYEE, MOHAMMED A Kabul. Afghanistan 

Agriculture Mechanization Graduate Student 

RHODES, DAVID I Salma 

Electrical Engineering Junior 

RHODES, JENNIFER J Topeka 

Elementary Education Senior 

RICHARDS, PAUL C Oklahoma City, OK 

Sociology Sophomore 

RICHARDSON, C. MICHAEL Overland Park 

Mathematics Senior 

RICHMOND, CHRIS S Springfield, MO 

Marketing Senior 

RICHMOND, CINDY A Overland Park 

Clothing and Retailing Senior 




490 — Off -campus 




RIEPL,GARYM Cimarron 

Accounting Junior 

RILEY, DEBRA G Dexter 

Music Education Senior 

RINKENBAUGH, JOHN D CoHeyvllle 

Mechanical Engineering Senior 

RITTERHOUSE. TERRY A Hutchinson 

Early Childhood Education Junior 

ROBARDS, M. LYNNE Wichita 

Dietetics Senior 

ROBBEN, THERESA M Hays 

Sociology Senior 

ROBERTS, CARLA S Great Bend 

Psychology Senior 

ROBERTS, CHARLES B. ..... . Kansas City 

Business Administration Junior 

ROBERTS, MARK W Sallna 

Lite Science Senior 

ROBERTS, RICKEY J Kansas City 

Dairy Science and Industry Senior 

ROBERTS, WENDY J Norwich 

Special Education Senior 

ROBERTSON, LORI L Leawood 

Dietetics Junior 

ROBINSON, G CRAIG Ellmwood 

Pre-Law Junior 

ROBINSON. LINDA A Perry 

Elementary Education Junior 

ROBINSON, VERLAND T Kansas City 

Architecture and Design Senior 

ROCKERS, PAT L Greeley 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

RODGERS, RANDY D Medicine Lodge 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology Senior 

ROE, RICHARD N Olathe 

Journalism and Mass Communications Junior 

ROE, ROSE Wilson 

Dietetics Senior 

ROEMER, DENNIS R Gove 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

ROEMER, MARCIA K Gove 

Home Economics Extension Senior 

ROESNER, PAT J Sallna 

Speech Pathology Senior 

ROESSLEIN, MARK A St Louis, MO 

Architecture Junior 

ROGERS, MARK A Manhattan 

Journalism and Mass Communications Junior 

ROGERS, PATRICIA A Garnett 

Business Administration Senior 

ROLFS, SUSAN C Lorraine 

Physical Therapy Senior 

ROLLINS, KARI L Overland Park 

Pre-Medlclne Senior 

ROMIG, MARGARET A Manhattan 

General Junior 

ROSE, MELINDA K Jewell 

Special Education Senior 

ROSE, TIM Jewell 

Animal Science and 'ndustry Senior 

RObS, SHARON A Hiawatha 

Home Economics Senior 

ROSTETTER, RANDAL D Sabetha 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

ROTHLISBERGER, ROYCE R, Green 

Animal Science and Industry . Junior 

ROWLAND. BARRY D Elkhart 

Agronomy Junior 

RUDEEN, LARRY J Harveyvllle 

Agronomy Senior 

RUDEEN, MARILYN I , Osage City 

Journalism and Mass Communications Junior 

RUES, ALICIA A McCracken 

Elementary Education Junior 

RULE. KIMBERLE J, Hermgton 

Physical Education Junor 

RUSH, JEANETTE Troy 

Pre-Vetermary Medicine Junior 

RUSHIN, JOHN D St. Louis. MO 

Architecture and Design Senior 

RUSSELL, M. JOAN Noedesha 

Business Finance Senior 

RUSSELL, SHELLA S Duncan, OK 

Home Economics Journalism Senior 

RYAN, MICHELLE Kansas City 

Family and Child Development Junior 

RYDER, MICHAEL W Kansas City, MO 

Architecture Senior 

SABATKA, GILBERT M Manhattan 

Business Administration Graduate Student 

SABATKA, TANYA L McDonald 

Food and Nutrition Science Senior 

SAHLBERG, KRISTINE M Overland Park 

Home Economics Senior 

SAINT, SANDRA J Mankato 

Elementary Education Senior 



Off-campus — 491 



SALMON, SHERRI Hutchinson 

Family and Child Development Junior 

SAMMENS, VAN D Leawood 

Business Administration Senior 

SANBORN, GRANT M Salma 

Fine Arts Sophomore 

SANDBERG, STEVEN D Topeka 

Civil Engineering Senior 

SANDERS. JOANN E Baytown, TX 

Food and Nutrition Science Graduate Student 

SANFORD, WAYNE E White City 

Industrial Engineering Senior 

SANKEY, SUSAN K Solomon 

Political Science Senior 

SAPP, GREGG A Holton 

Architecture Sophomore 

SARENSEN, GREGORY A, . . . Netawaka 

Agronomy Junior 

SAUBER, MICHAEL J. . Ellinwood 

Electrical Engineering Sophomore 

SAUNDERS, RICHARD W Independence 

Civil Engineering Senior 

SAVAGE, SUSAN M Hominy, OK 

Special Education Senior 

SCALES, PAUL F Overland Park 

Natural Resources Management Senior 

SCARBROUGH, KENT N Hiawatha 

Physics Junior 

SCHAFFER, DENNIS J Manhattan 

Accounting Sophomore 

SCHALLER, LAWRENCE E Kensley 

Civil Engineering Senior 

SCHETTLER, CHARLES D St. Paul 

Agricultural Mechanization Senior 

SCHEUERMAN, LINDA K Deerfleld 

Animal Science and industry Senior 

SCHIERECK, DONALD L Rockvllle, MO 

Nuclear Engineering Senior 

SCHMIDT,' PHYLLIS A St. Marys 

Elementary Education Senior 

SCHMIDT. RANDY G Cheney 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology Junior 

SCHMITT, MICHAEL L Lakin 

pre-Design Professions Sophomore 

SCHMITZ. TOM P Axtell 

Engineering Junior 

SCHNACKE, JERRY D Overland Park 

Radio and Television Junior 

SCHNECK, GARY A Lamed 

Mechanical Engineering Senior 

SCHNEIDER, TOM A Neodesha 

Accounting . Junior 

SCHNITTKER, THOMAS G Nashville 

Agricultural Mechanization Senior 

SCHOLZ, IVAN D Denton 

Accounting Senior 

SCHONEWEIS, DWIGHT A Manhattan 

Mechanical Engineering Freshman 

SCHOOF, BARBARA A Herlngton 

Journalism and Mass Communications Senior 

SCHOOLEY, DANN F Clay Center 

Elementary Education Senior 

SCHRAEDER, JO L Jetmore 

Music Education Senior 

SCHUESSLER, CONSTANCE S Kansas City 

Dietetics and Institutional Management Senior 

SCHULTZ, CAROL J Trousdale 

Family and Child Development Senior 

SCHULTZ, DON G Topeka 

Architecture Senior 

SCHWANKE, JULIE G Copeland 

Home Economics Senior 

SCHWANKE. MAURICE K Scott City 

Geography Graduate Student 

SCOTT, GLEN A Hutchinson 

Marketing and Business Administration Senior 

SCOTT, KAREN L Wichita 

Family and Child Development Junior 

SCOTT, KEVIN C Sallna 

Architecture Senior 

SCOTT, LARRY R Anthony 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Junior 

SCOTT, RAND D Beverly 

Natural Resource Management Senior 

SCOTT, RICHARD D Fredonia 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

SCOTT. SHARON S Wichita 

Family and Child Development Junior 

SCRIMSHER, BRENDA J. Topeka 

Sociology Junior 

SCULLY, NANCY J Wamego 

Horticulture Senior 

SEILER, GREG J Mt. Hope 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

SELIG. RICKH Topeka 

Psychology and Social Work Junior 




492 — Off-campus 




SELZER, KENNETH A Hlllsboro 

Accounting Senior 

SEPTS, ERNEST Baker. LA 

Education Graduate Student 

SERRANO, THOMAS M Kansas City 

Business Sophomore 

SERVIS, KAREN L Wichita 

Fashion Design Senior 

SEXTRO, MICHAEL T Kelly 

Business Administration Senior 

SEYBOLD, SAMUEL A Jetmore 

Secondary Physical Education Senior 

SEYMOUR, CYNTHIA A Sallna 

Interior Design Senior 

SHADDAY. JANICE C Manhattan 

Music Education Freshman 

SHANKS. DENNIS N Columbus 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

SHARP, CINDY A Greeley, CO 

Home Economics Sophomore 

SHARP, MARY C Ft. Worth. TX 

Home Economics Education Junior 

SHARP, RICK H Overland Park 

Business Administration Sophomore 

SHARPE, ANGELA KAYE Clyde 

Clothing and Retailing Freshman 

SHAW, JACQUELINE K Kansas City 

Early Childhood Education Senior 

SHAW, THOMAS R Wichita 

Electrical Engineering Senior 

SHAWGO, ROBERT D Manhattan 

Civil Engineering Sophomore 

SHEA, PATRICK N Salina 

Pre-Forestry Sophomore 

SHEHI, RONDA G Westmoreland 

Elementary Education Junior 



Off-campus — 493 



SHELDON. L- JAY Leawood 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

SHELLENBERGER, JANET E Scott City 

Family Economics Senior 

SHELLENBERGER, JOHN W Topeka 

Physics Senior 

SHIELDS, LEOWA J Topeka 

Microbiology Senior 

SHIRLEY, SHEILA L Manhattan 

Dietetics Junior 

SHIVE, DEBRA D Halstead 

Business Administration Senior 

SHORNEY, JAY L Narka 

Chemical Engineering Senior 

SHOWALTER, JAMES J Inman 

Accounting Junior 

SIEMER, ALAN J Bushton 

Industrial Engineering Senior 

SIGLE, D. SUSAN Pretty Prairie 

Recreation Senior 

SIGLE, LARRY L Osborne 

Recreation Senior 

SILADY, MICHAEL F Shawnee Mission 

Electrical Engineering Junior 

SIM, SCOTT M Sublette 

Mechanical Engineering Sophomore 

SIMON, RALPH E Netawaka 

Sociology Senior 

SIMPSON, JANET M Fort Scott 

Clothing and Retailing Senior 

SIMS, GREGORY D Topeka 

Architecture Senior 

SIMS, MIKELYN A Shawnee Mission 

Elementary Education Sophomore 

SINCLAIR, SHERRY E Wichita 

Clothing and Retailing Freshman 

SISCO, MICHAEL R Scranton 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology Junior 

SLATER, PATRICIA A Kansas City 

Business Administration Senior 

SLATER, WILLIAM H Mahaska 

Agronomy Junior 

SLIMMER, DON E Holton 

Social Science Senior 

SMALL, MELISSA K Kingman 

Elementary Education Senior 

SMITH, BRYAN T Manhattan 

Business Administration Sophomore 

SMITH, CINDY J Hutchinson 

Political Science Sophomore 

SMITH, DAVID E Milton 

Natural Resources Management Senior 

SMITH, DENNIS R Stafford 

Anthropology Freshman 

SMITH, DONALD J Topeka 

Business Administration Junior 

SMITH, DWIGHT C Latham 

Veterinary Medicine Senior 

SMITH, JANIE L Overbrook 

Journalism and Mass Communications Senior 







Mi m 




SMITH, JOYCE E Kansas City 

Speech Pathology Senior 

SMITH, KATHRYN A Overland Park 

Business Administration Senior 

SMITH, KATHYG Olathe 

Pre-Law Junior 

SMITH, KEVIN W Manhattan 

Business Administration Junior 

SMITH, LAMAR Columbus, GA 

Education Graduate Student 

SMITH, RAE A Amerlcus 

Home Economics Extension Senior 

SMITH, ROBERTA M Mankato 

Early Childhood Education Junior 

SMITH, TERRY A Shawnee Mission 

History Senior 

SMITH, VERA J Harper 

Accounting Senior 

SMOLL, DEE A Wichita 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

SMOLL, E KENT Wichita 

Accounting Graduate Student 

SNIDER, RAY S Abilene 

Agricultural Economics Junior 

SONDAY, BARBARA E Overland Park 

Elementary Education Sophomore 

SONES, DENNIS L Gordon, NB 

Pre-Veterlnary Medicine Senior 

SORENSEN, WILLIAM B Ness City 

Mathematics Senior 

SOUTHERLAND, JANICE E Olsburg 

Home Economics Extension Sophomore 

SOWERS, PAUL R. . , Spring Hill 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

SPACEK, DAVID E Mayetta 

Mechanical Engineering Senior 

SPAETH, ELAINE E Hutchinson 

Home Economics Junior 

SPANGLER, RONALD K Newton 

Psychology Senior 

SPENCER, DARWIN D . Kendall 

Pre-Design Professions Freshman 

SPENCER. TERRY L Dodge City 

Architecture Sophomore 

SPRINGER. KIM D Manhattan 

Fashion Retailing Freshman 

SPURLOCK, ANNE E Manhattan 

Speech and Journalism Sophomore 

STALLBAUMER, SANDY C Axtell 

Sociology Senior 

STANDLEY, DONNA E Great Bend 

Journalism and Mass Communications . Junior 

STANTON, BARBARA A Shawnee Mission 

Family and Child Development Junior 

STANWIX, LESLIE A Wichita 

Lite Sciences Senior 

STAPP, RANDY W Norcatur 

Food Science and Management Sophomore 

STEBBINS, LYLE E Oskaloosa 

Dairy Production Senior 



Off-campus — 495 







STEELE, GARY J Garnetl 

Agricultural Economics Junior 

STEELE, GLEN H Garnett 

Mechanical Engineering Senior 

STEELE, LYNETTE K Waterville 

Theatre . . . . Junior 

STEELE, NANCY L Wichita 

Interior Architecture Senior 

STENZEL, PATRICIA A Ness City 

Physical Education Sophomore 

STEPONICK, MARILYN R, Russell 

Computer Science Junior 

STERLING, JILL A Humboldt 

Home Economics Extension Junior 

STEWART, CATHY A Wamego 

Elementary Education Senior 

STEWART, CHRIS L Abilene 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology Senior 

STEWART, CINDY L McPherson 

Pre- Veterinary Medicine Sophomore 

STEWART, CLIFFORD D Topeka 

Secondary Education Sophomore 

STICKLEY, KARL E Milwaukee, Wl 

Civil Engineering Senior 

STILLIONS, ELIZABETH D Trumansburg, NY 

Elementary Education Junior 

STINSON, GAIL L Wichita 

Horticulture Senior 

STOHR, THOMAS J Sedalia, MO 

Interior Architecture Junior 

STOUTENBOROUGH, THOMAS C Maroa, IL 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

STRACK, SHARYL A Gardner 

Clothing and Retailing Sophomore 

STRAFUSS, BEN J Manhattan 

Pre-Design Protessions Sophomore 



496 — Off-campus 




.L 




STRAIT, CHRIS A Kingman 

Veterinary Medicine Freshman 

STRAMEL, TERRY L Hays 

Home Economics Junior 

STROWIG, G. ROSS Sallna 

History Senior 

STRUNK, MARVEL J Abilene 

Elementary Education Junior 

STUART, JAMES G Glen Elder 

Veterinary Medicine Senior 

STUEWE, NANCIE J Lawrence 

Fashion Design Senior 

STUM, WILLIAM L Ness City 

Radio and Television Sophomore 

STUMP, FREDRICK J Wichita 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology Sophomore 

STUMP, WILLIAM L Wichita 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

STURDEVANT, JOHNNIE R Trenton, MO 

Architecture Senior 

SUBERA, STUART A Caldwell 

Business Administration Junior 

SUGG, KATHRYN L Hutchinson 

Secondary Physical Education Senior 

SULLIVAN, CHARLES D Bowie, MD 

Mechanical Engineering Graduate Student 

SULLIVAN, DOTTY K Atchison 

Sociology Junior 

SULLIVAN, JANET C Holton 

Home Economics Education Senior 

SULLIVAN, MARY S Palmyra, MO 

Elementary Education Senior 

SUMNER, TRUDY M Sullivan, MO 

Interior Architecture Senior 

SUNLEY, BARBARA S Ransom 

Home Economics Education Senior 

SUTHER, RONALD F Westmoreland 

Agricultural Mechanization Senior 

SUTLIEF, DANIEL K Wichita 

Business Administration Junior 

SUTTON, GARY E Atchison 

General Senior 

SUTTON, MARCIA L Prairie Village 

Home Economics Junior 

SWAIN, JANELLE M El Dorado 

Clothing and Retailing Senior 

SWARTZ, MICHELE L Overland Park 

Radio and Television Junior 



SWENSON, GALEN G Salina 

Agricultural Economics Sophomore 

SWIFT, VICTORIA M Chanute 

Clothing and Retailing Junior 

SYLVESTER, ALAN L Salina 

Civil Engineering Senior 

TAMSON, TONY W Independence 

Business Administration Senior 

TATON, NOLEN G Argonla 

Agricultural Economics Senior 

TRAVARES, CARLOS A Recife 

Occupational Education Graduate Student 

TAYLOR, PAM A Topeka 

Art Sophomore 

TETLOW, LYNDA A Troy 

Clothing and Retailing Senior 

TEWELL, JANE E. Bonner Springs 

Home Economics Sophomore 

THALMANN, CAROL A Haven 

Early Childhood Education Junior 

THIEROLF, GALE D Manhattan 

Business Administration Junior 

THOMAS, ALAN R Clyde 

Accounting Junior 

THOMAS. RANDALL W Hutchinson 

Business Junior 

THOMAS. VICKIE J Buhler 

Home Economics Junior 

THOMPSON, CAROLYN F Harveyville 

Home Economics Junior 

THOMPSON, JAMES C Mound City, MO 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

THOMPSON, KENTON R Osborne 

Art Education Senior 

THOMPSON, PAULA J Wichita 

Business Sophomore 

THOMPSON, SHIRLEY R Osborne 

Elementary Education Junior 

THOMPSON, SIDNEY A Wichita 

Civil Engineering Junior 

THULL, VIRGINIA K Cawker City 

Physical Education Junior 

THURLOW, LADONNA L Wakefield 

Business Sophomore 

TILLINGHAST, KARL G Clifton 

Animal Science and Industry Sophomore 

TOBYNE, DWIGHT N Clifton 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

TOMAN. GILBERT J. Holyrood 

Biology Junior 

TOPLIFF.CINDAA. . . Goodland 

Community Services Junior 

TRANSUE, JANET W Studley 

Family and Child Development Junior 

TRAUTWEIN, SUSAN M Clay Center 

Speech Pathology Senior 

TREVARTON, JEAN A Troy, Ml 

Journalism and Mass Communications Senior 

TROST, CHRISTINE J Concordia 

Home Economics Education Senior 

TRUAX, SUSAN J Cuba, IL 

Music Education Senior 

TUCKER, COLLENA D Washington, DC 

Architecture Senior 

TUCKER, EDGAR G St. Georges, Bermuda 

Architecture Senior 

TUCKER. JULIE K Manhattan 

Business Sophomore 

TUCKER, STEPHEN A Independence 

Interior Design Senior 

TUCKER, TERESA D Carbondale 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Junior 

TULEY, LOISANN E Republic 

Secondary Education Senior 

TYLER, VICKIE L Ipswich, MA 

Physical Therapy Freshman 

UKENA, TERRY G Manhattan 

Business Sophomore 

ULLOA, KATHY J Eugene. OR 

Pre-Nursing Freshman 

UNDERWOOD, TRACY W Lancaster 

Radio and Television Sophomore 

UNRUH, DEBBIE L Wichita 

Family and Child Development Senior 

UPHAM, WARDS Junction City 

Biology Junior 

URBANSKI. BEVERLY A : Hillside, NJ 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Junior 

URISH, JANET J Burlingame 

Pre-Nursing Junior 

URISH, JOYCE R Burlingame 

Physical Education Junior 

UTTER, JANISC Wichita 

Clothing and Retailing Senior 

VAN BUSKIRK, WILLIAM J Mission Hills 

Psychology Senior 




498 — Off-campus 




VANCIL, ROGER D Manhattan 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology Senior 

VANDEVENTER, WILLIAM H Wichita 

Architecture Senior 

VAN DIEREN, JILL Leawood 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

VELASQUEZ, JONATHAN L Berryton 

Accounting Sophomore 

VELASQUEZ. TERRY J Topeka 

Secondary Education Junior 

VERMEULEN, DEAN A Rochester, NY 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

VERVYNCK, JANICE L Gardner 

Speech Pathology Junior 

VIENTOS, JOSE A Ponce, Puerto Rico 

Pre-Veterlnary Medicine Senior 

VINCENT. ROBERT M Lowry City. MO 

Architecture Fifth Year Student 

VINDUSKA, RONALD J Marlon 

Secondary Education Senior 

VINEYARD, DONNA P Salina 

Business Administration Graduate Student 

VLCEK, CANDACE E Columbus, OH 

Family and Child Development Senior 

VOHLAND, LAWRENCE W Manhattan 

Business Administration Sophomore 

VOHLAND, ROSE M Manhattan 

Clothing and Retailing Sophomore 

VOSICKY, LINDA K Overland Park 

English Education Senior 

WADE, JOE . Goddard 

Family and Child Development Sophomore 

WAGNER, GERALD L Hays 

Nuclear Engineering Senior 

WAKEFIELD. RON W Marysville 

Horticulture Sophomore 

WALKER, LEE O Junction City 

Social Sciences Senior 

WALKER, MAE E Mlltonvale 

History Senior 

WALL. KEVIN K Clay Center 

Chemical Science Senior 

WALSTEN, RICH J Hutchinson 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

WARD, HAROLD S Buffalo 

Pre-Veterlnary Medicine Senior 

WARNER, JACK W Dodge City 

Architecture Senior 

WARNER, LINDA S Lebanon 

Home Economics Education Senior 

WARNER. RANDALL L Lebanon 

Agriculture Education Junior 

WARNER. SHARON M Sayre. PA 

Modern Language Freshman 

WARREN. HEATHER M Bonner Springs 

Recreation Sophomore 

WARREN, SHELLEY A Bonner Springs 

Clothing and Retailing Senior 

WARREN, VIRGINIA L Eskndge 

Veterinary Medicine Junior 



Off -campus — 499 




WASSER, SCOTT A Overland Park 

Technical Theatre Junior 

WATERS, MICHAEL B Seneca 

Political Science Senior 

WATTS, GEORGE C North Newton 

Natural Resource Management Sophomore 

WEAVER, DONALD R Valley Center 

Civil Engineering Senior 

WEAVER, TRUDY L Wlnfleld 

Foods and Nutrition Senior 

WEBER, JOY A Ramona 

Sociology Senior 

WEBER, MARY L Wichita 

Family and Child Development Senior 

WEBERG, JEANNE W New Cambria 

Elementary Special Education Senior 

WECKER, GLENDA K Allen 

Pre-Nursmg Sophomore 

WEGENER, DENNIS C White Cloud 

Nuclear Engineering Senior 

WEIDNER, KIMBERLY A Sublette 

English Senior 

WEINBERG, BRADLEY A Hiawatha 

Business Administration Senior 

WEISHAAR. JIMMY D Argonia 

Chemistry Sophomore 

WEISSER, BARB A Leawood 

Family and Child Development Junior 

WEIXELMAN, RICHARD L Wamego 

Agricultural Mechanics Senior 

WELBORN, GEORGE A Merlden 

Agricultural Education Senior 

WELLS, CAROLYN L Nickerson 

Political Science Junior 

WELLS. RAY L Wallace 

Business Administration Junior 

WENGER, JANICE K Sallna 

Applied Music Senior 

WENGER, JOAN S Newton 

Accounting Junior 

WESSEL, WILLIAM J Goff 

Mechanical Engineering Junior 

WEST, LYNNETTE M LaCrosse 

Business Administration Senior 

WEST, MICHAEL L Medora 

Chemical Engineering Freshman 

WEYAND, JANET K McPherson 

Home Economics Senior 




500 — Off-campus 



WHEATLEY, KAREN A Cherryvale 

Physical Education Senior 

WHISLER, SCOTT R Topeka 

Business Administration Sophomore 

WHITAKER, BRUCE L Copeland 

Crop Protection Senior 

WHITCOMB, RANDY K Wichita 

Veterinary Medicine Senior 

WHITNEY, CARL J Manhattan 

Business Administration Junior 

WHITNEY, DONITA L Manhattan 

Elementary Education Senior 

WHITNEY. HARRY E Manhattan 

General Agriculture Sophomore 

WICHMAN, CURTIS W Seneca 

History Senior 

WIDMER, KIM Cofteyvllle 

Accounting * Senior 

WIEBE, RICHARD G Marlon 

Landscape Architecture Senior 

WIENS, GREGG E Meade 

Accounting Junior 

WIENS, JANICE K Meade 

Clothing and Retailing Junior 

WIKOFF, DOUGLAS P Independence, MO 

Architecture Senior 

WILES, BEVERLY A Hunter 

Home Economics Graduate Student 

WILES, WOOD D Hutchinson 

Mathematics Senior 

WILEY, DOUGLASS R Hutchinson 

Business Administration Senior 

WILEY, KAREN L Leavenworth 

Dietetics Junior 

WILKE, MARGIE L Troy 

Physical Education Senior 




Off-campus — 501 



WILLIAMS, CYNTHIA A Fort Scott 

Music Education Junior 

WILLIAMS, KIM A Columbus 

Architecture Senior 

WILLIAMS, L. ALAN Shawnee Mission 

Business Administration Senior 

WILLIAMS, NANCY M Colby 

Social Work Senior 

WILLIAMS, PEGGY S Shawnee Mission 

Elementary Education Senior 

WILLIS, R. JAMES Wheat Ridge, CO 

Interior Design Senior 

WILLMS, CLIFTON L Hutchinson 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

WILSON, CATHERINE L Hutchinson 

Medical Technology Sophomore 

WILSON, JACK E Bronson 

Animal Science and Industry Senior 

WILSON, JANET L Council Grove 

Journalism and Mass Communications Senior 

WILSON, JAREDL Hanston 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

WILSON, LAWRENCE E Manhattan 

Mathematics Senior 

WILSON, LYNDA S . Council Grove 

Theatre Sophomore 

WILSON, NANCY L Topeka 

Physical Education Senior 

WILSON, SHARON A Arkansas City 

General Sophomore 

WILSON, TERRI L Shawnee Mission 

Speech Pathology Senior 

WINDLER, GREGORY J Paola 

Veterinary Medicine Senior 

WINGFIELD, NANCY M Prairie Village 

Architecture Senior 

WINSTEAD, TAMMY Shirley, IL 

Clothing and Retailing Senior 

WINTER, JANICE E Satanta 

Sociology Junior 

WINTERSCHEIDT, ELOISE M . Clearwater 

Political Science Sophomore 

WISDOM, JONI Kansas City 

Dietetics Senior 

WITTHUHN, RAY L Bazine 

Physical Therapy Sophomore 

WITTORFF, CAROLYN K Inman 

Home Economics Education Senior 

WOKER, ARNOLD S St. Louis, MO 

Architecture and Design Senior 

WOLF, BEVERLY S Kensington 

Elementary Education Senior 

WOLKEN, MYRON B Greeley 

Pre- Veterinary Medicine Senior 

WOMER, MARY A Wichita 

Family and Child Development Senior 

WOODALL, JERALYN S Osawatomie 

Pre-Nursing Sophomore 

WOODMAN, SHEILA S Kansas City, MO 

Life Science Senior 

WOODRUM, CHRISTINA K Coffeyvllle 

Family and Child Development Senior 

WORMAN, DEBORAH D Elllnwood 

Family and Child Development Senior 

WORMAN, STACEY K Ellinwood 

Family and Child Development Graduate Student 

WORRELL, DAVID L. , Leon 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine Junior 

WORTHINGTON, BARBARA A Kansas City 

Elementary Education Senior 

WORTHINGTON, LINDA K Wamego 

Family and Child Development Senior 

WORTHINGTON, TIM R Kansas City 

Sociology Senior 

WRIGHT, SUSAN J Haven 

Sociology Senior 

WUNDER, BEVERLY F Topeka 

Journalism Education Senior 

YARSULIK, STEPHANIE E Shawnee Mission 

Pre-Nursing Sophomore 

YEAGLEY, ROBERT D Salina 

Pre-Design Protessions Sophomore 

YENNE, JACKIE B Smith Center 

Natural Resource Management Junior 

YENZER, BARBARA A Dodge City 

Home Economics Senior 

YERKES, JAN M Independence 

Elementary Education Junior 

YOAKUM, JOHN H Scott City 

Electrical Engineering . . . Junior 

YOCUM, SUE E Wamego 

Music Education Senior 

YOHN, GAIL D Greensburg 

Physical Education Senior 

YORK.DARRELLG Osage City 

Natural Resource Management Junior 




502 — Off-campus 




mk 



YOUNG, AMON Stillwater, OK 

Architecture Senior 

YOUNG, CHRISTINE L Junction City 

Modern Languages Senior 

YOUNG, MARSHA K Larned 

Clothing and Retailing Senior 

YOUNG, ROBERT K Pretty Prairie 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

YOUNG, WENDY J. Overland Park 

Elementary Education Junior 

ZEINER. SHARON I Sallna 

Elementary Education Senior 

ZELLER, STEPHEN M Baldwin City 

Agricultural Economics Junior 

ZIEGLER, CHUCK A Collyer 

Feed Science and Management Senior 

ZILLINGER, DOUGLAS G Phillipsburg 

Animal Science and Industry Junior 

ZIMMERMAN, TERRY J Hays 

Mechanical Engineering Senior 

ZOHN, RANDY E Scandla 

Psychology Senior 

ZUBECK, R. JAN Deertleld 

Music Education Senior 




A 

Aalbreglse, Suzanne 1 78, 209, 335 

Abbihett. John L 453 

Abbott. Brenda D 384 

Abbott. Gary L 374 

Abbott. Jeanne K 447 

Abell. DebraG .... 453 

Abell, Douglas E 453 

Abernathy, Ralph 62 

Abrams. Karen A 453 

Abrams. Steve E 453 

Abrams. Wayne A 169,215,453 

Abubakar.SalihuS 192 

Abughazalah, Nabil F 192, 453 

Acacia 312 

Achten, Philip B 332 

Achterberg, Donna 355 

Ackerman, Sherry J 223 

Acosta, Victoria A 366 

Adair. Sally J 418 

Adams. David E 327.374 

Adams. Deborah L 324 

Adams. Diana L 453 

Adams. Gary L 420 

Adams, Lucy A 447 

Adams. Malmda M 354 

Adams. Marvin 297 

Adams. Michael C 277 

Adams, Mar|one 171 

Adams, Nancy L 180.221,447 

Adams, Rebecca S 366 

Adams, Robert M 453 

Adams. Steve 166,375 

Adams. William C 177,235.420 

Adcock, Phyllis 453 

Addis, Deidre A 453 

Adkins. Dan 453 

Adkison, Marlene S 355 

Administrator* 1 40 

Aeschliman, David C 375 

Aeschliman, Susan 447 

Agriculture Mechanization Club 162 

Agriculture Education Club 1 62 

Agriculture Studant Council 1 63 

Agronomy Club 1 63 

Ahlquist. Lila E 234.331 

Ahrens. Juanita J 351 

Ahrens. Lesley L 366 

Ahrens, William W 195 

Aicher, Eric L 432 

Akers, Judy 305 

Akin, Donald L 252 

Akin. Tern J 248 

Al-Amoudi. Abdullah , 453 

Al-Amoudi, Khalid A 403 

Alam, Shah Farooq 191 

Albers. Deborah A 181.364 

Albers. Diane K 453 

Albers. Pamela D 239. 324 

Albers. Reinette M 355 

Albers, Tregan P 403 

Albracht, James J 166,237 

Albracht. Stephen J 197 

Albrecht, Walter J 374 

Albright, Julia C 316 

Aldenon, Melissa L 314 

Aldis, David F 453 

Aldis, Rosemary L 453 

Aldred. Lynn E 366 

Aldnch.Lisa 366 

Alets. BettyS 212,453 

Alexander. Arthur 277 

Alexander, Juanita 188, 355 

Alexander, Lance A 345 

Alexander, Mila A 436 

Alexander, Patricia 366 

Alexander, Royce A , ... 393 

Alexcites. Charlotte 199.331 

Altino. Anthony F 199. 403 

Algiene. Gary L 397 

Alison. Dale L 345 

Alldntt, Celeste 355 

Allen. Christine A 342 

Allen. Dale D 162,166,192.453 

Allen. Dale K 397 

Allen. Gregory L 235 

Allen, Joseph H 1 74 

Allen. Kann S 390 

Allen. Keith R 375 

Allen. Leslie J 192,454 

Allen. Lisa A 314 

Allen, MarciaK 454 

Allen, Marianne 

Allen, Marilyn A . 166. 192 

Allen. Mary C 387 

Allen. Mary L 342 

Allen, Michael 374 

Allen. Michael L 190 

Allen. PattiL 195 

Allen, Randall G 175,441 

Allen. Timothy E 397 

Aller. Jerry C 375 

Allerheiligen, Carol 454 

Allerheiligen, Dale 245 

Allerheiligen, Steve 327 

Allison, Douglas A 412 

Allison, Pamela D 422 

Allison, Suzanne S 454 

Almond, Marcia J 189,190,454 

Alpha Chi Omega 314 

Alpha Dalta PI 316 

Alpha Epallon Rho 164 

Alpha Gamma Rho 318 

Alpha Kappa Lambda 320 

Alpha Kappa Pal 164 

Alpha Lambda Dalta 165 

Alpha Phi Mu 165 

Alpha Phi Omlcron 166 

Alpha Tau Alpha 166 

Alpha Tau Omsga 322 

Alpha XI Delta 324 

Al-Rawl. Basil 192 

Altizer. Page L 447 

Altland. Susan M 193 

Alumbaugh, Michael D 199,454 



Alvis. David W 171,454 

Amann.JamesA 455 

Ambler, Jams L 234 

Amedn, Michael S 454 

American Choir Directors 167 

American Institute ot Industrial 

Engineers 167 

American Institute of Interior 

Designers 168 

American Society ot Agricultural 

Engineers 1 68 

American Society ot Mechanical 

Engineers 169 

American Veterinary Medicine 

Association 169 

Ames. Rodney W 430 

Amest, Marsha 209 

Ammel, Alice P 193. 213. 454 

Amrine. Robin D 1 76. 324 

Amy, Luann E 454 

Anderson, Jane E 387 

Anderson, Allen S 393 

Anderson, Amy K 1 72,454 

Anderson. Barry 255 

Anderson, Cynthia 1 70, 202, 324 

Anderson, Frank E 366 

Anderson, Harold E 1 74 

Anderson, Janet K 190.314 

Anderson, John G 199 

Anderson, John M 410 

Anderson, Joleen 331 

Anderson, Judith L .247,422 

Anderson, Karen R 390 

Anderson, Kitty J 314 

Anderson, Lloyd B 454 

Anderson, Michael B 347 

Anderson. Michael R 403 

Anderson, Milton P 443 

Anderson. Patrick L 175.410 

Anderson, Paul 251 

Anderson, RebeccaS. 183.216.454 

Anderson, Rex M . 403 

Anderson. Ronald G 412 

Anderson, Steven E 349 

Anderson, Susan B 331 

Anderson, Susan D 316 

Andreasen, Carl C 186.191.235,454 

Andres, John L 454 

Andrew, Cynthia L ... 355 

Andrew, Deborah A 183,216,355 

Andrews, Debra L 193.447 

Andrews, Johnny L 261 

Andrews, Julie A 355 

Andrews, Kathryn J 185,364 

Andnsevic, Mary E 454 

Andrist, Christopher 439 

Angel Flight 1 70 

Angell, Scott W 375 

Ankenman, Lee K 454 

Ankerholz, Sonya G 422 

Annis, Jenniter L 445 

Annis, John R 397 

Anselmi. Kent E 395 

Anson, Steven L 245 

Anspaugh, Nikki S 364 

Anstaelt. Nancy S 165 

Anstine, Mary F 316 

Anthony, Alan S 395 

Anthony, Russell V 174.454 

Antweiler. Marilyn B 324 

Anzola. Eduardo J 167 

Appel. Janet 355 

Appl, Fredrick 237 

Applebaugh. Brad D 397 

Appleby, Teresa L 200,201,387 

Araia, Tiblez 454 

Archer, Douglass K 420 

Architecture Design Council 1 70 

Arensdorl. Gerard R 432 

Arensman, Michael G 345 

Armagost, Steven M 374 

Armitage, Sue E 366 

Armour, Gloria J 1 90, 21 4, 454 

Armour, James L 416 

Armstrong, Jan P 335 

Armstrong, Joanadene 355 

Armstrong. Mechelle 366 

Armstrong, Suzanne 384 

Armstrong, Ten A 314 

Arnett, Douglas A 374 

Arnold Air Society 171 

Arnold, DeniseR 216,355 

Arnold. Jo E 182, 196,447 

Arnold, Richard L 414 

Arnold, Stanley D 454 

Arnold!, Mary 390 

Arnoldi, Rozanne C 390 

Arnoldy, Lanette M 225, 445 

Arnoldy, Nancy 445 

Arpin, Sidney L 414 

Arrighi, David A 410 

Arlh.KarenA 355 

Arts and Science Council 171 

Arudi, RavmdraL 191 

Asbury, Leonald K 397 

Ashbrook, Denise R , 454 

Ashcratt. Brenda L 455 

ASK 116 

Aska, Susan M 216 

Askren, Kathryn L 223.445 

Aspelin, Nyla J 366 

Association ot General 

Contractors 172 

Atchity. Janet S . . 366 

Athey, George F. . . . 172.455 

Atkins, Fredreals 209 

Atkinson. Alan J 397 

Atkinson, Barbara L 166.447 

Atkinson, Donald N 21 1 , 345 

Atkinson, Eric. J 374 

Atkinson, Gloria A 176 

Atkinson, Michael 283 

Atlakson, Karen J 316 

Allakson, Kevin K 428 

Attaway. Jack A 374 

Atteberry, Donald G 403 

Attebery, Jean D 387 

Atlerbury, Ruth A 422 



Atwell, David C 320 

Atwell, Linda M 214.324 

Atwill, Donald E . . . 434 

Atwood. William D 375 

Atzenhotler. Beth A 355 

Atzenhofter. Jams L 1 75 

Atzenhotler. Mark D 1 75. 397 

Auer. Kim L 403 

Aust. Elizabeth D 422 

Auxier, Bryan E 439 

Averill, Scott G 432 

Avery. Donald A 211 

Avery. Lana J 221 

Aylward. Jayne A 403 

Aylward, Kathenne M 447 

Aylward, Thomas M 455 

Ayres. Janet S 236 

Azrak, Fred M 268 

6 

Baalman, Rhonda G 455 

Baay, Sherylyn F 171 

Babb. Samuel M 168.374 

Babmgton. Wendy L 1 79. 355 

Bach, Rex C 403 

Bachman, AmyD . .. 165.314 

Bachman, Gary E 237 

Bachman, Melissa J 316 

Bachmann, Susan C 203 

Backhus. Janet L 217,447 

Bader, Terry F 235. 455 

Badger, Christopher 1 63, 1 75, 225. 374 

Badger, David A 374 

Badgley. Judy J 223. 364 

Baehler.GaryL 180,455 

Baehler, Vickie S 189, 190, 198.212.338 
Baetz, Cindy 179,316 

Bahr. Karen L 455 

Bahre, Susan M 366 

Bahruth, Sheila D 172,197,366 

Bailey, Arthur 261 

Bailey. Bruce G 194,374 

Bailey, Carl 245 

Bailey. Marilyn A 366 

Bailey, Nozella L 331 

Bailey, Patricia A 455 

Bailey. Rebecca S 355 

Bailey, Thomas F 169,194,215,412 

Bainter, Warren C 455 

Baird, James R .... 347 

Bajich. Lilhanna 455 

Bajoi, Abdul H. . .192,208 

Baker, Alan E 455 

Baker, Ann F 182.198,455 

Baker, Barbara 447 

Baker, Brenda G 1 82 

Baker, Brenda L. 335 

Baker. Cheryl L 216,324 

Baker, Debra D 316 

Baker, Dons R 338 

Baker. Fred W. 393 

Baker, Gregory D 397 

Baker, Gregory L 177 

Baker, James W 374 

Baker, Jerry L 194.438 

Baker. Jill C 455 

Baker, Judy E. 422 

Baker, Marc 374 

Baker, Martha L 181 

Baker, Nancy K 239, 445 

Baker, Randal W 374 

Baker, Robert L 258, 261 

Baker, Roger D 1 65. 439 

Baker. Susan L 366 

Baker, Teresa L 237 

Balbach, Marsha J 455 

Balbmot, Linda 355 

Balcom, Ramona J 331 

Baldinger, Steven G 374 

Baldwin, Barbara J 447 

Baldwin, Cynthia L 197,198,224,455 

Baldwin, Darryl D 168 

Baldwin, Dorene F 355 

Baldwin, Lynn W .366 

Baldwin, Marcia J 204,445 

Bales, Ann E 1 76. 220. 314 

Bales. Rebecca J 384 

Ball. Alesia J 211 

Ball, Brenda J 455 

Ball. Daniel A 163, 181 

Ballew, Rebecca J 234 

Balluch. Eddie E 340. 366 

Baltzer. Elizabeth A 203. 387 

Baltzer. Paul W .252 

Balzer, Nance R 338 

Banta. Susan E. 384 

Baranzyk, Sheila A 218 

Barba, Dennis L 185, 434 

Barber, Chester 1 428 

Barber, Marione 418 

Barber, Suzanne M 335 

Bareiss, Loren D 327 

Baresel, Renee L 455 

Barger, Robert E 403 

Bargmann, Steven K 327 

Barham, Emily K 181.190.364 

Barker. Cynthia A 1 76, 351 

Barker. Edward L 1 99. 225. 403 

Barker, Martin D 397 

Barkyoumb, Steven D 455 

Barnard, Judy A 314 

Barnes, Debra J 189,418 

Barnes, Greggory T 215 

Barnes, John F 455 

Barnes, John W 403 

Barnett, Arthur W 1 62, 1 66 

Barnett, Carol 212, 422 

Barrera, John M ... 403 

Barrett. Bruce E 171 

Barrett, Debra S 455 

Barrett, John T 340 

Barrett, Michele 355 

Barrett, Mynn 248 

Barrett, Sheryl A 355 



Barron, DayneC 439 

Barta, Randall L 455 

Barlak.GaryJ 322 

Bartak, Kathryn J. . 187,221,447 

Bartel, Douglas F 374 

Bartel, Susan P 208 

Bartell, Cynthia 455 

Barlell.MarkusE 455 

Barth, Anne 447 

Barth. Jeltrey S 186.191.234,403 

Barllett, Kathleen L 209.236,387 

Bartlett. Randall D 219 

Barllett, Ronald A 277 

Bartley. Jill E 1 89 

Bascom, Lylia K 455 

Bascom, Robert A , . .. 165,234.455 
Baseball 244 

Basel, Brian E 455 

Basel. Connie J 455 

Basketball 292 

Baskin, Vincent N 195 

Basom, Gary D 329 

Basom. Thon A 329 

Batchelor. Daryl J 1 95, 234 

Batdort, Harold G 261 

Bates. GylIC 216 

Batsell. Stephen G 397 

Batson, Connie J 237 

Bart. Beverly 387 

Ban, Carl 345 

Bart, Shelley L 206.342 

Bauer, Bradley L 349 

Bauer, Brian M 455 

Bauer, Christopher H 374 

Bauer, Gary B 428 

Bauer, Gregory G 439 

Bauer. Leann M 390 

Bauer, Michael E 374 

Bauer, Thomas L 349 

Bauerband. Stephen R 366 

Baugart. Steven G 322 

Baughan. Kim M 331 

Baugher.Earl 162 

Baugher, Marsha K 1 90, 1 93 

Baughman. Michael J 349 

Baumgarten, Fritz 335 

Baumgarlen, Winnie F 1 70 

Baumgartner. David E 349 

Baumgartner, Robed 455 

Baxter, Darrell J 403 

Baxter. Debra 223. 335 

Baxter, Pnscilla 335 

Bay. Randalls 410 

Bayer. Deanna 238 

Bayer, Jenney L 1 70, 1 96 

Bayer, Rebecca S 223 

Beach, Kimberly J 331 

Beachler, Stephen L 455 

Beadles, Sherri L . . . 355 

Beagle. Barry T 426 

Beal. Deborah A 366 

Beals, Constance L 331 

Beamish, Cynthia L 445 

Bean.MarseeL 212,384 

Beardmore, David H 395 

Beardmore, Luanne 1 68, 4 1 8 

Bearly. Elizabeth A 170.221.314 

Season. Jetl 268 

Beaston, Martha 366 

Beatson. Jacquelyn R 182,355 

Beatty, Daniel 146 

Beaty, Carol L 223, 364 

Beaty. Jo A 403 

Beavers, Robert 434 

Beck, Barbara M 316 

Beck. David W 455 

Beck. Glenn 1 46 

Becker, Carol L 190,355 

Becker, Curtis J 327 

Becker, Duane E 455 

Becker, Edward L 455 

Becker, Robert E 172,220 

Becker. Stuart D 163,188.455 

Beckerdite. Claudia 355 

Beckerdite. Estella 403 

Beckerle. Holly L 324 

Beckett. Ruth A 455 

Beebe, Joseph L 1 76 

Beech. Teresa M 455 

Beecher, Barbara J 206,316 

Beedles, Janet E. . . . 331 

Beem, Patrick K 414 

Beers, Gary F 455 

Beers, Ray 410 

Beery, Joe R 455 

Beezley. Ann W 201 , 390 

Beezley, Jack L 219 

Beier. Richard A 169.215,416 

Beier, Ronald R 416 

Beineke, Betty K 455 

Bems, Max A 410 

Beisel, Ruth M 455 

Bell, Anthony W 403 

Bell. Carol A 455 

Bell. Cynthia A 403 

Bell. David G 455 

Bell. Deborah J 190 

Bell, Deborah L 216.342 

Bell. Judy L 455 

Bell. Karen Kay K 234 

Bell. Linda L 176,207,351 

Bell, MarlysJ 422 

Bell, Mary G 324 

Bell, Sheryl A 447 

Bell, Teresa L 455 

Bell.ThenaM 216,364 

Bell. Thomas L 434 

Bell. Thomas N 227, 374 

Bell, William K. . 393 

Bellar, Michael D 180, 374 

Benda, Beverly J 222.455 

Benda. David L 397 

Bender, Michael H 215 

Benedict, Tern S 390 

Beneliel, Wendy L 188 

Benglson. Kenneth R 403 

Benignus. Nancy V 165.255 

Bemgnus, Sara 418 



Benish. William C 235 

Bennett. Darrell L 455 

Bennett, David E 318 

Bennett, Debra L 1 74 

Bennett, Linda K 224, 455 

Bennett, M Claire 316 

Bennett, Neisha L 355 

Benson, Ann 170.228.445.518 

Benson, Jay B 410 

Benson, Rebecca J 331 

Bentley, Jane K 331 

Bentz, Arlan E 455 

Beougher, Duane 455 

Berber, Mary J 210 

Berg, William M 1 62. 4 1 6 

Berg. William 166 

Berger, Carla A 183. 364 

Berger, Richard N 347 

Berges, Catherine A 366 

Bergkamp, Evelyn S 190.162.355 

Berglund, Tim A 162 

Bergner, Jams L 456 

Bergner, Thomas W 340 

Berke. Jeltrey H 426 

Berkley. Jacqueline 355 

Bernasek, Janice M 384 

Berney. Margaret 456 

Bernhardt, Laurel L 447 

Bernmg, Gary L 430 

Berning, Larry A 430 

Berquist, Roger A 349 

Berra. Ronald J 403 

Berry. Patty D 456 

Berry. Ralph C 366 

Berry. Rhonda L 216,355 

Berry, Sandra K ...456 

Berlz, Kathryn L 204 

Bervert. Timothy P 412 

Besch, Jeanine M 209 

Bessier, LynneE 196.197.456 

Best, Cecil H 237 

Beta Sigma Psl 327 

Beta Theta PI 329 

Bever, Diane 176.456 

Beverly, Georgiana 21 6, 331 

Beverly. Starla S 456 

Bey, Charleszetta 184,216 

Beyad, Mohammed H 191 

Beyea. Kurt W 1 74 

Beyer, Alan E 219 

Beyer, Christian E 199 

Beyer, Paul T 322 

Beymer. Robert K 426 

Bible, Carl K 456 

Bice, Patrice C 248, 456 

Bichel, Mark A 366 

Bichelmeyer, Jane C 355 

Bidwell, ArvilleW 207 

Bieberly, David D .366 

Bieberly, Gregory E 456 

Bieberly. Julie A 456 

Biederman, Glenn T. 162.374 

Biegler, Craig R 195 

Biegler, Judith M 183 

Biehl, David L 215,327 

Biehl, Cindy 202 

Biehl, Linda K 366 

Bieker, Cynthia S 1 83, 21 2, 220, 238. 355 
Biel.KentA 327 

Bienholt. John C 456 

Bienhott. MarkW . 456 

Biery. RickF 177.224.234.397 

Biery. Teresa E 198,255.279.447 

Bigelow, Lana J 209, 384 

Biggs, Bradley M . ... 186, 191, 397 

Biggs. Bryan E 374 

Biggs. Gregory D 397 

Bigham. Kenneth D 1 74 

Billmgton. JannaS 422 

Binder. Stephen F 456 

Bingham, Cynthia B .221,316 

Biology Club 1 72 

Birch, John W 416 

Bird. Ronald 432 

Birdsong, David 374 

Birk, Jeltrey P ... 248 

Birk. Sandra S 338 

Birzer, Matthew L 168 

Bisagno. S Kay 418 

Bischolt. Angela C 216,456 

Bischotl, Edward L 395 

Bishop, Barry W 426 

Bishop, Deborah L 324 

Bishop. Everett D 432 

Bishop, Martha A 201 

Bitler. Karen R 222, 456 

Bitter, Kenneth D 1 96. 456 

Blackaby, Christina 187. 355 

Blackburn. Ellen D 211 

Blackman, Merrill 172 

Blackman, Robin G 456 

Blackman, Sharon D 184 

Blackwell.ChristiL 212 

Blackwood, Sandra S 403 

Blair, Kathleen B 1 97, 366 

Blair, Sally R 198,227,238,355 

Blandin, Lana D 457 

Blanding, Oavid 374 

Blanding, Sylvia 237 

Blanken, John D 171, 191 

Blankenship, David G 457 

Blankinship, Jan B 422 

Blaschke, William A 291 , 397 

Blaske, Kathy J 331 

Blatt, Geotlrey L 397 

Blattner. Steven L 320 

Blartner, Stuart E 347 

Bleakley, Todd E 329 

Bleish, Steven V 345 

Blevins. Janet E 457 

Blevins, Michael F 312 

Blick, Joanne E 457 

Blick.JohnB 353 

Blinzler, Carol A . .422 

Bliss. Elizabeth A 355 

Block and Bridle 1 73. 1 74 

Block. Jayne S 355 

Blocksome. Richard C 180,457 



504 — Royal Purple 1 975 



Blomquisl. Denise I ... 165,183,324 

Blomquisl. Sally A 1 95. 387 

Bloom, Adalee A 403 

Bloom, Roni J. 447 

Bloomer, Richard J 176,322 

Blount, John M 397 

Blue, Janet E 238 

Blue Key 175 

Blume, Ann M 403 

Blume. Debra D 403 

Blume. Harold R 168 

Blume, Tina M 355 

Blunk, Katie A. ... 174 

Blythe.JanaB 342 

B'nal B'rllh Hlllel 1 75 

Boand, Victoria A 342 

Boatwnght, James T, 412 

Bock, Barbara J 422 

Bock. Jodeel . .355 

Bockelman, Donald L 181 

Bodecker, Barbara J 384 

Boden, Richard 441 

Bodenhamer. Daniel G 340 

Bodily, Jeanne 200 

Boecker, Patricia I 403 

Boeding, Joan C 

Boeh. William L 397 

Boehm, Sharon A ... 179,355 

Boehner, Keith E 220 

Bogart, Lee L ... 441 

Bogart. M Candace 331 

Boggs. Marion A 395 

Boggs, Pamela J 366 

Bogma, Michael E 397 

Bogner, Lucille M 1 98. 206, 209. 

210,224,390 

Bogue, Gary L 261 

Bohrer. Therese M 366 

Bois. PaulK 397 

Boisseau. Roger K 347 

Bokermann. Brian 349 

Bokermann, Neil C, . . 340 

Bol. David G 410 

Bolan, JebE 205 

Bolan.JohnE. 349 

Bolan, Jonna 219 

Boldt, Larry K 168,397 

Boleriack, Steven M , 349 

Bolin, Deborah J . .355 

Bolin, Patrick J . 176,430 

Bohnger, Karen G. , 457 

Bohnger. Sharen K 457 

Boll, Dana L 457 

Bollier, Danielle R 355 

Bollier, Eric L 374 

Bollinger. Michael G 374 

Bolton. Daniel W 414 

Bolton, Janice L 202 

Boman, Roger J 327 

Bonczkowski, Larry C 291 

Bond, LynetteK . ,174 

Bondank, Dianne J 168, 457 

Bone. Jeflrey D 234 

Bone, Russell L 235, 457 

Bonewitz. Donald R. 457 

Bonewitz, Karen A 457 

Bontrager, Robert 226 

Bontz, Evan L 335 

Bony, Paul , 432 

Book, Barbara K 182,387 

Boomer, Kathy L 335 

Booth. David W 374 

Booth, Jane 331 

Booth, JennaS . . 237,457 

Bordman, Stephens. 340 

Borge, Victor 70 

Borgerdmg. David G 416 

Borhani, Mostata . 457 

Borhani, Rahim 457 

Born, Holly A 457 

Boroughs, Harold R 397 

Borovicka, Sammy D 457 

Borst, Robert A 416 

Bortz, Kathryn L 457 

Borucki, Jettrey 393 

Bosch, Cathe 458 

Bosch, John F 327 

Bosch, TeresaJ 216,316 

Boss, Michael K 195,234 

Boster, Kent 374 

Boster.ScottA. .186,458 

Botkins, Joyce E 390 

Bottoms. Mona J 1 90, 366 

Bouchard, Rheal J 458 

Boucher, Robert A 329 

Bounous. Timothy J 458 

Bourk, Gil 432 

Bourk, Julie A. . 189,418 

Bowden, Mark L 322 

Bowe. PeterS 403 

Bowe, Susan E 212,217,355 

Bowell. Karen J. 458 

Bowen, Beth 314 

Bowen, Kenneth D 458 

Bower, David W . . 172,443 

Bowers. Beverly A 338 

Boweus. Robert W 458 

Bowman. Jacolyn E 458 

Bowman, Mary M 355 

Bowman, Michelle L 342 

Bowman, Richard L 1 69 

Bowman. Russell C 458 

Boyd 331 

Boyd. Becky L 355 

Boyd, Charles R 458 

Boyd, Debra A 1 94, 234, 324 

Boyd, Jean A . 203. 324 

Boymgton, John W 353 

Boyle, Mary J 458 

Boyle, Michael T 458 

Boyle, Randy E 374 

Boyum.RuthA. 458 

Brace. Mark 397 

Brack, Kim E 458 

Brack, Les L 458 

Brack, Michael J 397 

Bradbury, Dana A 418 

Braden, Roger A 190 



Braden, Shelley A . 190.458 

Bradford. Sheri L. . 458 

Bradford. Thelma D 458 

Bradley, Harold R 162 

Bradley, Laurie ... 458 

Bradley, Rebecca L 366 

Bradley, Richard W . 432 

Bradstreet, Terry E. . 374 

Brady, Karen K . 206,447 

Braley. William 439 

Bramiage, Lawrence R 169,175 

Bramlage, Marilyn S 216 

Bramiage, Ronald E 340 

Brammer, Elizabeth M . 331 

Branch, Jesse , 261 

Brand, Jean M. . . .366 

Brandenburg, Albert . 320 

Brandenburg, Barton 177 

Brandes. Robert L 175,458 

Brandner, E Lowell .237 

Brandt. Joann 355 

Brandt. Robert G 261 

Bransgrove. Robert E 403 

Brant, WesO, 340 

Brashear, Stephen A 312 

Brasher, Robert 245 

Braun, DeboraJ . 183.364 

Braun, Mary J 447 

Braxmeyer, Patricia 222, 331 

Brecheisen, Ben S 374 

Brecheisen, Kurt D ...366 

Brecheisen, NealC 403 

8reckenridge. Lorand . . 209,216,219 

Breckenndge, Lorrai 1 84, 21 9 

Breen.GailL. . 177,221,331 

Breipohl, Gary . 441 

Breilenbach, Marjain 458 

Brender, Michael H 169 

Brennan, George L 403 

Brennan, Lisa A 355 

Brennan, Terrence L 251 

Brenneis, Dennis R . 458 

Brenneman. Tonya M 187. 458 

Brensing, Richard H 353 

Brest. Gordon A. 166,171,177,397 

Brewer, Mia 255 

Brewer. Steven 426 

Bnggs, Juanita V 458 

Briggs, Paul N 443 

Briggs, PreolaJ. 458 

Bright, David , . .268 

Bright. Gary R. 397 

Bright, Sheila M 458 

Bnllhart. Steve E 458 

Brink, Linda J 404 

Brinker, Karen K 165,255 

Brinkley, Richard J 397 

Bnnkman, Bruce E 236. 353 

Bnnkman, James F 445 

Brison, Leah J 355 

Bristow, Tara J 390 

Brito. Gustavo P 458 

Britton, Roger G 172,207 

Broadtool, Cathy A 458 

Broadtoot, Jeffrey A 410 

Broadie. Ann M . . . .185,342 

Broadie, Marilyn K 342 

Brock, Carl 458 

Brock, James H 232 

Brock, Sharon L. . 305 

Brockmeier. Craig A ... 31 2, 235 

Brookover, Lisa K 459 

Brooks, John R. 162 

Brotton, Leslie E 430 

Broussard, Cynthia A 355 

Brown, Anne K. 351 

Brown, Bill . 226 

Brown, Bill 220 

Brown, Bryan C . . 234,374 

Brown, Carla L 459 

Brown, Catharine A 185.193,418 

Brown, Chris P. 397 

Brown, David L 397 

Brown, Donna D 331 

Brown, Janet K 447 

Brown, Jodi ...223,335 

Brown, Joe , , .268 

Brown, Kent 261 

Brown, Leon L 374 

Brown, Mary J. . .459 

Brown, Michaels . . .428 

Brown, Pamela 447 

Brown, Pamela J 390 

Brown, Phillip W 459 

Brown, Rhonda J ...366 

Brown. Richard A 230 

Brown, Robert P. 349 

Brown. Ronald G 441 

Brown, Ronald L 459 

Brown, Sandra L 335 

Brown, Shirley P 179.459 

Brown, Susan L 204,459 

Brown, Thomas L 237 

Brownback, Alan L . 374 

Brownback, Sam D 397 

Browne, Charles R. 374 

Brownlee, Douglas D 329 

Brozanic, Linda M 227, 335 

Brubaker, Stuart C 404 

Bruce, Robert P. 410 

Bruce, Susan E 418 

Brucker, Lester R 347 

Bruey, Lou A 178.198,234,436 

Bruey, Patricia 234, 436 

Brumbaugh, Steven T 235, 349 

Bruna, Duane E 459 

Brungardt, Gregory N 434 

Brungardt, Terrence 374 

Brungardt, Timothy L 459 

Bruning, Keith D 162,312 

Brunk, Robert L . .397 

Brunker, Elmer R 162,374 

Brunkow, Glenda 165,167,459 

Brunkow, Timothy J 459 

Brunner, Tracy L 404 

Brunt, Jane E 165.404,436 

Bruse, Relihan . . , 205 

Bryan, June E 195 



Bryant, BillieR . . . 355 

Bryant. Theopilis 261 

Bryon, Diana M 422 

Bryson. Edgar D 

Brzuchalski, Beverly A 1 66 

Brzuchalski, Charles 166 

Bua-Aim, Somietana 374 

Buchanan, James C 163,318 

Buchanan, Lina J 356 

Buchanan, Lois A ,, 384 

Buchanan, Rita M 279, 384 

Buchanan, Robin M , ,216,384 

Buchele, Phyllis J. 203. 236, 391 

Bucher, Denise M 1 90, 447 

Buchholtz, Steven D . 231 

Buchman, B. Rex 459 

Buchman, Stuart E. 459 

Buchman, Susan K. . 356 

Buck, Diane M. 200 

Buck, Joel A 218 

Buck. Peter C 207 

Buckman, Jon E 1 62 

Bucl.LoarnL 181 
Budd, David R 

Budke, MaryC 190 

Buehler, Mitchell B 428 

Buehman.RexB 174 

Buessing, Carol E 459 

Buettgenbach, Terry . .459 

Buhrer, Wayne E. .215,397 

Buller, Bruce A. 219 

Buller, LeroyG .164,199 

Buller, Rebecca J, 165,248 

Bullock, Robert A 404 

Bunck, Joseph H 1 63 

Bundy.AlanL 345 

Bundy, James C 171 

Bunker, Scott . .251 

Bunten, Roger J 215, 235, 397 

Burch, Phyllis C. 459 

Burcham, Linda K 316 

Burden, Betsy L , 204,316 

Burden, Linda K 459 

Burdick, John A 217 

Burgdorter, Janet L 422 

Burgdorter, Roger D 374 

Burger, Lonnie R 426 

Burger, Sheila M 239, 331 

Burgess, Lynda K .170,314 

Burik, Kimberly A 203, 324 

Burk. Daniel J 191,422 

Burke, Martin K . 375 

Burke. Mary L 447 

Burke, Nancy J. . 459 

Burke, Patricia L 447 

Burke, Timothy M 393 

Burke, Wanda J. 174,351 

Burkes, MaryK 167 

Burkhaller, C 387 

Burkhard, Kathryn D 195,221,335 

Burkhard, Kenneth R. 237 

Burkhart, Teresa 338 

Burkhead, Jenni L 459 

Burkholder. David E 459 

Burkman. Gene L ....... 459 

Burkman. Jon E 1 63 

Burnett, Christine 387 

Burnette, William C 322 

Burns, Cheryl A 351 

Burns, Doris J 214 

Burns, Linda D. 335 

Burns. Lu A 356 

Burns, Patrice 197 

Burns, William H 375 

Burr. Marlene K 356 

Burr, Steven K 375 

Burress, Thomas C 459 

Burris, Jeffrey K 420 

Burns, Jill M 216,366 

Burroughs, Brenda J ... 459 

Burrow, Joel M. . 235,426 

Burrus, Susie , 391 

Burtis, John O 375 

Burton, Charlene J 459 

Burton. Charlene J 459 

Burton. Elizabelh A 356 

Burton. Kenneth R 404 

Burton. William K 359 

Busch, Janet L . 366 

Busenitz.LaverleL 207 

Business Council 176 

Busse. Donald H 375 

Busse, Gary A 216.235,375 

Busse, Ronald P. 375 

Bussey, Lynn 165 

Butcher, Sharon L 314 

Butin, Sandra L 356 

Butler, Bradley J 404 

Butler. Joanne G 459 

Button, Amy L 209.225,418 

Button, Daniel J. . .432 

Butts, Cathy A 459 

Buxton, Shelly A 202,324 

Byard, MackE, 197,459 

Byard.SherylD . 366 

Byarlay, Debbie 351 

Byer, Cynthia D .316 

Byers, Brenda C. 223,238,459 

Byers. JackG 291 

Byington, Michael J 197 

Byrnes, Jeanne M 193,436 

Byron, Paula K. 316 

c 

Cable. Karen L 178.314 

Cady. Rebecca J 204 

Calfrey, Dannie T 329 

Caflisch. Leonhard R 375 

Cain, Cynthia E. 459 

Cain, Fredrick L 397 

Calderwood. Sarah J 182 

Calhoun, Richard R . 329 

Calhoun, Robert A 459 

Call, Keith B. 162.375 



Callahan, Angela M 422 

Cameron, Jane E 459 

Campbell. Austin B 251 

Campbell. Barbara L 209,418 

Campbell, Carla F 179 
Campbell. Carol J 195,206.231 

Campbell. Christophe 375 

Campbell. Jancy S 418 

Campbell, Janet L 356 

Campbell. Jetfrey 410 

Campbell. Judith A 404 

Campbell, Kim A 459 

Campbell. Marc A 167.404 

Campbell. Mark A 165,459 

Campbell, Mary D 342 

Campbell. Michael P. ...459 

Campbell. Michael W. 404 

Campbell, Michael W 412 

Campbell. Richard B. 459 

Campbell. Ronald A 404 

Campbell, Steven G 404 

Campbell, Susan J 418 

Campbell, William A. 375 

Campbell, William R 375 

Camplield. Morris L 375 

Campuzano, Maria 181,356 

Cannan. Susan G 422 

Cannell, VickiL, 356 

Cannon, John B 459 

Canny, Rebecca R 1 90. 356 

Cantrell. Candy C. 404 

Capers 176 

Cappleman, David W 441 

Carder. Rex 397 

Carey, Calvin M 347 

Carey, James C 237 

Carey. Robert E 375 

Carl, Tony A 375 

Carleton. Carla L 459 

Carlson. Darvin A 327 

Carlson, Edwin L 459 

Carlson. Jenniler L 218.324 

Carlson, Mark D 375 

Carlson, Mark W 318 

Carlson, Randall A 432 

Carnahan, David H 459 
Carnahan, Linda L 1 85, 1 98, 218. 387 
Carnahan, Nancy S 179,210.223,338 

Carnahan, Peggy J 422 

Carney, Karla J 459 

Carpenter, David H 375 

Carpenter, Donna E 331 

Carpenter, Helen D 192.316 

Carpenter, Jack 226 

Carpenter, Linda L 206 

Carpenter, Shera V 181,422 

Carpenter, William R. 144 

Carr, Carol A 181,331 

Carr, Jeffrey A 420 

Carr. Keith L 166 

Carr, Pamela L 316 

Carra. EarlR 434 

Carrel, Debra S .459 

Carrier, David W. 397 

Carnker, Catherine 366 

Carson. Alton L 261 

Carson, Colette A 366 

Carson, Jana L 335 

Carson, Julia A ...459 

Carson, KennaS 356 

Carson, Sharon J 366 
Carswell. Carol S 1 79, 1 90. 388 
Carswell, Cathy L 179.190,388 

Carter, Allen L. . . 234 

Carter. Cammie C 1 72. 459 

Carter. Debra L . .338 

Carter. Donald R 232 

Carter. Eldon R. 412 

Carter. Elizabeth L 364 

Carter. Eloise 459 

Carter. Jan L . 335 

Carter. John C 375 

Carter. Richard H 460 

Carter, Steven L. 349 

Carter, William C .349 

Carver, David L 460 

Carver, Judy M 447 

Carver, Rose M 331 

Cary, Susan C. 460 

Casady, Paul 173,404 

Casaert, Judith K 248 

Case, Diana L 342 

Case, Elaine L .338 

Case. James G 375 

Case, Rosse B 1 77, 329 

Case. Steven R . 460 

Case. TeresaJ . 170.391 

Case, Timothy G 414 

Casey, Barry A, 397 

Casey, Donna L . 342 

Casey, Ernest S 268 

Casey, Kendall F 237 

Cashman, William E . 331 

Cassing, Nancy 188,316 

Castetter, Kim 391 
Castetter, Sandra L 177,206.391 

Castnanni. Ronald M 375 

Cates, Larry K 204, 460 
Cathey, Joyce A 1 68. 1 79, 460 

Callin, Daniel L. 460 

Catlin, Gary L 460 

Catlm, Maurice A 375 

Catlin, Michael W 375 

Cato, C. Richard 340 

Catrell, Teresa R 173 

Catskeller 48 
Cauble. Deadra L 1 74, 234, 339 

Cauble. Deana R 195,339 

Caughron, Richard N 312 

Cavin. Mary L 460 

Caywood. Douglas C 349 

Cazier, Sharon K 216.460 

Cederstrom, Dayn L 397 

Challee. Nancy S 202,356 

Chaffee. Paul D 414 

Chaltant, Jack L . 460 

Chalk-a-lol 38 

Chalmers, John 146 



291 
447 

441 

312 



Chamberlin, David J 
Chambers, Barbara L 
Chambers, Curtis N 
Chambers, Edward W 

Chambliss. Gordon A 261 

Chambliss, Henry D 261 

Chambliss. Sam 268 

Chambliss, Terry A 364 

Chance, Ray D 397 

Chande, Dilip D 191.366 

Chandler. Charles O . 426 

Chandler. Gary L 318 

Chandler. Leslie A 460 

Chandler, Sheilah V 460 

Chandler. Victor G 261 
Channel. MaryA 189.197.212,436 

Chapman, Dennis K 204. 460 

Chapman, Mike 245 

Chappell, MaryBelle 347 
Charles, Cheryl A . . 188.356 
Chartrand. David V 220.231.232.434 

Chartrand. Edward 434 

Chartrand. Lucy A 227. 356 

Chase, Mary T. . 199 
Chatham. Michael D 165.167.234 

Chaves, Leslie S. 261 

Chavez, Eddie F 169 

Chawla. Kuloil K 192.208 

Cheatham, Thomas K 347 

Cheatum, Jody A 356 
Cheerleaders 

Chellgren. Steven E 404 

Cheney, Charlene L 404 

Chenoweth, David R 397 

Cherry, Stanford N . . 268 

Chesler. Ronald J 414 

Chestnut. Allan B 318 

Chestnut. Jon K 234.414 

Chestnut. Merlin B 318 

Cheves, David A 261 

ChlEpsllon 177 

Chi Omega 335 

Chiang, Bin-Yea 460 

Chiang, Hsiao-Lan 460 

Childs, Barry K . .332 

Childs, James A. 226 

Chimes 178 

Chipman. James T 404 

Chisholm.Sue A 391 

Chism. Sabnna A 422 

Chitlangia, Anand 191 

Chotena. Michael T 190 

Chnsman. Daniel E. . 167,460 

Chnsman. Jennifer D 460 

Chnstensen, Dena R 404 

Chrislesen. Dennis E 220,231.375 

Chnstey, Susan R 418 

Christner, Rex A 460 

Christy. Ray A 375 

Chubb. Dana E 356 

Chubb, Sally .356 

Church, Chen 366 

Cillessen. John E 460 

Cindnc. Richard 375 

Circle K 179 

Claassen, Cathy R 418 

Claassen, Stuart L 191 

Claiborne, Dana A 366 

Clair, Melissa L .168 

Clanton, Sandra K 221.460 

Clare, Linda S . . .460 

Clark, Ann M 314 

Clark, Bradley E . . . 404 

Clark. Cheryl G 356 

Clark, David W 168.460 
Clark, Deborah E 173.192.335 

Clark, Donna S 460 

Clark. Gay A 460 

Clark. Gregory C 181 

Clark. Jolene J 460 

Clark, Jonathan T 347 

Clark. Kristin C 238 

Clark, Nancy E 216.335 

Clark, Patricia L .356 

Clark, Samuel R 397 

Clark, Sara J . . 342 
Clark. Stephen L 162.163.166 

Clark. Steven R 460 

Clary. Cindy L 464 

Claus, John H 219.460 
Claus, Russell S 1 66, 237, 404 

Claydon, Cathryn I 206. 231 

Clayton. Gwen A . 460 

Cleary. Michael E 460 

Clements. Lawana . 460 

Clenhan. Patrick J 261 

Cless. Gary .420 

Cless, Stephen E 199.420 

Cline, Charles K 375 

Cline, Gregory S 177 
Cline, KymL 182,216.356 

Cline. Ricky J 375 

Clipsham. Robert C 395 

Cloppse. Joan M 422 
Clothing, Textiles, and Interior 

Design 179 

Clovla 338 

Coad. Loren D. 460 

Coady, Ellen J 447 

Coats. Charles C 460 

Coch.Jim .268 

Cochennet. Challa L 460 

Cochran, John A 376 

Cochran, Michele R 331 

Cocke. Michael J 349 

Cockrum, Ernest H 397 

Coco. Mark 251 

Coddington. Katherin . 366 

Coen. JohnC. . 193 

Coen. Robert L 171 

Collman, Geraldine A 1 88, 384 

Coflman. Paul 268 

Cohen. Laura A 175.195 

Colborn, Catherine R . 460 

Cole, Kathleen A 212.335 

Cole, Marilyn R 179.212.324 

Cole. Steven M 345 

Coleman, Dawn L 224.460 






Royal Purple 1975 — 505 



Coleman, James A 460 

Collegian 230 

Collegiate 4-H 179,180 

Collell, Keith L 167,214.345 

Collier, AvaT 188,366 

Collier, GlendaL 460 

Collier, John E 171,46 

Collier, John N 441 

Collier, Mary M 460 

Collier, Raymond D 460 

Collier, Stuart R 441 

Colling, Ronald D 397 

Collmge, Michael A 174 

Collins, Annette K 460 

Collins, Charles P 329 

Collins, Cheryl L 181 

Collins, Deborah A 239,447 

Collins, Wanetta L 404 

Coloney, Patricia 445 

Coloney, Steven J 171,222,312 

Colson. Connie J 404 

Coltram, Amy 436 

Coltrain, Terry L 460 

Colyn, Leslie D 46 

Combs, Deborah A 216.331 

Combs. Lawrence I 252 

Combs. Ronald J 376 

Combs. Stephen H .163,318 

Combs, Tern A . 184,460 

Comtort, Debra A 202 

Commer, Roger D 393 

Commings. Tim 268 

Compaan, Melody L. 178,180,460 

Conard. Susan E 447 

Conaway, Denise A 165 

Condray, Scott R 178,460 

Cones, David J 397 

Conger, Charles B 460 

Conkwnght, Kay S 1 93, 461 

Conley, William J 461 

Conn.ShellyC 170,316 

Connell. John J 426 

Connolly. Deborahs 391 

Connor. Brenda C 364 

Connor, Marc S 168,322 

Conrad. John F 347 

Conrad, Kelly E 178,404 

Consani, Keith A 194 

Converse, Cynthia S 189.387 

Converse, Merle W 432 

Conway. A Denise 1 92 

Conway, John F 376 

Cook.ArdisD 235 

Cook, Carols 418 

Cook, Cathy A 461 

Cook, Debra A 461 

Cook, Linda J 165,223.239,356 

Cook, MaryM 168,461 

Cook, MelindaA 461 

Cook, Nixie M 404 

Cook, Robert P . 376 

Cook, Teresa 366 

Cook, Virginia 316 

Cook, William A 168.224,461 

Cookson. Mark E 194 

Cooley, Amy S 336 

Coon. John C 182 

Cooper, Alice E 445 

Cooper, ColletleR. 335 

Cooper. Craig 297 

Cooper, Craig W 162.166,245,461 

Cooper, David L ... ,171,434 

Cooper. David R 261 

Cooper, Dean L 461 

Cooper, Earl T 349 

Cooper, James L 438 

Cooper, James L 1 79, 261 

Cooper, Jams A 461 

Cooper, John M 393 

Cooper, Joleen K 1 84 

Cooper, Karen L 461 

Cooper, Kent C 175,1 86, 224, 234, 428 
Cooper, Nancy J 168 

Cooper. Suzanne M 461 

Cooper, Terry E. . 398, 167 

Coopnder, Duane G 461 

Cope. Cheryl E . ,221,339 

Cope, John M 430 

Cope, Robert E 219 

Copeland, Frances C 461 

Copeland, Malcolm L 177,439 

Copeland, William E 461 

Copp, Laura E 461 

Corbm, Cynthia A 183,247,364 

Corbin. Nancy A 190 

Corcoran. Jeffrey B 461 

Corkran. Deborah S 384 

Corman, Richard W 420 

Cormode. Randy D 398 

Corn, David A 434 

Corn, Susan L 447 

Cornelius, Mary D 461 

Cornelius, Patricia 314,404 

Cornell, ConnieS . . 212,461 

Cornett, Judy L 461 

Cornett, Vicki L 461 

Cornwell. Martha J 1 89. 206, 208, 210, 

212,461 
Cornwell, Nancy . 179,461 

Cory, Linda M 203,356 

Cory, Scott E 420 

Cosby. Bernard L 443 

Cosgrove, Stephen E 168 

Cossaart, Cynthia K 462 

Cossman, Douglas T 347 

Colt. Alan J 462 

Cott, Jell 227,428 

Cott, Karen M 177, 185 

Cott, Richard H 174.353 

Cott. Thomas W. 163.174.180,353 

Cotten, Jennifer J . ... 212.217.462 

Cottom, Melvin C 191 

Cotts, Virginia C 367 

Couch. James L 261,262 

Council tor Exceptional Children 1 80 

Coupal, James L 462 

Coupal, Virginia R 447 

Coun. Robert M 398 



Coverdale, Lynn E 462 

Covert, Bonnie R 204 

Covert, Carol A , . ,222,418 

Cox, Allyson A 384 

Cox, Bill ... 261 

Cox. CherlynD 222,367 

Cox, Harold K 420 

Cox, KerwinC 268 

Cox, Samuel J 207 

Cox, Sarah C 356 

Cox, Susan L 204,222,462 

Coyle, Michael D 420 

Cozme, MarkL . 169.462 

Crabb, Jeremiah E 398 

Crabtree, Judy K . .183,238 

Craghead, John S 340 

Craig, Cynthia C. 173,339 

Craig, Deborah L 214,324 

Craig. Denise L 193.387 

Craig. Douglas J 205. 395 

Craig, Nancy M 187 

Craig, Thomas A 462 

Cramer, Candace K. .238,316 

Cramer, Debbie S 391 

Cramer, Jane L , . , 201 , 324 

Cramer, Karin K 170.391 

Cramer, Lissa F 316 

Cramer, Lois J 216,222,331 

Crandall, Linda A 248 

Cranston, Bradd L 174,462 

Craven, Richard D 376 

Crawford, Alan W 398 

Crawford, Carol S .202,462 

Crawford. Carolines. . 206 

Crawford, Gay V. 356 

Crawlord, Jeflery A 430 

Crawford, Mary P 367 

Crawford, Roderick J. . . . .395 

Crayton, Catharine L , , ,462 

Cresants 181 

Creviston. David A 404 

Creviston. James M 410 

Crews, Carol G 422 

Crider, Debby K .223,393 

Crider, Steven M .393 

Cnsler, Morns F 398 

Cnspell. Rebecca J 342 

Crist, Raymond J 432 

Criswell. James H 329 

Crockett, Gayle 356 

Croloot, James W 420 

Cronin, Louis W. 169 

Cronister, Joann 198,462 

Crop Protection Club 181 

Cropp, KentW 463 

Crosby, MarkS. 395 

Crosby, William E 256,261 

Crosley, Debra A 131,190,331 

Crosscountry 251 

Cross, Debora L 356 

Crosson, Russell D 376 

Crosswhite, Darrell 327 

Crouch, Martha L 356 

Crowley, Colleen M 180,239,463 

Crowley, Mark L 463 

Cubit, John D 62,166.463 

Cudney. Nancy L 356 

Culbertson, Robert K 197, 463 

Culp. Anita E. . . . 172,422 

Culp, Boyd H 186,191,463 

Culver, Nancy S 463 

Cummings. Dan D 1 71 . 463 

Cummmgs, William L 398 

Cummins, Walter S 345 

Cunningham, Claudia 180,185, 

198,206,404 

Cunningham, Maralyn 195 

Curley, Christine A .202, 356 

Curnutte, Basil 237 

Currie, Curtis G . 347 

Currie, Marty R. . ... 384 

Currie. Michael R 347 

Currie, Ralph A. 347 

Currier, Mark A 376 

Currier, Martin L 376 

Currier, Roberla K 404 

Currier, William R 463 

Curry, Andrea J 193,316 

Curry. Eugene G 376 

Curry, Kim J 447 

Curry, Syneva D 1 85, 463 

Curtis. Marsha L . . 195 

Curtiss, Kevin J 349 

Curtnght. Paula R 356 

D 

Dahlstrom. Hugo G 430 

Daily, Greg 268 

Dairy Science Club 182 

Daise, Richard L 376 

Dale, Michelle M 367 

Dallman, Nancy C 364 

Dalrymple, Randy W . 322 

Dalsing, Cynthia A 331 

Dalton, Cynthia D 220,238.422 

Dalton. Janet L 202, 232, 387 

Dameron, Robert J 1 90 

Damm, Janice E 1 85, 463 

Dammann, Karen S 356 

Dancy, Wmnona D 1 83 

Dane. Dedna L 184 

Daniels, Judy A. . 367 

Daniels, Kate 364 

Daniels, Norman E 404 

Danielson, Candace S 384 

Danler, Patrick J. . 463 

Danner, Dearl 223.418 

Dantonio, Alfred J 398 

Dantonio. Michael J 186.191,398 

Dardis, Mark W 166. 434 

Darland, KirkL . . .261,426 

Darling, Wendy .....188,356 

Darnell, Gwenith S 463 

Daughters ol Diana 182 



Daurelton, Brad 252 

Davidson, Douglas A 215 

Davidson, Stephen R . . 189.376 

Davidson, US .297 

Davidson, Vernon D 463 

Davignon, Roger E 1 62, 463 

Davila, Gaspar M 166,404 

Davis, Amy K 222,384 

Davis, Chris N 196 

Davis. Clark H 347 

Davis, Dale B 395 

Davis, Darcy J 422 

Davis. Deborah D 324 

Davis, Dennis L 340 

Davis, Gareth 404 

Davis. Joann E 463 

Davis. John 222,416 

Davis, Keith E 186,191,463 

Davis, Lynn A 398 

Davis. Mary J 356 

Davis. Mary S 21 1 , 463 

Davis, Michael C 439 

Davis, Patricia C 339 

Davis, Randy N 248, 376 

Davis, Retta A. . 463 

Davis, RobertD 441 

Davis, Roger L 398 

Davis, Sallie K 1 78, 324 

Davis, Vicki L 447 

Davis, Vikki L 230 

Davisson, Patricia J 418 

Davisson, Stanley P 420 

Dawdy, David A 412 

Dawes, Michael A 410 

Dawkins, Kathenne I 387 

Dawson, John G 426 

Day, Mary T 202,356 

Day, Michael 340 

Day, Robert A 181 

Dayhofl, Terri S 463 

Daylor, Paula K 356 

Dean, Janice R 463 

Dean, Jennifer L 331 

Dean, Kent A 463 

Dean, Kimberly A 203. 387 

Dean. Marilyn K 463 

Dean. Paula K 331 

Dean, Richard L 318 

Debenham, Randy R 376 

Debrick. Connie M 222.463 

Debnck, Rita 356 

Debrick, Ronald D 430 

Deck, Donald D 463 

Decker, Marilyn J 445 

Deckness, Phyllis D 418 

Dedonder. Eugene F ...... 177,376 

Dednckson, Byron J 169 

Deege, Denise J 463 

Deltenbaugh, Eric P 1 99. 376 

Delorest, Allen D 191 

Defries. Richard 398 

Degarmo. Kenneth L 268 

Dehart, Steve D 463 

Deholf. FredM 219,463 

Deines, Janet S 205. 364 

Dejesus, Jose 463 

Delahunt, Thomas A 162,261 

Delehanty, Michael 245 

Delimont, Barbara G 239. 356 

Delta Chi 340 

Delta Darlings 183 

Delta Delta Delta 342 

Delta Psl Kappa 183 

Delta Sigma Phi 345 

Delta Sigma Tau 1 84 

Delta Tau Delta 347 

Delta Upsllon 349 

Delta Zeta 351 

DeMand, JohnW 224 

Dembski, Jane L 1 85 

Demint, William J 167,398 

Demirkan, Huseyin 192 

Demo, Daniel D 277 

Dempsey, Elizabeth A 463 

Dempsey, Michael T 463 

Dempster, Richard E 237 

Demuth, Dorothy L 235 

Dengler, Patricia M 385 

Denholm, Carol J 189,212,356 

Denker, Terry E 345 

Dennett, Debra A. 187,189,422 

Denney, Barbara J 200 

Denning, Dale P 438 

Denning, Douglas G 438 

Denning, Mark R 251 

Dennis, Daniel L 404 

Dennis, Scott M 1 72, 463 

Denton, Deborah D 356 

Denton, Kim M 203, 209, 387 

Denton, Rodger W 376 

Denyer, Dana L 21 9, 238. 380 

Denzel.SusanJ 170,324 

Depe, Karen M 1 79. 463 

Depenbusch. Kenneth 162, 166 

Depenbusch, Lawrence 376 

Depenbusch, Linda C 376 

Derby, Day 44 

Desai.GinshD. . 165, 167, 191 

Desch, Joseph P 463 

Deschner, Bruce K 327 

Deschner, Kim M 367 

Deshpande, Prakash B 167,191 

Desmarleau, Linda M 21 1 

Desmarleau, Steve F 463 

Detar, George F 191, 194 

Deters. Ailine L 238 

Deters, David G 463 

Deters, Steven H 463 

Detnck, Randy 195 

Detrick, William R 404 

Detlmer, Deborah J 339 

Deutsch, John L 322 

Deutsch, Steven L 327 

Devane. Larry F 

Devaux. Paula J 463 

Deveau. John A 1 65, 1 99 

Devenney. Dennis A 225, 463 

Devers. Anne S 1 82, 387 



Devore, John J 426 

Dewertl, Donald M 1 62, 1 79, 353 

Dey, Thomas A 463 

Dlamonettes 1 84 

Diaz, Carlos A 463 

Dibben, Norman C 463 

Dick, David A 398 

Dickerson, Randy R. 

Dickerson, Ronald L 261.268 

Dickerson. Sara F 178,314 

Dickerson, William J 463 

Dickey, Halley K 376 

Dickman, Charles E 345 

Dickson, Debora 422 

Dickson, Debra 179,447 

Dickson, Gary D 434 

Dieckhott.SueE 463 

Diehl, Linda M 351 

Dieker. Eddie 398 

Diener.Gary L 205 

Dierking, Mark 347 

Dierks, Charles C 194,432 

Dierks, Lloyd R 398 

Dielench, William H 395 

Dietrich, Marsha L 239, 331 

Dietrich, Mary S 335 

Dielz, Randy F 404 

Dietz. Steven D 441 

Dikeman. Darrel G 322 

Dikeman, Sandra A . 356 

Dikeman, Steven L 463 

Dikeman, William C 322 

Dill, Stephen R . , 318 

Dill.ThomasA 163,318 

Dille, David P 340 

Diller, V Heather 391 

tilling, Donald W 195,214,234.438 

Dillman, Dennis B 414 

Dillon. Kurt 393 

Dilts, Ray A 168 

Dimick, GlenE 172.463 

Dinkel. Patricia 391 

Dirks, Jo A 463 

Dirks, Randall K 211,463 

Dissel, Evelyn M 464 

Diveley, Robert R 376 

Divine. Stephen G 225 

Dixon, Bill 261 

Dixon, Linda S 208, 21 9, 385 

Dixon, Michael E 404 

Dizmang, Belinda G 364 

Dlabal, Deborah K 223. 356 

Do.OuangV 398 

Doan, Richard L 464 

Dobbie. Joann M 1 83, 464 

Dobbie, Theresa A . 224, 464 

Dobbins. Ruth G 179,189.212,464 

Dobralz, Michael A 1 76, 428 

Dobson, JeanR . 464 

Dodds. DeLoss 251.252 

Doebele. Barbara J 170,178.391 

Doebele. Constance J 1 70, 464 

Doebele, Debra K 367 

Doering, Michael C 175,430 

Doherty. Stephen J 395 

Doile, Robert E 464 

Dokken, Daniel P 376 

Dokken, Doug E 398 

Dolan. Patrick E 376 

Dold. Jettrey T 376 

Doles, Dennis A. . . 398 

Doll, Colette M .... 464 

Doller, Dale E . 376 

Dolliver, MarkT. 176,225,430 

Oollmann, Steven C 439 

Donahue, Debbie J 447 

Donahue. Michael E 170.225.414 

Donker, Debra L 367 

Donmyer, John E 376 

Donnelly, Elizabeth 331 

Donnelly, Kevin J 376 

Donovan, Gary J 393 

Donovan, Kevin D 464 

Donovan, Sherman L 323 

Doornbos, Larry L 464 

Dorsey, Floyd K . .268 

Dorsey. John D 376 

Dorsey, Renea C 464 

Dosien, Anthony R 410 

Dotson. Deborah 342 

Doud. Vickie A. . . 1 99, 21 2. 225. 404 

Dougan, Patricia L 436 

Douglas. Wanda J 367 

Douglass. Jason J 410 

Douthit. Stephen V 1 74, 464 

Dowell, Diane M 314 

Dowlmg, David F 322 

Dowling, Gregory J 235 

Downer, Rebecca E 464 

Downes, Ronald 443 

Downey, Carolyn G 464 

Downing, Karen S 367 

Downing, Michael N 183 

Downs, Rose J 170.171.206,238,316 

Doyle, Diana L 464 

Doyle. Gregorys 220, 232 

Drake. Debra L 1 79. 21 8, 447 

Drake, Richard L 349 

Drakes. Thomas M 420 

Dreher, Donald G 21 1 , 248 

Dreher, Ronald D 248 

Dreilmg, Richard L 245 

Dreith, Jon R 353 

Drew. Lisa B 346 

Dring, Susan E 201 , 335 

Dritley, Paul M 395 

Droge, Beverly F 174,180 

Droge, Daniel N, 295. 297. 298 

Drom. Patricia J 1 73, 283, 367 

Drop!. Donald H 174 

Drown, Bradford D 193, 347 

Drumhiller, Linda K 447 

Drumhiller, Stephen 438 

Drumm, Robin D 404 

Drummond, Cheryl J 208, 212, 464 

Dubach, Linda D 447 

Duch, Larry L 464 

Dudley, Debra J 255, 445 



Dudley, Julia A 367 

Dudley, Mark G 410 

Dudrey, Barbara J 204,210 

Duensing, Tim 376 

Duerksen, Luetta A 1 90, 404 

Duethman, Mary J 181,335 

Dutlendack, Scott A 340 

Dugger, Ronald R 464 

Duguid, Pamela F 356 

Dukich, Marsha L 367 

Dumler, Sylvia J 404 

Dunaway, Theresa S 223 

Dunbar, Steven D 323 

Dunbar, Thomas 437 

Duncan, Brenda S 324 

Duncan, John D 312 

Duncan, Stewart R 268 

Duncan, Terry E 211 

Dunlap, Mary E 342 

Dunlap, Sherry 356 

Dunn, Craig A 395 

Dunn, Jean A 193 

Dunn. Marc T 205,430 

Dunn, Patricia D 316 

Dunn. Ronald M 395 

Dunn, Wayne E 162, 166 

Dunne, Patrick J 347 

Dunning, Craig S 1 90 

Dunton, Stephen M 414 

Dupree, Janiece A 387 

Dupy. DwightD 422 

Durbin, Randal L 376 

Durler, Maurice G 464 

Durrie, Judith A 364 

Durst. Rebecca L 165,223,314 

Dusin, AnnM 211,442 

Duskin, Lelah 195 

Dutro, Kenneth R 349 

Dutton, Jayne Y 174 

Dye. Rebecca A 356 

Dye, Timothy J 376 

Dyer, David K 398 

Dyke, Gary 398 

Dyke, Ronald L 291,464 

Dykstra, Michael A 426 



E 

Eagleton, MarkS 430 

Eakin, Barbara B 255 

Easter, Richard C 428 

Easterday, Stephen P 195. 214 

Easton, Helen E 464 

Easton, Natalie J 385 

Eatherly, Linda L 185,418 

Eatmon, Celois J 1 84, 464 

Eaton, Leslies 364 

Eaton, MarkT 199.227 

Eaton, Stephen L 464 

Eaverson, Deborah J 464 

Ebert, Martha J 464 

Ebright, Alan J 349 

Eckenberg, Robert N 340 

Eddy, Adell L 356 

Eddy. Barbara J 168,464 

Eddy. Carolyn N 418 

Eddy. Jan 418 

Eddy, Susan M 367 

Edleman, Charlotte L 1 75 

Edelman. Mark A 175,217,225, 

237,464 

Edgar, Alan R 428 

Edgerley. Paul 349 

Edgerley, Susan 364 

Ediger, Charlotte A 1 79, 357 

Ediger, Duane M 322 

Edmonds, Vicki S 247,464 

Edson, James W 464 

Edwards, Cynthia L 202 

Education Council 185 

Edwards. Janet L 178, 367 

Edwards, Janice A ,. . . 324 

Edwards, Jennifer K 1 79 

Edwards, L. T 261 

Edwards, Marlm D 190 

Edwards, Susan 357 

Edwards, William R 174,353 

Egan, Christine M 182.209 

Egan, Frances L 236 

Egbert, Douglas D 349 

Eggerman, Jeffrey N 393 

Ehler, Stanley W 181 

Ehlers, Bruce J 404 

Ehmke. Calvin B 398 

Ehret, Martin K 464 

Ehrhard, MarkO 430 

Ehrlich, Joanna L 357 

Ehrlich, Melvin R 398 

Ehrsam, Alex G 393 

Ehrsam, Julie A 314 

Eichhorn, Connie M 422 

Eichman, James J 329 

Eikenberry, Kent R 322 

Eilert, MaryC 174 

Eilert. Rebecca L 464 

Eisenberg, Deborah S 238. 464 

Eisenhuth, G Scott 428 

Eitzen, Barbara J 464 

Ekart, Kimberly A 357 

Ekberg. Cheryl A. 204 

Ekdahl. Linda C 464 

Ekholm, David D 312 

Elder, Kent E 426 

Elder, Mona J 170,367 

Elder, Richards 464 

Elder, Roderic L 404 

Elder, Sandra S 367 

Elder, Susan R 357 

Elias. Jane F 279. 464 

Ellitt. Connie J 464 

Ellitt. Doanld F 464 

Elliot, Debbie 331 

Elliott, Anthony M 464 

Elliott, Cameron M 376 

Elliott, Craig C 376 



506 — Royal Purple 1975 



Elliott. Gary A 170. 172.464 

Elliott. Lois 170.464 

Elliott. Mark D 199 

Elliott, Meredith L 174 

Elliott, Robert L 376 

Elliott. Sandra K 200. 464 

Ellis, LeeD. 210 

Ellis. Luann 342 

Ellis. MaryB ...-..., 183 

Ellis. Randall W 464 

Ellis. Walter C 413 

Elmer. Dana G . ., 420 

Elmore, John 303 

Elsea, Connie 324 

Elsey, Bruce D 464 

Elston. Deborah J 464 

Elwell, DanielS 329 

Emery, Barbara A 464 

Emery, Teresa K 464 

Emig, Sharon S 223, 316 

Engel, Carol B, .185,385 

Engel, Mary A . 214,316 

Engelhardt, Darryl L 438 

Engelhardt, Vicki 436 

Engelland, Glenn A 465 

Engels, Glenn M . 410 

Englndeari 185 

Engineering Student Council 186 

Engler.VerlynR 163,353 

Engleson, Sheryl L 465 

Ensley, Charna L 367 

EpIee.JohnR 291 

Epler, Deborah K . 465 

Erdwien, Mary C 170,447 

Ericson, Debra D 1 74 

Erickson, David W 465 

Erickson, Debra J 1 70. 222, 364 

Enckson, Marian S 397 

Enckson, Marney 188 

Erickson, Michael V 416 

Erickson. Robert D ,465 

Erickson, Shelley A 331 

Erickson, Timothy J , , ,320 

Ericson, Debra D 1 74 

Erni, Christine E. 180,200,331 

Ernst, Jack R 426 

Ernst, Sandra B 

Erwin, Terry L 324 

Erwme, Stanlord W 410 

Esau. Debra L 465 

Esau. Michael M 195,465 

Eschmann, Cynthia D ...... 447 

Esteld, Gerald L 165,167,465 

Esis. David C 1 70 

Estes, Ann L 247, 465 

Estill, Bradtord W 426 

Estrada, Pedro J 416 

Ethendge, Warren A 353 

Etlmg, James B 426 

Etter, Dorothy A 385 

Etzel. Connie S 314 

Eubank, James W 426 

Eubanks, Carolyn A 198,224 

Eubanks, Willone E , ., 207 

Eudaley, Linda S 465 

Euker, Valerie D 465 

Eulert.Carol J 444 

Evans, Dennis A . , 465 

Evans, Dorothy K 357 

Evans, Elizabeth I 367 

Evans, Jerry R 465 

Evans, Karen G ,223,418 

Evans, Lee A 367 

Evans. Leslie W 376 

Evans. Linda 404 

Evans. Michael 297 

Evans, Randall K 376 

Evans, Robin R , , . . 367 

Evans, Sheryl J 465 

Evans, Stephen P 393 

Evans, William A 465 

Everett, Evelyn A 168,170,447 

Evers, Pamela S . .351,447 

Ewing, Janice L 357 

Eyestone. Gail 239. 465 

Eyestone. James D 465 

Eyestone, Richard L 465 

Eylar, Edward C 398 



F 

Fabrizius, Karl 327 

Facklam, Roger L 222 

Faden. Janet L 447 

Fagan, Dan J 404 

Fagerah. Adnan H 404 

Fair. DonsM 187 

Fairchild, Karen A 465 

Fall Follies 34 

Family and Child Development 
Club 187 

Fanning, Gary L 190, 465 

Farha, Connie A 324 

Farmer, Nanette E 201 

Farley, Terry J 277 

Farmer, Ronald D ...173.465 

FarmHouae 353 

Farney, Jo A 447 

Farnsworth. Marilyn 364 

Farnsworlh. Ronald J 347 

Farrell. Michael W 186,191.235,420 

Farrell, Patricia A 422 

Farrell. Ritchie L 320 

Farrell, Roger A 177, 235, 465 

Farnngton, Kipley E 347 

Fasnacht, Glen F 367 

Faubion, Luanne 223. 357 

Faulkner, Tom 329 

Faville, Susan C 385 

Fawcelt.KimM 173.404 

Fay. Richard D 412 

Featuraa 18 

Fee. Suzanne L 422 

Feeney, Carolyn C 331 

Feeney, Gerald M 171 



Feese. Colleen G 212.221,339 

Fehlman, David E 376 

Fehr, David L 320 

Fehr, Leslie B . . .465 

Feightner, Sharon A 186,235 

Feild, Dianne ... 391 

Felder, Paula A. 189.465 

Feldhausen, Bruce A 168.194, 

224.234,404 

Feldhausen, Jon R 405 

Feldkamp, Cynthia M 1 88. 31 4 

Feldkamp, Lynn E 

Feldkamp, Terry L 223,436 

Feldmann. JohnC 164,199.430 

Fells. Stephen A 412 

Fellows, Patricia L . . .385 

Feltner.John 252 

Felton, James D 466 

Felton, Richard E 171.367 

Felts. Barbara A 367 

Fenton, Gary K 376 

Fenton.TomA 466 

Fergerson, Terry L 439 

Ferguson. George A 173 

Ferguson, Ruth A 447 

Fernkopl. Patricia J 208, 466 

Ferris, Connie A 422 

Ferris. Susan G. 466 

Ferro. Frank S 405 

Fessenden, Charles B 443 

Fetter, Roxanne 405 

Feyerherm, Carol A 314 

Fickes. Karen L 316 

Fidler.BobE 164 

Fiddler on the Root 70 

Fieden. Lone 168 

Field. Harry L 162, 192 

Field. Randall K 466 

Field, Ralph 162 

Fielden. Mary L 367 

Fieser, Margaret L 224, 466 

Figurski, Marcia 351 

Filby, James 205 

File, Judy J . , . 466 

Finegan, Maria K 173,179,187.357 

Finger. Greg F 398 

Fmgland, Robert L . .252 

Fink, Sara A 391 

Finney, Karl 248 

Finson, Kevin D 413 

Firebaugh, Nancy A 314 

Firestone, Donald D 1 66, 1 86, 1 91 , 398 

Fischer, Gregg K 376 

Fischer, Kathryn J . . 196 

Fiser, Karen 418 

c ish. Patricia A 223 

=ish. Peter R 174,318 

-ishburn, Beverly E 466 

Fishburn, Casey 441 

Fisher, Deanna L 466 

Fisher, Debra L 180,466 

Fisher, Gary W. 245,329 

Fisher, Jim C ... 170, 235 

Fisher. Mary L . 180.339 

Fisher. Sharon L 197.224.436 

Fisher. Terry L 398 

Fitch, Gregory K 405 

Fitzgerald. Margaret 316 

Fitzgerald. Peggy 188.208 

Fitzgerald. Robert T 466 

Fitzsimmons. Caren J 466 

Fitzsimmons, Michael 234 

Fielstul, Cynthia L .202 

Flaming. Nancy F. 339 

Flanagan, Edward M 466 

Fleischman. Lee B 175 

Fleming. James E 251 

Fleske, David H 353 

Fletcher, Carolyns 184,466 

Fletcher, Deborah 184 

Fletcher, Donna 

Fletcher, Michael ...322 

Fletcher, Peter S 318 

Flick, John .428 

Fhckner, Raymond G 318 

Flinn. Jeryl A 367 

Flint, Jill R . . .466 

Flora, TresaL . 201,466 

Flournoy, James A 398 

Floyd, Barbara A 167,448 

Fluderer, Joann 466 

Flynn.Kathy 85.201 

Flynn, Mary K 324 

Flynn, Tina 174 

Flynn, Tina 1 74 

Foelsch, Douglass 376 

Foerster, Bernd 150 

Foerster. Stephen L , . 445 

Fogelman, MmdyS 167 

Fogler, Ron 251 

Fohey. Michelle L 357 

Foley. Donna F 466 

Foley. Robert L , .347,466 

Foley, Susan J 239 

Foley, William J. 205.347 

Folkerts, Don A .176,428 

Follz, Becky L .336 

Foncannon. Robert G 1 86, 1 94, 235. 329 

Football 256 

Foote. Diane K. ... 205,466 

Forbes, Laurie 405 

Forcum. Sherri D 336 

Ford. Charles A 398 

Ford, Don T , .398 

Ford Hall 355 

Ford. Loretta 184 

Ford. Nancy A •. . 165,466 

Ford, Raymond E 

Ford, Stephen W ,438 

Fore. Jane A. . 177.222.466 

Forestry Club 1 88 

Foret, Gregory W 376 

Forke. Scott C . . .329 

Fornal, Virginia A 1 79. 367 

Forrest, Keith P 405 

Forsberg, Kenneth E 466 

Forsberg, Rochelle L 195.324 

Forster. Melanie P 173 



Forsyth. Charles B. . 322 

Fortney, Debra L 466 

Foster, Celeste K 391 

Foster, Debra M 223 

Foster. Don 345 

Foster, Gary M 

Foster. JohnS. . 340 

Foster. Juanette L 

Foster, Kelli I 466 

Foster, Kent R 466 

Foster, Lisa K 

Foster, Mark A 

Foster, Rickie W 

Foster, Robert D 395 

Foster, Rocke S 

Foster, Susan J 

Foster, Thomas J 268, 340 

Foudray, Kathy 

Foudray, Robert K 

Fountaine, Charles W 174 

Fourniej". Joseph T 466 

Foushee, Danny K 

Fowler, Daniel L 171,445 

Fowler, Donald K 405 

Fowler, Donna L 367 

Fowler, Douglas D 186,466 

Fowler, Ronald K 405 

Fowles, Neal E 376 

Fowles, Rita K. 385 

Fox, Larry D 164,428 

Fox, William L 443 

Foy, DanaG. . . . 466 

Fozzard, Fred 277 

Francis. James V 181. 205 

Francis, Mary L 338 

Frangione, Kenneth A 416 

Frank, Gregory E 393 

Franken, John W 443 

Franklin, Douglas L 398 

Franklin, Earl B . 175,231 

Franklin. Wayne L 405.466 

Franzman, Margaret A 248 

Fraser, Barry R 405, 466 

Frasier,DuaneW 163,174,353 

Frauentelder, Jo 367 

Frazee, Dennis R 261 

Frazell, Becky L 316 

Frazier, Michael C 329 

Frazier, Val K. ..... . 466 

Freach, G Stephen 398 

Frederick. Larry S 416 

Frederick, Susan G 357 

Frederick, Thomas A 376 

Freed, Stephen W 439 

Freeland, Gaila M 198, 357 

Freeland, Gloria B 220,230,232,466 

Freely, Debbie L 336 

Freely. Michael S 439 

Freeman, Bruce R 376 

Freeman, Gary L 261 

Freeman, Patricia A 466 

Frees, Jerry L 432 

French, Deborah K 367 

French, JeaneneG 190 

French. Russell W. 405 

Frerichs. William R 466 

Frese, Daniel R 466 

Frese, Donna J 466 

Frewen, Cynthia J 204,316 

Frey. Edward H 376 

Frey. Ruth A 418 

Frey, Tim C 416 

Freyenberger, Stanle 163, 466 

Frick. Christine E . 368 

Fnck. Nancy L 331 

Frick. Ten J 194 

Friedench, Maria J 368 

Friednch, Raymond 466 

Friend, Lindsay 387 

Friend, Susan C 466 

Fnesen. Bradley W 405 

Fnnt. Gary D 

Fnsbie, David S 207. 466 

Frisbie, Linda S 368 

Friskel, Mary A. 448 

Frith, Thomas 157 

Fritz, George R 318 

Fritzemeier, Randy 353 

Fritzler, Gary L 

Froebe. Donald D 466 

Froseler, Harold W 186 

Fromme. Debra J 418 

Frost. Doug S 1 95 

Frost. JettR 195 

Frusher, William J 164,176,225.466 

Fry, Cynthia L 239,316 

Fry. RoselynG 331 

Frydendall, Douglas 398 

Frye, DarcyL 368 

Fuessle, Rhonda C 422 

Fulbnght, William J 63 

Fulkerson. Glen D 1 86, 1 91 , 398 

Fulkerson, Kevin L 340 

Fuller, Deborah A . .223,466 

Fuller. Lesa L 466 

Fuller, Virginia E 331 

Fullerlon, Julia A 385 

Fundis, RoxanneM 195.422 

Funk, Bonnie R 212 

Funk, BoydR 
Funk, Dan E 

Funk. Douglas R 169 

Funk. Glenn E. 199.434 

Funk, Jeffrey L 175, 220, 226, 231 , 232, 

434 
Funke. MarkW. 322 

Funke. Terrance D 169 

Funkhouser, JackR 376 

Furgason, Barbara A 216,239.448 

Furlley. Michael 194 

Furney. Mark A 171.232 

Furnish, Susan J 357 

Fursman, Roxanne E 422 

Fyte, Gregory B 172.395 



G 

Gabel, Linda L 216 

Gabel. Susan R 466 

Gable, Debora K 466 

Gaches, Ronald N 171,467 

Gaddie. F M 169 

Gaede. Nell L 441 

Gahagen, Robert D 405 

Gale. David M 376 

Galitzer, JanisC 175 

Galitzer. Steven J 1 75 

Gallagher, Debe J 239, 467 

Gallaway. Dale W 277, 439 

Galle. Jack G .318 

Galle, Kay A 179,357 

Galle, Neal W 467 

Galliher, Deborah A 467 

Galliher, Denise 368 

Gallon, Mary E 467 

Gallup, Donald R 410 

Gallup, George A 410 

Gamba, Julie A 178,183.364 

Gamma Phi Beta 364 

Ganjidoost, Mohammad 192 

Gannett, Richard B 192 

Ganstrom, Sheldon E 467 

Gantz, Alice J 368 

Gantz, Kathryn A 418 

Garcia, Dave .252 

Gardner, Fred B. 467 

Gardner, George R 168,180 

Gardner, Mary 1 79. 436 

Gardner, Polly A 364 

Gardner, Rebecca C 364 

Gannger, Susan 179,357 

Garrett. Alicia G 209 

Garrett, Christine E 202. 357 

Garrett, Chuck 297 

Garrett, Elaine G 324 

Garrett, Roann K 436 

Garrett, RosannG . .436 

Garnett, Terry J 303 

Garrison, Stephen J ... 322 

Garrison, Victoria L 357 

Garten, Carl H 163,180.467 

Garten. Casey D 180.405 

Garten. Gary F 405 

Garten. Mark L 376 

Gartner, Christopher , 204, 443 

Garton, Janet S 238 

Gartrell, Gregory A 168.353 

Garverl. Terrance J 426 

Garvin, David W 325, 467 
Garvin, Rick L. 

Gaskin, Patricia A 212 

Gast, David C 329 

Gastmann, Michael L 1 78 

Gates, Daniel T 169,467 

Gates, Joni L 467 

Gates, Shelly L .... 188.387 

Gates, Thomas E 467 

Gatewood, Vickie J . .182.200.388 

Garterman, Bruce T 467 

Gatz, Jane A 206 
Gatz, Kathryn A 174.199.212.213,467 

Gatz. William E 467 

Gatzoulis, Paula L 1 88, 336 

Gebhart. Bruce E 347 

Geers. Peter L 377 

Gehlbach. Debra L 219.223.336 

Gehrl. John F 467 

Geiger. Wendell E .172,220 

Geist, Elaine K 223,445 

Geist. Gary E 252 

Gemar, Steven L 467 

Genchan, Cheryl A 467 

Gentry. Robert 405 

George, Ann E 234,357 

George, Delma L 422 

George, Philip D 318 

George, William D 1 74 

Geraghty, Susan 422 

Gerard, Mark E 169,467 

Gerard, Randall S 204 

Gerard, Roy W 467 

Gerdis.TomA. 194 

Geren, Pamela A 467 

Gerhardt. Aimee G 336 

Gerhardt. Leland H 181 

Gerken, Gayle L 202, 339 
Gerlach, Carl R 293, 295. 297, 298, 347 

Gerlach, Paul M 467 

Gerlaugh, James 413 

Gerritz, Ellsworth 150 

Gerstberger, Joseph 432 

Geyer, Sherry L 467 

Ghere, Debra J 368 

Ghermazien, Testai 467 

Giantorte, Thomas J 205,405 

Gianos, James G 368 

Gibbs. Sue J 1 79 

Giblm. Marguerite A 368 

Gibson, Barbara M 357 

Gibson, Daniel W 445 

Glbaon Girls 1 88 

Gibson, Marsha A 391 

Gibson. Roger E 377 

Gibson, Vince 258,261.262,266 

Giesch, Nancy L 201 . 336 

Gittord. Marchel L 467 

Giger. Debra L 239, 467 

Gigstad: Allred O 318 

Gigstad. Robert E 318 

Gilbert. Scott A 405 

Gilham, Gail .204 

Gilkison. Chris A 467 

Gilkison, Kevin C 172.432 

Gill. Cynthia A 467 

Gill. Cynthia S .222 

Gill. Gregory L . .467 

Gill, Lisa A 222.331 

Gillaspie, John R 251.252 

Gillaspie, Judy M 368 

Gillen, P Richard 398 

Gillespie, Pamela 181 . 331 



Gillert, Catherine A, 192,316 

Gillette, Curtis J 426 

Gilliam, Peggy A 357 

Gilliland.BradC 172 

Gilliland.RaneyL 353 

Gilmore, James W 468 

Gilmore, Lynn A 448 

Ginn. MaryL 211 

Gmlhner, Nancy C 197.445 

Given. Patricia J 248 
Givens. LonJ 184,212.219 

Gladden, Linda 448 

Glanville. Beth A 316 

Glasco, Calvin 432 

Glass, Bruce R 443 

Glass. Thomas E 312 

Glasscock. Richard M 468 

Glatt, Andrew K 322 

Glaze, James B 468 

Gleason. Martin J 377 

Glick, Denise L 331 

Glidden. Mary E 391 

Glidden, Meg 201 

Glotzbach. Susan M 364 

Glover. Diane K 468 

Glueck, William A 377 

Glynn. Earl F 224 

Glynn. Gary J 468 

Gnaegy. David L 377 

Gobber, Jana S 351 

Goble. Elizabeth A 448 

Gochenour. Kim G 445 

Godlrey. Terry S 179 

Godsey, Bruce F 405 

Godsey. Julie 405 
Goeckel. Carol L 181.216,339 

Goenng, Barbara J 468 

Goenng, Rebekah 255, 357 

Goenng, Sara 357 

Goenng, Selma 225. 357 

Goetz. Carol A 468 

Goetz. Dale J 220. 468 

Goetz, Phyllis A 448 

Goetz, Ronald E . ... 468 

Gotf, Janet A 221 , 422 
Golorth. Gregory L 199.213.377 

Gold. David N .329 

Goldberger, Sara S 234 

Golden Heart! 189 

Goldhorn, Paul E 340 

Goldsberry, Carter V 432 

Goldsmith, Linda .388 

Goll 250 

Gonterman, Pamela J 342 

Gonzalez, Michael L 377 

Good, Craig A , 174,353 

Good. Ellen L 468 

Good. James E 468 

Good. Lisa 239. 468 

Good, Michael W 398 

Good, William E 468 

Goodnow Hall 366 

Goodrich, Tracy J .422 

Goodyear, Kenneth D- 329 

Gooley, William E 191.468 

Goosen, Jerry L 398 

Gordon, Daniel 414 

Gordon. Doug C 439 

Gordon. Mark D 398 

Gordon, Steve J . 320 

Gorman. Janet C 182.317 

Gorman, Lawrence K 468 

Gosnell. Joni 468 

Gossard, Peggy L 460 

Gottschalk. Eugene .218 

Gotlschalk.GaryM 164.377 

Gould. James D 439 

Gould. Richard S 197,468 

Goulding. Theresa D 469 

Govert, Julie L 180.405 

Gowdy, Stephen R 347 

Gowen. Julie 317 

Gowler. Randall E 469 

Goyen. Michael L 169,215 

Graber.DeanA 188.469 

Graft, Barbara 357 

Graft. Gary M 398 

Graft. John F 432 

Graft, Victoria S 469 

Gragg, Dennis L 261 

Graham, John R 237 

Graham. Judith L 185.385 

Graham. Karen D 185.364 

Graham. Lawrence S 469 

Graham. Lloyd R 377 

Graham. Paula .324 

Graham, Rebecca I 190 

Graham. Richard L 469 

Graham, Steven H 377 

Granberry. George S 377 

Garnberry, Margaret 317 

Graney, Joseph S 443 

Grant, Violet 184 

Granzow, Thomas A 469 

Grapengater, Dana L 377 
Grapengater, Richard 165.167,405 

Gratny. Linda L 219.469 

Grauerholz, Marcus R 327 

Graves, Carolyn L 1 68 

Graves. John K 320 

Graves. Kathy 179.357 

Graves. Richard O 1 64 . 469 

Graves. Sharon K 197.422 

Gray. Barbara J 364 

Gray. David C 410 

Gray. JohnS 377 

Gray, Kathenne 181,368 

Gray. Pamela S 173. 357 

Gray, Rickey E 258.261 

Greeley. Paul K 410 

Green. Charles 268 

Green, Cheryl E 368 

Green, David D 318 

Green. Debra J 331 

Green. Marcia B 283.418 

Green, Pamela Y . . . 1 76. 351 

Green, Ronald L 169,469 

Green, Samuel F 220.518 



Royal Purple 1975 — 507 



Green, Thomas H 398 

Greenbank, Janet 336 

Greene, Earl F 312 

Greenleal, John P 329 

Greenlee, John W 432 

Greer, William L 377 

Gregory, Dick 62 

Gregory, Janet E 388 

Gregwire, Roberta L 469 

Greig. James K 237 

Gress. Judith K 1 62, 1 66 

Grice. CaraM 317 

Grider, Nancy E 357 

Griebel, Francis J 1 78, 398 

Grier, Christopher A 377 

Grier. JohnW 398 

Grieves. Brad A 430 

Grieves. Kevin D 430 

Griffin. Maxine A 469 

Griffin, Stuart M 469 

Griffin, Susan K 436 

Griffith. Debra A 448 

Griffith, Edward L 420 

Griffith, Pamela J 448 

Griffith, Susan L 422 

Griffith. Thomas S 439 

Grimes, Deborah S 405 

Grimes. Gail M 324 

Grimes. Gary W 1 72 

Grimwood. James T 166.191,196.398 

Grisham, Cynthia S 388 

Grissom, Joni F 317 

Grogan. Steven J 256, 261 . 262, 264 

Gronquist, Paul G 469 

Grosdidier. Barbara 469 

Grosdidier, Michael 164,322 

Gross. Georgette L 448 

Gross. Jeff L 171,398 

Gross, Linda C 194 

Gross, William M Jr 377 

Grossardf. Theodore 172 

Grossenbacher, Jetfe 345 

Grothusen, JanetS 170,357 

Grout, Pamela 255, 368 

Grove, Nancy K 212.221.469 

Groves. Randy D 329 

Growney, Patrick J 219 

Gruber, Betty J 368 

Gruber, Randall R 1 93, 469 

Gruber. Terry M 162. 166,377 

Gruver. Gretchen J 391 

Gucker.RitaD 469 

Gudeman, Janel C 469 

Guess. Charles L 398 

Guess. Rita 180.448 

Guettermann, Stephen 207 

Guipre. KevenA 187.448 

Gulhckson, Micheal , 405 

Gunzelman, Katheryn 469 

Gunzelman, Leo J 416 

Gunzelman. Rita J 324 

Gurss, Mary E 368 

Gustafson, Mark M 414 

Gutchm. Ilene 175. 469 

Gutchin, IraP 175 

Gutierrez, Raul Jr 414 

Gutknecht, Deborah I. ,214,388 

Gutsch, James L 469 

Gulsch. Karen L 212 

Gulzman, Melissa A 239,418 

Gwm. Francis E 1 67 

Gwin, Leslie P 206 

Qymna»llc« 282 



H 

Haack. Pamla J 1 79. 31 4 

Haase. Suzanne M 336 

Habiger. Grace C 368 

Hacker, Dale A 443 

Hadachek, Peggy S 247, 436 

Hadden, Terry W 398 

Haddock, Michael J 377 

Haden, MarkD 199,377 

Hadicke, Joni 469 

Haen, Donna R 469 

Haerllmg. Sally A 317 

Haffener. Connie 469 

Hatfener.Joe 168,186,443 

Haffener, Teresa S . , 216.469 

Hailing. Michael N 398 

Hagan, Kimberley A 385 

Hagans, Beckie J 469 

Hagen. James E 426 

Hagen. Martha K 208 

Hagenbuch. Lori J 1 74 

Hagenmaier, Marsha A 1 79, 339 

Hagler, Linda J, 217 

Hagman, Rodney L 469 

Hahn, Carol 188, 448 

Hahn, Carole A 

Hahn, Douglas E 322 

Hahn, Sherry L. 368 

Hahner. Betsy 405 

Haifleigh, Debra G . 165, 199. 357 

Hair, Juliana J . 180.198 

Haiovsky, Robert J 377 

Hake. Lynn D 469 

Hake. Nolan 399 

Halbach. Kevin W ...235 

Hale, Marjone L 469 

Hale, Michael A . . , 340 

Hale, Steven C. 426 

Haley. Moira 469 

Haligh, Dennis A 220 

Hall. Deborah L 469 

Hall. Edward H III .329 

Hall. Maureen L 336 

Hall, Patricia E. 469 

Hall, Robert F ...410 

Hall. Suzan 195,234 

Haller, Patricia J 469 

Haller, Rebecca L 469 

Hailing, Michael F 469 

Hallis. Ralph 469 



Hallmark. Alan B 234 

Halls. KristenJ 317 

Halterman, Deborah K 469 

Hambnght, Marjorie 469 

Hamby. Danny R 227 

Hamed. BaigM 191 

Hamel, Annette M 351 

Hamilton. Harold L 1 86, 1 91 

Hamilton, James J 171, 329 

Hamilton, Karlynn K 203, 324 

Hamilton. Nancy 237 

Hamilton. Nancy A 368 

Hamilton. Stuart A 213.377 

Hamilton. Timothy M 207 

Hamlett, Charles A 340 

Hamlin. Jill L : 168. 208. 342 

Hamm, Dana L 448 

Hammeke, Kevin F 469 

Hammeke. Mary E 422 

Hammeke, Susan M. . 357 

Hammerle, Letty J 1 73. 405 

Hammerschmidt, Rita 469 

Hammerschmidt. Samue 469 

Hammond. Genevieve J 469 

Hammond. Susan L 357 

Hammons. Amy L 207. 422 

Hampl. Julie 368 

Hampton. Michael E 245 

Hamsher, Michael R 268 

Hancock. Karen J 1 83. 342 

Hand, Colleen J 238 

Hand, Terry L 448 

Handkins. David M v . 186. 445 

Hands, Cednc K 211.353 

Hankammer, Jennifer 168,385 

Hanks. Gloria A 339 

Hanna. Donald 377 

Hannatord. Roger W 205. 329 

Hansen, Carol J . 180.224.448 

Hansen. Gary W 439 

Hansen, George B 218 

Hansen, Nancy J 405 

Hanson, Dirk A 329 

Hanson. Marcia J 168, 391 

Hanson, Margaret A 422 

Hanson, Rebecca A 469 

Hapgcod. Curtis R 312 

Hapgood, James D 312 

Harbach, Evelyn J 339 

Harbaugh, Darrel L 469 

Harbert, Cathie A 388 

Harden, Michelle E 368 

Harden, Pamela J 470 

Harden, Philip A 168, 443 

Hardenburger. Philip 169, 470 

Harder, Jan A 283. 331 

Harder. Melinda L 314 

Hardesty. Judith L 470 

Hardin. Jim 252 

Hardman. Barry S 443 

Hardman. Jan E 204.422 

Hardman, JanieS 167,206,470 

Hardman, Kent L 470 

Hardman, Kristi Jo A 368 

Hardwick, John V 252 

Hargrave, Joseph R 234 

Hargus, Herschella K 368 

Harlem Globetrotter* 81 

Harlin, Maureen C 357 

Harlow, Anne W 470 

Harman, Patricia 201 , 21 1 , 368 

Harmon, David P 428 

Harmon, William J 1 63 

Harms, Royce L 377 

Harms, Wayne A 470 

Harness, Connie R 418 

Harold. Bryan D 327 

Harper, Mark W 194 

Harper, Robert L 177 

Harper, Timothy R 470 

Harrell. Joleen K 168.470 

Harrington, Cynthia 448 

Harrington, Nancy K 357 

Harris, Arthur L 261 

Harris. Curtis 377 

Harris. Jean 405 

Harris. Max W 172,204.205 

Harris. NedraG 470 

Harris. Sandra 203. 388 

Harris. William R 1 7 1 , 220, 232. 395 

Harrison, Brent A 470 

Harrison, Ivan E 210 

Harrison, Jane A 448 

Harrison, Kim A 234 

Harrison, Lennie M . 251,252 

Harrison, Patti L 21 2, 471 

Harrison, Paul D 164, 412 

Harrod, Gayle K 336 

Harrod, Herbert E 1 67 

Harryman, Joan D 471 

Harsh, Alicia K 336 

Hart. Barry T 377 

Hart. Bradley D 471 

Hart. Candace A 206. 368 

Hart. Dianne L 165, 422 

Hart, Gregory S 191,471 

Hart, Lawrence R 443 

Hart, Michael A 410 

Hartford, Lynnellen 357 

Hartig, Mary M 448 

Hartman, Andrew S 329 

Hartman, Cheryl A 418 

Hartman. Jack 295. 297 

Hartman. Matthew S 377 

Hartter.DeniseE . ... 165, 179. 448 

Harvell, Everett W 347 

Harvey, Roger A 353 

Harvey, Russell C 199 

Hase, Vickie S 436 

Haskett. Joyce K 1 79 

Haskms. Judy K 193,211.339 

Haslett, Lisa S 368 

Hasman, Rodney 1 62 

Hass. Kenneth J 368 

Hasten. Arthur A 416 

Hatcher. Bryan C 432 

Hatcher. Carta J 471 

Hatcher, Joseph C 268 



Hattield. John R 426 

Hathaway. Melissa K 1 70, 351 

Hattan. Michael A 426 

Hauber. James E 428 

Haug, Tom 412 

Haugh. Dennis A '172, 235. 471 

Haun. Randal D 186,234,471 

Haun, RudyT 471 

Hause. Jane C 385 

Hausmann, Gary J 405 

Havel, Eileen F 1 65 

Havener, David W 1 86 

Havens. John H 428 

Havertield, Nancy L 

Haverkamp, Bryce F 225, 405 

Hawk, Deborah A 422 

Hawkins, James M 439 

Hawkinson, Dale P .471 

Hawkmson. Paul G 329 

Hawn. Raymond B 1 73, 406 

Hawlhorne, Jimmy D 399 

Hax. Christopher M 430 

Hax. Robin V 197 

Hay. Kim A 224,364 

Hay. Rebecca J 368 

Hayden, William D 377 

Haydock. Mary L 332 

Hayes. Monte L 406 

Hayes. Robert A 426 

Haymaker Hall 374 

Haynes. Jeanine E 1 87 

Hays. Linda S 423 

Hayward. Elizabeth A 180 

Hazzard. Daniel M 393 

Head. Judy 223 

Head. Kevin 426 

Head. Melaine L 364 

Healy, Frank G 471 

Healy, Mark J 426 

Healy. Matthew F 441 

Healzer. Mark A 393 

Hearn. Virgil D 1 93 

Heasty, Daryl M 225 

Heath. Ted 261 

Heathman. James B 222. 399 

Heaton. David G 471 

Heaton, Janice O 471 

Heaton, Roger A 199,471 

Hecht, Janet M 418 

Hecht.John 377 

Heckerson. Diane G 199 

Hedberg, Axel W . .261 

Hedger. Manorie J 21 4. 388 

Hedges. Dawn R 472 

Hedrick, Nancy K 224, 448 

Hedrick, Sally .387 

Heeler. Diane M 202. 472 

Hettel. Shelley D 195.314 

Hefner, Rose M 332 

Helner. Sydney L 223. 472 

Hetty. Elaine C 179.193,339 

Heider. Ann 247 

Heidrick, Ruth A 448 

Heier. Kendall R 416 

Heier, Margaret C 472 

Heikes. Janice K 423 

Heilman. James L 

Heimer. Barbara J 1 99, 448 

Hem. David N 225 

Hein, Margaret M 193, 368 

Heinen, Roberta S 351 

Heiniger, Richard W 162, 193 

Heinz, Patrick .214,234 

Heinz, Richard 399 

Heinz, Rita L . 357 

Heitschmidt, Diane K 187.423 

Held. Jon J .222.472 

Helferstay. Cynthia 357 

Heline, Linda F 332 

Heller, Marilyn J 472 

Heller, Michael W 353 

Heller, Ronald W 318 

Heller, Sally A 213,368 

Heilman, John E 412 

Hellmer, Dennis 416 

Hellmer. John F 416 

Heimer. Kendall J 235. 472 

Helton, Michael D .197,239 

Helton, Timothy M 439 

Helvey. Richard L 472 

Hemberger, BrendaJ 174,357 

Hemmerling, Theresa 472 

Hemphill. Debra J 205. 472 

Hemphill. Reta R 224. 472 

Hemphill, Susan J 472 

Hempstead, Karla 195, 445 

Henderson, Kevin S 329 

Henderson, Mark 347 

Henderson, Shelby A 261 

Henderson, Shenlyn . ... 358 

Henderson. Susan B 185. 201 . 324 

Hendnchs, Kent 230 

Hendrix, Charles C 445 

Heng, Marilyn L 358 

Henke, Maurene L 358 

Henke. Nancy J 190,214,358 

Henke. Virginia L 1 73. 368 

Henley, James B 399 

Henley, Mark E 428 

Henne, Pamela M 332 

Henning, Betty A 217 

Henoch. Richard B 399 

Henncks, Kathleen A 1 79, 448 

Henry, Cynthia K 449 

Henry, Dee D 443 

Henry, Dennis R 472 

Henry, Frank J 406 

Henry, Kathleen 472 

Henry, Richard S 167,472 

Henry, Stephen L 416 

Henry, Terry W 1 74, 353 

Hensley, Debra M 369 

Hensley, John L 251 , 329 

Hensley, Ken 445 

Hentzler, Carol L 358 

Herbers. Jim 1 62 

Herbers, Susan K 358 

Herbers, Thomas L 353 



Herbert. Mary C 358 

Herbin. Mary L 223,238,472 

Herl, Jacqueline 171,472 

Herl, Mitchell J 194 

Herman. Douglas L 237,472 

Herman, John D 412 

Herman, Kathenne D 436 

Herman, Kathryn A 472 

Hermes, Steve 236 

Hermesch, Jane E 472 

Hermreck, David K 377 

Hernandez, David C 261 

Herndon, Michael L 1 69 

Herald, Don 426 

Herrig. Brent W 1 69. 377 

Herring, Ouentin J 378 

Hernngton, Walter B 320 

Herrmann, Charles E 210,399 

Herrmann, Darrell E 210, 218, 222, 399 

Herron, Lyndell D 472 

Herschell, Scott E. . . 432 

Hershberger, Laleen 472 

Hershberger, Roy D 472 

Herzog. Gregory S 225. 399 

Hess, Carroll 1 50 

Hess, Connie J 358 

Hess, Janette L. . 165,187,423 

Hess, Michael H 378 

Heter. Sarah L 189,225.385 

Hettenbach, Bruce E 378 

Hetzel, Armon D 406 

Hetzke, Clifford T 174 

Heuermann, Paul A 428 

Hewett, Jane E 

Heyhn, Michael T 443 

Heyne, Annemarie 

Heyne. David E . . 235. 472 

Heywood. Michael D 195, 210 

Hibbard. Gordon V 1 99 

Hickert. David R 162,472 

Hicks, Linda S 472 

Hicks, Marcia 369 

Hicks, Stephen A 218 

Hiebsch. Carl T 312 

Hiesterman. Dale E 219 

Higgins, Diane E 1 79. 358 

Higgs, Debra S 423 

Highberger. Stephen 213 

Highland, Ronald L 219 

Hildebrand, Donald S 353 

Hildebrand, John W 1 74, 1 80. 1 93, 472 

Hildebrand, Rex E 329 

Hilderhot. Gary B 322 

Hileman, Lanell R 472 

Hilger, Charles J 231 , 232, 395 

Hill. Barbara J 358 

Hill, Betsy F 436 

Hill, BrendaJ 368 

Hill, Brian K 378 

Hill. Charles D 406 

Hill, Charlotte J 385 

Hill, Cheryl A 184,472 

Hill, Cheryl J 177 

Hill, EdmondG 210 

Hill, Edmund G 399 

Hill, Jacqueline K 385 

Hill, Jan E 472 

Hill, Jeffrey C 406 

Hill. Kathleen C 449 

Hill. Robert C 472 

Hill. Roger R 292 

Hill. Sherri A 418 

Hillebrandt. Carol A 209.317 

Hillman.RexV 399 

Hills. Scott W 430 

Hilt, Rodney D 322 

Hilton. Barry P 322 

Hillz, Susan M. . . . .' 423 

Himebaugh, Karen S 388 

Hinchey. Charles E 345 

Hinchlitte. James N 251 , 252 

Hindman, Kristi L 369 

Hine, GaryL 199 

Hinkson, Craig O 378 

Hintz. David J 472 

Hintz, Maureen K 1 89. 1 99, 206. 21 2, 472 

Hipps, Alan H 420 

Hirleman, Greg P 329 

Hirning, Mary L 182,209.336 

Hirt, Steven E 178 

Hitch, Daniel L 

Hite. Julie J 358 

Hitt, Barbara J 166,189,217.358 

Hitt. Stephen H 195 

Hittle. LisaL 358 

Hitz. Lottie M 342 

Hixon, Pamela S 239 

Hixson. Barbara J 449 

Hietland, Peggy L 1 87. 406 

Ho, Paul W 472 

Hobble. Deborah F 351 

Hobson, Clifford 169.215,472 

Hobson, Patti S 204 

Hoag, Chris 268 

Hobbie, Deborah F 1 70 

Hobson, Susan K 472 

Hobsch.Sue 204 

Hoch. Sydney A 342 

Hoch, Toni 342 

Hochuli. Sheldon D 472 

Hodge. Sharon D 369 

Hodges. Marilyn A 472 

Hodges. Terry L 399 

Hodgson, Michael L 378 

Hodnefield. Lori 358 

Hoeckle. Cheryl L 21 7, 423 

Hoefgen. Debra K. 190,314 

Hoener, Carolyn 189.385 

Hoener, Linda 208. 388 

Hoerman. Connie M 189,208,472 

Hoffine. Susan L 369 

Hoffman, Calvin C 369 

Hoffman, Donald F 245 

Hoffman, Garold J 406 

Hoffman, Joan K 336 

Hoffman, Pamela E 1 79, 1 99. 423 

Hoffman, Randy A 472 

Hoffman. Steven J. 428 



Hoflin. Ruth 154 

Hofmeier, Dennis G 347 

Hofmeister, Phyllis 449 

Hogan, Charles T 261 

Hoge, DeIG 216,343 

Hogerty, Kathryn A 189 

Hoglund, Douglas M 214 

Hoglund, Jay R 395 

Hoglund, Jo E 181 

Hoisington, Laura 239,449 

Hoisington, Paula J 206, 449 

Holbrook, Lorinda S 369 

Holcomb, Debbi K 21 3, 358 

Holder, Blaine K 472 

Holeman. Linda L 180, 198, 332 

Holl, Diane K 406 

Holladay, Scott J 312 

Holland, Constance L 472 

Holland, Karen M 472 

Holle. Barbara R 1 90, 21 2, 332 

Hollern, Vicki A 472 

Hollinberger, Thomas 438 

Hollingsworth, Miche 381 

Hollis.AnneK 178,209.351 

Hollomon, Judy G 336 

Holloway. Linda S 1 88, 388 

Holloway. Randall L 473 

Holloway, Richard D 473 

Holman, Beverly E . . .197,212,436 

Holmes, John A 167,214 

Holmes. Lu A 358 

Holmes, Rodney E 399 

Holmquist, Kristin D 449 

Holovach. Terry P 181 

Holste, Curtis A 378 

Holste. JayH 163.318 

Holste. Sylvia N 449 

Holt, Denise 388 

Holt. Mark I 195 

Holt, Michael T 473 

Holt, Susan E 369 

Holthus, Michael D 327 

Holtman.GailD 211 

Holton. George M Jr 378 

Holub.GaryS 245,473 

Holytield, Jeffrey L 399 

Holyfield, Roger L 399 

Holzrichter, Carol M 172.187,369 

Homecoming 112 

Home Economics Council 189 

Home Economic* Education Club 1 90 

Honer, Steven L 128 

Honig, Catherine A 449 

Honig, Karen S 189,212.234.436 

Hoobler, Sidney D 165.167,186, 

224, 234 

Hood, Paula K 232 

Hooker, Holly K 189, 336 

Hooper, Thomas K 162.378 

Hoover. Connie J 185.189.223.332 

Hoover, Justin A 473 

Hoover. Marcus L 225 

Hopkins. Holly A 391 

Hopkins. Lynn D 

Hopkins, Thomas L 1 86. 21 0, 406 

Hoppas, Douglas W 426 

Horack. Andrea M 358 

Horan. Tim 441 

Horn, Barbara J 473 

Hornbaker, Pamela S 210.358 

Hornecker, Susan L 358 

Hornung, Mary G 239, 369 

Horticulture Club 190 

Hoshor. Bruce W . 406 

Hoskins, Richard A 443 

Hoskinson. Diana M 358 

Hoskinson. Rex 378 

Hosseinmardi, Abbasa 192 

Hostin. Gary L. . 320 

Hostin, Lonnie 320 

Hout. William G 378 

Hougen, Harvey R 

Houghten, Leon 1 74 

Houghton. Joan 200, 388 

Houghton, Leon D 353 

Houghton, Patsy L 173,210 

Houk. Janet M 436 

House, Delpha L 206, 473 

Houser, Sharon M 218 

Housh, Richard D 473 

Housing 310 

Houts. Harriet L 202 

Hoverder. Jamie 213.388 

Howard, Barclay 201 

Howard, Bonnie.G 473 

Howard, Elizabeth B 391 

Howard, Gregory W 410 

Howard, Ruth E 180, 238, 358 

Howe, David M 345 

Howe, Kenneth A 234 

Howe, Marcia L 358 

Howe. Mickie S 473 

Howe, Steven D 473 

Howell, Bobby Jr 473 

Howell. Fredrick S 474 

Howell, Vaudene A 206. 474 

Howlett. Harold D 212.474 

Hoyl. Phillip G ' 69 

Hrabe, Christy 248.317 

Hsu. Rick C 438 

Hubalek, Verne A 378 

Hubbard. Fred W 169 

Hubbard, Rhonda D ! 474 

Hubbs, Terry D 215,443 

Hudson, Dennis J 164 

Hudson, Judy M 358 

Huebert. Michael A 441 

Huelskamp, Clinton A 312 

Huerter, Susan M 449 

Huettenmueller, J 358 

Hugg, Joyce L 238,474 

Hughes, Dennis L 474 

Hughes. Jeffrey D 426 

Hughes. Judy K '•74 

Hughes, Kathleen S 369 

Hughes, Lonnie J 378 

Hughes, Timothy J 432 

Hulett, Karla J 223 



508 — Royal Purple 1975 



Hull, Luanda K 219,385 

Hullman, Kalhryn L 474 

Hullman.KimH 474 

Hultme. Vicki K 474 

Humbarger. Glenn E 474 

Humbert, CleveE 193,406 

Humboll, Marsha A 369 

Humes. Larry L 474 

Humleld. Susan M 358 

Humleld, Terry L 378 

Hund. Mary A 474 

Hundley. Allan B, 171 

Hundley, Robert 195 

Hunt. Brenda S 187, 332 

Hunt, JettreyB 474 

Hunt, Melody J 423 

Hunt. SheriA 187.198.339 

Hunter, Barbara 358 

Hunter. Steven R 474 

Hurd. JanisS 358 

Hurlburt. Randy K. 220 

Hurley. Allen L 163.318 

Hurley, James A 314 

Hurley. Lyle L 397 

Hurley. Martha L 209 

Hurley, Patricia D 168,397 

Hurrelbnnk. David W 378 

Hurst, Deborah K 358 

Hurst, John P 399 

Hurt. Linda L, 358 

Huseman. Bob E 474 

Huseman, William A 474 

Huska, Michael V 340 

Hustead. David R 406 

Huston. Terry A 369 

Hutcherson, Danny A 406 

Hutchinson, Robert H 322 

Hutchison, Jon M 234.399 

Hutchison, Maria S 418 

Hutchison, Michael C 474 

Huttig. JackW 232 

Hutton. Bradley D 393 

Hutton, LacmdaG 324 

Huxman, Marilou 358 

Hymer. Michael G ,378 

Hynek. Kevin L 474 



I 

Imboden. Kathy B 369 

Imel, Terry L 378 

India Association 191 

Ingalsbe, Patricia L 224. 474 

Ingle. Paul 168J399 

Ingmire, Wayne L 169,378 

Ingram, James R 345 

Ing/am, Karen A 369 

Ingram, Sheryl 221 , 336 

Ingram, Stephen W, 426 

Institute ol Electrical Electronic 

Engineers 191 

Intramurale 272 

Ireland, Deborah A, 418 

Ireland, James R 205,474 

Ireland, John M 225,474 

Ireland. Randal W 439 

Irons, Stephen M 416 

Irwin. John W , 313 

Isaac, Diane W 474 

Isaac, Kenneth D 474 

Isaacson, Marsha R 1 89, 324 

Isch, Ellen M 343 

Isch. Lisa 343 

Isenberg, Mar|one E 358 

Isenhower, Dana J 423 

Isern. Mark D 475 

Islamic Association 192 

Ives, Randy 430 



J 

Jackson, Anne 181 

Jackson, Bobby 261 

Jackson, Brenda C 1 84 

Jackson, Brian C 353 

Jackson, Deborah L 202, 358 

Jackson, Denise M 193, 475 

Jackson, Galen H 378 

Jackson, Howard T 171,313 

Jackson, James D 207 

Jackson. Joseph M 190 

Jackson, Latessa R 209 

Jackson, Mark F 277. 475 

Jackson, Mike A 378 

Jackson, Sharyl L 358 

Jackson, Wuanita A 332 

Jacob, Kathy 358 

Jacob, Larry E 475 

Jacob. Steven D 475 

Jacobs. Carl L 320 

Jacobs, Joan M 179.475 

Jacobs, Ruth M 200 

Jacobsen, Scott L 195 

Jacobson, Carols 198.204,449 

Jacobson, Stephens 428 

Jacques, Robert M 475 

Jaderborg, Arlene S 336 

Jaeckel, Suzanne M 237,369 

Jahnke, Debra 423 

James, John D 291,475 

James, Merilu 332 

James, Sidney R 1 74 

Jamison, Mark 475 

Jamison, Monte D 369 

Janicke, Timothy J 220, 227 

Janke, Edward L 168,186.225,399 

Jankovich. Richard B 395 

Janousek. Jack R 426 

Jansen, Robert J 438 

Jansen. Ruth E 194 

Janssen, David M 378 



Janssen, Gerald W 177.475 

Janssen, Royce C 164,412 

Janssen, Stuart 378 

Jantz, Jonathan P '...... 165 

Jantz, Merle F. 378 

Jantzen, Steven W 

Japp. Susan B 165, 332 

Jaques, Nancy A 358 

Jarred, James L 475 

Jarrett, Teresa E 239 

Jarvis, Kathy J 224, 475 

Jarvis, Verlan W 475 

Javernig, William J 393 

Jayachandran, Purush 191 

Jecha, MaryE, 221,475 

Jeltries, Elinor 342 

Jeffries, Robert J 261 

Jettries, Wm M 200 

Jelinek, Nancy A 332 

Jenik. Steven C. 165,475 

Jenkins, Edward L 378 

Jenkins, John L, 175.235,441 
Jenkins. Philip W 395 

Jenkins, Robert E . 320 
Jennings, Gaynelle A 1 84 



291,475 
205, 399 

410 
199.369 

406 



Jennison, Kevin D 

Jennison, Tindel K 

Jensen, Howard A 

Jensen, Peggy M 

Jespersen, Jean M ... 

Jessup, Ricky L. . . . .173,318 

Jester, Vicki M 369 

Jeter, Michael A 475 

Jewell, Trudy L 369 

Jewett, Randall P 378 

Jianadpanh, Mahmood 192 

Jilka, Catherine M 227.332 

Jilka, JohnP 416 

Jilka.Rose 214.423 

Jirak. AnnC 474 

Joeckel, Steven L 406 

Joerg.CindyA, . 223 

Johannsen, Nancy J 369 

Johansen, David R . , 474 

Johansen, Julie A 212.475 

Johansen, Roy 268 

Johns, Geralynn L 475 



Johns. Norman D 


163,475 


Johns. Peggy 


255, 305 


Johnson. Ann R 


165. 180. 187.339 


Johnson. Beatrice A 


209 




475 




406 




475 


Johnson, Charlene K 


204 


Johnson, Dani G 


475 




... 248 




414 




235 


Johnson, Debra S 


332 




475 


Johnson, Donald R 


164,378 


Johnson, Dwight W. 


475 


Johnson, Eric W 


475 


Johnson, Heather K, 


178, 190,222,358 


Johnson, James R 


169,475 


Johnson, Janet E 


449 


Johnson, Janet L 


475 


Johnson, Janice L 


343 


Johnson, Karen M 


177,343 


Johnson, Kathy L 
Johnson, Keith A 


, , 358 


220 


Johnson, Kristy M 


406 


Johnson, Larry R 


395 




475 


Johnson, Leroy 


195 


Johnson, Linda K 


423 


Johnson, Marcella L 


184 


Johnson, Mark A 


225.236.369 


Johnson, Mary J 


. . 238. 369 


Johnson, Muriel J 


475 


Johnson, Nancy J 


449 




172 


Johnson, Pam 


227 


Johnson, Paulette M 


225 


Johnson, Richard L 


406 




420 




432 


Johnson, Roberta R 


. . . . 202. 324 


Johnson, Roberta L 


231 


Johnson, Russell K 


186, 191,234.475 


Johnson, Sharon D 


193, 197,212,423 


Johnson, Shenl L 


314 


Johnson, Steven C 


167,323 




410 


Johnson, Susan J 


190,358 


Johnson, Timothy R 


393 




207 


Johnson, William H 


237 


Johnston, Brenda 


358 


Johnston, Denise R. 


358 


Johnston, Jerry D 


420 


Johnston, Jody S 


197,475 


Johnston, Lloyd B 


172 


475 




406 


Jokerst, Kathleen M 


187,449 


Jolly, Jams L 


369 



Jolly, Samone L 184,423 

Jones. Albert R. . . .420 

Jones, Charlotte A 173,332 

Jones, Clay G. 378 

Jones, Cynthia A 449 

Jones. David E 426 

Jones. Debra S 475 

Jones, Dennis R 181,234,406 

Jones, Gary L 475 

Jones, Jana M 1 70. 358 

Jones, Jams A 449 

Jones. Larry D 1 86, 235. 443 

Jones, Mark A 399 

Jones. Max A 1 92, 475 

Jones. Nancy K. 183,364 

Jones, Oliver E. 261 

Jones. Pamela L 475 

Jones. Patsy Y 1 62, 475 

Jones. Rex , , 428 

Jones. Richard P 414 



Jones, Ricky L 213,378 

Jones, Robert T 414 

Jones, Rodney L 1 64 

Jones, Ronald P 171,205,426 

Jones, Susan C 180.339 

Jones, Terrance 207 

Jones, Thomas M 414 

Jones, Thomas W 211 

Jones. Verdell 261 

Jordan, Colleen S 369 

Jordan, Michael D 378 

Jorgensen, Sharon L 200 

Joshi. Prakash V 191 

Joss, Delma D 369 

Joy, Aden 163 

Joy, KirbyE 219 

Joyce, PatricL 432 

Joyce. Rex M 432 

Juarez, Joyce A 369 

Judge, Patty 406 

Judge, Ronald E 475 

Julian, Arlyn 162 

Jungmann, Jenniter A 202.385 

Juno. Julie A . 222,239,324 



K 

Kadavy, David J . .. 205.378 

Kadlec, Judy A 475 

Kaigama, Baba K. 192 

Kail, Gerald. , 162 
Kaiser. Roger P 

Kaiser. Rose M 1 79. 200. 339 

Kalb. Barbara J . . . . 475 

Kalivoda, Scott N ... 399 

Kallenbach, Susan L 423 

Kancel, Anita 418 

Kanouse, Donald E 169 

Kansas 72 

Kantack. Carolyn J 475 

Kapelle. Judy L 475 

Kappa Alpha Theta 384 

Kappa Delta 387 

Kappa Delta PI 197.198 

Kappa Kappa Gamma 390 

Kappa Phi 1 98 

Kappa Sigma 393 

Kappelmann, Carolyn 352 

Kappelmann, Mary ,324 

Karlin, Deanna M 423 

Karlin. Julie 332 

Karnes, Bruce L 369 

Karnes, Howard A 313 

Karnes. Kathleen K 406 

Karnowski, Richard S 439 

Karr, Colleen F 224.475 

Karr, Steven D 205,379 

Karst, Catherine R 203. 332 

Karsl, David W 377 

Karstadt. Blythe C 195.445 

Kasten, Veronica S 388 

Kaster, Larry V 379 

Katterhenry, Curtis , 399 

Kauftman, Noreen 358 

Kautman, Dean A 379 

Kautman, Gary R 475 

Kautman, Nathalea J 358 

Kautman. Russell F 194.379 

Kautman. Teresa A 181.194,204.380 

Kautman, Tony D 475 

Kautmann, Rodney D 379 

Kaul. Thomas B. . 393 

Kaup, James Michael 476 

Kaup. Janette E 223. 388 

Kaup, Steven C , 251,410 

Kautz, Michael G 406 

Keating, James H 406 

Kearn, Judith M 476 

Kearney, Bob C 379 

Kearny, Michael A 410 

Keas, Dena E, 208, 476 

Keating. Mary C 476 

Keating, Rick 399 

Keberl. John R 379 

Keck, Debra A, 223 

Keebler, Nancy C. 230 

Keegan, Robert M 420 

Keeler, Karen J 449 

Keeler. Patrick D 347 

Keenan. Cynthia D 198 

Keenan.MarkA 172.220 

Keeten, Janice S. . . , 358 

Kehmeier. William R 211,252 

Keil.GlendaR 369 

Keim, Jerry L 476 

Keith, Raymond E 323 

Kellams, Robert K 476 

Kellenberger. Ricky 187, 1 89, 358 

Keller, Daniel J 318 

Keller, Mark R. , 193,347 

Kelley, Naomi F 476 

Kelley. Shanna L 423 

Kellner. Timothy L 416 

Kellogg, Kenneth K 177,347 

Kellogg, Sharon S 476 

Kelly. Barbara J . 212,219,227.388 

Kelly, Gerald 476 

Kelly. Karen L 176.418 

Kelly. Karen L 324 

Kelly, KentC 379 

Kelly. Nancy L 449 

Kelly, Nancy S. - 183,364 

Kelly, Nina 170.336 

Kelly, ShaunaL 343 

Kelly. Wesley P 318 

Kelsey. Carol S. 1 74 

Kelsey. Richard M 235. 379 

Keltner. Gene H , ,172,476 

Keltz, JackD 434 

Kemp, Kevin C . 476 

Kemper, Annetta M 369 

Kenagy, Leighann 1 76, 209, 352 

Kendall, Charlene S 317 

Kendall, Constance M 391 

Kennedy, Debra J 476 



Kennedy , James W 164,476 

Kennedy, Kay E 247. 255 

Kennelly, Michelle E 445 

Kennett, Melinda 449 

Kenney. Mark E 412 

Kenning. Eleonore M 221,336 
Kent.MaryJ 166,181,369 

Kent, TapleyW 188 

Kent, Thomas G, 476 

Kenyon, James R 169 

Kerkvliet. Michael F 193,476 

Kerley, Marsha L 213,476 

Kern, Gregory L 169 

Kern, Linda E 178.314 

Kerr. Patricia A 364 
Kerr, Paul M 

Kerr.Renee 184.476 

Kerr,Tnsh 219 

Kershaw. Karen L 358 

Keshlear, Bradley J 231 

Kesl, Peggy M 476 

Kessler, Barbara E 170,317 

Kelter, Dorothy W 179,406 

Keltler, Denise L 200.339 

Keune, Willard H 476 

Keys, Samuel 1 54 

Khalid.GopalT 191 

Khan.AbourR 192 

Khan. BakhtR 192.208 

Khan, IttikharA. , 208 

Khan, Mohammad S 208 

Khan, Mohammed N 1.92.208 

Khan.RabN 208 

Khan. Sailullah ,192,208 

Kibhnger, Robert L 476 

Kidd, Debra Sue P 190.476 

Kidwell. Judy M 212,476 

Kiernan, Frances A 476 

Kiernan, Theresa M 317 

Kilby, Pamela 358 

Kilgore, Charley W 261 

Kilgore, Patricia A 476 

Kill, Colleen 203, 364 

Kille, Barbara A 324 

Killion, Janette S 476 

Killough. John E 410 
Kimble, David E 186,191,235 

Kimble, James C 416 

Kimble, Linda J 218,476 

Kimerer, Kevin J 210.476 

Kimmel, Halsey W 439 

Kimmell, Karen A 358 

Kimple, Kandace A 449 

Kimple, KnsG 175.318 

Kimsey, Gwen L 476 

Kinder. Sheryl L. 388 

King, AnnC 418 

King, Denis R 476 

King, Edward A 476 

King, Eric S. 476 

King, JerrieL 180, 476 
King, Joan A 185.222,418 

King. Manzy 268 
King. Marilyn A. 165.179,189.359 

King, Michael E 379 

King, Michaels 476 
King, Pamela J 1 98. 206. 364 
King. Philip N 186,191,235.406 

Kingston, Arietta 359 

Kinney, JamsL 391 

Kinney, Karen J 1 85, 1 97. 206. 21 9, 225. 
236. 391 

Kinney. Kristi L 391 

Kinsey.JohnM 192 

Kiracote. Guy H 1 74 

Kirby, Cheryl 332 

Kindly. Farouk K 177,438 

Kirkpatrick, Carl W 185 

Kirn, Cynthia A 423 

Kirn, Rebecca 444 

Kirton, Sarah E 369 

Kiser, Kimball P 379 

Kisielius, Ruthann 449 

Kisner, Kimberly A 476 

Kisner, Mark A 399 
Kissing, Pamela K 214,228,388,518 

Kitch. Michael D 211 

Kite, Edward K 426 

Kite, John G 379 

Kite, Ronald A 166,399 

Kiltelson, Mary B 476 
Kittner, Jane E 170.225,325 

Klaassen, Matthew . . 318 

Klaassen, Thomas D 318 

Klahr. Michael D 192,476 

K-Lalrs 192 

Klaumann, Teresa K 449 

Klaver. Susan K 476 

Kleczka. Frank A 476 

Klees, Karen A 449 

Klees. Knstina M 449 
Klein. Kathleen A 174,182.476 

Klein, RhodaL 476 

Klein. Stephen M 432 

Klema. Frank A 327 

Klema, Sharyl M 476 

Klenda. Susanna 185.406 

Klenke. Susan M 359 

Klenke. Thomas A 169 

Kliewer. Glen M 379 

Kline, Roderick A 163.318 
Kline. Sherry J 202,232,388 

Klipowicz. Paul V 211.245 

Klock, Edward L 399 

Kloetkorn, Randy L 234. 476 

Kloplenslem. Carol 202,359 

Kloster. Karen J 201 

Knabe. Steven R 340 

Knaus, Jaime S 211 

Knecht, Linda K 183.364 

Knetter, Paula P 476 

Kniet, Claudia A 391 

Knight. Gary E 395 

Knight, Joey D 347 

Knight, RIondaR 184 

Knighl, Virginia A 476 

Knilans. Matthew J 476 

Kmlans, Richard J 169.476 



Knipp. Sam H 476 

Knoche. Jane E 369 

Knocke, Jodi 188 

Knop, Amy J 336 

Knopick. Thomas J 428 

Knopp. Clayton R 399 

Knopp. Max E 379 
Knopp. Nancy 

Knowles. John W 399 

Knowles. Kenton 340 

Knowles. Melodie S 369 

Knox. Douglas B 323 

Knox. Jacalyn E 388 

Koch, Kevin E 193.347 

Koch, Nicholas F 168 

Koch, Paula R 204.423 

Kocour, Barbara A 423 

Koekan, Ronald W 167 

Koelliker, James 168 
Koelsch, Richard K 168.224.443 

Koelson. K Rick 186 
Koepke. Leslie A 1 78. 209. 364 

Koetting. Constance 332 

Kogler. Bradley W 476 

Kogler. Larry 323 

Kohake. Marcia R 359 

Kohl, Vicki M 436 

Kohman. Kurt 379 

Kohman, Pamela J 359 

Kohman. Ray J 477 

Kolarik, Albert J 252 

Kolank. Thomas J 477 

Kolich, Margaret J 406 

Kolman. Beverly , 477 

Kolterman, Marian J 359 

Komarek. KimK. 205.477 

Kongs, Beverly J 203.477 

Kongs. Kathy A 477 

Konicek. Jeanetle M 179,359 

Koontz, Debra K 477 

Korb. Rebecca J 343 

Korbelik, Jill 369 

Korle.GaryM 414 

Korte. Steven G 379 

Korver, Kim D 359 

Koskan. Ronald W 1 67 

Kossoy, Faith S 359 

Kost, John A 379 

Kostelec Maureen A 359 

Koster, Rebecca A 255. 436 

Koster. Ronald G 477 

Kotay, Kevin 393 

Kotecha. Shirish R 191 

Koudele. Larry J 234,477 

Koukol, Darwin L 399 

Kozak, MarkW 261 

Kraltl. Blame L 174 
Kratt. Scott C 220, 226. 228. 
230.320.518 

Kratt, Terrence R 171 

Kramer, Joyce M 423 

Kramer, Ronald D 477 

Krantz. Wade R 369 

Kratina. Ernest L 219 

Kraus. Dennis B 162,400 

Kraus, Dennis B 166 

Kraus, Nancy J . 225 

Kraus. Nancy J 477 

Krause, Betty 477 

Krause, Robin S 432 

Krause, Starla J 423 

Krause, Starla 477 

Krebs, DianneM 189.388 

Krehbiel. Bradley J 379 

Krehbiel. Debra K 359 

Krehbiel. Peggy A 199.359 

Kreiser, Craig A 478 

Krempa, Ellen M 423 

Knder.JohnA 170 

Knshnan, Subramaniam 191 

Knsman, David 341 

Knzek. Craig L 313 
Kroeger. Anna M 198.238.332 

Kroeger, Hedwig E 332 

Kroemng. Mary L 359 

Kroeger, Hedwig 187 
Kroh, Roger L 176.225.236.347 

Kroth, Marianne 478 

Kroupa. Joan C 206. 423 

Kroupa. Sharon L 167.324 

Krueger. Cindy K 478 

Krueger, Kathaleen A 359 

Krug.JohnR 327 

Krug. Philip C 327 
Kruger. Dennis A 186.191.222.478 

Kruger.JayB 412 

Kruger, Lon 245 

Kruh, Robert 154,209 

Kruse, Teresa M 449 

KSDB 52.199 

K-State Singers 193 

KSU Engineers 194 

KSU Judo Club 194 

KSU Orchestra 195 

KSURAH 199 

KSU Rifle Club 195 

KSU Sailing Club 196 

KSU Scuba Cats 196 

KSU Wildlife Association 197 

Kubie. Bruce D 200. 379 

Kuchem. Chnslopher 406 

Kuczynski, Josephine 406 

Kuebelbeck. Kathy K 219. 364 

Kueker, Richard J 478 

Kuhn. David F 416 

Kuhn. Donna M 478 

Kuhn. Karl E 430 

Kuhn. LelandV 416 

Kull, Daniel D 393 

Kumholm, Alan G 443 

Kunz. Michael 426 

Kunz, Robert 426 

Kurtiss. Debra J 478 

Kurtenbach. Elizabeth 478 

Kurtz. Allen 379 

Kussman. Richard L. . .177. 234 

Kuzila. Christopher 379 

Kyle. Sondra S 423 



Royal Purple 1975 — 509 



L 

LaPlant, Barbara ...;..... 317 

Laakso. Carol G 225.478 

Laaser, Gregory N 478 

Laaser, Wini L 1 70 

Lacey. Dennis V 210 

Lacey, Penny S 314 

L acicero, Joseph M 439 

Lacy. Stephen M 205, 426 

ladner. Robin 426 

Latferty. Terne L 200. 324 

Lagergren, Ralph E 164. 478 

Lair. Gregory 420 

Lala.Brenda 201,324 

Lald.Brenda J 219 

Lallemenl, Linda J 332 

Lambert. Kristin D 369 

Lambda Chi Alpha 395 

Lambie, James R 379 

Lamphear, Pamela K. 234. 369 

Lancasler. Marcia J 183. 343 

Land. Connie B 176,185.204,211.324 
Land. Donald L 444 

Landis. Laura L 423 

Landon. Timothy E 379 

Landnth, Melanie A 332 

Landrum, Peggy V 478 

Lane. Mary J . 407 

Lang, CherylS 332 

Lang, Jane 449 

Lang, Joyce K 210 

Lange, Jeffrey M 478 

Langenkamp, Robert A 193.478 

Langhoter. Martin C. ...... . 169 

Langley. Lyle E . 394 

Langley, Marilyn K 478 

Langmacher, Cynthia 167,449 

Langton. Scott 303 

Lankston. Kathy A 391 

Lanter, Keith R 163 

LaPlant. Barbara R 206,317.428 

Lareau, Donald E 252 

Largent. RexE 177 

Larkin, Stephen P 225 

Larosh, KyeL 423 

Larsen, Dennis K 169.478 

Larsen. Eric C 197,434 

Larsen, Linda 325 

Larson, Brent G .200 

Larson, Charyl D . 221.314 

Larson, Dons J 478 

Larson, George K 478 

Larson, Janette E 1 83 

Larson, Philip O 478 

Larson, Thayne E 347 

Larsons, Evan 195 

Lassai. Winnie L 391 

Lassen, Dennis L 164, 478 

Latta, David W 353 

Latta, Ronald 434 

Lattany, John L 268 

Latter Day Saint* 200 

Lauber.JohnA 163,225,478 

Lauck. DebraD 216,222,343 

Laudel, Sharon A 201 

Lauder, Barbara 478 

Laughlm, Jan L ... 183.305.325 

Laughlin. Melissa R . . 478 

Laulme, Eric 215 

Law. Roberts 430 

Lawrence. Amy L 478 

Lawrence. Carol S , 359 

Lawrence. Cindy D 369 

Lawrence. Kristine L 369 

Lawrence, Terry L 353 

Lawson. Forrest C 415 

Lawson, Sally J 478 

Layne, Daryl E 400 

Lea, Leslie C 407 

Leach, Ann J 173.333 

Leach, Susan G , 216,478 

Leader, Janet K 180 

Lear, Nancy L 333 

Leavitt. Wallace C 407 

Leckron, DebraD 231,232,238,385 

Leclerc. Byron W 345 

Ledy, Mario J 206,478 

Lee, Barbara J 181,279 

Lee, Donald D 227.230.231,412 

Lee. Mike 252 

Lee, Steven A 230 

Lee, Tana S 189 

Leebnck, Linda C 424 

Legler, Donald A 410 

Legler. John R 478 

Lehman, Byron A 400 

Lehman, Robert L 379 

Lehman. William W .394 

Lehner. Pamela J 212,424 

Lehrmann, Ken 245 

Leiker, Joyce M 176,211.478 

Leiker. Leon E .478 

Leishman, Leon D 479 

Leister, Michelle D 183,336 

Leiszler, James 1 68 

Lem, Vincent M 479 

Leman.CariS. , 170,190,352 

Lembnght, James A 261 

Lemon, Susan D . 388 

Lentz, Nancy J 385 

Lenz. Carolyn J 165,359 

Lenz, Marilyn J 165 

Leonard, Evan L 205, 400 

Leonard, John E 415 

Leschber, Diane K 449 

Lesh, Lou A 359 

Letch, Peter E , . , 396 

Letourneau, Karen 181 

Leuke, Alan 234 

Levene, Elyse B 208 

Levenson, Lee 479 

Levin, Martha L 445 

Levme, Arthur E 

Lewis. Allen L 479 

Lewis. Charles C , . 479 



Lewis. Clifford S 199.438 

Lewis. Dee A 179,190.197,212,359 

Lewis, Gary A 479 

Lewis, Gregory K 410,416 

Lewis. Janene . .. 199.200.333 

Lewis, Jane 479 

Lewis, Janet 359 

Lewis. John G 176.225 

Lewis, Kayleen C 173.180.359 

Lewis, Marty A 223,314 

Lewis. R Perry 400 

Lewis, Shannon M 179. 359 

Lewis. Stanley D 235, 479 

Lewis. Steven J 369 

Libby.Deanna J 190.359 

Lichtenauer, David M 171.209.314 

Liebl. Barbara E 222. 479 

Liebl, Laurie J 437 

Liebl, Stephen A 379 

Lienemann. Robert P 400 

Lies. Stephen J 479 

Lietzan. Christopher 347 

Lieurance. Dale K 394 

Lige, Henry 261 

Light Brigade 200 

Lignitz. Larry 445 

Lilly. Shirley .359 

Lmd. Debbie D 407 

Lind. Patricia J 449 

Lmdau, JohnH 379 

Lmdell.Sfu 245 

Lindberg, Jeanette D 359 

Lindberg, Teresa J 333 

Lindblom, David M 251 

Lmdeblad. Robert O 379 

Lindenmuth, Leslie D 313 

Linder. Robert D .237 

Linder, Vicky M . 369 

Lmdgren. Debra J 189,418 

Lmdgren, Fred 479 

Lindholm. Carol A 479 

Lmdholm. John C ... 169, 303 

Lindholm, Kathy K , .179.202 

Lindsay, Arnita 437 

Lindsay, Jane E 314 

Lmdshield, Charles 407 

Lindsten, Karen G 407 

Lindstrom, Mary A 203,479 

Line, GayleL 201,317 

Line. Nancy S . 185.343 

Linenberger, Steven 416 

Lmenbroker, Melanie 479 

Lingentelser. Daniel 168 

Link, Gerald L 479 

Link, Malcolm K . 438 

Linn, Brian G 379 

Linn, Gary D 379 

Lmvill, Laurie G 391 

Linville. Randal L 353 

Lipovitz, Francis A 441 

Lippelmann, Karen R 352 

Lisher. Maria K 190,479 

Lisson, David J . . . . 445 

Liston, Patricia A 369 

Little. Douglas 444 

Llttla Sisters ol Delia Chi 20 1 

Little Sisters ol Minerva 20 1 

Little Sisters ol the Golden Rose 202 

Little Sisters ol the Shield 202 

Little Sisters ol the Shield and 

Diamond 203 

Little Sisters ol Theta XI 203 

Little Sisters ol Triangle Fraternity 204 
Littleton. Cynthia L 325 

Livingood, Amy L 391 

Livingood. David H 170.479 

Livingston. Diana J 325 

Livingston, Marsha R. 196,449 

Livingston, Susan E 479 

Liungdahl, Marilyn 1 87. 407 

Llamas. Stephen A 416 

Lloyd, Steven W 175,199.445 

Lober, Terence A 346 

Lobmeyer. Harold L. . . . 480 

Lobunchongsook. Ladd 480 

Lobunchongsook, Vich 480 

Lockard. Nancy E 480 

Locke. Elizabeth 247, 480 

Locke, Linda M 220,231,238 

Locke, Mark A 407 

Lockyear, William L 480 

Lockyer. Ann L 211 

Loehr. Christopher S 406 

Lotlm, Joann A 359 

Logan, Thomas D 420 

Lohrentz, David K 235,444 

Lohrentz, Margie A 204.480 

Lohrey. Cynthia J 174.480 

Londeen. David S 400 

Long. David E 268 

Long, Edward A 480 

Long, Karen E 219.391 

Long. Kathryn A. 480 

Long.Kieth 193,415 

Long.Lyn A 359 

Long, Patrick O 480 

Long, Ray E 261.268 

Long, Steven P 444 

Long, Susan K 385 

Loomis, Jack L 252 

Lord, Gerald 218 

Lorenz. Martin J 420 

Lorenzen, Randall D 468 

Loschcke. Christian 205 

Loschke, Lynne tvl 480 

Losey, Marilyn L 481 

Lotz, Steven J 172.346 

Louche, Joe 268 

Loucks. Cynthia G 202,336 

Loughbom, Diane M 388 

Loughnge. Kathy J 369 

Louk, LucindaC 418 

Love, Daniel B 236.415 

Love, Linda J 481 

Love, Mary L 369 

Love, Robert D , 323 

Love. Sara E . . 221 , 325 

Love, Tommy R 439 



Lovseth. Roxann J .179,216.359 

Low, Douglas M 400 

Low, Kendall C 446 

Lowb, J H 197 

Lowdon, Corey G 400 

Lowdon, Janet R ,359 

Lowe. Sheree 201 , 325 

Lowery. Dennis M 406 

Lowrey. Coreen E 369 

Lowrey, Drew I 379 

Lowry. Tamara 359 

Loyd. Carolyn M .208,212.481 

Loyd. Douglas R 481 

Loyd. JamesG 165. 167 

Lucas. Ann M 481 

Lucas, Gary F 444 

Luck, Janet K 359 

Luck, Richard D 415 

Lucke, Gregory A 1 71 , 327 

Luckeroth. Michele 223. 317 

Luder, Jennifer H 317 

Ludlum, TedW 232 

Ludwig, Kathryn A 481 

Ludwig, Susan M 481 

Luebbers, Jerome L 432 

Lueker, Deborah A 314 

Lukert.KarIF 400 

Lukert, Susan K 223.481 

Lunberry, Tyler D 481 

Lund, Roger D 481 

Lundberg, Danny O 162,166 

Lundberg, Donna L .... 237,481 

Lundgren, Christina 481 

Lundgren, Gail A 481 

Lundin, Marsha L 481 

Lundsted, Nancy J 391 

Lundstrom, Debra J 198.481 

Lungren, Herbert J 445 

Lungren, Kathy M 199 

Lupton, James W 327 

Lusci. Stephanei D 206 

Lusco, Stephanie D 234 

Lust, Keith M 328 

Lustgarten, Eddie H 412 

Luthi, Allison J 418 

Luthi. Hal L 481 

Luthi. Jannette E 190. 450 

Luthi, Jerry L 481 

Luthi, Jill K 238,450 

Luthi, JomR 418 

Luttrell, Curtis W 432 

Luttrell, Vicki F ... 239,317 

Lux, Ann C 210.385 

Lux, Lynn M 385 

Lyle, David A 420 

Lyle. Dwight R 420 

Lynam, Linda B 343 

Lynam. Patricia 234,343 

Lynch, Dennis R 481 

Lynch, Michael D 248 

Lynn, Naomi B 237 

Lynn, Robert 152 

Lyon, Barbara J 325 

Lyon, Timothy J 432 

Lysaght Rosalind A 481 

Lyfle. John A 400 



m 

Maack, Martha 385 

Maben. Pamelas . .. 198,450 

Mabin, Debra 305 

Mach, Scott W 428 

Mack, Debra J, . 194 

Macke. Patricia A 248 

Mackender, Steven R 379 

Mackey, Cheryl A 424 

MacLaird, Steven A 171 

Macy, Cindy M 173,178.180.198.339 
Maddux. MitziC. 195,234,339 

Mader, Ernest L 1 63 

Madill. Dixie L 481 

Madorin, Melvm L 197,400 

Maechtlen, Steve W 481 

Magan, James L 205 

Magerkurth, JohnH 481 

Maggard, Carol J 190,199,424 

Magill, KentB 248,481 

Magner, Richard A 400 

Magneson, Darci M 370 

Mahatfey.BevD 207 

Mahaney, JayW 481 

Mahar, John R 440 

Mahoney, Janet A 238, 370 

Mahoney, Patricia A 222, 333 

Mai, David R 179 

Mai, Marilyn S 450 

Mai. Melodee A 424 

Main, JennilerL 178,189.419 

Maisch. Mark A 341 

Malgren, Chris 268 

Malmowski. Patricia 359 

Malir, Lynn M 333 

Mall. Denise E 370 

Mallard, Harry C 481 

Mallon, Michael J 412 

Mallory, Patricia L 481 

Malm, David L 168 

Malone, Kathleen A 359 

Malone, Michael J 481 

Malone. Patrick R 481 

Malone. Sue A 223. 239 

Maloney, LuA . . .343 

Maltby, Daniel P 438 

Mance, Thomas E 406 

Maness. Mark M 172.481 

Mangan, Stephen L 379 

Manges, Rodney E 1 95 

Manley, James T 347 

Mann, Brenda L 481 

Mann, George W 346 

Mann. Gregory R 481 

Mann. John J 428 

Mann. Lawrence V 323 

Manning, Mary K 336 



Manry.JohnR 428 

Mans, Val 237 

Manzo. Wiltred F 400 

Marchetti.DavidA 370 

Marcotte. JoanE 221 

Marcotte. Marilyn R 187,481 

Marcotte, Renee S 195.221,234.481 

Marcuson, Bradley A 481 

Marietta, James R 246 

Marietta, John C. 430 

Marietta, Kala J 202, 235, 437 

Markee, James M 420 

Markey, Douglas B 428 

Markham, Marcie L 359 

Marks, James M 400 

Marks, Sandra K 

Marlatt 347 

Marlette. Kala 186 

Marlow. Denver D 373 

MarrriOr, Frederick W. 181 

Marquez, Edward J 396 

Marr. Debra K 481 

Marr, John M. . 237 

Marr. Steven K. 481 

Marrs. Danny D 171, 434 

Marrs. Donnie D 252 

Marrs. Valeria L 187,481 

Marschman. Kent L .328 

Marsh. Debra K 178.213.325 

Marsh, Mary A 359 

Marsh, Mori 188 

Marsh, Rhonda S 359 

Marsh, Susan M . 360 

Marsh, Wallace A .428 

Marshall, Deborah K 195. 234 

Marshall, Glenn D 481 

Marshall, JuanitaC 184 

Marshall, Mark L 205 

Marshall. Paula F 209. 352 

Marsteller, Thomas A .173 

Marston. Barbara D 173.370 

Marten, Lynn E 481 

Marten, Paula S 450 

Martens. Beth D 336 

Martens. Kent A 396 

Martens. Wendell A 400 

Martin, Blake G 168.400 

Martin. Christina A 360 

Martin. Deborah K 481 

Martin. Deborah L 406 

Martin. Dennis M 207 

Martin, Donald L 166 

Martin, Edwin D 481 

Martin, Gary L 406 

Martin. John C 313 

Martin, John W 379 

Martin, Nancy A 187,360 

Martin. Nancy J 333 

Martin. Peggy J 437 

Martin, Ralph C 426 

Martin, Richard A 415 

Martin, Rose M 193.481 

Martin. Scott A 481 

Martin. Scotly J 347 

Martinson, Cheryl K 406 

Marty, Donald J 72, 220, 235 

Martz, Timothy R 379 

Marzolf.G Richard 172.237 

Maskus. William G . 328 

Mason. Ernest L 400 

Mason, Lucy N 481 

Mason. Ronald C 379 

Massoth. Glenroy F 379, 406 

Mast, Philip N 481 

Masters, David 444 

Mastin.GaryA 379 

Mathews, Mark R 323 

Mathews, Pamela J 450 

Mathewson, Judith J 166 

Mathis. Samuel E 236, 406 

Matlack, Roxanne 325 

Matlack, Terry C 407 

Matousek, Carl W 163,481 

Matousek, Noralee N 218 

Matteson, Dennis K 200 

Matteson, Diane R 200 

Matthews, Douglas A 481 

Mattmgly, Kathleen 325. 450 

Mattson. Dick 190 

Mattyak. Judy M 481 

Matzeder. Laurie E 204.482 

Maupin, Kimberly A 343 

Mausolf. Debra J 211.482 

Mawhmey, Lisa K 360 

Maxson, Knsti G 482 

Maxwell. Rodney 318 

May, Adnenne S 317 

May. Tony 277 

May. Rosemary A 388 

Maydew, Brian J 163,353 

Mayer, Gregory L 353 

Mayhew, Cynthia A 482 

May, Susie 221 

Mayo. Michael G 482 

Mayo. Steven A 318 

Mays. Bruce 261 

Mays, Penny J 385 

McAdow, David T 1 72 

McAlee, Cheryl L 360 

McAtee, Gary L . . . 482 

McAllister. Cynthia 360 

McAllister, R D 379 

McArthur, David K 482 

McArthur, West K 420 

McAtee. Joseph M 400 

McAulitte, Susan B 238, 360 

McBee, Shelley A 182,388 

McBoyle, Donneta K 198, 339 

McBride, Dan A 482 

McBnde, Penelope A . 482 

McCabe. Randel D 1 74 

McCaftree. Michelle 203 

McCain. James 142.143.144,145,262 
McCaleb, Pamela A. . . .168,208,419 
McCandless. Debra K 1 65, 1 88, 385 

McCandless, Douglas 407 

McCandless, Teresa . . .190,198.325 
McCahn, Nancy J 190. 424 



McCanon, Janice J 370 

McCarter. Becky B 317 

McCarter, Susan J 317 

McCarthy, Phyllis A 216.333 

McCarthy. Susan F 221 

McCaskill, Nancy S 450 

McClae. Francis D 444 

McClain.GaryD 313 

McClanahan, Alan J 1 70. 379 

McClanahan, Barbara . . . 172.482 

McClarnon, Susan G 360 

McClary. Kent M 394 

McClary, Michael D 394 

McClaskey. David E 173 

McClay. Jon 268 

McClmtock, Gary W . . . 400 

McClintock. William , 174.407 

McCluggage, Mark D 379 

McClung, James H 162,163,166.482 

McClure. Anne L 197,360 

McClure, Cynthia A 1 78, 437 

McClure, Douglas L 225. 236 

McClure, Gay 333 

McClure, Susan J 223,336 

McClurg, Robert L 186.191,235,482 

McCobb, Carolyn A .482 

McCollough, Monty E. 396 

McCool, Mary E. , . 360, 482 

McCorgary, Larry W 318 

McCormic, Steven E 1 72, 1 97 

McCormick.HughT 245 

McCosh, Cathy 333 

McCoskey, Steven L 435 

McCoy, MarkS 379 

McCoy. Michael D 428 

McCoy, Thomas B 236 

McCracken, Carol L 187, 482 

McCraner. Carol 424 

McCrann, Lisa P 188.482 

McCrary. Sharon L 178.237.339 

McCray. Christi 370 

McCreery. Sharon K 482 

McCreight. Jane 424 

McCreight. Patricia 437 

McCnllis, Marilyn 336 

McCullough, Danella 1 98, 482 

McCullough, Joseph B 482 

McCune, Greg A 163,174,426 

McCune, Linda D 343 

McCune, Marcia E 325 

McCune, Susan L 343 

McCurdy, Mark F .482 

McCutcheon, Donald T 482 

McDade, Jettrey 283 

McDaniel. Billy G 225, 328 

McDaniel, Pamela D 1 70. 325 

McDittett. Timothy L 442 

McDonald, James P 432 

McDonough, Kathryn J 166.178,238 

McDowell. Ravae 482 

McElroy, Norval R 483 

McElroy, Warren A 400 

McEuen. Michael S 172.220 

McEwen. Patricia A 1 78. 1 89, 208, 212, 

391 

McFadden, Patrick M 225. 379 

McFall, Larry D 379 

McFarland, Connie S . ...483 

McFarland. Roberta J 239,314 

McFarland, Steven D 483 

McFee, Rob R 407 

McGanty, Mark K 388 

McGhee, David R 407 

McGivern. Michael R .346 

McGranaghan, Margare 178.314 

McGrath, Julia A 360 

McGraw, Eugene 337 

McGraw. Marcia G 483 

McGreevy, Laure 360 

McGreevy, Suzanne 483 

McGrew, Robert L 420 

McGrew, Ruth .... 424 

McGritt, PatnciaS 370 

McGritf, Robert W 400 

McGugm, Terry C 407 

McGuire, Teresa A 483 

McHugh. Michael L 483 

Mcllhon. Stephen J 347 

Mclntyre. Pegge A 183.419 

Mclntyre, Robert R 407 

Mclver, Kristine 424 

McKaig. Douglas R .400 

McKaig. Susan M 483 

McKay, Kevin W 483 

McKee, Charlotte A 216,364 

McKee, Judy A. . 212,360 

McKee, Sharon A 370 

McKeeman, Lorraine 283 

McKenna, Jerome E 396 

McKimens, Beverly J 314 

McKinley. Gregory E 379 

McKmney, Katheryn 1 83 

McKinney, Marsha L 201,239,483 

McKinnis. Steven R 186,191,235.483 

McLaughlin. Kathleen .370 

McLeland. David A 1 95. 328 

McLeod. Deborah S 203. 209. 325 

McMahon. Renee 203, 424 

McManus, David M 432 

McMillen. Gwendolyn 343 

McMurray, Debbra A 483 

McMurray, Dee A 360 

McMurray, Linda A 483 

McNary, Jane E 450 

McNaughton, Gary A . 186,191,235 

McNeely, Carolyn J 187.483 

McNeil, Marcia F 333, 360 

McNeil, Richard I 313 

McNeill, Anna L 188, 424 

McNeive, Lucy K 343 

McNerney, Coleen A 360 

McNerney, Frances M 370 

McNett, David L 318 

McNickle, Tim A 174.353 

McNish.JohnJ 379 

McNitt, Jay 420 

McRae. Patricia A 391 

McReynolds. Jeanice 208.212360 



510 — Royal Purple 1975 



McVey. Barl L 442 

McVey, Craig L 251,252 

McVicker, Marilyn M 183.450 

McWhorler. Daniel M 396 

McWilliams, James P 1 70. 442 

McWilliams. Robben L 353 

Meacham, Frank D 1 71 , 380 

Mead, Mary E 325 

Meade, Sandra A 419 

Meador, Patricia A 202, 483 

Mealman. Linda K 388 

Mealy, DeniseK 424 

Means, Daniel E 396 

Means. Rita M 370 

Mears. Timothy P 432 

Medical Technology Club 204 

Medill, Carol 317 

Medill, Cynthia M 185 

Medill. Susan J 317 

Medley, Murray K 380 

Meehan, Barbara L 333 

Meek, Arlon L 199.483 

Meengs, Mary L 360 

Mehan, Barb 214 

Mehl, Karen A 170,325 

Meier, Mary L 170 

Meier, Steven K 162,166,483 

Mem. John C 175,179.186,191,224, 

235,328 
Mem, Steven A, , , ,328 

Meinke, Michael S 400 

Meisenheimer, John P 163,407 

Meister, Barbara J , 208,333 

Meitl, Gerard F 169 

Meitner, John T 426 

Melcher, Jeltrey L 400 

Melgaard, David K 195 

Melhus, Melinda , .216,343 

Mellies, David N 483 

Melson.ChrisA 173,407 

Menaugh, Steven A 199.483 

Mendenhall. Jana B. 450 

Mendenhall, Marilyn 483 

Menehan, Kelsey D 219,231,232,385 

Menehan, Melissa 385 

Mengarelli, Jimmie J. 

Mensch. Paul C 380 

Men's Glee Club 205 

Mentzer, Jeanme M 450 

Mercer. James A 171 

Mercer. Kathenne E 1 70 

Meredith. Rodney L 483 

Merklein. Paul W 174 

Mernlield, Michael 268 

Memtield. Thomas E 261 

Merrill, Fred 252 

Mernman, Cynthia 360 

Mernman, Jannie E 183 

Merritt, Randall E, 211.353 

Mersch, Ronald D 261 

Merlz, Thomas D 163, 225 

Messall, John M 416 

Messenger, Evan S 483 

Messmer, DeaneneS 178,314 

Metcalt, Bill L 400 

Metheney, Larry A 432 

Metro. TheresaS 483 

Metzinger. Joe W 320 

Metzler, Bradley D 420 

Meyer. Allen D 328 

Meyer, BrendaS 247 

Meyer, Carolyn D 483 

Meyer, Cathy J 370 

Meyer, Cindy L 484 

Meyer, Craig A 400 

Meyer, David J 168 

Meyer, Donna R 1 80, 223, 339 

Meyer, Frank W ,171 

Meyer. Gail A 328 

Meyer, Gary W 440 

Meyer, Laurie A 314 

Meyer, LibbyG 180,224,484 

Meyer, Nancy L 370 

Meyer, Susan D 343 

Meyers, Carol A 484 

Meyers. Paula K 227, 484 

Meysing, Joseph J 167 

Mezget.DenaE 424 

Michaels, June A 333 

Micheels, Marlene M 450 

Michel, Michael E 484 

Michel, Vickie L, 360 

Michels. Gary L 174,353 

Michels. Kay L 484 

Micoplay, Jim 251 

Microbiology Club 205 

Middlekamp, Rick D, . 320 

Middleton, Jettrey P 380 

Mierau. Constance L 424 

Mikesell, Tressa A 239 

Mikols, Wayne J 234. 445 

Milam, Michael L .211 

Milberger, Mary L 180,370 

Milbourn, Max 148 

Milburn, Michael W 394 

Miles, Steven W 318 

Millard, Philip B 380 

Millard, Robert B 420 

Miller, AlanG. . 484 

Miller, Carol L . 237, 391 

Miller. Charhss A ...219,225,391 

Miller, Cynthia L 484 

Miller, DebraK . 199,214,437 

Miller, DonW. 166, 173 

Miller, Gary E. . 219 

Miller. Gregory B 211.400 

Miller. Jeanme 317 

Miller, Jim D 174 

Miller, Kathleen 370 

Miller, Kathryn A 343 

Miller, Kathy P 360 

Miller. Kim A 234.353 

Miller, Kim E 445 

Miller. Marcia A 424 

Miller. ManlynS . .227,333 

Miller, Mark A 341 

Miller. Mark W 426 

Miller, Mary B 370 



Miller, MaryK 204 

Miller. NyleM. 169,484 

Miller. Paul L . .215 

Miller, Richard W 431 

Miller, Robert C 232.445 

Miller, Sandra L. . .216,219,317 

Miller, Stacey J. 197.212.360 

Miller. Stanley R 171 

Miller, Steve 205,416 

Miller, Thomas , 426 

Miller, Virgil K. . .318 

Millhouse, Nancy K .424 

Millikan, Joe A 323 

Million, Eileen 424 

Mills. Brian J 420 

Mills. Cynthia J 450 

Mills. David J 380 

Mills. David W 400 

Mills, Earl E ...380 

Mills, Jan A 339 

Mills, Jeanme M 188 

Mills, Keith A 440 

Mills, Margaret A 317 

Millsap. Teresa C ... 202, 388 

Millsap, Timothy M 328 

Milner, Susan E 484 

Minnix, James M 440 

Minor, Cortland A . .380 

Minor, Kathleen A 484 

Minteer, Nancy H 314 

Minturn, Martha L 224,437 

Mirocke, Annette C 407 

Miskimins, Joel A , . 380 

Misner. Joann 407 

Mitchell, Bruce D 207 

Mitchell. Dale D .380 

Mitchell, Gary R 171 

Mitchell, Gregory P ,,.380 

Mitchell, Lowell R 442 

Mitchell, Marlene K 424 

Mitchell. Phyllis 450 

Mitchell, Shelley D 419 

Mitner, Joe . .268 

Mitts. Kathleen A 216,424 

Mitts, Pamela S .360 

Mix. Michael J. 394 

Mize, Barbara K 484 

Mize, Franks. . .484 

Mlinek, Kirk A 188,380 

Moats, Bilhe M 205, 484 

Mock, ArminR 167 

Mock, Craig C 167 

Mock. Dean B 167 

Mockry, Eldon F 177.234 

Moddrell, Nancy 343 

Moden. Joleen 1 79 

Moeckel, Douglas N 261 

Moeckel, Merle J . 400 

Moehlenbrmk. Larry 205, 410 

Moeller, Chris R 400 

Motlilt, Nancy J 484 

Moghaddam. Mahmoud F 192 

Moheng, Mitchell C 313 

Moherg, Mitch C 204 

Mohler. Michael H 484 

Mohler, Paula J 360 

Mohr, Eric 440 

Mohr, Julie K 484 

Mohr, William J. ,400 

Molina, Robert L , .432 

Molinari, James 297 

Moll, Janet L 484 

Mollett, Kathryn 248 

Molzen. Myron 380 

Monlort, Darrell R 484 

Monlort, Kathleen 484 

Monk.Gwen A 343 

Montgomery, David E 484 

Montgomery, Jane M 450 

Montgomery, Joan M 484 

Montgomery, Michael 194,484 

Montgomery, Nancy J 189,343 

Montgomery, Susan F 370 

Moore 403 

Moore, Alan D. 252 

Moore. Alisa K 484 

Moore, Carol A 484 

Moore. Dee A 200. 424 

Moore, Gloria S 450 

Moore, Gregory D 407 
Moore, James P 186,191,235,484 

Moore, Jeffrey W 410 

Moore, Judy L . . , 343 

Moore. Kenneth D 169,434 

Moore, Kimberly J 343 

Moore, Lynn A ,445 

Moore, Melissa 385 

Moore, Shelley 247,391,484 

Moore, Suzanne K 317 

Moore. William D . .484 

Moore, William E 237 

Moormann, Betty M 370 

Moots, Craig K 432 

Morain, Michelle 370 

Morford, Quentin A .400 

Morgan, John W 484 

Morgan, Kathryn A 333 

Morgan, Kimberly A 419 

Morgan, Linda L 484 

Morgan, Lynn N 484 

Morgan, Margaret J 218.370 

Morgan, Sheryl J 174,339 

Morgan, Susan E 214 

Morgan, Thomas H 318 

Morgan, Timothy J 416 

Morgenstern. Roxanne 176, 199 

Morland. David E 215 

Morray, Brian S .380 

Morrell, Jack E 484 

Morris, Bradford H 231 

Morris, DanaS , . 370 

Morris, Derrick E 484 

Morris, Julia A , , ,450 

Morris, Mary F . ... 1 65, 360 

Morris. Michael E 412 

Morris, Pamela 424 

Morris, Tresia E 484 

Morrison, Beth D 484 



Morrison, Debra J 484 

Morrison. Donald P 407 

Morrison. Kile R 429 

Morrison, Nancy J 193,450 

Morrison, William R 484 

Morse, Roanna L 314 

Morse, Steven K 484 

Mortar Board 206 

Morion, David L 380 

Morton, Stephen C 341 

Morts. Robert S 323 

Moseley, Pamela 193 

Moser, Bradley C 410 
Moser, Brenda L 1 85, 206. 212. 385 

Moser, Jeffrey C 410 

Moser, Jon A. . 484 

Moser, Mary E 185.189.195,225.385 

Moser, Theresa K 360 

Moses, Barbara E 246. 484 

Mosley, KimD . 341 

Moss, Marilyn C 314 

Moss. Melinda A 336 

Mossman. Rick L 197,400 
Mothes, Charlotte D 1 65, 21 0, 238, 333 

Mott.JohnG 394 

Mount. Elizabeth A 213 

Mowery, Gerald L 484 

Muckenthaler, Michael 416 

Muckenthaler, Terry 343 

Mudd, Flavian G. 416 

Mudd. Patrick P 416 

Muehlbach.Chnslopher 252.484 

Mueller, Ann E 224.450 

Mueller, Jill E 204.360 

Mueller, KalhleneR 370 

Mueller, ThelmaG 189.317 

Mueller, Thomas E 484 

Muetmg. Dale F 182 

Mugler, David J 163,175.237 

Mugler, Janet K 450 

Mugredge, Mike 268 

Muirhead, Mignon E 484 

Mukhebi. Adrian W 484 

Mullen, Bruce A . . . 164 

Mullen. Kevin M 213.380 

Mullenix, Cynthia K 208 

Muller, Suzanne K 1 79, 1 80, 333 

Mullin.MaryJ 489 

Mullins, Marsha L 484 

Mumma, Vickie L 212,485 

Mummed. Katherine A 1 76. 360 

Munden, David G 353 

Munger, Theodore F 227 

Munson, Gaylord R 353 

MuPhl Epsllon 206 

Muret. William E 370 
Murphy, Andrea M 

Murphy, Byron T 485 

Murphy, Claire E . 450 

Murphy, Daniel D 174,328 

Murphy, Kathleen L 202 

Murphy, Kathy 370 

Murphy, Marcia A 339 

Murphy, Matthew D 207 

Murphy, Nancy J 203,424 

Murphy, Sheryl A 343 

Murray, Janinne M 352 

Murray. JereL, 182.209,317 

Murry.JohnP. 237 

Murrell.LydiaG 370 

Murrill. Cynthia A 178.199,424 

Musick, Nancy L 223,336 

Musil, Donald E 410 

Musser, Daniel F 235, 485 

Mustafa. Abdelmoneim 192 

Mustoe, Nancy D 314 

Myer, David 268 

Myer. Melinda A 317 

Myers, Bradley R 188,291,320 

Myers. Claire H 173 

Myers. Janet L 238 

Myers, Jerry C 485 

Myers, Joe 380 

Myers, Kathleen A 360 

Myers, Keeta S 388 

Myers. KristyA 333 

Myers. Melanie 407 

Myers, Ramona L 196,450 

Myers, Susan M 360 

Myers. Trula J 485 

Myracle, Eva D 370 

Myszka. Karen S 370 



N 

Nadon, Suzanne L 185,388 

Nagaraia, Tiruvoor G. 191 

Nail, Bruce N 346 

Napier, Bruce A. 234 

Nash. Alvin E 380 

Nash, Elizabeth E 370 

Nash, Margaret M 1 96, 450 

Nason. Randall R 435 

Nass, Timothy J 199.213,380 

Nataraian, T ... 191. 192 
Natural Resource Management 

Club 207 

Navarro, Ernesto 268 

Nave. Sherry M 166.370 

Nawaz. Ahmad 208 

Nay, Cynthia A. 203, 388 

Naylor. Gary L . . . . 400 

Neaderhiser. Janine 460 

Neaderhiser, Stephen 485 

Neal. Linda L , . 216,370 

Nease, Dennis A , , ,380 

Nederman, Jeltry A .432 

Nedwed.Jan 203,343 

Neely.AnneN 198 

Neely. Robert G 162.174,180 

Neibling, David L 380 

Neibling.MarioneM 204,234.352 

Neibling, William H 168.186.444 

Neighbors. David 420 

Neighbors, Mark S 420 



Neilson, Marilyn 283 

Nelkm, Sherry L 485 

Nelsen, Kirk 432 
Nelson. Aline G 173.179.339 

Nelson, Ann 179,360 

Nelson. Brett E 318 

Nelson, Bruce A 407 

Nelson, Carta D 407 

Nelson. Cathy L 223,325 

Nelson. David C 172,410 

Nelson. David D 1 74 

Nelson. Dennis F 485 

Nelson, Donald D 220 

Nelson, Gary A 420 

Nelson, Greta F 317 
Nelson, Janet K 231,232.419 

Nelson. Lily J 370 

Nelson, Patricia J 485 

Nelson. Paul T 277 

Nelson, Raebern L 174,485 

Nelson, Becky S 180 

Nelson. Randy 283 

Nelson, Richard L 400 

Nelson, Rodney A 313 

Nelson, Ronald W 407 

Nelson. Sally J. 485 

Nelson, Thomas L 174 

Nelson, Wayne E 407 

Nemechek, Eugene C 380 

Nemechek, Michael C 380 

Nemechek, Victor M 380 
Neptune, Calvin 

Nesbit. Mary J 360 

Nesbit, Terry L 410 

Nelherton, TamaraA. 212 

Neuteld, Stanton M 485 

Neuharth, Belinda R . 170,352 

Neuhaus. Robin M 343 

Neuhotel. Nancy L 486 
Neumann. JeanetteL 165.223.451 

Neumann. Yvette 360 

Neymayer, Robert T 429 

Newby, Fran 168 

Newby. Stanton L 162 

Newby. Steven L 380 

Newcomb, Eric A 486 
Newcomer, Janel E 1 79. 209, 325 

Newell. Karen K 486 

Newkirk. Alan D 313 

Newman, Richard C 328 

Newton, Marilyn K 224 

Ney.JohnT 174 
Ney. Timothy D 195.214,234.486 

Nichols 120 

Nichols, Anita J 360 

Nichols, Laurence E . . 420 
Nichols, Lonnie J 163,225.486 

Nichols. Nancy A 222.333 

Nichols, Polly 370 

Nichols. Steven T 303.370 

Nicholson. William G . 410 

Nickel. David E 197 

Niederee. Michael C 432 

Nielsen. Danny L 318 

Nielsen, Douglas A 219 

Nielsen, Helen M 198,486 

Nielsen, Marilyn J 364 

Nienhuis, Debra L 486 

Nighswonger, Ted J 1 74, 485 

Nightengale, Peggy J 360 

Nikkei, Lena K 486 

Niles. Norma D 216,451 

Nilson. Edwin 207 

Nitzschke. Kevin J 426 

Nivens. Mary 424 

Nix. Cecilia A. . 486 

Nix. Nancy M 486 

Nobel, Larry M 211 

Noble, Joseph E 195 

Noe, Bruce A 400 

Noel, Lionel C 234 

Noel, Rhonda S 213 

Nottsinger, Teresa L 385 

Nolan, William J 213 
Noland, Robert C 293.297,298,347 

Noll. David S 396 

Noll. Janel L 424 

Noll, Jeffrey E 162,400 

Noller, Pamela J 239. 487 

Nolte. Thomas R 380 

Nollmg. Earl 158 

Nolting, Steven P 197.487 

Nonamaker, Thane W 178 

Noone, James C 487 

Noonen, Denise M 451 

Noonen, Thomas H 400 

Noordsy, Thomas L 1 69. 1 75 

Nordboe, Connie J 451 

Noren, Alice V 333 

Norman. Laurie 179.339 

Norman, Sara J 360 

Norris, MaryK 451 

Norsing, Mark . 268 

Norsworthy. Steven K 1 63, 487 

North. Linda E 385 

North. Sheila A 388 

North. Susan E 212,385 
Norton, Susan M 255, 305. 343 

Norton. William B 431 

Norwood. Lloyd 268 

Noteis, Victoria L 487 

Nottingham. Barbara 487 

Nottingham. David L 380 

Nottingham. Lyle D 487 

Novotny, Bruce J 407 

Novy. Cindi . 360 

Nowak. R D 435 

Noyes. Bradley A 341 

Nuessen, Michael J 487 
Nulik, Rodney L 162,163.166.174,353 

Nuss, Lyman L 353 
Nuss. Susie 226. 238. 343 

Nutsch.TenL 197.487 

Nutter. Connie 385 

Nutter. Judith A 333 

Nyberg, Lyndal 195 

Nykaza. Scott M 320 

Nyquist. James A 487 



o 

Obee. Robert 252 

Ober. Susan 234 

Oatman. Roger 283 

Oatman, Wayne 283 

Oberhelman. Kathy J 451 

Oberly, Amber 388 

O'Brien, David 217 

O'Brien, Gmny 232 

O'Brien. Mary V 360 

Ochs. Cheryl A 314 

Ochs. Jeanette L 487 

Ochs, Roger K 380 

Oshsner. Susan M 424,487 

O'Connell. Barbara A . . . , 360 

O'Connor. Timothy P 394 

O'Connor. William 353 

O'Connor, Yvonne M 487 

O'Dell. Leora H 333 

O'Oell. William E 167 

Odom. Gregory D 380 

O'Donnell, Paula J 174 

Oehmke. Gary D 407 
Oesterreich, Teresa 1 98, 238, 437 

Oelmger, Cynthia L 1 83. 343 

Ott Campus 453 

Officer. Dawn C 360 

Oghabi.AliA 192 

Ogle, Leslie D 407 

Ogorman, Colleen S 171 

O'Hara, BrigidD , 487 

Ohno, Tsufomu 487 

Olander. Jane A 218.325 

Olandt. Vicki L 451 

Olberdmg. Daniel J 407 

Olberding. David L 487 

Olcott, Robert H 415 

Oldlield, AnnE 314 

Oldham, Andrew L 400 

Olds, Gary D 303. 396 

Olds. Gregory D 396 

Oleen. Charles E 173 

Oliphant. Mark J 487 

Oliver. Barbara A 325 

Oliver. Michael P 193.347 

Oliver. Sara L 317 

Olmstebd. Don R 210 
Olmstead, Marvin L 

Olmstebd, Don R 210 

Olney, Bradford W 410 

Olney, Brent E 251.410 

Olopai. Margarita R 360 

Olsen. Daye 173 

Olson, Connie J 424 

Olson, Dan S 353 

Olson. Dana G 442 

Olson. Donald D 1 79 

Olson. John E 341 

Olson. John T 347 

Olson. MarkS 168 

Olson, Randall D 341 
Olson. RenetA 203,239.370 

Olson, Richard W 174 
Oltien. James W 174,222.353 

Oltjen. Larry M 394 

Oltien. Rita A. 238.451 

Omega Psl Phi 207 

Omenski, Philip P 400 

Omlcron Nu 208 

O'Neal, Kelly D 347 

O'Neal. Ten L 221.391 

O'Neil.JaneE 407 

O'Neill, Margaret M 173 

O'Neill. Richard J 313 

O'Nello, Ann L 360 

O'Nello, Maureen E 333 
Oni, Kayode C 

Oppitz. Constance C 207. 212. 388 

Oppitz, Lawrence W 321 

Oppitz, Michael E 321 

Organizations 160 
Orme. KathieJ 183.199.217.451 

Ormislon, Rock A 347 

Orndorll, Danette L 445 

O'Rourke. Maureen P 315 

Orr. Kenneth R 172 

Ortmann. Michael F 380 

Osborn, Don 268 

Osborn. Mona D 333 

Osborn, Patrick R 261 

Osborne. David F 1 72. 380 

O'Shea. Susan E 360 

O'Shea. Thomas R 487 

Osman. Khalid 191.192 

Ost, Kirk D 394 

Oswald, Marlene K 195 

Oswalt. Jane E 202. 385 

O'Toole. Frank K 394.438 
O'Toole. Kathleen A 221.305.370 

O'Toole. Patrick J 380 

Ott. Jon S 380 

Ott. Kent A 173.426 

Ort.Laureen 171 

Otle.VernE 169 

Otfmger, Curtis E 396 

Otfo. Dan 303 

Oukrop. Carol E 165 

Ousdahl. Lisa P 188 

Overgaard. Glenn A 380 

Owen. David R 407 

Owen. Greg D 432 

Oyster. Ronald A 219 

Ozark Mountain Daredevils 67 



P 

Pack. Jams A 223.487 

Page. Cynthia M 234 

Page, Pamela R 364 

Paidy.Sudhakar R 191 

Painter, Knstie A 360 



Royal Purple 1975 — 511 



Pakistan Student Association 208 

Palenske. Jean L 218,419 

Palenske. Judith A 218 

Palma, Philip F 429 

Palmblade. Freddie E 415 

Palmer, Bruce E 380 

Palmer, Carolyn L 370 

Palmer. Christine 219.336 

Palmer, David P 234 

Palmer, Keith A 251 , 252 

Palmer, Kim 333 

Palmer, Michael L 341 

Panhellanlc 209 

Pankratz, Barbara A 487 

Paramore, Cynthia J 451 

Parcel. Pennie 179,424 

Parham. Donald E 261 

Parhamovich, Jeltrey 407 

Parikh. Dakshesh D 191 

Parikh, Yogesh 191 

Park, Gilbert N 318 

Parker, Bonnie L 390 

Parker, Deborah K 317 

Parker. James W 353 

Parker, Jay B 245 

Parker. Jeltrey J 1 67, 435 

Parker. Landon K 426 

Parker, Mark M 440 

Parker, Marshall D 347 

Parker, Richard W 410 

Parker, Robert E 487 

Parker, Robert W 164,429 

Parker, Thomas E 167 

Parks. Cynthia L 209,325 

Parks, Darrell D 207 

Parks. James C 169 

Parks. Julie K 225 

Parks. Max 370 

Parks, Nancy 200 

Parks, Vicky J 339 

Parks. Wendy . 360 

Parmely, Janice K 487 

Parmely. Teresa J 370 

Parr. Howard F . .347,163 

Parr. KelleeR 180,380 

Parr, Patricia A * . . 360 

Parns, Fred M 237 

Parnsh.GiendaW 333 

Parrish, Jean 226,518 

Parsons. David C 429 

Parsons. Earle M 487 

Parsons, John A 380 

Parsons, Martha L 216 

Paschal, Mark J. 407 

Paslay, Lesa G 451 

Passen, Philip C 415 

Patrick, Christine L 407 

Patrick, John B. 429 

Patrick, Kay D 183,223.364 

Patry, MananS 190.451 

Patterson, Sharon 445 

Pattmson, Linda D 206,385 

Patton. Dannie D 400 

Patton, Joyce L 213,487 

Patton. Laree A 451 

Patton, Leon J 353 

Patton. Lewis A 410 

Patton, William R 431 

Paulich, Cheryl L 360 

Paulich.Dana J . 216,487 

Paulik, Joseph 487 

Paulsen, Daniel B 353 

Paulsen, DeanaC 210,239.364 

Paustian, Donald L 412 

Pauzauskie, Dan 303 

Pavlik. Joseph O 219 

Payne. Deborah J ...212,487 

Payne, John A 435 

Payne, Lisa A 487 

Payne. Richard D 438 

Payton, Ronnie L 261 

Peach, Elizabeth 315 

Peake, Steven G 220 

Pearls 209 

Pearls and Rubles 210 

Pearson, Bradley B 487 

Pearson, Pamelas 247.255.488 

Pearson, Steven E 210,488 

Peavler, Gary D. 407 

Peckman. Carol J 339 

Peckman, Clinton H 440 

Peel, Bob 251 

Pegues, Virginia A 336 

Pelton, Gregory V 394 

Pelton, Lynn E 1 74, 353 

Pelton, Sue L 210.212,385 

Peltzer, H C 336 

Pellzer, L C 336 

Pember, Marianne A 173,407 

Pence, Merrole 391 

Pendleton. David E 380 

Pendleton. John 
Pendowski, James J 

Peng, Victor I 380 

Penner, Richard L 215 

Pennington, Carl J 261 

Pennington. Gary L 1 63, 488 

Penny, Beverly 407 

Penny, Nancy L 451 

Penny. Susan 370 

Pepoon, Michael D 346 

Pepperdine. Gary A 165,167 

Pepperdme, Ronald D 420 

Percy, Audrey D . 234,333 

Peretli. Frank J . 205 

Perez. Christopher P 251 

Perilla. Alberto 370 

Penne, Susan J 388 

Perkins. Cynthia L . 488 

Perky. David W 164,176.429 

Perry. Chad L 220,231.232.488 

Perry, Donna G 183, 370 

Perry, Edward H 186.235 

Perry. Ruth A 407 

Persmger. Steven 380 

Persinger, Susan D 1 89, 1 97, 206. 208. 

212,360 

Persyn. Sandra K 238 



Pertsch, Kathenne A 488 

Pesha, Cynthia R 1 68, 41 9 

Pershing Rifles 210 

Peterman, Michael L 197 

Peters, Bruce L .328 

Peters, Chester 1 48,21 7 

Peters, Cinda L 343 

Peters, Deborah L 1 70, 204, 385 

Peters, George R 237 

Peters. Matthew W 1 76, 429 

Peters, Susan E 211,214, 445 

Petersen, Erland A 400 

Peterson. Bradley D 407 

Peterson, Cheryl L 424 

Peterson, Cindy M 187.218,424 

Peterson, Daniel L 166 

Peterson, Garry E 438 

Peterson, Gary C 163 

Peterson. Gerald M 252 

Peterson. James F 245 

Peterson. Jane M 171.176 

Peterson, Janet 1 73, 370 

Peterson, Jean M 223,451 

Peterson, Jerry 268 

Peterson, John R 488 

Peterson, Kathryn L 488 

Peterson, Keith F 252 

Peterson. Ricky L 318 

Peterson, Shirley L 360 

Peterson. Susan K 203,388 

Peterson, Terry G 488 

Peterson, Tom M 218,488 

Peterson, Valerie H 213. 380 

Peterson, William C 321 

Petitjean, Joyce D 360 

Petree, Gregory S 261 

Petrusky, Albert R 415 

Petry, Gary L 394 

Pettiiohn, Francis M 488 

Pleiler, Belinda A 166.176,370 

Pteiler, Mark K. ... 412 

Ptollner, Kimberly K 361 

Ptost.OlindaG. . .... 217.424 

Ptrang. Gary F 400 

Pharis, Alice A 488 

Pharr, Susan K 488 

Phelps, Lou A 343 

Philbrook, Richard L 234 

Phi Chi Theta 21 1 

Phi Delta Theta 410 

Phi Epsllon Kappa 21 1 

Phi Gamma Delta 412 

Phi Gammas 213 

Phi Kappa Leroy 213 

Phi Kappa Tau 414 

Phi Kappa Theta 416 

PhlKaptlves 214 

Philip, Sandra L. . 219.488 

Phillips, Charlotte 488 

Phillips. David B 444 

Phillips. Dennis E 232.488 

Phillips, Edward W 166.173,380 

Phillips. Frances E 222.488 

Phillips, Gregg W 432 

Phillips, Jo A -. 451 

Phillips. Larry N, 400 

Phillips, Mary E 488 

Phillips, Reginalds 173,488 

Phillips, Robert N 488 

Phillips, Ronald E 172,220,488 

Phillips. Ronald G 170 

Phillips. Steven L 1 68. 488 

Phillips, Teresa A 221,370 

Phillips. Timothy W 435 

Phi Mu Alpha Sigma 214 

Phi Upsllon Omlcron 212 

Phinney. Deborah S 388 

Physioc. Steven H 199 

PI Bete Phi 418 

Picardy, Cathy L 388 

PI Kappa Alpha 420 

Pickel, Thomas E 488 

Pickett, Alan W 1 64, 1 99, 488 

Picktord. Peggy A 1 73 

Pickler, Susan K 424 

Pickup. Cheryl L 407 

Pieper, Dennis E 400 

Pierce, Connie R 488 

Pierce, Jeanne L 419 

Pierce, Michael E 442 

Pierce, Patricia R ... 445 

Pigg, Sherry K 407 

Pigiel, John P 346 

PlgmaStl 215 

Pigno, Louis 1 95 

Pike, Keith E . .194.323 

Pike, Robbi D 427 

Piland, AnnaG 213,370 

Piper, AnnikaL 488 

Piper, Barbara J. 209 

Pislora, Cynthia D 213,488 

PI Tau Sigma 215 

Pitman, Paul A. 1 66. 328 

Pitner, Kolean A 361 

Pitt, Allison M 488 

Pixley, Cynthia L 223,488 

Plagge, Dawnett L 336 

Piatt, David F 252 

Plegge, Jean M ,219,316 

Plegge, Karen J 214 

Pletcher, Cheryl L 361 

Pletcher, JanetS 388 

Ploosler. Larry G 268 

Poell. Timothy M 380 

Pohlhammer. Patricia 333 

Polansky. Andrea A 1 79, 200, 325 

P0I1I0, Gregory S 400 

Polica, Gerald 239 

Polich, Jerry 1 93, 205 

P0II1. Steve 444 

Pollom. Julie A. . . 343 

Poison. Douglas R 380 

Pooler, Donald R . ,489 

Pooler. Van E 407 

Pope. Elizabeth L 204. 489 

Pope, Virginia A 489 

Popham, Deborah S 385 

Popp, RoyceR 328 



Poppe. Marsha J 255, 305 

Porbandarwala, Aslam 191 

Poresky, Robert 237 

Portell. JonE 283,400 

Portenier, Keith E 166 

Porter, RonE , . .489 

Porter. Timothy J 1 64, 252 

Porubsky, Gary L 222, 489 

Poss.GaryE 318 

Poltberg, Craig E 489 

Pottberg, Jimmie L 1 99 

Potter, Jon H 321 

Potter, Robin F 489 

Potts. Cyndi 370 

Powell, William R 175,431 

Power. Ted H 245 

Powers, Laura J 202, 385 

Powers, Uteva E 238 

Powers, William P 1 73 

Prather, Norman T 380 

Prather, Susan E 222 

Pratt, Carolyn K 1 79 

Pratt, Tyler P 407 

Preisser, Donald G 416 

Pre-Nurslng Club 216 

Presta, Paula S 361 

Preston, Carolyn P 424 

Prettyman, Martin H 489 

Pretzer, Jams R ... 489 

Price. Amy A 407 

Price, Brian F 318 

Price, Leah S 173 

Price, Rebecca A 185,364 

Price, Susan B 407 

Price, Thomas L 268 

Pndeaux, Debra L 333 

Prldottes 216 

Pridey, Ronald 489 

Prince, Robert L 251,252 

Pnngle, Barbara A 407 

Pringle, Richard K 380 

Prochaska, Brelt A 1 74, 489 

Prockish, Joyce 361 

Proctor. Jana L 

Proctor, Lela D 445 

Proctor, Robert D . . .489 

Prodey, Roger 252 

Professional Foods Club 217 

Prottilt, Karen C 212,391 

Protlitt, Michael J 347 

Prothe, Susan E 489 

Pruitt, Colleen M 370 

Pruilt, Donald E 321 

Prus, Wanda R 489 

Pryor. Dean 261 

Pryor. William D. 380 

Pucket. Steven K. 420 

Puckert, Judy L 200,220,227, 

228,489,518 

Pugliese, Joseph 407 

Pukach. Wallers. 431 

Pukrushpan. Thanong 489 

Pulliam. GaryD 174 

Pulliam, Kendal 407, 442 

Purinton, Vicki D 180,315 

Purner. Robert A 396 

Pursley, James R 415 

Pursley, Richard E . 182,219 

Purushethaman. Jayapalan 191 

Pusa, Richard D 268 

Putnam 422 

Pulnam, James C 199,213,407 

Pyke, DaraR . .185, 336 

Pypes, Elizabeth R 361 



Q 

Quadeer, Mohammed A 192 

Qualizza, Amelia 371 

Ouinn, Colleen M. . 214 

Qumn, Teresa A 361 

Quiring, Virginia M 237 



R 

Raab. Linda L 371 

Raatz. James L 489 

Rabas. Alan J 167 

Rademacher, Dennis W 323 

Raden, David T. 175,429 

Rader, Ron L 380 

Rader. Treva J 1 93, 489 

Raile, Marvin L 219,489 

Raile. Richard W 380 

Railsback. Cynthia J 164.199,489 

Raleigh, Nancy J 361 

Ramaswamy, Adisesh C 191 

Ramer, Lois A 451 

Ramsdale, Janelle S 165,223,424 

Ramsdale, Jean M 181 

Ramsey, Craig J 1 68 

Ramsey. James W 353 

Ramsey, Marsha P 1 89, 21 8. 336 

Ramsey, Meredith A 177 

Ranallo. Paula M , . .336 

Randall, Bruce 277 

Randall. Michael D 381 

Randall. Philip D 313 

Randall. Thomas W 341 

Randolph, Rita J 424 

Rankin. Milton 427 

Rankin, Pam R 168.489 

Rankin. Stephen W 211,442 

Rappoport, Leon H 237 

Rash, Valerie L 388 

Rashid, Hardon-UI 208 

Rasley, Michael A 268 

Rathbone, Donald 1 52 

Rathbun, Randall K 21 7, 225 

Rathert, Randall K 371 

Rathert. Susan L 489 



Rathert, Vicky L 197,212 

Ratlitf, Jerald K. . . . . . . 489 

Ratzel, Carol J 361 

Raush, Jay 157 

Raul. MadhuriK 191 

Rawson.KentE 318 

Ray. Virginia A 336 

Rays. Arthur B 435 

Reames, Deborah E 343 

Reber, Rebecca J 489 

Recreational Services 217 

Rector, JohnS 191 

Rector, Steven 407 

Redd, Lawrence R 416 

Redd, Rhonda S 234, 424 

Redden. Marty G 227, 41 5 

Reddy, Helen 72 

Redeker, Jana J 238.489 

Redecker. Norma J 237 

Redenbaugh. Elaine M 1 66, 371 

Reece, Edward G 1 62 

Reed, Barbara J 451 

Reed, Carl I 381 

Reed. Daniel W 381 

Reed, Donna D 1 86, 224, 235, 489 

Reed, Karen L 168,202,385 

Reed. Karen S 199,333 

Reed, Larry C 225 

Reed, Lawrence D 170,429 

Reed. Linda A 220.228,229,238,371, 

518 

Reed, Mark E 489 

Reed. Michael A 410 

Reed. Nancy 333 

Reed, Richard L 489 

Reed, Ronald W 489 

Reed, Sally C 179,183 

Reed. Sara M 339 

Reed, Scott D. 195 

Reeder, Katherine L 385 

Reeder, Patricia A 1 89. 225. 385 

Reese, Marjorie L 437 

Reese. Mark C 328 

Rehme, Edwin L 489 

Rehme, Erwin L 407 

Reich, Timothy D 330 

Reichenberger, Jeann 218, 361 

Reicharl, Lawrence J 416 

Reichle, Annalene R 490 

Reid, Jennifer J 315 

Reid. Joyce A 174,490 

Reid, Lance E 211,381 

Reid, Susan A 361 

Reid, William 432 

Reit, AlanF 381 

Reif, Eugene A 381 

Reiland, Catherine A 391 

Reilly, DanaK 283 

Reiman, Margo A 180.388 

Reimer. Michael W 407 

Rein, Audrey 203,386 

Reinert. Bill D 490 

Reinert. Ellen M 386 

Reinhardt, Gregg L 346 

Reinhardt, Randall D 330 

Reisl, Randall D 346 

Reister, Margaret E 419 

Reiter, Linda J 490 

Relihan. Bruce A. 215,401 

Relihan. Michael D .215,225.401 

Rembleske, Margaret 386 

Remington, Paul R 381 

Rempe, Michael E 268 

Rempel, Don L 1 86, 236 

Remus. Michael L 224, 225. 490 

Remus, Thorn 181 

Renken, Kathryn A 173 

Rensner, Gary D 490 

Replogle, Andrew D 245 

Rest, Emily G 180 

Relhorst, David N 490 

Reukaul. Kathy S 211,445 

Reusser, Janet K 255.305.364 

Revels, Kathy L 183, 490 

Revels, Terry D 209 

Rexroad. Lynn J 386 

Rexwinkle. Angela C 437 

Reyes, Carlos J 490 

Reyhle, Linda L 361 

Reynolds. David L 268 

Reynolds, James P 268 

Reynolds, John M 490 

Reynolds, Jorjean A 204, 205. 490 

Reynolds, Laura L 386 

Rezayee, Mohammed A 490 

Rhine, Donald L 162 

Rhoades, Deborah L 181 , 325 

Rhodes, David 1 490 

Rhodes, Jennifer J 490 

Rhodes, Randall A 435 

Rho Mates 218 

Ribordy. Debra 196 

Ribordy, Edward E 1 96 

Rice, Jennifer L 361 

Rice, Nancy L 451 

Richards. Daniel 348 

Richards. Dennis S 371 

Richards. Patricia K 231 . 388 

Richards, Paul C 490 

Richards, Steven H 381 

Richards, Verlyn D 1 64 

Richardson, Charles 490 

Richardson, David E 381 

Richardson, Kathy L 361 

Richardson, Kimberly 361 

Richardson, Peggy L 167, 437 

Richardson. Tony 381 

Richmond. Chris S. . 490 

Richmond. Cindy 1 79, 490 

Riddell. M Gatz 330 

Rider, Gary R 173,381 

Ridgeway, Stephen D 445 

Rieb, Mark L 381 

Riebe, Delbert 401 

Riedel, Barbara 419 

Riekenberg, Darrell 210, 218, 401 

Riepe, Randalls 236 

Riepl.GaryM 491 



Riepl, Greg A 407 

Rieschick, Martha A 216. 437 

Ritfel, Lawrence D 415 

Riffel, Steven K 1 74, 1 79, 353 

Riggert, Martin J 328 

Riley, Debra G 491 

Riley, James C 1 73, 353 

Riely, Terry Z 197 

Riley, William F 401 

Rill, William A 431 

Ringer, Ronald E Jr 268 

Ringleb, Al H 225 

Ringler, Susan K 202 

Rinkenbaugh, John D ...491 

Rinkes, Bruce D 173 

Rinner. Karen 336 

Riordan. Robert 348 

Riphahn, Bill 381 

Ritter, Teresa M 419 

Ritterhouse. Terry A 491 

Rives. Robin J 388 

Roach, Nancy C 1 79, 361 

Roane, Thomas N 1 66 

Robards, Mary L 491 

Robb. Cynthia K 424 

Robb, Lorinda L 407 

Robb. Rebecca L 1 79, 31 7 

Robben.MaryA 183,200,364 

Robben, Theresa M 491 

Robbms, Cheryl L 204, 451 

Robbms, Francis V 381 

Robbins. Lynn M 234, 371 

Robel, Barbara K 209 

Robel, Raydon 217 

Robel, Robert J 197 

Roberts. Brad J 176, 401 

Roberts. Carla S 491 

Roberts, Charles B 491 

Roberts, Cinda L 1 73, 361 

Roberts, David E 330 

Roberts, David L 1 70 

Roberts, Gregory W 180, 401 

Roberts, Marion K 195 

Roberts, Mark W 172,491 

Roberts, Patricia G 333 

Roberts, Rickey J 491 

Roberts, Mike 261 

Roberts. Roy C 427 

Roberts, Sandra K 451 

Roberts. Thomas M 394 

Roberts. Wendy J . 180,224,491 

Roberts, William D 381 

Robertson, Lori L 491 

Robinson, Billy 297 

Robinson, Carrie L . 168,192,388 

Robinson, Curtis S 396 

Robinson, Cynthia M. . 166,315.371 

Robinson, Glenn C 491 

Robinson, Linda A 198, 491 

Robinson, Lisa K 182, 336 

Robinson, Steven R 396 

Robinson, Thomas A 407 

Robinson, VerlandT 491 

Robifaille, Mary K 179,221,339 

Robson, Diane M 1 79, 339 

Robson, John E 438 

Robson, Kenneth E 381 

Robson, Michael R 412 

Roby. JoanE 219,336 

Rochat.GenaL 195 

Rockers, Patrick L 491 

Rodenbaugh, Stephan 435 

Roder, Treva J 1 72 

Roderick, Amanda S 371 

Roderique. Leigh A 188, 333 

Rodgers, Randy D 197, 491 

Roe, Barbara I 165,180.189,223.419 

Roe. Gary G 429 

Roe, Keith E 429 

Roe, Richard N 491 

Roe, Rose M 491 

Roe. Sue A 237,424 

Roe, Sylvia A 451 

Roeder, Judy I 
Roeder, H Michael 

Roemer, Dennis R 491 

Roemer, Marcia K 491 

Roenbaugh, John B 318 

Roesch, Carolee S 424 

Roesener, W Scott 401 

Roesler, David E 215,235 

Roesler, Harold W 191 

Roesner, Patricia J 491 

Roesslein, Mark A 491 

Roll. DonB 199 

Rogan, Diane C 183 

Rogers, Danny H 435 

Rogers. Glen W 408 

Rogers, James T 268 

Rogers, Mark A 491 

Rogers, Patricia A 491 

Rogers, Richard N 381 

Rogge, Mary E 165 

Roggenkamp. Karen L 328 

Rohles, Susan E 185.216 

Rohrer. John W 1 72, 439 

Roland, Vance D 252 

Roles, Sandra K 371 

Rolfs, Susan C 491 

Rollins, Kan L 491 

Romberger, Debra J 165,437 

Rome. Donald L 193,413 

Romig, Margaret A 283,491 

Romig, Ronald L 408 

Roney, Cynthia D 178.212.218,451 

Ronning, Lucia L 1 85, 235. 364 

Ronsse. Greg S '94 

Roof, DonB 199 

Rook, Mary A 391 

Roos, Rita J 451 

Rose, Don 291 

Rose, Gale J 401 

Rose. MelmdaK 491 

Rose. Tim 205.491 

Rosetta, Victor 381 

Rosewicz, Gary P 416 

Ross. Frank J 432 

Ross. Sharon A 491 



512 — Royal Purple 1975 



Rosselot, Angela 227 

Rostetter Randal D 491 

Roslme. JoanV 386 

Roth. Chene M 424 

RothJoannJ 333 

Roth, Robert A 353 

Roth. Robert E 173 

Rothlisberger, R 491 

Rothman, Cheryl A 21 2, 333 

Roths, Glen R 197 

Rotman, Dennis J 354 

Rottmann, Russell W .442 

Rouse. Melmda A 361 

Rouse, Robin L 364 

Roush, Catherine M 203, 361 

Row. Richard N 232 

Rowe. Carolyn D 315 

Rowe. KathyJ 451 

Rowing 290 

Rowland, Barry 163,491 

Rowland, Pamela K 201 , 326 

Rowley, Cheryl A 371 

Roy, Lawrence R 261 

Roy, Ronald D 219 

Royal Purple 227,516 

Ruark, Roger 435 

Rubenich. Jo A 208, 21 2, 224. 451 

Ruby, Linda 195 

Rucker, Deanna 343 

Rucker, Myra J 216. 326 

Rudeen. Larry J 491 

Rudeen. Marilyn I 220. 491 

Ruder. Harvey 416 

Ruder, Johnathan E 401 

Rudolph, Tim .175 

Ruebke, Judith A 199,361 

Rues, Alicia A. 180,491 

Rulener, Jettery L 413 

Rull, David E 323 

Rugby 285 

Ruggles, Barbara L 315 

Rule. KimberleJ 183,216,491 

Rumble, Debra A 343 

Rumold. Karin D 371 

Rumsey. Jill J 386 

Rundle, Kathleen E 371 

Rundquist, Amy . . . 326 

Rundquist, Eve L 221,326 

Runge, Mark 410 

Rupp. SylvieA 371 

Rush, Jeanette 239, 491 

Rush, Rhonda D 184 

Rushin.JohnD 491 

Russell. DeniseS. 189,190,218 

Russell. Joy J 181.352 

Russell. Leroy W . . 318 

Russell, Mary J 211.491 

Russell. Patricia E 1 65, 1 80, 223, 361 

Russell, Sheila S 230,238,491 

Russell. Steven F 408 

Rust, Barbara A 208.212.217,371 

Rutledge, Cinthia S 361 

Ryan, John R 381 

Ryan, Lois 324 

Ryan, Michelle 491 

Ryder. Michael W 491 

Ryer. Kathenne A 219 

Rygaard, Martha E 170 

Rynard, John E 432 

s 

Sabatka, Gilbert M 491 

Sabalka, Janiece M 171,424 

Sabatka, Tanya L 491 

Sadauskas. John W 1 94, 408 

Saetz. Patricia E 371 

Sager, Kimberly S 408 

Sageser, Susan J , 1 65, 248, 343 

Sahlberg, KristineM 208,212,491 

Sail, Wlahkhan 208 

Salisbury, John T 381 

Saint, Sandra J 491 

Saleem, A Naieer 191 

Salinas, Jose S 381 

Sallee, Deanne K 317 

Salmon, Denise A 419 

Salmon. Shernlee 492 

Salter, Lorna M 445 

Sailers, Richard T 188 

Salyer, Karen , 178,388 

Samarrai, Mark C 268 

Sammons, Van D 492 

Samuelson, Joyce 361 

Sanborn, Grant M . . 492 

Sandberg, Steven D 1 77, 234, 492 

Sanders, Cynthia K 177 

Sanders, Douglas K 420 

Sanders, Gary B 396 

Sanders, Joann E 492 

Sanders, Richard M. 420 

Sanders, Toni M 200 

Sanders, Virginia L 333 

Sandmeyer, Cary B 440 

Sandmeyer, Melmda S 185 

Sands, Deborah A 424 

Sandy, Marcia 283 

Sanlord, Wayne E 1 65, 1 67, 218, 235, 492 
Sankey, Chris . .348 

Sankey. Lee 174,348 

Sankey, Susan K 492 

Santee, Ray L 427 

Sapp, Ellen .305,343 

Sapp, Gregg A 492 

Sapp, JonL. 381 

Sarensen, Gregory A 492 

Sargent, David W 171,330 

Sasenick.SherylM. . 361 

Satterlee, Jane E 315 

Sauber, Michael J 166.492 

Sauder, Diana K 343 

Saunders, Janet A 365 

Saunders. Mitchell S 420 

Saunders, Richard W 492 

Savage, Mary M 361 



Savage, Susan M 492 

Sawhill, Rhonda R 283, 333 

Sawin, Ruth M 1 79, 1 89, 451 

Sawyer, Douglas W 408 

Sayles, Curtis E 394 

Scabbard and Blade 218 

Scales, Linda 195 

Scales, Paul F 492 

Scantlin, Michael L 394 

Scarbrough, Kent N 492 

Scales, Randy L 408 

Schaab, Karl 200 

Schabel, Susan M 221.336 

Schaettet, Michael 303 

Schater, Annette M 451 

Schater, Gregory A 416 

Schater, Jill K 419 

Schatter, Barbara J 371 

Schatter, Dennis J 492 

Schatter, Jill R 371 

Schaible, James M 394 

Schaid.TimA 283,427 

Schaller, Cecilia N 361 

Schaller, Lawrence E 492 

Schamle, Rodney J 401 

Schanker, Neil B 172,188,197,371 

Schanze, Melissa A 451 

Scheer. Kendall E 168 

Scheib, Charles W 219 

Schell, JohnC 162,166 

Schemmel, Jettrey W ,251. 252 

Schenberger, Nancy L 451 

Schenewerk, Roger L 440 

Schesser, James F 1 80, 1 81 

Scheltler, Charles D 1 62, 492 

Scheuerman, Linda K 173,492 

Schieten, James C 381 

Schiereck, Donald L 492 

Schierling.DuaneA 173,371 

Schildhaver. Joseph 341 

Schiller, Elizabeth 352 

Schimpl, Charles W. 408 

Schippers, Mary R 168 

Schirmer, Valerie A 451 

Schirlzbaum, James V 416 

Schlaegel. Keith W 330 

Schlatter, Charles W, 381 

Schley, Joanne F 189,225,371 

Schlicht. Mark R 420 

Schloerb, Marilyn A 336 

Schlup, John R 235, 321 

Schmale, Robyn G 336 

Schmedemann. Ron 251 

Schmid, Anthony C 181,381 

Schmidt, Cynthia A 419 

Schmidt, Jacquelyn J 437 

Schmidt. Marilyn K 333 

Schmidt, Paul C , 182.416 

Schmidt, Phyllis A .224.492 

Schmidt, Randy G . .492 

Schmidt, Richard W , . ,323 

Schmidt. Robed W 165,167 

Schmidt. Roger K 440 

Schmidt, Steve 416 

Schmidt. Susan R 214,408 

Schmidt. Yvonne K 189,197,208,212 

Schmitt, Michael L .492 

Schmitz, Thomas P 492 

Schnacke, Jerry D 492 

Schneck.GaryA ,169,186,215, 

224, 234, 492 

Schneider, Brenda J 198.361 

Schneider, Tom A 492 

Schnittker, Thomas G 162,492 

Schoap, Larie 361 

Schoap, Margaret J 195 

Schockey, Lynda C 1 85 

Schoen, Rodney R 318 

Schoenleber, L 209,212.336 

Scholz, Ivan D, 492 

Schoneweis. Dwight A 236, 492 

School. Barbara A 220, 231 , 232, 492 

Schooley. Dann F 1 98, 224 

Schooley, Karolyn K 333 

Schoonover, Kathy L .223 

Schott.LeoJ 313 

Schottler, Kirk E 277 

Schottler, Mark E 277 

Schrader. Daniel J 401 

Schrader, Deborah K 371 

Schraeder, Jo L 167,206,224 

Schraeder, Leann 188 

Schrag, Kerry 401 

Schrag, Loren R 431 

Schreiber, Alan N 234,401 

Schreiber, Jeffrey A 411 

Schreibvogel, Rebecca 371 

Schreuder, Marilyn A 371 

Schreurs, Kathenne 361 

Schrock, Debra J 179.181,200,326 

Schrock. Jo A . . ,216. 419 

Schrock, Susan R 200, 365 

Schraeder, Carl D 207, 401 

Schroeder, Connie J 424 

Schroeder, Constance 391 

Schroeder, Fred . .396 

Schroeder, Lynn Y 187. 361 

Schroeder. Richard V 416 

Schrott, Bruce D 401 

Schuessler, Constance 492 

Schuett, Jettrey J 219 

Schuett, Randolph J 219 

Schuette. Sharon S 361 

Schul.JillD 408 

Schuler, Andrew J 411 

Schuler, Gary A 207 

Schuler, Judy .333 

Schuler. Marianne K 372 

Schuler. Steven J 411 

Schultz. Carol A .326 

Schultz, Carol J 492 

Schultz. Donald G 492 

Schultz, James R 401 

Schulz, Marilyn J 178 

Schust.JayE 427 

Schutte, Emily A 391 

Schwab, Debby J , . . . 333 
Schwab, Florence H 234 



Schwab. Patrick R. 445 

Schwab, Stephen R 381 

Schwanke, Julie 492 

Schwanke, Maurice K 492 

Schwartz. Cynthia D. 231,238,343 

Schwarz. Michael D 408 

Schwarzenberger, Mary 1 65, 223, 437 

Schwarzenberger, Marly 214 

Schwat, Patrick R 166 

Schweitzer, H Jo 212, 333 

Schweitzer, Ruth A 173 

Schwensen, John C 330 

Schwerlfeger, Deanna 408 

Schwerlfeger, Elaine 408 

Scobey, Roscoe C 261 , 262 

Scoby, Joe H 433 

Scott, Casey M 350 

Scott, CharmaineB 372 

Scott, Glen A. 492 

Scott, Jim 268 

Scott. Karen L 173.492 

Scott. Kathy 333 

Scott, Kevin C 235. 492 

Scott, Larry R 492 

Scott, Mary B 190 

Scott, Michael R 220,232 

Scott, Rand D, . 492 

Scott, Richard D . . , 173,492 

Scott, Robert E . , 237 

Scott, Sharon S 1 74, 492 

Scott, Steven P. 328 

Scott, Teena . 174, 361 

Screen, Rita M . . . 176,352 

Scribner, Craig W 381 

Scrimsher, Brenda J 492 

Scully. Nancy J 492 

Seaman. Cynthia J 343 

Seaman. Loren L 163 

Searcy, Kent L 1 73 

Sears, Larry L 164,413 

Sears, Roberts , 215,401 

Sears. Robert E 381 

Seaton, Alan J 41 1 

Seba, Rodney R 401 

Sedlacek, Jane F. ,170, 361 

Sedlacek. Wanda J 1 65, 446 

Sedlock, Cherise M 446 

Seely, Susan R. 204 

Seifert, Keith 188 

Seiler. Charles J 401 

Seller, Gregory J 492 

Seller, Guy M ... 416 

Seim, Janice K, 219.224,391 

Seitz, Forrest S 321 

Seitz, Richard M 171,420 

Seitz, Victoria A 203. 391 

Selby, Patricia A 386 

Seley, Debra J. 179,361 

Selig, Richard H 492 

Sell, Richard D. 350 

Selm, Michael E 381 

Selvy, Janell M 333 

Selzer, Kenneth A 493 

Senior Veterinary Medicine 

Student* .219 

Septs, Ernest 493 

Serrano, Vincente Z 493 

Servis, Karen L 493 

Seth, Daryl L 382 

Sethna, Prochy P 191 

Settle, Ted F 164,251,252 

Settler, Nick A 215 

Severance, Jean E 195.206.372 

Severance. Sara J 1 95, 220, 227, 238. 372 

Sevennsen, Doc 67 

Sewell, Barbara A 386 

Sextro. Michael T 493 

Sextro, Wanda M 451 

Seybert, William W 433 

Seybold, Samuel A 493 

Seytert, Warren E 165,167,401 

Seymour, Cynthia A 168,493 

SGA Executive Council 225 

Shad. SaeedA 192,208 

Shadday, Janice 493 

Shafer, Bradley J 313 

Shafer, William M 205 

Shank, Debra D 333 

Shank, Ray A , . 220.348 

Shanks, Dennis N 493 

Sharp, Ann L 218,391 

Sharp, Anthony W 207,401 

Sharp. Charles E. 401 

Sharp. Cindy 493 

Sharp, Diane 333 

Sharp, Jean 218,392 

Sharp, Mary C 21 2, 493 

Sharp, Richard H 493 

Sharp, Tony 251 

Sharpe, Angela K .... 1 79. 493 

Shaughnessy, Catherine 333 

Shaughnessy, Teresa 424 

Shaw. Diana J 334 

Shaw. Jacqueline K 493 

Shaw. Rebecca L. . . . 408 

Shaw, Shawn C. 230 

Shaw, Suzanne C . ,222,223,339 

Shaw, Thomas R 185.191,493 

Shaw. William D 413 

Shaw, William K 427 

Shawgo, Robert D 493 

Shawver, Judy E 315 

Shea. Patrick N 493 

Shearer, Richard 330 

SheOUs 219 

Sheehan, Joan M 361 

Sheeley. Nick , . 1 94 

Sheely, Michael R 350 

Shehi, Lora J 446 

Shehi.RondaG ...213.493 

Sheik, Julie , 223.419 

Sheik, William J. 394 

Sheldon, Le Roy J .1 74. 494 

Shelile, Belinda K 239. 362 

Shellenberger, Janet 494 

Shellenberger, John 494 

Shelley, Karen L 343 

Shelley. Steve E 245 



Shepard. Nancy J 408 

Shepard, Patrice D 223, 336 

Sheppard, Sue A 451 

Sherlock, Peter K 382 

Sherman, Brad S 348 

Sherman, Deborah K 222. 451 

Sherrard, Diana L 364 

Sherwood , Robert L 401 

Shelter, Marilyn B 1 85, 1 86, 336 

Shetty, M. R 191.218 

Shideler, Robert J 382 

Shields, Cynthia M 221 , 326 

Shields. Leona J 494 

Shields. Martha M 372 

Shilling, Gregory L 382 

Shimp.JohnF 401 

Shinkle, Angela M .212,218 

Shipman, Edgar A ..163 

Shippers, Kathryn M. 372 

Shirer, Virginia 190.334 

Shirk, Beverly L 216.386 

Shirley, Julie L 392 

Shirley, Sheila L 494 

Shive, Debra D 174,211,494 

Shively, Kyle S . 220 

Shivers. Mary B 372 

Shockey. Curtis A 245 

Shockey. Linda C 336 

Shoemaker. Keith A 401 

Shoemaker, Roberts 415 

Shoemaker, Steven J. 394 

Shogren, Gary N 446 

Shogren, Kristin A 451 

Shook, Martha J 334 

Shorney. Jay L 235. 494 

Short, Fredrick W 420 

Short, Karen A 362 

Short, Kristi D 305 

Shorter, Vici D .364 

Showalter, James J 494 

Shnnkle, Angela W 386 

Shriwise, Sidney C 172 

Shroeder, Jane 305 

Shrum, Christy S 392 

Shull. Michael W 350 

Shuman, Debra A 408 

Shuman. Mark W 435 

Shute, Steven E 401 

Sides, Keith . 277 

Sidic. Dmka D 408 
Siemer.AlanJ 165,167,234,494 

Siemsen. Debra K 424 

Sigel, Greta 305 

Sigle, D Susan 192,494 

Sigle, Larry L 192,494 

Sigler. Harold W 416 

Sigma Alpha Epsllon 426 

Sigma Chi 428 

Sigma Delta Chi 220 

Sigma Lambda Chi 220 

Sigma Nu 430 

Sigma Phi Epsllon 432 

Silady, Michael F 494 

Silcott, Jeannme 1 80. 31 5 

Siler, Janet L 179,190,451 

Sim, Scotl M, 494 

Siman, Gail E 364 

Simcox, Marcine 337 

Simmons. Leeann 343 

Simon, Ralph E 494 

Simonson, Brenda S 451 

Simonson, Cynthia J 195.234.372 

Simpson, Janet M 212.221.494 

Simpson, Scott A 171,435 

Simpson. Steven R 435 

Sims, Gregory D 494 

Sims. Mikelyn A 494 

Sims, Ronnie L 328 

Sinclair, Marcia A 352 

Sinclair. Robert 1 58 

Sinclair. Sherry E 494 

Singer, Phil B 420 

Singer, Sandra J 195 

Singleton, Susan J 362 

Sinovic, Susan M 388 

Sinovic, William F 261 

Sipes, Martin J. 421 

Sisco. Michael R 494 

Sisters ol the Maltese Cross 221 

Sisters ol the Sphinx 221 

Sisters ol the White Rose 222 

Silts. Richard L 396 

Siogren, Kurtis 442 

Skidmore, Mark E 185.401 

Skidmore, Michael B 401 

Skinner, Kimberly R .173.372 

Skinner, Nancy L 451 

Skoglund, Gary A 408 

Skoog. Peter R 429 

Skwarlo, Barbara P 451 

Slagle, Charles E. 382 

Slater. Patricia A. 494 

Slater, William H 163.494 

Slavik, Doyle R 438 

Slile, Curtis L 382 

Sliler, Ricky D . . 252,348 

Slimmer. Don E 494 

Shnkman, Jeanette F 1 95 

Sloan. Michele E 365 

Sloan. Wayne R 220,411 

Sloop, Sandra K 424 

Smail, Ronald D 401 

Small, Bee 283 

Small, Melissa K 494 
Small. William E 163.190.225.323 

Smalley, Richard S 234 

Smethers. Jerry S 164 

Smigh, Christopher C 172 

Smith 434 

Smith. Andrew Jr 261 

Smith. Ashanna M 372 

Smith, Becky A 424 

Smith, Benjamin J 182 

Smith, Bryan T 494 

Smith, Camille L 177 

Smith, Cindy L . 494 

Smith, Colleen M 231 , 232 

Smith. Dana E 315 



Smith. David C . 354. 174 

Smith, David E 494 

Smith, David R 168.444 

Smith, Dennis 494 

Smith, Donald J 494 

Smith, Douglass S 341,350 

Smith. DwighIC 494 

Smith. Edna F 372 

Smith, Elizabeth S 222,419 

Smith. Eric A 382 

Smith, Gail A 339 

Smith,GaylaJ 343 

Smith, Gregory V . 348 

Smith. JanieL 220.494 

Smith. Jennifer J 362 

Smith, John A. 166 

Smith. John B 416 

Smith, Joyce E 216.495 

Smith, Karen S 337 

Smith, Kathe 362 

Smith, Kathy A 495 

Smith, Kathy G 495 

Smith, Keith L 313 

Smith, Kenneth C 401 

Smith, Kevin D 207,401 

Smith. Kevin W 495 

Smith, KordS. 346 

Smith. Lamar 495 

Smith, LesleeM 419 

Smith, Mark E 411 

Smith, Mark E 442 

Smith, Martha K 334 

Smith, Marti J 408 

Smith. Mary L 362 
Smith, Matthew W 225.230.237 

Smith, Maureen E 227. 372 

Smith, Paul R 382 

Smith, Paul R 261 

Smith. RaeA 208.495 

Smith, Randall A 172 

Smith, Randy A 197 

Smith, Rebecca J . 362 
Smith. Richard D 203.204.382.413 

Smith, Roberta M 495 

Smith, Roderick A 413 

Smith, Ronald L 166 

Smith, Shirley R 446 

Smith, Stephen D 401 

Smith, Susan E 424 

Smith, Terry A 495 

Smith, TraceyL 392 

Smith. Vera J 495 

Smith. Walt 158 

Smith. William B . .222 

Smith, William L . 346 

Smithee, Linda K 372 

Smoll. Dee 495 

Smoll, Elwood K 495 

Sneath, Allen L 313 

Snell, Robert 237 

Snell, Vicki D 204, 326 

Snider, Douglas 297.298 

Snider. Ray S 495 

Snow. Cathy L 365 

Snow. Cindy M 183,365 

Snyder, Donna L 182,368 

Snyder, Jeffrey A 408 

Snyder, Kent V 225 

Snyder. Mark G 415 

Snyder. Marty M 238 
Snyder. Melmda K 1 83. 204. 326 

Snyder, Susan D . .. 174 

Snyder. Verle E 211 

Soccer 284 

Society ol Physics Students 222 

Soeken, Shane A 328 

Sollner, Stephen L 394 

Solt. Ronald B 261.264 

Solus. Keith E. 416 

Solus. MaryE 214.437 
Sommer. Deborah L 1 83. 1 85, 388 

Son, KevenV 277,350 

Sonday, Barbara E 495 

Sones. Dennis L 495 
Sontag, Charlotte M 185,201,326 

Sontag. William M 341 

Sorensen, Susan E 362 

Sorensen. William B 495 

Sorrell. Roger D 446 

Sorrick, Cynthia J 372 

Sorrick. William A 328 

Sottler. Nicholas A 217 

Soukup, Nancy A 362 

Southard. Jams 392 

Southerland. Janice 237, 495 

Southwick. Christopher 442 

Sowers, Paul R 495 

Spacek, David E 495 

Spaeth, Elaine E 495 

Spangler, John D 237 
Spangler, Ronald K 171.236,495 

Spam, Gary L 268 

Spare. David R 261 

Spare, Donna J 425 

Sparks. John P 415 

Sparks, Kathryn L 419 

Sparks. Marvin E 180.321 

Sparks, Susan 372 

Spauldmg. Leslie C 401 
Specht. David W 245.261,262 

Specht. Susan L 203. 425 

Speed, Daniel E 401 

Speer. Robert W . 354 

Speirs, Susan L 392 

Spellman, Sherry L 451 

Spence. Ann L . 247, 451 

Spencer. Darwin D 495 

Spencer. Diane M 238.437 

Spencer. Douglas M 394 

Spencer, Steve 186.433 

Spencer, Steven H 444 

Spencer, Terry L 495 

Spicer. Linda J 216.389 

Spilker. James M 164 
Spitsnaugle. Sherry 214.231.317 

Spohn.JulieA , . 372 

Sports 240 

Spradlmg. Linda L 181,372 



Royal Purple 1975 — 513 



Spratt Debra S 372 

Spratl, Patti J 165,425 

Springer, Kim D 495 

Spring Fling 34 

Spurlock, Anne E 495 

SPURS 223 

Snsuthep. Salhorn 167, 382 

St. Clair, Christine 408 

Stables, Dan R 313 

Stach, Karen L. 451 

Stachelbeck, Kenneth 313 

Stadel. Deborah J 170,181,188,352 

Stafford, JettreyL 199.213 

Staftord. Mark W 408 

Stainbrook, Nancy E 361 

Stalcup. GiaM 188,386 

Stalcup, Nancy 372 

Stalcup, Roger A 165. 167 

Stallbaumer, James F 401 

Stallbaumer, Sandra 495 

Stamey, William 152 

Standing, James M 408 

Standley. Donna E 231,232,495 

Stanitorth, Christopher 421 

Stanley. Christine J 326 

Stanley. Dee A 337 

Stanley, Mark E 171 

Stanley. Neal M 382 

Stansberry. Craig L 433 

Stansberry. Gary 433 

Stanton, Barbara A 495 

Stanwix. Leslie A 171,219,495 

Staples, Deborah L 203. 389 

Stapleton. Carrie E 189, 225 

Stapleton. John W 207 

Stapp. Randy W 495 

Starch, Michael 401 

Stardust*™ 223 

Stark, Kenneth P 328 

Starks, Laura J 1 73 

Staub, Rita J 194.361 

Stautter, John R 408 

Stautler, William H 411 

Stebbins, Lyle E 182,495 

Steele. Gary J 496 

Steele. Glen H 169. 496 

Steele, Lynette K 496, 

Steele, Nancy L 496 

Steele, Robert A 427 

StMl Ring 224 

Steenberg, Don-Ann R 185,372 

Steeples, Carla J 173,218.392 

Steeples. John C 174,318 

Stetten, Nicholas P 1 74 

Stettenhagen, Sue A 216. 425 

Stegeman, James F 283. 382 

Stegman, Kim 372 

Steider, Tom W 350 

Steier, Larry D 165. 234 

Steil. Christy E 372 

Stem. Chris 348 

Stein. David E 348 

Stein, Gregory L 415 

Stein, Richard A 214 

Stein. Suzetle E 202, 362 

Steinbauer, Martha J 386 

Sterner, Carl R 261 

Sterner, Susan K 362 

Steinhardt, Dee A 362 

Stenzel. Patricia A 248.496 

Stepan. Shauna J 372 

Stepanich, James E 433 

Stephen, Dennis A 186, 224 

Stephens. Donald D 427 

Stephenson. Elizabeth 446 

Stephenson. Nancy M 425 

Stepomck, Marilyn R 202,496 

Steps. Steven C 382 

Sterling. Jill A 496 

Sterling, Michael B 167 

Sterling, Steve 394 

Stetson, Laura J 222 

Stevens, Larry W 382 

Steward. Byron C 186. 224, 444 

Steward, Karen J 1 67 

Stewart. Cathy A 496 

Stewart. Chris L 496 

Stewart, Clifford D 496 

Stewart, Cynthia L 221 , 496 

Stewart, Gay L 372 

Stewart, Patricia K 337 

Stewart, Paul D 382 

Stewart. Ricky R 330 

Stewart, Sarah S 1 70, 31 7 

Stickley. Karl E 177.235.496 

Stigall. Janet A 343 

Stigge, Douglas K 442 

Stiles, Dale W 382 

Stiles, Mary C 200,326 

Still, Richard E 167,225 

Stillions, Elizabeth 496 

Stillwell, Jan L 372 

Stinson.GailL 496 

Stites, DeanE 181 

Stites, Gerald R 330 

Stock, Gregory L 382 

Stock, Steven J 235, 382 

Stockstill. Kristin 183,203,315 

Stockton, Mary D 183. 365 

Stotfer, Janet M 437 

Stohr, Thomas J 496 

Stoller, Brentton G 382 



Stoltenberg, Stephen 394 

Stoltz, James E 199 

Stolz. Debbie 334 

Stone, David R 346 

Stonecipher, Gregory 408 

Stonehocker, James P 167 

Stoops, John D 401 

Story, Clayton 174,382 

Story, Constance L 1 73, 339 

Stoskopl, Debra L 1 78 

Stoskopt, Norman D 1 80. 354 

Stout. Rick G 382 

Stout. Teresa L 187 

Stoutenborough, Thomas 496 

Stover, Barbara J 1 70, 31 5 

Stover, Deborah S 389 

Strack, Sharyl A 201 , 496 

Strader, Elaine E 425 

Stratuss, Benedict J 283, 496 

Strahm. Dick 261 

Strahm. JoeD 219 

Strait, Chris A 1 74. 497 

Stramel, Terry L 497 

Strand, Constance 425 

Strand. Garth B 194 

Straney, Dorothy J 408 

Strange, James M 382 

Strathman, Kurt A 431 

Strathman, Timothy A 211, 346 

Straub, Joseph W 341 

Straub, Linda S 451 

Straub* 438 

Slrawig, G, Ross 497 

Slrawn, Barry W 382 

Slrawn, Cynthia J 206, 362 

Slreeler, Judith A 183. 279, 344 

Streit, AlvernaD 210,362 

Streit. Nadine J 362 

Strieker, Mary J 362 

Strickland, Kay L 362 

Strickler, Darrell L 319 

Strickler, Duane J 319 

Strickler, Thomas S 163, 182,319 

Stroberg, Jeffery A 350 

Stroble. John C 277 

Stroda, Mark G 283 

Strom, Stephen C , , 401 

Strong, Mabel B 199 

Stroupe. Phillip J 205.408' 

Sttouse. DwightL 341 

Strowig, Catherine A 326 

Strunk, Marvel J 497 

Strunk, Randall J, 323 

Struthers, David L 382 

Stryker, RossW 205 

Stuart, JamesG 219, 497 

Stuart, Lee C 205, 382 

Stuart, Susan K 178,315 

Stuart, Mitzi 209 

Stubbletield, Robert 421 

Stubbs, RickyS 195,210 

Stuber, Dennis K 401 

Stucker, David L 382 

Stuckey, David S 429 

Stucky. Jim M 401 

Stucky, Roger N 261 

Stucky. Sylvia L 164,199.372 

Student Education Association 224 

Student Governing Association 56, 225 

Student Publications 226 

Stueve. Bonnie L 362 

Stueve, Clinton C 277 

Stueve, Gerald J 435 

Stuewe, Nancy J 497 

Stuewe, Scott F 268 

Stum, MarleneS. 165, 179. 187.212,451 

Stum, William L 497 

Stump, Fredrick J 197, 497 

Sturdevant, Johnni R 497 

Stutzman, Emelise D 446 

Subera, Stuart A 497 

Suderman, Donald A 162 

Suderman, Glenn M 401 

Suellentrop, Richard J 163. 188, 354 

Sugg, Kathryn L, 497 

Suiter. Kerry R 382 

Sullivan, Catherine 1 78. 1 83. 200, 389 

Sullivan. Charles D 497 

Sullivan. Dorothy K 497 

Sullivan, Henry D 408 

Sullivan. Jack L 401 

Sullivan. Janet C 497 

Sullivan, Kathleen A 386 

Sumner, Trudy M 497 

Sundgren, Donald W 323 

Sunley, Barbara S 497 

Surber, Heidi M 419 

Suther, Ronald F 497 

Sutlick, Albert F 171,197 

Sutliel. Daniel K 497 

Sutter, Mark D, 

Sutton, Gary E 497 

Sutton, Jeffrey J 195, 204, 382 

Sutton, Les 245 

Sutlon. Marcia L 21 3, 497 

Svaglic, Susan J 334 

Swatford, SheriS, 419 

Swain, Janelle M 497 

Swain, Leila G 408 

Swann, Craig A 1 76, 225 

Swann, Kevin E 

Swanson, Ernest V 321 



Swanson, Jenita L 334 

Swanson, John E 408 

Swanson, Richard D 382 

Swanstrom, David L 175,176 

Swarner, Joseph M 433 

Swart. Kyle D 168 

Swartz, Michele L 497 

Swearingen, Kim A 251 

Sweeney, Felicia C 451 

Sweeney, Michelle L 216,389 

Sweeney, Richard L 348 

Sweet. Anna R 201 , 392 

Sweet. Lisa S 372 

Sweet. Robert L 330 

Swenson, Debra R 209.344 

Swenson. Galen G 498 

Swenson, James W 350 

Swift, Victoria M 179,498 

Swift, William J 438 

Swimming 278 

Swingle. Diane K 206 

Switzer, Gregory C 1 64, 1 99. 4 1 3 

Switzer, Marvin D 261 

Swob, Bruce C 321 

Sydney. Craig A 169,215 

Sylvester, Alan L 177, 186, 224, 235, 498 
Sylvester, Leon E 1 74, 180, 354 

Sylvester, Noel D 354 

Symphonic Band 234 



T 

Tade. Jeffrey A 401 

Tadtman, Thomas D 1 99 

Taliaferro. Claudia 362 

Talley, Ronnie 382 

Tamson, Tony W 498 

Tandy. Cecelia A 334 

Tanner, Beccy J 1 79 

Tanner, Kim A 1 77 

Tapsak, Pamela A 386 

Tate, Mark D 164,323 

Taton, Nolen G 498 

Tau Beta PI 234 

Tau Kappa Epsllon 439 

Tau Sigma Delta 235 

Taylor, Bradley H 382 

Taylor, Brenda 209 

Taylor, Karen S 437 

Taylor, Kenneth S 162 

Taylor, Kermit 210 

Taylor, Kevin D. 382 

Taylor. Mark 382 

Taylor. Michael E 261 

Taylor, Pamela A 498 

Taylor, Richard L 277 

Taylor, Sandra 372 

Taylor, Tommy J 234, 382 

Tedrow. Jan M 362 

Teeley, Jeffrey L 396 

Teel, Douglas J 234, 372 

Teeter, John H 350 

Teeter, Vicky 362 

Teichgraeber, Art C 330 

Teichgraeber, Pamela 362 

Tellefson, Corene S 212 

Telthorst, Lisa A 352 

Tenholder, Timothy N 350 

Tennis 248 

Terrell. Tern L 184 

Terrill, Patricia A 451 

Terry, David D 163. 225 

Teske, Richard R 382 

Testori, Karen A 209, 222. 389 

Tetlow, Lynda A 498 

Tewell. JaneE 498 

Thalmann, Carol A 498 

Thames, Butch 251 

Thanawongrat, Vichai 408 

Tharp, Nona L 389 

Tharp, ToniK 372 

Thatcher, Randy 215 

Thaw, Larry E 277 

Thayer. Holly J 188,451 

Theis, Sandy 183 

ThetaXI 441 

Thielen, Julie M 372 

Thierolt, Gale D 498 

Thierolf, Linda L 362 

Thies, Sandra S 344 

Thigpen, Michael 207 

Tholstrup. David B 1 63, 252, 348 

Thomas, Alan R 498 

Thomas, Cynthia D 183 

Thomas, Cynthia J 223, 334 

Thomas. JonnieL 207 

Thomas. KimK. 261 

Thomas. Kimberly A 362 

Thomas. Leslee K 362 

Thomas, Martha A 167,181,239 

Thomas, Nathaniel G 191 

Thomas, Norma J 209 

Thomas, Randall W 498 

Thomas, Rebecca J 344 

Thomas, Robert W 440 

Thomas, Vickie J 498 

Thome, Jane A 362 

Thompson, Carolyn F 1 70, 498 

Thompson, Daniel K 219 

Thompson. Dawn G 392 



Thompson, Diane K 334 

Thompson, Douglas C 382 

Thompson, Fred 63 

Thompson, Gregory N 205, 330 

Thompson, James C 498 

Thompson, Melinda L 362 

Thompson, Roberts 167, 214 

Thompson, Steven L 205, 354 

Thompson. Tad M 350 

Thompson. Tyron 297 

Thorn. Eleanor L 236 

Thornton, Nan 279 

Thornton, Roger D 348 

Thowe. Merle E 222 

Thull, JohnT 162, 166 

Thull, Virginia K 1 83, 21 0, 305 

Thurlow, Karen D 204 

Thurman, Pamela A 372 

Thurston, Virginia L 451 

Thweatt, Angela P 362 

Tidemann, Jean V 1 89, 425 

Tiemeyer, Patricia M 208 

Tiffany, Steven W 1 74 

Tilden, Susan J 217,392 

Tilghman. Richard K 382 

Tillman, Frank A 1 67. 21 7, 234 

Timmcke, Dana 415 

Timmins, Eileen M 237 

Tippin, Kimberly A 419 

Tiimas, Barbara A 334 

T|aden. Dena 188.326 

T|aden. Max H 440 

Tobald, John A 408 

Tobler, Jeffrey E 427 

Tobler, JillE 170,223,337 

Todd, David M 348 

Toher, James D 402 

Tohey, Shelly L 201 

Tolin, BryceA 167.444 

Tollelson. Ann C 165,182,223,419 

Tomasch, Bret 1 95 

Tompkins. Shen K, 1 79, 1 81 . 1 89. 200, 326 

Toms, Loretta S 362 

Toohey. Susan D 219 

Toplirt, Becky A 1 79, 362 

Tophtt, Cinda A 1 79, 1 89 

Torres, Abdon M 408 

Tortora, Richard A 346 

Totman, Robert E 219 

Towell. Michael S 421 

Townes. James E 218 

Townley, Roger R 446 

Townsend, Amy L 173.179,339 

Townsend. Jan R . .... 183,419 

Townsend. Karl L 1 65 

Townsend. Steven E 372 

Townsend, Su M 200, 21 6, 365 

Toyne, Mitchell B 402 

Track 252 

Tramposh, Gerald P 172 

Trapp, Timothy M 431 

Travares, Carlos A 498 

Trayer, Deaun K 425 

Trayford, Gail M 392 

Treasure. Mark A 382 

Trembley, Sarah J 452 

Trevarton, Jean A 212,220,228. 

229.238,498,518,520 

Trevitt, Carmen D 261 

Trexler, Brad A 179,354 

Triangle 443 

Tripp, Deborah L 198, 337 

Trotter, Donald 1 57 

Trotter, Ronald W 219 

Trower, Gay L 372 

Truax, Susan J 167 

Trude. Becky L 372 

True, RoniM 223,317 

Trueblood, Marsha L 452 

Truman, Christopher 402 

Trump, Sheryl A 315 

Tryon, Charles P 382 

Tryon, Michael D 402 

Tubbs. Kevin L 372 

Tuchey. Susan D 392 

Tucker, Bonnie F 372 

Tucker, Brenda K 362 

Tucker, Greg A 408 

Tucker. Julie K 188,238 

Tucker. Keith D 235, 350 

Tucker, Stephen A 168 

Tucker, Teresa D 165,223 

Tucker, Thomas C 411 

Tuckwood, Tom E 372 

Tuley. Loisann E 247 

Tuohey. Susan D 1 68 

Turek, Sally A 201,317 

Turk, Rebecca S 452 

Turnbull, Cheryl R 392 

Turnbull. Cynthia J 392 

Turner, Keith E 321 

Turner, Kimberly 475 

Turner, Peggy L 362 

Turner. Ronald E 382 

Turner, Rory 236 

Turner. Tommy K 162,163,166,354 

Tush, Cathryn L 372 

Tuttle, Dave J 245 

Tuttle. Dolores J 247 

Tuttle, John R 261 

Tuttle. Rose 247 

Tuxhorn, Doyle P 382 

Twaddell. Janet L 212, 425 



Twietmeyer, Cynthia 222, 326 

Twietmeyer, Steven F 431 

Tyaack.JanR 221 

Tyhurst. John R 382 

Tyler, Dennis R 372 

Tyler, VickiL 173 

Tyson, Jeff A 402 



u 

Ukele, Paula S 1 78, 372 

Ukena, Karen S 170, 181,326 

Umbehr, Nancy K 372 

Underwood, Alan K 200 

Underwood, James W 413 

Ungeheuer.BethL 174.344 

Ungles. Ralph L 408 

Union Governing Board 236 

Union Program Council 236 

University Faculty Senate 237 

University Learning Network 237 

Unkeler, Daynad 317 

Unrein, Carol E 239 

Unruh. Deborah L 189 

Unruh. Galen K 433 

Unruh. Janice E 179.190,339 

Unruh, MiloM 433 

Unruh. Virion N 382 

Upson, Ron W 330 

Urban, James E 205 

Urbanski, Beverly A 1 66, 205 

Urish, Janet K 174 

Urish, Joyce R 1 83. 266 

Urish. ReneeS 174.452 

Utter. Nancy C 337 



V 

Vacek. Karen L 213,362 

Vaczi, James 408 

Vaghela, Rameshchand 191 

Van Allen, Barbara J 419 

Vancil, Roger D 499 

Van Cleave, Janet H 419 

Van Daele, Stephen W 408 

Vandeventer, William H 499 

VanDieren, Jill 499 

Van Dyke, John R 438 

Van Loenen, Rodger L 382 

Van Pelt. Reginald A 402 

Vancil, Roger D 197 

Vandervort, Randy B 408 

Vandewiele, Scott J 408 

Vangundy, Mike 354 

Vanhorn, Crystal A 204, 339 

Vanier, Jay 413 

Vanier, Martha 173,392 

Vanlandingham, Becky 392 

Vanlerberg, Diane M 362 

Van Meter. Eddy J 237 

Vanover, MargoL 210, 238, 344 

Vantasell, Debra S . . . . 1 65, 227. 425 

Vantuyl. Connie L 386 

Vanwinkle. Daphne L 362 

Van Zlle Hall 445 

Varney. Susan R 223. 365 

Vaughan, Douglas C 348 

Vaupel. William E 382 

Vautravers. Randy A 321 

Vavricek. Joseph J 1 64. 1 99 

Veazey, Linda J 317 

Vedros, Valerie A 213,315 

Velasquez, Jonathan 499 

Velasquez, Terry J 499 

Velez. Marisol 248 

Veniohn, Rodney P 235, 444 

Venker, John S 415 

Vera, Thomas J 394 

Vereen, William N 348 

Vermeulen, Dean A 499 

Vernon, Larry 382 

Vernon, Rex C 167 

Verser, Rocke C 235 

Vervynck, Janice L 499 

Vest, Cynthia L 352 

Vick, Steven A 341 

Vienfos, Jose A 499 

Viers, Perry C 261 

Vigneron, Russell D 402 

Vilhnes. Cathy 362 

Vincent, Linda L 315 

Vincenl, Randa M 204 

Vincent, Robert M 499 

Vinduska, Darlene C 1 79, 372 

Vinduska, Ronald J 499 

Vineyard, Donna P 499 

Vining, Frances B 181.315 

Vimng. Margaret A 199, 437 

Vining, Mark A 382 

Vint, Nancy N 344 

Visser, Adelma L 179.200.210.339 

Vlcek. Candace E. 202. 499 

Vock, Diane S 362 

Voegeli, John J 408 

Vogel, Cynthia K 372 

Vogelman, Tresa D 362 

Vogt, Patricia K 190.362 



514 — Royal Purple 1975 



Vogts. Joan 425 

Vohland, Lawrence W 499 

Vohland.RoseM 499 

Vohs. PalnciaD 372 

Voigl, Barbara J 

Voigt. Bruce E 321 

Voigls, Martha L 174,362 

Voiles, Denise A 425 

Volker. BoydL 354 

Vollbrachl, Mark L 394 

Volleyball 246 

Voorhees, John J 323 

Voran, Roxie L 446 

Vosicky, Joseph E, 341 

Vosicky. Linda K 224,499 

Voxx.SherriO 217,362 

Volh, Donald J 164 

Volh, Priscilla F 362 

Vuneni, Bugga R 191 

Vulgamore, Linda L 425 



w 

Wade, Jacqueline L 372 

Wade, Jo E 499 

Waeldm, Joan K 209, 344 

Wagenknecht, Timothy 167 

Wagner, Carol E 317 

Wagner, Gerald L 499 

Wagner, Gregory C 1 95, 372 

Wagner, Randell G 1 67, 328 

Wagner, Roger K 408 

Wagnon, L Thomas 348 

Wagoner, Sleven J 171,313 

Wahle, Tern L 202 

Wainwnghl, Dennis A 382 

Wakabayashi, Isaac 1 94 

Wakelield, Ronny W 499 

Waldman, Simon 205, 383 

Waldren, Deryl E 180,402 

Waldren, Vernon L 180, 402 

Walker, AnlhonyC 346 

Walker, David T 372 

Walker, Denise K 363 

Walker, Dianna L 1 74, 334 

Walker. Jimmie 71 

Walker. Larry D, 167,402 

Walker, Lee O 499 

Walker, Leslie A 425 

Walker, Lonnie J 402 

Walker, Mae E 499 

Walker. Marc L 383 

Walker, Rita Y 184 

Walker, Robin E 177.209 

Walker. Terry L 1 77, 402 

Walker. Tony 195 

Walker. Warren 237 

Wall, Kevin K 499 

Wall. William H . , ,321 

Wallace, David K 219 

Wallace, Karen J 373 

Wallace. Leesa M 334 

Wallace, Marilyn I 

Wallace. Roger W 323 

Wallace, Shellie 283 

Walsh, Frank 297,303 

Walsh. Mary J 317 

Walslen. Richard J 174.499 

Waller, Becky L 168 

Waller, Debra L 344 

Waller, Thomas J 1 90 

Wallers, Barbara E 373 

Wallers, Calhy J 452 

Wallers, Charles I 417 

Wallers. Delbert 408 

Wallon, David N 402 

Wampler, Deborah L 373 

Wampler, Jellrey W 330 

Wannemacher. Jo A 315 

Ward, Deborah D 165,170,363 

Ward. Harold S 499 

Ward. K Kenneth 

Ward. Karen L, 392 

Ward, Kenneth A 191 

Ward, KirkL 173,402 

Ward. MarkE. . 194 

Ward. Nancy J 362 

, Ward. Sandra J 212 

Warden. Paul G 383 

Warmund. Pamela J 163, 207 

Warner, Jack W 499 

Warner, James S 383 

Warner, Lenita B 190. 472 

Warner. Linda S 198,208,499 

Warner, Palti A 452 

Warner. Randall L 166,499 

Warner. Sharon M 499 

Warner. VickiL 223 

Warnica, Charles A 417 

Warnock. Mary 317 

Warren, Bryan J 

Warren, Carolyn 1 87 

Warren, Cletus J 402 

Warren, Dewey 261 

Warren. GeneW 211 

Warren. James H 203. 499 

Warren, M Elaine 334 

Warren, Shelley A 499 

Warren, Thomas D 218,408 



Warren, Virginia L 499 

Warrior, John D 199, 220. 408 

Wary, Joleen M 437 

Wasemiller, Timothy 261 

Wasinger, Karen L 373 

Wasser, Scott A 500 

Wasserman, Kathy A 255 

Waterman, Fred L 218 

Waters, Clarence E 330 

Waters, Michael R 236, 500 

Waters. Monte G 446 

Walkins, Gary L 383 

Walkins, Jettrey P .373 

Walson, David E 411 

Walt, Stanley F 442 

Watts, George C 207, 500 

Watts, Tony B 394 

Waugh, Marcia 363 

Wayne, Nancy J 389 

Weast, David H. 168 

Weatherbie, William , ,■ 383 

Weaver, Donald R 1 77. 500 

Weaver, Jack R 354 

Weaver, Tracy E 402 

Weaver, Trudy L 189,500 

Webb, Brian K 415 

Weber, Bob 261 

Weber, Clarence D 251 

Weber, Joy A 500 

Weber, Mary J 373 

Weber, Mary L 500 

Weber, Stanley E, 433 

Weberg, Phillip S 500 

Webster, Elaine L, ..183.334 

Webster, Randall B 431 

Webster, Richard A 

Wecker, GlendaK 500 

Weddle, Sara K, 446 

Wedel, Stephanie G 389 

Wedel, Vicki D 200, 239, 339 

Weech, Hardden K 261 

Weeks, Stetni L. . . . 200. 202, 389 

Wegener, Connie L 452 

Wegener, Dennis C 234, 500 

Wegerer, Louis W 261 

Wegman, Elaine R 373 

Wehling, Randy L 402 

Wehrly, Manlred R 402 

Wehrwem, Barbara C 170.315 

Weibert, Mary A, 192,223 

Weidenheimer, Amy J 344 

Weidle, NickL 219 

Weidman.Gary W 383 

Weidman, John 383 

Weidner, Jay P ...... 163,383 

Weidner, Kimberly A 500 

Weinberg, Bradley A 500 

Weir, Lorrie A ... 203 

Weir, Rick R 427 

Weishaar, Jimmy D 500 

Weiss, Russ 321 

Weiss, Susan M 363 

Weisser, Barbara A ... 201 . 500 

Weixelman, Ann 214 

Weixelman, Elizabeth 334 

Weixelman, Paul L 211,417 

Weixelman, Richard L 500 

Welborn, George A 1 62. 1 66. 500 

Welborn. Robert A 174 

Wellons, William A 383 

Wells, Carolyn L 500 

Wells. Raymond L 500 

Wells, Stephanie J 188,317 

Wells, Ward V. ... 168 

Weltmer. Kenton L 173 

Wellsch, Susan G 198.206,219.419 

Wendt. Sandra C. . 179.363 

Wenger, Gregg D 348 

Wenger, Janice K .195,206,500 

Wenger, JetID 394 

Wenger, Joan S 500 

Wenger, Ronald E 383 

Wentworth , Dianna L 20 1 , 452 

Werner, Lisa M 425 

Wesley. Terri L 219, 386 

Wessel, William J 500 

Wesson, Cynthia A 239. 363 

West Hall 447 

West, Julie E 334 

West, Karen A 425 

West. Kern J 373 

West. Lynnette M 500 

West. Michael L. . . . 402, 500 

West. Rita A 337 

Westberg. James H 348 

Weslhott. Jerry J. 177 

Westhusing, Jana D 386 

Weston, Janet M 199 

Wetta, Patricia J 437 

Weyand, Carol A 452 

Weyand, Janet K 500 

Weyer, Diana L 170,437 

Weyer, JamesP. 163,319 

Wheal, John D 173 

Whealley, Karen A .183. 501 

Wheeler, Jane C 199,446 

Whelan, Gregory C 261 

Wherry, Martha L 363 

Whipps, Michael D 421 

Whisler, Scott R 501 

Whisman, Carol K 192 

Whislon, Karen A 179.237.408 



Whitaker, Bruce L 501 

Whitcomb, Randall K 501 

White, Beverly 315 

White, Deborah L 167,173,206,363 

White, Ella E 206 

White, Jack 80 

White, Jettrey H. . 413 

White, Liz 386 

White, MarkS 427 

White, Mary A 373 

White, Peggy M 326 

White, Richard A 446 

White, Rosalind 184 

White, Stephan C 177 

White, Tracy M 421 

Whitehair, Donna J ...179,339 

Whitehair, Elaine 213 

Whitehair, Stephen C 413 

Whitehead, Lesley K . 165,419 

Whitesell, Pamela S. . . 208, 408 

Whiteside. Timothy E. 396 

Whitfield. Carlos L 261 

Whithan. Jane E 192.389 

Whitley, Mark E 383 

Whitmer, Monte W 174.413 

Whitmore, Ivey L 363 

Whilmore. Rhonda L 239, 31 7 

Whitney. Carl J 501 

Whitney, Carol A 197.208,212,363 

Whitney, Donita L 1 73, 501 

Whitney, Harry E 501 

Whitney, Jana L 239, 452 

Whitson, Tim .... 245 

Whin, Patricia D 363 

Whiltier, Beth A 365 

Wian, Deborah E. 209.419 

Wiard, David C 220 

Wichman. Curtis W 501 

Wick, Bradford J 402 

Widmer. Kim 501 

Wiebe, Richard G 501 

Wiegert, Bryan K. . . . 440 

Wiens, Gregory E 501 

Wiens, Jacque C 389 

Wiens, Janice K , , .179.501 

Wiens, Teresa A 408 

Wiesner, Robert J ... 21 8, 402 

Wiesner. Theodore F 417 

Wietharn. Gary E 413 

Wikott. Douglas P 501 

Wilbeck, Tony A. . 383 

Wilcox, Dianne L 408 

Wilcox, Jane 326 

Wilder, Gregg A 409 

Wileman. Stanley A 1 75, 1 96. 409 

Wiles. Beverly A 501 

Wiles. Wood D 501 

Wiley. Crystal L. . . 190,214,452 

Wiley. Douglass R 501 

Wiley. Francis A 177.332 

Wiley, Karen L 501 

Wilke, Margie L. . 183,501 

Wilkerson, Wanda L 363 

Wilkins. Thomas W 394 

Wille. Mark H 383 

Willhite. Curtis R 180,402 

Willhite, Michael G 402 

Williams. Alice M 170,212.409 

Williams. Byron W 219,225 

Williams, Chuckie .297,298 

Williams, Cynthia A , 195.502 

Williams, Dana J 363 

Williams, David 402 

Williams, Dean A 252, 261 

Williams, Deborah K 181,195,317 

Williams, Dennis M 350 

Williams, Dewey D 438 

Williams, Donna M 386 

Williams, James L 252 

Williams, James S 319 

Williams. Jarvis E 219 

Williams, Jernlee 363 

Williams, Julianne .452 

Williams. Kent S 193 

Williams. Kim A. 235.502 

Williams, Nancy M 502 

Williams. Peggy S 502 

Williams, Randy E 323 

Williams, Rebecca A 452 

Williams, Regina L 238 

Williams, Robert D .167.383 

Williams, Robert S 232 

Williams, Scott . . . 174 

Williams. Sharon M 184 

Williams. Sherry L 425 

Williams. Waller C 169 

Williamson. Nanette 334 

Willis, James 168, 189 

Willis, Raymond J 208. 502 

Willis. Rodney D 409 

Willms. Clitton L .163,502 

Wilms, Richard N 328 

Wilner, Joy L . ., 220,231 

Wilson, Carrie A 363 

Wilson, Craig N 502 

Wilson. Curtis F 162 

Wilson, Dennis E 197.435 

Wilson, Garth W 207.330 

Wilson, Gregory H 413 

Wilson, Jack E. 173,502 

Wilson, James H. 1 90. 200. 389 

Wilson, Janet L. . . . 502 



Wilson. Jared L 502 

Wilson. Jon R 350 

Wilson. Lawrence E 502 

Wilson. Linda S 502 

Wilson, Lori L 363 

Wilson, Mark D 383 

Wilson, Mark T 413 

Wilson, Michele D 337 

Wilson, Nancy L 183,502 

Wilson. Paul R 409 

Wilson. Phil 245 

Wilson, Ronald J 162,354 

Wilson. Sharon A. .193,502 

Wilson. Tern L 502 

Wiltlang, Wendy S 334 

Wiltz, Patricia A. 172.373 

Wmchell, Thomas C 211,261 

Winchester, Richard . 431 

Windhorst, Dana J 421 

Windhorst, Dave A 421 

Windier. Gregory J , . 502 

Windsor, David M 348 

Windsor. Nancy L 183,365 

Winfrey, Pamela K 373 

Winfrey, Randy 409 
Winger, Anne . 203.216,337 

Winger. John R 442 

Winger, Joseph A 348 

Wingerson, Jolee 452 

Wingert, Teresa A 173 

Wmgfield, Gregory A 197,402 

Wmgfield, Nancy M 219,502 

Wigle, Diane K 425 

Winkler, Melissa A 343 

Winkler, Nancy C 343 

Winkler, Sarah J 343 

Winkler, Tom F 383 

Winsky, Deborah A 317 

Winstead. Tamara 502 

Winston, Shana K 201 , 392 

Winter. Brian F 383 

Winter. Charles L 409 

Winter, Dan H 402 

Winter, Janice E 502 

Winter, Kent T 319 

Winler.MaryA 446 

Winter. Roger B . 251.252 

Wmteroth. Suzanne E 363 

Winterscheidt, Lois 214,502 

Winterscheidt, Rita 373 

Wisdom, Joann 502 

Wise, Cnss 334 

Wise, Scott G 328 

Wise, Steve C 444 

Wisner, Diana L .363 

Witt, Bernie T 350 

Witthuhn, Ray L 193,502 

Wittliett. Michael J 196 

Wittmer, Phillip D 195 

Wittmeyer, Gayle 373 

Witlortf, Carolyn K ,202,502 

Wittslock, Jane A 364 

Wixson, Michael 321 . 283 

Woellhof , Dana J 1 65. 343 

Woeppel, Jacklyn J 234 
Wohler, Rebecca L 188,409,425 

Woker, Arnold S 502 

Wolf, Beverly S 197,502 

Wolf, Carol J 373 

Wolt, William E 383 

Wolle, Glenn L 174 

Wollert, Henry J 348 

Wolken. Myron B 502 

Wollers, Mark A 383 

Womack, Nancy D 203, 425 

Womble. Sandy L 337 

Womble, Shelley J 317 

Women In Communications 238 

Women's Glee 238 

Womer, Mary A , 502 

Wood, Philip A 446 

Wood, Suzanne E 365 

Woodall, Dennis C 383 

Woodall. Jeralyn S 502 

Woodman, Sheila S 502 
Woodrutt, Timothy C 

Woodrum, Christina K 502 

Woods, Janice L 389 

Woods, Nancy G 189,389 

Woods, William D 440 

Woodward, Kirk P 433 

Woodward. Susan L 365 

Woodworth. Nancy J 189,389 

Woodworth, Stanley N 433 

Woody. Carmella A 363 

Wooldndge. Baird J 431 

Woolery, Joelta S 326 

Woolery, Lana J 179.452 

Woolery, Suzanne K 409 

Woolley, Leslie A 452 

Woolpert, Bruce D 350 

Works, Richard C 225 

Worman, Deborah D . 502 

Worman.StaceyK 502 

Wornom, John L 427 

Worrell. David L 502 

Worthing. Linda K 502 

Worthington. Barbara 502 

Worthinglon, Timothy 502 

Wrestling 276 

Wrestling Cheerleaders 239 
Wright, Catherine I 1 63, 1 90. 425 



Wright. Dons J 237 
Wright. Elizabeth A 208, 222, 326 

Wright, John H 383 

Wright. Keith A. 348 

Wright, Larry G 402 

Wright, Lee E 429 

Wright. Ronald E 321 

Wright, Susan J 502 
Wunder, Beverly F 228.502.518 

Wurst. Gregory J 373 

Wursf. Wendel W 373 

Wurtz. Gregory J 435 

Wurtz.VerlJ 164,199 

Wulhnow, Mark 383 

Wyatt. Cynthia D 189,208 

Wysong. Valenda D 179,363 



Y 

Yarrow, Frederick L 446 

Yarrow. LennisM 255 

Yarsulik, Robert G 341 

Yarsulik, RochelleY 201 

Yarsulik, Stephanie 502 

Yaussi. Debra R 425 

Yeager. Nancy L 365 

Yeager. Sleven E 383 

Yeagley, Jonathan P 268 

Yeagley, Robert D 502 

Yee. Pat A 373 

Yenne. Jackie B ... 502 

Yenzer. Barbara A 502 

Yenzer. Beverly M 248 

Yerby, Philips 215.402 

Yerkes. Jan M 502 

Ylander, David M 383 

Yoakum, John H . 502 

Yocum, Sue E 502 

Yoder. David D 383 

Yonning. Kathryn E 502 

York. Darrell G 502 

York, Terry 205 

Yost. John M .181.328 

Youk, Teresa A 452 

Young, Amon 503 

Young. Christine L 503 

Young. Lester F 168 

Young. Linda J 315 

Young. Marsha K 503 

Young, Paul 148 

Young, Rhonda G 203.373 

Young. Robert K 192.503 

Young, Terrell A 185 

Young, Wendy J .218.503 
Youngblood. Kathleen 214, 239. 389 

Younger. Glenda F. . 317 

Younger. Leon E 277 

Younger, Lester A 383 

Youngland. Debbie J 452 

Yusut.Yunusa 192 



z 

Zahn. Martin E 402 

Zahn. Thomas F 421 

Zahner. Elizabeth A 337 

Zaman, Haider 208 

Zarda. Lilli 409 

Zarda. Maria J 170.315 

Zalezalo. Linda L 181.365 

Zawafzki. Mary K 201 . 392 

Zemer. Sharon I 198,503 

Zeleznak, Kathleen J 386 

Zeller, Stephen M 503 

Zeman. Rodney J 169 

Zerbe, Sleven C 383 

Zercher. Thomas L 234 

Zernickow. Kent L 396 

Zey. John J 1 77 

Ziegler. Charles A . .503 

Ziegler, Denise J 373 

Ziegler, Howard 41 7 

Ziegler, Loren A 417 

Ziegler. Ralph P 211.417 

Zier. Mark B 261 
Zlggy and the Zeu 

Zillinger. Charles M 188 

Zillinger, Douglas G 1 73. 503 

Zillman. John J 348 

Zimbelman, Cindy D 199.452 

Zimmer, Paula K 386 

Zimmerman. David K 431 

Zimmerman, Debora A 180.193. 
203. 239. 373 

Zimmerman. Howard A 193 

Zimmerman. Jack 402 

Zimmerman, John W 

Zimmerman, Susan C 165.197,389 

Zimmerman. Terry J 169.215.234,503 

Zmk. Janita M 425 

Zipp. Cary L 348 

Zohn. Randall E 236. 503 
Zubeck, Robin J 195,234.503 

Zuk. Eric A 383 

Zulavern, Ann L 326 

Zwego, Marilyn 279 



Royal Purple 1975 — 515 




Colophon - 

Paper stock — 80 pound Velopake Text 
Cover material — Cordoba 
Cutline type — 8 point Helvetica 
Body type — 1 point Helvetica 
Headline type — 28 point Spartan 
Art type — Rhonda Light 
Ink — RP Brown 
Press Run — 7,050 copies 



Photography 
credits - 



Ann Benson — 2; 1 8; 23; 31 ; 32; 46; 
51; 57; 98; 110; 115; 119; 123; 133; 
160; 240; 246; 306; 320. 

Tom Bell — 28; 58; 75; 82; 83; 126; 
127; 454; 478; 487; 488; 489; 490; 
494; 495; 499; 51 9B. 

Jeff Cott — 76; 84; 263; 264B; 278 



279 
359 
383 
444 



304TL; 319; 345; 346; 352; 357 
361; 363; 375; 377; 378; 381 
399; 428; 429; 441; 442; 443 

474; 497. 



Dennis Doles— 108T; 267; 332; 334 



368 
450 
493 



371; 373; 402; 405; 423; 446 
452; 456; 461; 462; 470; 485 
501. 



Jeff Funk — 35TR; 250; 253TC; 267; 
434; 435. 

Bill Giles — 37; 44; 45; 249; 254B; 
284. 

Stephen Good — 409. 

Sam Green — 8T, BR; 9; 1 2T, BR; 1 4 
16; 20; 34T, BL; 38; 39; 64; 66B; 70 
72; 73; 82; 87; 100; 102; 125; 136 
142; 143; 147; 149; 151; 153; 155 
156; 159; 244; 250BL; 252; 253B 



256BL; 271; 272BC; 274; 276; 280; 
282; 284T; 285; 286BL; 290; 292TC; 
294T; 304C; 440; 51 8TC; 51 9CL. 

Tim Janicke — 8BL; 12BL; 13BL; 24 
36; 40; 41; 43B; 62; 70; 90; 104; 129 
134; 135; 144; 245; 254T; 256TC 
260TC, TL; 261 ; 263B; 270; 272L, BL 
282; 284BL; 286BC; 287BR; 288BL 
292BC; 294BR; 296; 302T; 303; 341 
348;518TR;519TR. 

Kevin Jones — 403 

Don Lee — 54; 55; 60; 66T; 1 1 6; 1 38 
230; 243; 250BC; 257; 264; 265; 269 
287TR; 288BC; 292L; 293; 294BL 



300 


309 


312 


313 


315 


316 


327 


328 


337 


338 


350 


386 


390 


395 


396 


411 


412 


413 


414 


415 


417 


421 


425 


427 


430 


431 


433 


436 


437 


439; 


449; > 


482; 500; 503. 





Steve Lee — 335; 344; 351 ; 365; 384; 
392; 419. 

Dave Massy — 286T. 

Donna McCallum — 479; 483. 

Ted Munger — 4; 43T; 64B; 131 
256BC; 258; 259; 262; 266; 277 
288T; 297; 320; 321; 322; 323; 325 
326; 340; 342; 354; 387; 389; 393 
394; 438; 453; 468T; 473; 477; 486. 

Barbara Reed — 488. 



Grant Ringel — 520. 

MarkSchirkofsky— 1; 10. 

Joe Spear — 246TC; BC; 247; 304BL. 

Cliff Tharp — 496. 

Larry Wright — 52; 94; 95; 457; 458; 
465; 467; 471; 480. 



Story credits - 



Kathy Andrews — 305. 



Tim Allen — 250. 



Linda Brozanic — 63R. 



Steve Buchholtz — 252. 



David Chartrand — 20. 



Dennis Christensen — 1 28. 



Greg Doyle — 71; 270. 



Mark Eaton — 47; 53; 132. 



Jeff Funk — 25; 113. 



Jan Garton — 246; 247; 249; 255. 



Ben Herrington — 65; 248. 



Art credits - 



SamKnipp — 72B. 

Scott Kraft — 28; 62T; 110; 242; 245 
251; 256; 258; 261; 262; 264; 266 
268; 273; 277; 281; 283; 285; 289 
291 ; 293; 295; 297; 298; 300; 307; 69 



John Lonergan — 22; 33; 74; 99. 

Patti Loving — 55. 

TedLudlum — 303. 

Paula Meyers — 37T; 45; 81 T; 86; 
105; 108B; 116; 124; 125. 

Judy Puckett — 42; 61; 67; 79; 80B; 
85; 92; 103; 108L; 109T; 118. 

Linda Reed — 27; 36BL, T; 64; 66; 
77B;83;95; 122; 124; 130. 

Sara Severance — 35; 36BC; 37B;39; 
50; 59; 63L; 66B; 80T; 81 B; 91; 101; 
109B; 114; 121; 137;69. 

Donna Standley — 64B. 

Jean Trevarton — 5; 9; 1 1 ; 1 3; 1 5; 1 7; 
30; 40; 56; 89; 126; 139; 520. 



1975 Royal Purple Staff 

Top left: Sam Green, head photographer. Top center: Jean 
Trevarton, editor. Top right: Jean Parrish, adviser. Bottom 
lett: Linda Reed, managing editor, Pam Kissing, business 
manager. Bottom center: Bev Wunder, assistant business 
manager, Judy Puckett, assistant managing editor. Bottom 
right: Ann Benson, artist, Scott Kraft, sports editor. 





Mm*., Uter 




518 — Royal Purple staff 







Royal Purple staff — 519 







Parts of this book are a personal 
soapbox, but I can't conceive how this 
type of publication could function with- 
out the editor's philosophies of life to 
tie it together. Many people, through- 
out my long 21 -year lifetime, have 
contributed their philosophies to my 
soapbox — and I am indebted to 
them. Those who have had the great- 
est influence concerning my thoughts 
on honesty and perfection, the goals 
of this book, are my parents, my sister, 
and Gail Stajduhar Hofmeister. To you, 
thank you for everything. 

There are many other persons who 
have helped to make this book what it 
is. For the true pleasure they are to 
have as yearbook cohorts and friends, 
I thank Pam Kissing, Linda Reed, Scott 
Kraft, Judy Puckett, and Bev Wunder; 
and for their help in completing the 



book, Ann Benson, Sara Severence. 
Mary Davis, and the business and writ- 
ing staffs. To Sam Green, thank yoi 
for your cooperation and true efforts \r 
coordinating that photo staff. 

For their guidance around yearbook 
pitfalls, and their friendship, I thank 
Brad Murphree, Jean Parrish, and Bill 
Brown. And, David Chartrand, Jeff 
Funk, and Barb Schoof — I really 
appreciate your friendship and con- 
cern about the book. 

Before jumping off this soapbox for 
the last time, I want to remind people 
of the theme of the book: be honest 
with yourself first, then go help the 
world — we all might be better off. 

Jean Trevarton 

Editor 

1975 Royal Purple 



STUDENT PERSONNEL SERVICES 
COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 
HOLTON HALL, ROOM 111 
KANSAS STATE UNIVERSITY 
MANHATTAN, KANSAS 66502 



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STUDENT PE^O^NEL SERVICES; 
COLLEG .. /HON 

HOLTON : . ., m 

KANSAS ST. . ,-cRSITY 

MANHATTAN.. KA^oAS 66502 




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